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Patent Analysis of

Inner seal with an overlapping partial tab layer

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10000310

Application Number

US15/254765

Application Date

01 September 2016

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

SELIG SEALING PRODUCTS, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

SELIG SEALING PRODUCTS, INC.

International Classification

B65D17/50,B65D51/20

Cooperative Classification

B65D17/501,B65D17/50,B65D51/20,B65D2251/0009,B65D2251/009

Inventor

THORSTENSEN-WOLL, ROBERT WILLIAM

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 1 US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 2 US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 3
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Abstract

A pull-tab sealing member for a container containing an upper laminate defining a circular segment and forming a pull-tab bonded to a lower laminate capable of being heat sealed to a container's mouth or opening. The upper laminate defines the pull tab wholly within a perimeter or circumference of the seal, but the upper laminate does not extend the full width of the sealing member in order to define the gripping tab.

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Claims

1. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising: a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim; an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a gripping tab; and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, a tab portion, and an adhered portion, wherein a ratio of the surface area of the tab portion to the surface area of the adhered portion is about 1:1 to about 3:1 and a circular segment forming the upper laminate covers about 10 to about 40 percent of the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member with the remainder of the upper surface being the lower seal portion top surface.

2. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.

3. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.

4. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein the gripping tab of the upper laminate is the circular segment, the circular segment being less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of a pivot line cord.

5. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein the circular segment is defined by a first edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion and the first edge being spaced from a center of the tabbed sealing member.

6. The tabbed sealing member of claim 5, wherein the circular segment forming the upper laminate is defined by an angle of about 125 to about 150°.

7. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein a ratio of a first length of the gripping tab to a second length of the at least partial bond of the upper laminate is about 1:1 to about 2.5:1.

8. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein the at least partial bond of the upper laminate includes an adhered portion directly bonded to the lower seal portion.

9. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising: a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim; an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a single gripping tab; and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion with the chord having opposite ends, and a circular edge extending to the ends of the chord, wherein the upper laminate is at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion adjacent the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and not bonded adjacent at least a portion of the circular edge of the upper laminate to form the single gripping tab.

10. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.

11. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.

12. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein the single gripping tab of the upper laminate includes a circular segment less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of a pivot line cord.

13. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein the circular edge is defined by an angle of about 125 to about 150° between radius lines extending from a center of the tabbed sealing member.

14. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising: a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim; an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a gripping tab; and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, a circular edge, and an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion, wherein the upper laminate is at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion adjacent the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and not bonded adjacent at least a portion of the circular edge of the upper laminate to form the gripping tab and the at least partial bond of the upper laminate includes an adhered portion directly bonded to the lower seal portion and the adhered portion is about 30 to about 75 percent of the upper laminate.

15. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising: a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim; an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a single gripping tab; and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion with the chord having opposite ends, and a circular edge extending to the ends of the chord, and a pivot line, wherein the pivot line is positioned between the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and at least a portion of a circular edge of the upper laminate, the upper laminate being at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion in an area between the pivot line and the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion.

16. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.

17. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.

18. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein the single gripping tab of the upper laminate includes a circular segment less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of the pivot line.

19. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein the circular edge is defined by an angle of about 125 to about 150° between radius lines extending from a center of the tabbed sealing member.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising:
    • a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim
    • an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a gripping tab
    • and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, a tab portion, and an adhered portion, wherein a ratio of the surface area of the tab portion to the surface area of the adhered portion is about 1:1 to about 3:1 and a circular segment forming the upper laminate covers about 10 to about 40 percent of the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member with the remainder of the upper surface being the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 2. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 3. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 4. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • the gripping tab of the upper laminate is the circular segment, the circular segment being less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of a pivot line cord.
    • 5. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • the circular segment is defined by a first edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion and the first edge being spaced from a center of the tabbed sealing member.
    • 7. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • a ratio of a first length of the gripping tab to a second length of the at least partial bond of the upper laminate is about 1:1 to about 2.5:1.
    • 8. The tabbed sealing member of claim 1, wherein
      • the at least partial bond of the upper laminate includes an adhered portion directly bonded to the lower seal portion.
  • 9
    9. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising:
    • a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim
    • an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a single gripping tab
    • and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion with the chord having opposite ends, and a circular edge extending to the ends of the chord, wherein the upper laminate is at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion adjacent the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and not bonded adjacent at least a portion of the circular edge of the upper laminate to form the single gripping tab.
    • 10. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein
      • an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 11. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein
      • the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 12. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein
      • the single gripping tab of the upper laminate includes a circular segment less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of a pivot line cord.
    • 13. The tabbed sealing member of claim 9, wherein
      • the circular edge is defined by an angle of about 125 to about 150° between radius lines extending from a center of the tabbed sealing member.
  • 14
    14. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising:
    • a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim
    • an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a gripping tab
    • and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, a circular edge, and an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion, wherein the upper laminate is at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion adjacent the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and not bonded adjacent at least a portion of the circular edge of the upper laminate to form the gripping tab and the at least partial bond of the upper laminate includes an adhered portion directly bonded to the lower seal portion and the adhered portion is about 30 to about 75 percent of the upper laminate.
  • 15
    15. A tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container, the tabbed sealing member comprising:
    • a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim
    • an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the lower seal portion top surface to form a single gripping tab
    • and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface, an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion with the chord having opposite ends, and a circular edge extending to the ends of the chord, and a pivot line, wherein the pivot line is positioned between the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion and at least a portion of a circular edge of the upper laminate, the upper laminate being at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion in an area between the pivot line and the edge forming the chord extending across the lower seal portion.
    • 16. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein
      • an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is partially defined by a minor portion of the upper laminate top surface and a major portion of the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 17. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein
      • the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member is temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the upper laminate top surface and other portions of the liner temporarily bonded to the lower seal portion top surface.
    • 18. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein
      • the single gripping tab of the upper laminate includes a circular segment less than a semicircle and defined by an angle of about 90 to about 120° between radius lines extending from a center of the sealing member to endpoints of the pivot line.
    • 19. The tabbed sealing member of claim 15, wherein
      • the circular edge is defined by an angle of about 125 to about 150° between radius lines extending from a center of the tabbed sealing member.
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Description

FIELD

The disclosure relates to a pull-tab sealing member for closing the mouth of a container, and more particularly, to a pull-tab sealing member having a tab formed with an overlapping, partial layer on the upper surface of the sealing member.

BACKGROUND

It is often desirable to seal the opening of a container using a removable or peelable seal, sealing member, or inner seal. Often a cap or other closure is then screwed or placed over the container opening capturing the sealing member therein. In use, a consumer typically removes the cap or other closure to gain access to the sealing member and removes or otherwise peels the seal from the container in order to dispense or gain access to its contents.

Initial attempts at sealing a container opening included an induction- or conduction-type inner seal covering the container's opening where the seal generally conformed to the shape of the opening such that a circular container opening was sealed with a round disk approximately the same size as the opening. These prior seals commonly had a lower heat activated sealing layer to secure a periphery of the seal to a rim or other upper surface surrounding a container's opening. Upon exposing the seal to heat, the lower layer bonded to the container rim. In many cases, these seals included a foil layer capable of forming induction heat to activate the lower heat seal layer. These prior seals tended to provide good sealing, but were often difficult for a consumer to remove because there was nothing for the consumer to grab onto in order to remove the seal. Often, the consumer needed to pick at the seal's edge with a fingernail because there was little or no seal material to grasp.

Other types of seals for containers include a side tab or other flange that extended outwardly from a peripheral edge of the seal. These side tabs are generally not secured to the container rim and provide a grasping surface for a consumer to hold and peel off the seal. These side tabs, however, extend over the side of the container rim and often protrude into a threaded portion of the closure. If the side tab is too large, this configuration may negatively affect the ability of the seal to form a good heat seal. The side tabs (and often the seal itself) can be deformed or wrinkled when the closure or other cap is placed on the container due to contact between the closure (and threads thereof) and tabbed part of the seal. To minimize these concerns, the side tabs are often very small; thus, providing little surface area or material for a consumer to grasp in order to remove the seal.

Yet other types of seals include a sealing member having a tab defined on the top of the seal. One approach of these prior seals includes a partial layer of coated pressure sensitive adhesive to secure the tab to a layer of metal foil. The tab was formed by a full layer extending across the entire surface of the sealing member, but the full layer was only bonded to half of the seal to form the tab. This type of top-tabbed seal offered the advantage of a larger tab, which provided more grasping area for the consumer to hold and peel off the seal, but required a full additional layer of material in order to form the tab. In other approaches, the seal may include a tab formed from the additional full layer of film combined with an additional full layer of adhesive utilizing a part paper or part polymer layer, called a tab stock, to form the tab. This part layer is inserted between the additional full layer of adhesive and lower seal portions to prevent the tab from sticking to the layers below, which formed the tab. In all the prior types of top-tabbed-like seals, the gripping tab was formed by a full layer of material (or a full layer of material and a full layer of adhesive) that extended across the entire surface of the seal.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary tabbed sealing member;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of another exemplary sealing member;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of another exemplary sealing member;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of another exemplary sealing member;

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of another exemplary sealing member;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of another exemplary sealing member;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of another exemplary sealing member temporarily bonded to a liner via a release layer; and

FIGS. 8 and 9 are top plan views of exemplary tabbed sealing members.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A pull-tab sealing member for a container is described herein containing an upper laminate forming a pull-tab bonded to a lower laminate capable of being heat sealed to a container's mouth or opening. The upper laminate defines a pull tab wholly within a perimeter or circumference of the seal, but contrary to prior seals, the upper laminate does not extend the full width of the sealing member in order to define the gripping tab. The pull-tab sealing members herein combine the advantages of a tabbed sealing member with a large gripping tab defined completely within the perimeter of the seal, but achieve such functionality with less film and adhesive and permit such a tab structure to be formed on many different types of lower laminates. The upper laminate structure is advantageous, in some approaches, in seals for large or wide mouth containers, such as container with an opening from about 30 to about 100 mm, in some approaches about 60 to about 100 mm, such as common 38 mm or 83 mm seals, but can be used with seals for any sized container.

In one aspect, the sealing members herein include a pull or grip tab defined in the upper laminate portion wholly within a perimeter or circumference of the sealing member wherein an upper surface of the sealing member is partially defined by the upper laminate portion and partially defined by the lower laminate portion. In one approach, the top surface of the sealing member is provided by a minor portion of the upper laminate and a major portion of the lower laminate. In other approaches, the lower laminate is exposed at a top surface of the seal, in some approaches, covering about 50 percent to about 75 percent (or more) of the upper surface of the entire seal. In some approaches, the seals herein allow consumers to remove the sealing member using the tab (as in a conventional pull-tab seal) or puncture the sealing member by piercing the exposed lower laminate portion to provide push/pull functionality depending on the preference of the consumer. Prior tabbed seals having a top-defined gripping tab via a full width film layer generally did not allow the functionality of easy piercing because the additional full layers used to form the tab rendered the seal too difficult to pierce.

In other aspects, the seals of the present disclosure defining a tab wholly within a perimeter or circumference of the seal (but formed by a partial layer) provide an improved ability for the tabbed sealing member to function in a two-piece seal and liner combination. In a two-piece seal and liner combination, the tabbed sealing member is temporarily adhered across its upper surface to a liner. After container opening and removal of a cap or closure, the sealing member stays adhered to the container mouth and the liner separates and remains in the container's cap.

In some prior versions of this type of seal, the bottom layer of the sealing member is a heat seal layer that is activated by heating, such as by induction or conduction heating, in order to adhere or bond an outer periphery of the sealing member to a rim surrounding the mouth of a container. In the two-piece seal and liner combination, an upper surface of the sealing member is temporarily adhered to a lower surface of the liner by a release layer, which is often a heat-activated release layer, such as an intervening wax layer. During heating to bond the sealing member to the container, heat not only activates the lower heat seal layer, but also travels upwardly through the seal to melt the intervening wax across the entire surface of the sealing member to separate the liner from the sealing member. Often, the melted wax is absorbed by the liner in order to permit easy liner separation from the sealing member. As can be appreciated, for this sealing member and liner combination to function properly, the intervening wax layer needs to be melted across the entire surface of the sealing member. If the wax is not melted evenly all the way across the sealing member upper surface, the liner may not properly separate from the lower seal portion.

As the prior tabbed seals required additional full layers of material (film and adhesive) to form the tab, these additional layers would tend to negatively affect heat transfer upwardly through the seal. This shortcoming of less upward heat transfer limits the ability of top-tabbed-type seals to be used in the two-component assembly because the required additional full layers of material (film and adhesive) to form the tab often led to issues with the proper melting the wax for liner separation.

These shortcomings of prior tabbed seals in the context of a two-piece liner and seal combinations tended to be even more pronounced in view of further shortcomings of typical induction heating equipment. In an induction seal, a metal foil is often included in the seal to generate heat for activation of the heat seal. This heat is generated due to the induction apparatus forming eddy currents in the foil layer. The induction heat from the foil melts the lower heat seal layer for bonding to the container rim. In a common two-piece assembly, the induction heating generated by the foil layer is also used to melt the intervening wax layer; however, the induction heating generated by the foil layer at the center of the seal is often lower than the induction heating generated by the foil at the periphery of the seal laminate. The center of the laminate is farthest away from the induction coil in the induction heating apparatus and the eddy currents in the foil are weakest at the center of the disk, which can form a cold spot in the center of the seal. This shortcoming tends to be further exaggerated in wide seals (such as those about 60 mm in diameter or larger, or seals about 60 to about 100 mm across) because the center is much farther from the induction coil. Normally, such variation in induction heating between the edges of the seal laminate and the center is not an issue because heat is needed most at the seal's periphery for bonding to the container rim at the periphery of the seal laminates. In prior two-piece seals without tabs, there was less material to hinder the upwardly directed flow of heat. However, when attempting to use the prior tabbed seals, with the full layer of materials(s) forming the tab, in a two-piece liner and seal combination, the extra full layers forming the tab often created problems when attempting to use induction heat to melt the intervening wax layer, especially in the center of the seal where the induction heating was the lowest.

In some further approaches of the present disclosure, on the other hand, the tab is formed wholly within a perimeter of the sealing member, but the upper laminate and layers forming that tab are spaced from central portions and regions of the sealing member. In some approaches, the layers defining the tab in the upper laminate are provided by a circular segment that is less than a semicircle within of the sealing member's upper surface. As discussed more below, in some approaches, the upper laminate circular segment forming the tab is defined by a chord that does not extend through the center of the sealing member and the perimeter of the sealing member along its circumference between opposing endpoints of the chord. In this manner, the center and center portions of the seal are exposed to the lower laminate and free of the layers forming the tab (and upper laminate). This is advantageous in a two-piece assembly because it permits greater upwardly directed heat flow in the center portions of the seal to melt the intervening wax layer more easily than the prior tabbed seals.

For simplicity, this disclosure generally refers to a container or bottle, but the sealing members herein may be applied to any type of container, bottle, package or other apparatus having a rim or mouth surrounding an access opening to an internal cavity. In this disclosure, reference to upper and lower surfaces and layers of the components of the sealing member refers to an orientation of the components as generally depicted in figures and when the sealing member is in use with a container in an upright position and having an opening at the top of the container. Different approaches to the sealing member will first be generally described, and then more specifics of the various constructions and materials will be explained thereafter. It will be appreciated that the sealing members described herein, in some cases, function in both a one-piece or two-piece sealing member configuration. A one-piece sealing member generally includes just the sealing member bonded to a container rim. A cap or closure may be also used therewith. A two-piece sealing member includes the sealing member temporarily bonded to a liner. In this construction, the sealing member is bonded to a container's rim, and the liner is configured to separate from the sealing member during heating to be retained in a cap or other closure used on the container. In a two-piece construction, a wax layer, for example, may be used to temporarily bond the sealing member to a liner. Other types of releasable layers may also be used to provide a temporary bond between the seal and liner, but the releasable layers are generally heat activated.

Turning to more of the specifics, FIGS. 1 and 2 generally show a tabbed seal 10 having an upper laminate 12 and a lower laminate 14. The upper laminate 12 defines a grip tab 16 wholly within a circumference or perimeter 18 of the seal 10. By one approach, the upper laminate 12 is formed by one or more layers of adhesive and/or film where all layers forming the upper laminate 12 and the defined grip tab 16 extend only partway across an upper or major surface of the lower laminate 14. In one form, the upper laminate 12 forms a circular segment defined by edges of the upper laminate 12 where one edge 20 is a chord of the seal 10 and another edge 22 is a segment extending along the perimeter or circumference 18 between opposing chord endpoints 24 and 26. As shown in the exemplary approach of FIGS. 1 and 2, the upper laminate, circular segment 12 is spaced a distance 28 from the center C of the seal 10. In this manner, the center portions or regions of the seal 10 are free of the upper laminate 12. In some forms, an upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 is exposed for at least about 50 percent and, in some cases, greater than half of the sealing member 10. In other approaches, the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 is exposed for about 50 to about 75 percent of the sealing member's total upper surface area.

The circular segment forming the upper laminate 12 includes the tab portion 16, which is free to pivot upwardly at a pivot line 34 because the tab 16 is not adhered to the lower laminate 14. The circular segment forming the upper laminate 12 also includes an adhered portion 30 that is directly bonded to the lower laminate 14. The adhered portion 30 extends between the pivot line 34 and segment chord 20. In some approaches (turning to FIG. 9 for a moment), the adhered portion 30 of the upper laminate circular segment 12 may have a length or height H1 that is about 30 to about 75 percent of the total length or height H of the upper laminate circular segment laminate 12 and, in other approaches, about 40 to about 60 percent of the laminate 12, and in yet other approaches, about 30 to about 40 percent of the laminate 12 and still provides a strong bond so that the tab 16 may be used to pull the sealing member 10 from a container rim in one piece. The tab 16 of the upper laminate circular segment 12 has a height or length H2 being the remainder of the upper laminate circular segment 12, and in some cases the tab 16 is the majority of the segment 12. In another approach, the circular segment 12 may define a ratio of tab 16 to adhered portion 30 of about 1:1 to about 2.5:1 and, in other approaches, may be about 1.1 to about 2.1:1.

The lower laminate 14 is not particularly limited and can be any single or multiple layer film structure, sheet, or laminate as needed for a particular application. For instance, lower laminate 14 may be from about 1 mil to about 20 mils thick, and in some approaches, about 7 to about 10 mils thick. In some approaches, however, particular laminate structures of the lower laminate 14 are more advantageous for certain applications. FIGS. 3-7 provide examples of various forms suitable the lower laminate 14.

In FIGS. 3 and 4, another example of a seal 10 is provided. In this approach, the lower laminate 14 may include, from bottom to top, a lower sealant or heat seal layer 100, a polymer film support layer 102 above and over the seal layer 100, a membrane or an induction heatable layer 104 above the support layer. On top of the membrane layer 104 may be an insulation layer or heat redistribution 106 and an optional top polymer support layer 108. Each of these layers will be described more below.

The lower sealant or heat seal layer 100 may be composed of any material suitable for bonding to the rim of a container, such as but not limited to induction, conduction, or direct bonding methods. Suitable adhesives, hot melt adhesives, or sealants for the heat sealable layer 100 include, but are not limited to, polyesters, polyolefins, ethylene vinyl acetate, ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers, surlyn, and other suitable materials. By one approach, the heat sealable layer may be a single layer or a multi-layer structure of such materials about 0.2 to about 3 mils thick. By some approaches, the heat seal layer is selected to have a composition similar to and/or include the same polymer type as the composition of the container. For instance, if the container contains polyethylene, then the heat seal layer would also container polyethylene. If the container contains polypropylene, then the heat seal layer would container polypropylene. Other similar materials combinations are also possible.

Support layer 102 may be optional in the laminate 114. If included, it may be polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, or other structural polymer layer(s) and may be, in some approaches, about 0.5 to about 1 mil thick.

Next, the membrane layer 104 may be one or more layers configured to provide induction heating and/or barrier characteristics to the seal 10. A layer configured to provide induction heating is any layer capable of generating heat upon being exposed to an induction current where eddy currents in the layer generate heat. By one approach, the membrane layer may be a metal layer, such as, aluminum foil, tin, and the like. In other approaches, the membrane layer may be a polymer layer in combination with an induction heating layer. The membrane layer may also be or include an atmospheric barrier layer capable of retarding the migration of gases and moisture at least from outside to inside a sealed container and, in some cases, also provide induction heating at the same time. Thus, the membrane layer may be one or more layers configured to provide such functionalities. By one approach, the membrane layer is about 0.3 to about 2 mils of a metal foil, such as aluminum foil, which is capable of providing induction heating and to function as an atmospheric barrier.

Layer 106 may be an insulation layer or a heat-redistribution layer. In one form, layer 106 may be a foamed polymer layer. Suitable foamed polymers include foamed polyolefin, foamed polypropylene, foamed polyethylene, and polyester foams. In some forms, these foams generally have an internal rupture strength of about 2000 to about 3500 g/in. In some approaches, the foamed polymer layer 106 may also have a density less than 0.6 g/cc and, in some cases, about 0.4 to less than about 0.6 g/cc. In other approaches, the density may be from about 0.4 g/cc to about 0.9 g/cc.

In other approaches, the layer 106 may be a non-foam heat distributing or heat re-distributing layer. In such approach, the non-foam heat distributing film layer is a blend of polyolefin materials, such as a blend of one or more high density polyolefin components combined with one or more lower density polyolefin components. Suitable polymers include but are not limited to, polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene-propylene copolymers, blends thereof as well as copolymers or blends with higher alpha-olefins. By one approach, the non-foam heat distributing polyolefin film layer is a blend of about 50 to about 70 percent of one or more high density polyolefin materials with the remainder being one or more lower density polyolefin materials. The blend is selected to achieve effective densities to provide both heat sealing to the container as well as separation of the liner from the seal in one piece.

When used in the seal 10, effective densities of the non-foam heat distributing polyolefin layer 106 may be between about 0.96 g/cc to about 0.99 g/cc. Above or below this density range, unacceptable results are obtained because the layer provides too much insulation or does not effectively distribute heat. By another approach, the non-foam heat distributing layer is a blend of about 50 to about 70 percent high density polyethylene combined with low to medium density polyethylene effective to achieve the density ranges described above.

In addition, effective thicknesses of the non-foam heat distributing layer are selected to achieve such performance in combination with the density. One approach of an effective thickness may be about 2 to about 10 mils. In other approaches, layer 106 may be about 2 to about 5 mils thick, in other approaches, about 2 to about 4 mils thick, and in yet other approaches, about 2 to about 3 mils thick. Thicknesses outside this range tend to be unacceptable for heat redistribution because the layer does not provide enough insulation or does not effectively distribute heat as needed to achieve the dual performance characteristics of liner separation and seal member bonding.

On top of the lower laminate 14 is an optional, outer polymer support layer 108, which may be PET, nylon, or other structural-type polymer layer(s). In one form, layer 108 is an asymmetrical polyester film having an upper layer of an amorphous polyester and a lower layer of a crystalized polyester layer. The amorphous polyester layer may have a lower melting point than the crystalized polyester and may aid in achieving a good bond with the upper laminate 12 and improve processing over hot rollers and other equipment during seal manufacture. In one approach, the layer 108 is a co-extruded layer with the crystalized layer being thicker than the amorphous layer. In the seal, the amorphous layer may form the bond with the upper laminate 12 and form the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14. The upper laminate 14 may also include other layers as needed for a particular application, which may be layers in between the various layers discussed herein as appropriate for a particular application.

Turning to FIG. 4 for a moment, each of the layers of FIG. 3 may also be bonded to the layer adjacent to it via an optional adhesive layer 110. These adhesive layers may be the same, as shown in the exemplary seal of FIG. 4, but may also be different in composition. The adhesives useful for any of the optional adhesive layers described herein include, for example, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), polyolefins, 2-component polyurethane, ethylene acrylic acid copolymers, curable two part urethane adhesives, epoxy adhesives, ethylene methacrylate copolymers and the like bonding materials. Other suitable materials may include low density polyethylene, ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers and ethylene methacrylate copolymers. By one approach, any optional adhesive layers may be a coated polyolefin adhesive layer. If needed, such adhesive layers may be a coating of about 0.2 to about a 0.5 mil (or less) adhesive, such coated ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), polyolefins, 2-component polyurethane, ethylene acrylic acid copolymers, curable two part urethane adhesives, epoxy adhesives, ethylene methacrylate copolymers and the like bonding materials.

Turning back to FIG. 3, one approach of the circular segment portion forming the upper laminate 12 will be described further. In this approach, the laminate 12 includes a layer of heat activated adhesive or a heat activated bonding layer 120 and a corresponding or overlapping upper polymer support layer 122 where the adhesive layer 120 partially bonds (126) the support layer 122 to the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 to form both the tab portion 16 and the bonded portion 30. The upper polymer support layer 122 may be PET, nylon, or other structural-type polymer layer(s).

In the approach of FIG. 3, the upper laminate also includes a partial layer 124, which is shorter or smaller than layers 120 and 122 of the laminate 112, and called a tab stock. The tab stock 124 is adhered or bonded to the adhesive layer 120 on a top surface thereof, but is not bonded to the lower laminate 14 in the final assembly. However, in optional approaches, the tab 16 may also be formed without a tab stock 124 and, instead, utilize a part layer of adhesive corresponding only to the bond area 30. (This optional way of forming the tab 16 may be utilized on any of the seal approaches described herein.)

When using the tab stock 124, the tab 16 is defined or formed via the tab stock 124 that extends only part way across the upper laminate 12. More specifically, the tab stock 124 forms the tab 16 because it bonds to the heat-activated bonding layer 120 and generally prevents layer 122 (and any layers above) from adhering to the upper surface 32 of the lower seal laminate 14 across at least a portion thereof as generally shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. That is, a top surface of the tab stock 124 is adhered to a lower portion of the heat-activated bonding layer 120. A bottom surface of tab stock 124 is adjacent to, but not bonded to, the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 to form the tab 16. In one aspect, the tab stock 124 is formed of polyester, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), or paper. By one optional approach, a lower surface of the tab stock 124 may be coated with a release material, for example silicone. The optional release coating minimizes the possibility that the tab stock 124 will become adhered to the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 during the heat sealing or induction heat sealing process. However, such release coatings are not typically necessary. As generally shown in at least FIGS. 1 and 2, the tab stock 124 permits the tab structure 16 to pivot or hinge upwardly along a boundary line 34 to form the tab 16. By this approach, the tab stock 124 and formed tab 16 are defined wholly within a circumference or perimeter 22 of the seal.

The heat-activated bonding layer 120 may include any polymer materials that are heat activated to achieve its bonding characteristics. By one approach, the heat-activated bonding layer may have a density of about 0.9 to about 1.0 g/cc and a peak melting point of about 145° F. to about 155° F. A melt index of the bonding layer 120 may be about 20 to about 30 g/10 min (ASTM D1238). Suitable examples include ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), polyolefin, 2-component polyurethane, ethylene acrylic acid copolymers, curable two-part urethane adhesives, epoxy adhesives, ethylene methacrylate copolymers and the like bonding materials. As shown, the heat activated bonding layer 120 extends the full width of the laminate segment 12 (but not the full width or length of the entire seal 10 or the entire lower laminate 14). In other approaches, the laminate 12 may only include a partial layer of adhesive and, thus, not use the tab stock layer 124 discussed above.

By one approach, the heat-activated bonding layer 120 is EVA with a vinyl acetate content of about 20 to about 28 percent with the remaining monomer being ethylene in order to achieve the bond strengths in order to securely hold the upper laminate to the lower laminate. A vinyl acetate content lower than 20 percent is insufficient to form the robust structures described herein. By one approach, bonding layer 120 may be about 0.5 to about 1.5 mil of EVA and, in other approaches, about 0.5 to about 1.0 mils of EVA; however, the thickness can vary as needed for a particular application to achieve the desired bonds and internal strength.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show yet another alternative approach of a sealing member 101 described herein. In this approach, a lower laminate 114 includes just a lower sealant or heat seal layer 100 combined with a membrane layer 104 bonded together with an optional adhesive layer 110. The upper laminate 12 or segment may also include similar layers as the version discussed above. To this end, the segment 12 may include an upper polymer support 122, a heat activated bonding layer 120, and the tab stock 124. The composition of these layers is similar to the version discussion above and will not be discussed further. In this approach, the lower laminate may be from about 1 to about 5 mils thick, and in other approaches, about 1 to about 3 mils thick.

The approach of FIGS. 5 and 6 is advantageous because it presents an exposed membrane layer (often a foil layer) as a portion of, and in some cases, the majority of the top surface of the sealing member 101. Additionally, in view of the relatively thin laminate 114, the sealing member 101 can be opened by either a consumer pulling on the tab 16 to peel the sealing member from the container rim or, alternatively, exposed portions 200 of the seal (that is, the portions of the seal not covered by the upper laminate segment 12) can easily be punched through or pierced by a consumer. This enables push/pull functionality to the seal—that is, push or pierce through the lower laminate 14 and pulling of the tab 16 to peel the seal 10 from the container. FIG. 5 shows an approach with the tab stock 124 formed from a PET layer while FIG. 6 shows an alternative approach with the tab stock 124 formed from a paper layer.

FIG. 7 illustrates the seal of FIG. 5 or 6 in an exemplary two-piece seal and liner assembly 300. The other seals described herein may also be used in a similar arrangement. In this approach, a top surface of the sealing member 101 is temporarily bonded to a liner 302 shown as an optional pulp backing in FIG. 7. The liner 302 is temporarily adhered to seal 101 via an intermediate layer 304, which in this approach, is a heat-activated layer of wax or microcrystalline wax. Prior to heat sealing (by induction, conduction, or the like) to a container rim, the wax layer 304 bonds the liner 302 to the seal 101. As part of the heating process to bond the seal 101 to a container, heat (in some approaches, induction heating from the metal layer) flows upwardly in the seal and activates or melts the wax 304 to release the bond between the liner 302 and the sealing member 101, which separates the two components. In some approaches, the wax is melted and absorbed by the liner 302.

As can be appreciated, for this separation to occur cleanly and properly, the wax needs to melt across the entire surface area of the seal 101. With prior seals having a full layer of film and in some cases a full layer of adhesive, there was additional material at the center portion of the seal that the upwardly directed heat needed to transfer through. As the center portions of the seal are farthest from the induction coils and, thus, generating the lowest levels of induction heat, the center of the seal was previously prone to not generating sufficient heating in a two-component assembly when an upper laminate included full layers forming the tab. This poor central upwards heat transfer was often made worse if the seal had an insulation layer that further limited upward heat transfer, or if the seal was large (such as about 60 mm or greater).

The seal of FIG. 7, for example, eliminates the additional tab forming layers at the center and central portions of the seal 101 so that these areas with the weakest eddy currents in induction sealing do not need to generate high levels of heat to flow through additional layers of material in order to reach and melt the center wax areas. Thus, the seal of FIG. 7 provides an improved two-piece seal and liner assembly even with a tab defined wholly within a perimeter or circumference of the seal. Moreover, because the center of the seal is exposed, the upper laminate 12 can be thicker than normally used in tabbed seals and, in some approaches, be greater than about 5 mils, and in other approaches be about 5 to about 10 mils thick. This layer can also include other structural support layers without the problem of hindering upwardly directed heat flow. To this end, laminate 12 may include thick polymer and/or thick foam layers to improve tab rigidity.

In some approaches, the liner 302 can be formed of one or more layers of cardboard, pulp board, or a synthetic compressing agent (such as a synthetic foam or synthetic fibers) that is effective for absorbing the release layer 304, such as wax, upon being activated by heating. In one approach, the liner 302 may include a layer of foamed plastic material to which a paper layer (not shown) has been adhered to a bottom surface thereof. In this approach, the paper layer is the layer in contact with the release layer 304 for absorbing the molten wax or other activated components thereof. By another approach, the liner 302 may have a thickness in the range from about 400 to about 1800 microns. Synthetic foam or fibers may also be useful as materials or the liner if they are formed into a layer with a suitable compression factor comparable to pulp board of the type traditionally used in induction seals. For example, low density polyethylene (LDPE), coextruded LDPE, polypropylene (PP), and polystyrene (PS) foam or fibers may also be used as the liner. The synthetic material selected should have a sufficient absorbency, suitable pore volume, and structure to absorb substantially all of the wax used in the seal. The dimensions of the compressing agent absorbing material will vary according to the application and the size of the opening of the container and size and construction of the closure being used.

By one approach, the release layer 304 may be a wax layer. The wax may include any suitable wax material which will melt within the temperature range to which the sealing member is to be subjected by an energy source during the induction sealing process. For example, the wax layer may include paraffin, microcrystalline waxes, and blends thereof. By one approach, the wax layer may comprise a blend of paraffin wax and microcrystalline wax wherein the proportion of microcrystalline wax used in the wax layer is adjusted to provide the wax layer being formulated to enhance the ability of the wax to be absorbed by the liner. Alternatively, the wax layer may include microcrystalline wax modified with other polymeric additives to enhance its initial bonding properties. For instance, the wax layer may comprise microcrystalline wax modified with at least one of ethylene vinyl acetate and polyisobutylene.

In general, the application of induction energy to the sealing member heats the membrane layer 104 to a temperature, in some approaches, from about 300 to about 450° F. The volume or thickness of the wax layer, therefore, should be selected such that substantially all of the wax will melt during the manufacturing process and be absorbed by the compressing agent.

FIGS. 8 and 9 schematically show some of the relative features of the seal when viewed from above and the unique characteristics of the circular segment upper laminate 12. As shown in FIG. 8, the total upper laminate segment portion 12 may be defined by an angle α1 between radius lines extending from the center C to the endpoints 24 and 26 of about 125° to about 150°, in other approaches, about 130 to about 140°, and in yet other approaches, about 130 to about 138°. This forms an upper laminate segment portion 12 that covers about 10 to about 40 percent of the upper surface of the seal, in other approaches about 14 to about 35 percent of the seal, in yet other approaches, about 20 to about 30 percent of the seal. In this manner, the upper surface of the seals herein are formed from a minor portion of the top layer from the upper laminate portion 12 and by a major portion from the top layer of the lower seal laminate 14.

The tab 16 of the upper laminate circular segment may also define a second circular segment and may be defined by a second angle α2 between radius lines extending outwardly from the center C to endpoints 300 and 302 on opposite sides of a chord defining the pivot line 34 of about 90 to about 120°, in other approaches, about 100 to about 115°, and in yet other approaches, about 105 to about 112°. In this manner, the seals form a tab 16 that is wholly defined within a perimeter of the seal in a ratio of tab surface area to the surface area of the bond area 30 of about 1:1 to about 3:1 and in some approaches, about 1:1 to about 2:1. These ratios are achieved even when the upper laminate portion 12 is less than about 50 percent of the seal, in some approaches, less than about 40 percent of the seal, and in yet other approaches, less than about 35 percent of the seal's upper surface area.

Turning to FIG. 9, another schematic of an exemplary sealing member is shown showing various relative relationships between the upper laminate circular segment portion 12 and the upper surface 32 of the lower laminate 14 effective for the sealing member to function as an overlapping tab on several different configurations of lower laminate. In one approach, the upper laminate circular segment 12 has a total height H that is about 15 to about 40 percent (in some approaches, about 20 to about 30 percent) of the total length of the sealing member with the total length of the exposed lower laminate portion 32 being about 60 to about 85 percent (in other approaches, about 70 to about 80 percent) of the total sealing member length. Thus, in some approaches a ratio of the circular segment height to the length of the exposed lower laminate 32 may be about 0.2 to about 0.7.

In summary, the disclosure herein provide for, among other features, a tabbed sealing member for sealing to a rim of a container where the tabbed sealing member includes an overlapping upper laminate that may include a lower seal portion having a top surface with a total surface area and including a heat sealable layer configured for heat sealing to a container rim, an upper laminate at least partially bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion to form a gripping tab defined wholly within a perimeter of the lower seal portion; and the upper laminate having a top surface with a surface area less than the total surface area of the lower seal portion top surface and forming a circular segment defined by an edge forming a chord extending across the lower seal portion and spaced from a center of the tabbed sealing member.

In optional approaches, the tabbed sealing member may also include an upper laminate with a heat activated bonding layer forming the at least partial bond to the top surface of the lower seal portion or a tab stock bonded to the heat activated bonding layer but not bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion to form the gripping tab. In other approaches, an upper surface of the tabbed sealing member may be partially defined by a minor portion of the top surface of the upper laminate and a major portion of the top surface of the lower seal portion. The upper surface of the tabbed sealing member may also be temporarily bonded to a liner with portions of the liner are temporarily bonded to the top surface of the upper laminate and other portions of the liner are temporarily bonded to the top surface of the lower seal portion.

In some approaches, the lower seal portion may have a thickness and composition configured to be pierced through portions of the tabbed sealing member not covered by the upper laminate.

In some approaches, the circular segment forming the upper laminate may be defined by a sweep angle of the formula 2 arccos (H1/radius). In some approaches, this angle may be about 125 to about 150°. In other approaches, the tab of the upper laminate is a circular segment being less than a semicircle and defined by a second sweep angle of the formula 2 arcos (H2/radius). In some approaches, this angle may be about 90 to about 120°.

The circular segment of the upper laminate, in some forms, may cover about 10 to about 40 percent of the upper surface of the tabbed sealing member with the remainder of the upper surface being the top surface of the lower seal portion.

The lower seal portion, in some alternative approaches, may include a variety of different materials and layers. For instance, the lower seal portion may include a metal foil, and the top surface of the lower seal portion may be the metal foil. The lower seal portion may also include a foamed polymer, or the top surface of the lower seal portion may be a polymer film selected from polyolefin materials and polyester materials.

It will be understood that various changes in the details, materials, and arrangements of the process, liner, seal, and combinations thereof, which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the products and methods may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the embodied product as expressed in the appended claims. For example, the seals may include other layers within the laminate and between the various layers shown and described as needed for a particular application. Adhesive layers not shown in the Figures may also be used, if needed, to secure various layers together. Unless otherwise stated herein, all parts and percentages are by weight.

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33.0/100 Score

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66.26/100 Score

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It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Dichteinlage für Behälterverschlüsse ALFELDER KUNSTSTOFFWERKE HERM. MEYER GMBH 14 May 2007 30 April 2009
VERNETZBARE UND ZUR SCHÄUMUNG GEEIGNETE KUNSTSTOFFE FÜR BEHÄLTERVERSCHLÜSSE CONSTANTIA PACKAGING AG 06 December 2004 15 August 2006
Verpackungsverbundmaterial CONSTANTIA HUECK FOLIEN GMBH & CO. KG 09 January 2009 16 April 2009
Cover for lidding e.g. yogurt cup, has gripping tab constituted by support layer and sealing layer, where sealing layer has weakness lines placed in zone of gripping tab and defining bulged zone with accretion sealing resistance CONSTANTIA TEICH GMBH 03 September 2009 15 April 2011
Bedruckte Materialbahnen, insbesondere mit fluoreszierendem Material bedruckte Materialbahnen CONSTANTIA HUECK FOLIEN GMBH & CO. KG 02 February 2002 07 August 2003
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US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 1 US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 2 US10000310 Inner seal overlapping 3