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Patent Analysis of

Accelerated drying concrete compositions and methods of manufacturing thereof

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10000414

Application Number

US14/867545

Application Date

28 September 2015

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

U.S. CONCRETE, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

U.S. CONCRETE, INC.

International Classification

C04B28/02,C04B18/14,C04B22/14,C04B24/04,C04B18/08

Cooperative Classification

C04B28/02,C04B22/085,C04B24/04,C04B22/147,C04B22/14

Inventor

GUZZETTA, ALANA,HENKENSIEFKEN, RYAN ALLEN,TURPIN, JR., RAYMOND C.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 1 US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 2 US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 3
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Abstract

Cementitious compositions and processes for preparing and using the cementitious compositions are provided. The cementitious compositions are characterized by the property of a reduced or an attenuated water vapor emission from a cementitious mix and a concrete formed therefrom. Certain cementitious compositions are characterized by the property of accelerated drying while still maintaining good workability. Methods of improving water retention and surface drying of concrete, including lightweight concrete are provided. A water soluble ionic salt may be used to sequester water within the pores and capillaries of the cement paste and/or porous lightweight aggregate. In some examples, the salt may be added directly to concrete or aggregates may be infused with a water-salt solution to provide treated porous aggregates having improved water saturation and water retention.

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Claims

1. A cementitious composition comprising: a hydraulic cement; an aggregate; and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration of from about 0.24% to about 4.72% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.

2. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein the alkali metal salt has a concentration of from about 0.59% to about 2.95% by weight of the cementitious composition.

3. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein the alkali metal salt is blended with the cementitious composition.

4. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising water.

5. The cementitious composition of claim 4, wherein at least a portion of the alkali metal salt is infused as an aqueous solution in the aggregate.

6. The cementitious composition of claim 5, wherein the alkali metal salt has a concentration in the aqueous solution of from about 0.5% to about 18% by weight of the aqueous solution.

7. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein the alkali metal salt is selected from the group consisting of sodium acetate, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium sulfate, potassium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium thiosulfate hydrate, and sodium thiocyanate.

8. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising a superplasticizer.

9. The cementitious composition of claim 8, wherein the superplasticizer is selected from the group consisting of polycarboxylates; formaldehyde condensates; methylolation and sulfonation products of naphthalene; methylolation and sulfonation products of melamine; methylolation and sulfonation products of phenol; methylolation and sulfonation products of urea; methylolation and sulfonation products of aniline; metal naphthalenesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates; metal melaminesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates; phenolsulfonic acid formaldehyde condensates; phenol-sulfanilic acid-formaldehyde co-condensates; polymers and/or copolymers obtained by polymerizing at least one monomer selected from the group of unsaturated monocarboxylic acids, derivatives of unsaturated monocarboxylic acids, unsaturated dicarboxylic acids, and derivatives of unsaturated dicarboxylic acids.

10. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising a finely divided material.

11. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising at least one of a pozzolan or ground granulated blast furnace slag.

12. A cementitious composition comprising: a hydraulic cement; an aggregate; and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.2% to about 4% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.

13. The cementitious composition of claim 12, wherein the alkali metal salt has a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.5% to about 2.5% by weight of the cementitious composition.

14. The cementitious composition of claim 12, wherein the alkali metal salt is selected from the group consisting of sodium acetate, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium sulfate, potassium sulfate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium thiosulfate hydrate, and sodium thiocyanate.

15. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising water.

16. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising a superplasticizer.

17. The cementitious composition of claim 16, wherein the superplasticizer is selected from the group consisting of polycarboxylates; formaldehyde condensates; methylolation and sulfonation products of naphthalene; methylolation and sulfonation products of melamine; methylolation and sulfonation products of phenol; methylolation and sulfonation products of urea; methylolation and sulfonation products of aniline; metal naphthalenesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates; metal melaminesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates; phenolsulfonic acid formaldehyde condensates; phenol-sulfanilic acid-formaldehyde co-condensates; polymers and/or copolymers obtained by polymerizing at least one monomer selected from the group of unsaturated monocarboxylic acids, derivatives of unsaturated monocarboxylic acids, unsaturated dicarboxylic acids, and derivatives of unsaturated dicarboxylic acids.

18. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising a finely divided material.

19. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising at least one of a pozzolan or ground granulated blast furnace slag.

20. A cementitious composition for decreasing a rate of water vapor emission from a concrete comprising: a hydraulic cement; and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration of from about 0.24% to about 4.72% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.

21. A cementitious composition for decreasing a rate of water vapor emission from a concrete comprising: a hydraulic cement; and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.2% to about 4% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A cementitious composition comprising:
    • a hydraulic cement
    • an aggregate
    • and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration of from about 0.24% to about 4.72% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.
    • 2. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein
      • the alkali metal salt has a concentration of from about 0.59% to about 2.95% by weight of the cementitious composition.
    • 3. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein
      • the alkali metal salt is blended with the cementitious composition.
    • 4. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising
      • water.
    • 7. The cementitious composition of claim 1, wherein
      • the alkali metal salt is selected from the group consisting of
    • 8. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising
      • a superplasticizer.
    • 10. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising
      • a finely divided material.
    • 11. The cementitious composition of claim 1, further comprising
      • at least one of a pozzolan or ground granulated blast furnace slag.
  • 12
    12. A cementitious composition comprising:
    • a hydraulic cement
    • an aggregate
    • and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.2% to about 4% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.
    • 13. The cementitious composition of claim 12, wherein
      • the alkali metal salt has a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.5% to about 2.5% by weight of the cementitious composition.
    • 14. The cementitious composition of claim 12, wherein
      • the alkali metal salt is selected from the group consisting of
    • 15. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising
      • water.
    • 16. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising
      • a superplasticizer.
    • 18. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising
      • a finely divided material.
    • 19. The cementitious composition of claim 12, further comprising
      • at least one of a pozzolan or ground granulated blast furnace slag.
  • 20
    20. A cementitious composition for decreasing a rate of water vapor emission from a concrete comprising:
    • a hydraulic cement
    • and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration of from about 0.24% to about 4.72% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.
  • 21
    21. A cementitious composition for decreasing a rate of water vapor emission from a concrete comprising:
    • a hydraulic cement
    • and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of alkali metal halides, alkali metal nitrites, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal acetates, alkali metal sulfates, alkali metal thiosulfates, alkali metal thiocyanates, and combinations thereof and having a concentration, based on a sodium chloride equivalent, of from about 0.2% to about 4% by weight of the cementitious composition in order to reduce internal relative humidity of hardened concrete made from the cementitious composition.
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Description

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention is directed to concrete compositions. Various embodiments of the present invention relate to cementitious compositions used in preparing a concrete having an attenuated or decreased rate of water vapor emissions after hardening. Other embodiments of the invention relate to cementitious compositions that are accelerated drying concrete compositions. Yet other embodiments of the invention relate to concrete including low-density concrete that enhance water retention and/or provide accelerated drying of such concrete. Certain embodiments of the invention also relate to methods of preparing and using the cementitious and concrete compositions of the invention.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Concrete is a composite construction material composed primarily of the reaction products of hydraulic cement, aggregates, and water. Water is both a reactant for the cement component and is necessary to provide desired flow (e.g., spread and/or slump) characteristics and ensure consolidation of freshly mixed concrete to prevent formation of strength-reducing voids and other defects. Chemical admixtures may be added to freshly mixed concrete to modify characteristics such as rheology (i.e., plastic viscosity and yield stress), water retention, and set time. Although some of the water reacts with the cement component to form crystalline hydration products, a substantial portion remains unreacted and is typically removed from concrete by evaporation. The continued evaporation of water from concrete can pose problems, particularly when applying a floor covering.

A cementitious composition for forming concrete generally refers to a mixture of natural and/or artificial aggregates, such as, for example, sand and either a gravel or a crushed stone, which are held together by a binder of cementitious paste to form a highly durable building material. The paste is typically made up of a hydraulic cement, such as Portland cement, and water and may also contain one or more chemical admixtures as well as supplementary cementing materials, such as, for example, fly ash or ground granulated blast furnace slag cement.

Early cements were based on calcined lime, which is produced by exposing limestone at an elevated temperature, for example, a temperature well in excess of 800° C., in the presence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form quick-lime according the reaction in equation (1).

CaCO3→CaO+CO2(g)  (1)

Hydraulic limes are derived from calcined limes that have some amount of clay. The clay provides silicon and aluminum that react with the calcium from the limestone to produce cements having complex compounds that hydrate. These compositions even have the ability to harden underwater. Portland cement eventually evolved from these materials.

Most conventional construction cements are hydraulic, many of which are based on Portland cement. Hydraulic cements set and harden after being combined with water, as a result of chemical reactions induced by the water, and demonstrate an improved strength and stability after hardening.

The discontinued use of volatile components in floor covering adhesives for concrete surfaces has created bonding and delamination problems. Concrete contains water for cement hydration as well as water of convenience to facilitate workability and placement. The water is both chemically bound and entrapped in gel and small capillaries comprising about 30-50% of the paste material depending upon maturity. Water in concrete must be consumed, sequestered or evaporated into the atmosphere before a proper, permanent water-based adhesive bond can be assured. Unfortunately, the time necessary to accommodate the requisite drying process is approximately one month per inch of concrete floor depth for standard weight concrete.

Setting and hardening of hydraulic cements is caused by hydration reactions that occur between the compounds that make up the cement and water, which result in the formation of hydrates or hydrate phases. The cementitious composition begins to progressively stiffen leading to the onset of setting, where additional consolidation of the hydration reactants occurs. Hardening follows setting, which is characterized by a steady growth in the compressive strength of the material over a period that can range from a few days in the case of “ultra-rapid-hardening” cements to several years in the case of ordinary cements.

Portland cement consists of five major compounds as well as some additional minor compounds. The major compounds are tricalcium silicate, 3CaO.SiO2; dicalcium silicate, 2Ca.SiO2; tricalcium aluminate, 3CaO.Al2O3; tetracalcium aluminoferrite, 4CaO.Al2O3.Fe2O3; and gypsum, CaSO4.2H2O. The hydration of tricalcium silicate is represented by the reaction according to equation (2).

2(3CaO.SiO2)+11H2O→3CaO.2SiO2.8H2O+3Ca(OH)2  (2)

Upon the addition of water, the reaction rapidly progresses to release calcium and hydroxide ions. Once the water solution becomes saturated, the calcium hydroxide begins to precipitate forming a crystalline structure. Calcium silicate hydrate is also simultaneously formed. As the calcium hydroxide precipitates from solution, the tricalcium silicate continues to go into solution to form calcium and hydroxide ions. The reaction is somewhat exothermic involving the evolution of heat as the reaction progresses.

The formation of calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate provides “seeds” around which calcium silicate hydrate may continue to form. At a certain point, the rate of reaction finally becomes controlled by the rate of diffusion of water molecules through the layer of calcium silicate hydrate that surrounds the unreacted tricalcium silicate, which progressively becomes slower as the layer of calcium silicate hydrate grows larger.

Dicalcium silicate is hydrated to form the same products as tricalcium silicate according to the reaction in equation (3).

2(2CaO.SiO2)+9H2O→3CaO.2SiO2.8H2O+Ca(OH)2  (3)

However, the hydration of dicalcium silicate occurs much more slowly and is mildly exothermic in comparison to that for tricalcium silicate.

The reactions of the other major components of Portland cement are more complex and beyond the scope of the background discussion given here. However, the hydration of cement is typically characterized by five distinct phases. Phase I is characterized by rapid hydrolysis of the cement compounds and can result in a temperature increase of several degrees over a period lasting on the order of 15 minutes or longer. The evolution of heat begins to dramatically slow in phase II, the dormancy period, which can extend from one to three hours. In phases III and IV, the concrete begins to harden and the evolution of heat begins to increase due primarily to the continued hydration of tricalcium silicate. These phases can encompass a period of up to approximately 32 to 36 hours. Stage V marks a period of continued hydration, but at much lower rates than experienced in the earlier phases, and continues as long as unreacted water and unhydrated silicates remain and can come in contact with one another. Stage V typically continues on the order of days, if not longer.

More commonly, modern-day cements are formulations of hydraulic cement blends. For example, a hydraulic cement, such as, for example, Portland cement, can comprise up to 75% of ground granulated blast furnace slag. The slag results in a reduction in early strength but provides increased sulfate resistance and diminished heat evolution during the stiffening and hardening stages of the concrete.

Blended hydraulic cements can comprise one or more pozzolan materials, which are siliceous or aluminosiliceous materials that demonstrate cementitious properties in the presence of calcium hydroxide. The silicates and even aluminates of a pozzolan reacting with the calcium hydroxide of a cement form secondary cementitious phases (e.g., calcium silicate hydrates having a lower calcium to silicon ratio), which demonstrate gradual strengthening properties that usually begin to be realized after 7 days of curing.

Blended hydraulic cement may comprise up to 40% or more fly ash, which reduces the amount of water that must be blended with the cementitious composition, allowing for an improvement in early strength as the concrete cures. Other examples of pozzolans that can be used in hydraulic cement blends include a highly reactive pozzolan, such as, for example, silica fume and metakaolin, which further increases the rate at which the concrete gains strength resulting in a higher strength concrete. Current practice permits up to 40 percent or higher reduction in the amount of hydraulic cement used in the concrete mix when replaced with a combination of pozzolans that do not significantly reduce the final compressive strength or other performance characteristics of the resulting concrete.

A lightweight coarse aggregate is frequently designed into a concrete mix to reduce building dead load, enable longer spans, provide better seismic benefits, increase fire resistance, and improve sound insulation. This lightweight material commonly comprises expanded shale, clay, pumice, cinders or polystyrene with a density of about ½ or less than that of normal stone coarse aggregate and is capable of producing concrete that weighs from 800 to 1000 pounds less per cubic yard.

In general, the weight reduction in the lightweight aggregate is achieved by creating a highly porous internal structure that can, unfortunately, also absorb up to 30% water. This water is in addition to the normal water of convenience and can impart an additional amount to the concrete mix equal to 2-3 times that which must normally be consumed and evaporated, thereby further increasing the time-to-dry for adhesive or epoxy application. To prevent workability losses due to water absorption during mixing, transport and placement, porous aggregates must be pre-conditioned with water.

Should the concrete be conveyed to the location of placement by a concrete pump, water absorption by the porous aggregates becomes more critical, since the concrete may be subjected to liquid pressure within the pump and attendant line of up to 1000 psi (69 bar), which greatly compresses the air in the pores and causes significant additional water absorption. Such pressure can force water required for workability into the previously unsaturated pores of the lightweight aggregates (i.e., pores which are not filled when subjected to atmospheric pressure but which can be filled at high pressures associated with pumping). Thus, complete saturation of the pores of lightweight aggregates is preferred to prevent workability loss and potential pump line obstructions under these conditions.

Unfortunately, complete saturation is impractical since prolonged soaking in water will not displace air trapped within the capillaries of the lightweight aggregate, so some loss of mix water during conveyance has to be tolerated. Moreover, water instilled into porous aggregates may quickly evaporate in storage, returning the lightweight aggregate largely to its previous dry condition within days. Thus, pre-wetted aggregates must be used almost immediately to capture the desired benefit.

Moreover, even these methods often do not typically result in fully saturated capillaries. Any remaining empty capillaries, when subjected to pump pressures, partially fill with water in response, compressing the air trapped in the capillaries of the lightweight in accord with the Universal Gas Law, thus resulting in the aforementioned workability losses and potential line clogging during pumping. This can have several consequences: additional water must be added to the concrete mix prior to pumping to maintain workability sufficient to facilitate pumping. Thereafter, when the concrete exits the pump and returns to normal atmospheric pressure, the excess water responds to the compressed air within the lightweight aggregates and is partially forced back out into the mix. This, in effect, increases the water-to-cement ratio, excessively diluting the plastic concrete mix and impacting the hardened concrete's permeability.

The cementitious materials in concrete require water, typically known as chemical water or hydration water, to chemically evolve into a hard, crystalline binder. For example, Portland cements generally require up to about 40% of their weight in water in order to promote complete hydration and chemical reaction.

Excess water has conventionally been added to make concrete more plastic allowing it to flow into place. This excess water is known as water of convenience. A small amount of the water does escape as a result of solids settling during the plastic phase, evaporation at the atmospheric interface, and absorption into accepting interface materials. However, much of the water of convenience remains in the concrete during and immediately following hardening. The water of convenience can then escape into the atmosphere following the hardening of the concrete. The water of convenience, depending on, among other things, the water to cementitious ratio, may represent up to about 70% of the total water in the concrete.

The concrete construction and floor-covering industries may incur both construction delays and remedial costs as a result of water vapor emissions and water intrusion from concrete. For example, adhesives and coatings used in the construction of concrete floors are relatively incompatible with moisture that develops at the concrete surface. Moisture may also create an environment for promoting the growth of mold.

Water tightness in concrete structures is a measure of the ability of the hardened concrete to resist the passage of water. Water vapor emission is proportional to the state of relative dryness of the body of the concrete structure. Once isolated from external sources of water, water vapor emissions are derived from the amount of water that is used in excess of that needed to harden the cementitious materials—i.e., the water of convenience. Depending upon the atmospheric temperature and humidity at the surface and the thickness of the concrete, the elimination of excess water through water vapor emissions can take on the order of many months to reach a level that is compatible with the application of a coating or an adhesive.

There is also a possibility that water may develop under the floor due to flooding, water backup, etc. A hardened concrete that resists water vapor permeation is capable of further protecting any coatings that have been applied to the surface of the concrete. There is a need in the art for a concrete that, once it becomes hardened, is substantially resistant to water vapor permeation.

Installation of an impermeable barrier on the surface of the concrete prior to reaching an acceptable level of dryness may result in moisture accumulation, adhesive failure, and a consequential failure of the barrier due to delamination. Premature application of coatings and adhesives increases the risk of failure, while the delay caused by waiting for the concrete to reach an acceptable level of dryness may result in potentially costly and unacceptable construction delays.

The floor covering industry has determined, depending on the type of adhesive or coating used, that a maximum water vapor emission rate of from 3 to 5 pounds of water vapor per 1,000 square feet per 24 hour period (lb/1000 ft2·24 hr) is representative of a state of slab dryness necessary before adhesive may be applied to the concrete floor.

There remains a need in the art for cementitious compositions that reduce the amount of time needed to reach a desired water vapor emission rate in concrete floors enabling a more timely application of coatings and adhesives.

It is known in the art that certain polymers classified as superplasticizers may be included in concrete in order to reduce the amount of water of convenience needed to allow the cementitious mix to more readily flow into place. Certainly, a reduction in the amount of excess water remaining after the concrete hardens should lead to a reduction in the amount of time necessary to reach a desired water vapor emissions rate. However, the use of superplasticizers alone does not address other effects that influence the rate of water vapor emission from the concrete.

There remains a need in the art for cementitious compositions that further reduce the amount of time necessary to reach a desired water vapor emission rate in concrete floors beyond that which is achieved through a reduction in the amount of water required through the use of a superplasticizer additive.

If attainment of a faster drying lightweight concrete is an objective, the usual method of water reduction by utilizing large doses of super-plasticizers (very high range water reducers) is difficult because of the sensitivity of the mix to the loss of the enhanced efficiency water. Furthermore, high doses of super plasticizers tend to impart a thixotropic characteristic exhibited by workability loss if deprived of mixing shear. This loss of mixing shear often occurs during pump hose movement or delay in concrete supply. Because the efficiency of admixture-treated water is improved, loss of water by temporary absorption into the pores of lightweight aggregates during pressurized pumping has both a substantially greater negative impact on workability and a greater negative impact causing potential segregation and bleeding when the admixture-treated water is released from the pores of the aggregates after exiting the pump.

Similarly, the inclusion of silica fume or metakaolin both well-known, highly reactive pozzolans, possess very high surface areas and therefore again require super-plasticizer to reduce water and maintain workability. It also has been found that highly super-plasticized concrete is more difficult to air entrain. Air entrainment is an important feature of lightweight concrete, since it aids in reducing weight and lowers the mortar density thereby attenuating the tendency of the coarse lightweight aggregate particles to float to the surface and hinder finishing operations.

The absorbed water and resulting added mixture water caused by pumping concrete containing porous lightweight aggregates therefore poses difficulties when accelerated drying of the concrete is desired. As a consequence of concrete hydration and lowering of internal vapor pressure in the mortar, the additional water released from the capillaries of the porous aggregates permeates the mortar in the concrete. While this can be beneficial from the standpoint of promoting more complete hydration of the cementitious binder, particularly in lower water-to-cement ratio systems, it can create a prolonged period of relatively high humidity within the concrete, resulting in moist concrete that must dry out before it can be coated or sealed. Such drying is further retarded in humid climates.

The state of dryness within concrete is usually determined by drilling holes to accommodate in-situ humidity probes. When these probes indicate an internal relative humidity (IRH) of 75%, it is presumed to be representative of the future sealed equilibrium moisture condition of the full concrete thickness. Attainment of 75% relative humidity (some floor coverings tolerances may be slightly more or less) ensures that the concrete surface is ready for adhesive application. Experience in the floor covering industry has validated research data which indicates that if internal humidity probes are inserted to a depth of 40% of a concrete structure having one side exposed to the atmosphere (20% if two sides are exposed) in accordance with ASTM F-2170-09, “Standard Method for Determining Humidity in Concrete Floor Slabs Using in-situ Probes”, and the probes indicate an internal relative humidity of 75%, that this is representative of the sealed future equilibrium moisture condition of the full thickness. If the internal relative humidity is higher than 75%, it is assumed the floor will not accept water based glue and will generate sufficient vapor pressure to delaminate impervious coatings. Below that amount, and absent outside moisture influences, it is assume the structure can accept water based glue and not generate sufficient vapor pressure differential to de-bond impervious coatings. Epoxy sealers are also sensitive to water vapor pressure and consequently, encounter similar problems. Premature application of either water-soluble adhesive or epoxy sealer to under-dried concrete can result in moisture accumulation beneath the applied impervious surface and a potential for loss of bond with the epoxy or flooring. There are sealers that can be applied to attenuate the water vapor emission, but they often fail, resulting in loss of space utilization during repair and occasionally creating costly litigation. To reduce the risk of such problems, floors with excessive humidity may require drying times of up to a year or more.

The substitution of the porous lightweight aggregates which absorb water instead of normal aggregates can prolong drying times by months or a year or more. Research has demonstrated that high performance standard weight coarse aggregates concrete (HPC) can dry to satisfactory IRH condition comparatively rapidly. These concretes have water-cementitious ratios (W/Cs) generally below 0.40 and contain fairly large amounts of cement or cement/pozzolans to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75% as ascertained by ASTM F 2170 “Determining Relative Humidity in Concrete Slabs Using in situ probes.” An example the large water difference is shown in Table 1 below.


TABLE 1
dry, lbs
dry, lbs
dry, lbs
Lightweight
Lightweight
Normal
HPC
HPC
Cement
300
400
400
GGBFS
200
400
400
Sand
1340
1274
1220
Stone
1750
1750
850
Water
325
285
325
plasticizer
10 oz.
40 oz.
40 oz.
W/C
0.65
0.36
0.41
PCF
145
150.5
118.3
AE
1.30%
1.30%
5%
Total W/C
0.70
0.39
0.60
Aggregate Water
23
23
151

Other research by Suprenant and Malisch (1998) reported that a 4 inch concrete slab made from conventional concrete required 46 days to reach a moisture vapor emission rate (MVER) of 3.0 lb/1000 ft2/24 hours. In 1990 they reported that a lightweight concrete slab made with the same w/cm and cured in the same manner took 183 days to reach the same MVER, a four-fold increase.

The construction industry, therefore, faces a dichotomy. It can address water absorption by the porous aggregate with as much water as needed to ensure pumpability and avoid critical workability loss in the pump line and deal with the consequent prolonged drying time of up to a year or accept the risk of floor failure by using a sealer to isolate the moisture-laden floor from an applied impervious coating or water soluble glue. The concrete construction and floor-covering industries may therefore incur construction delays and/or remedial costs as a result of water vapor emissions and water intrusion from concrete. Moisture may also create an environment for promoting growth of mold.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Various embodiments of the invention relate to cementitious compositions having an attenuated or a decreased rate of water vapor emissions from a concrete formed therefrom. Certain embodiments of the invention are directed to a concrete produced from certain cementitious compositions of the invention. While not intending to be bound by theory, certain embodiments of cementitious compositions offer the improvement of providing a concrete that allows for the application of coatings and adhesives sooner than concretes produced by cementitious compositions known in the art.

In one of the various aspects of the invention, a cementitious composition is provided comprising a hydraulic cement having a concentration in a range from about 8% to about 35% by weight based on a total weight of the cementitious composition, a finely divided material having a concentration in a range from about 5% to about 40% by weight based on the total weight of the cementitious composition, an aggregate having a concentration in a range from about 50% to about 85% by weight based on the total weight of the cementitious composition, a superplasticizer having a concentration in a range from about 4 to about 16 ounces per 100 pounds of the hydraulic cement, and at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt having a concentration of from about 20 lb/yd3 to about 40 lb/yd3.

In an embodiment of the invention, the aggregate of the cementitious composition aggregate may comprise a fine aggregate and a course aggregate. In certain embodiments of the invention, a ratio by weight of the fine aggregate to the aggregate is from about 0.25 to about 1.00.

In an embodiment of the invention, the alkali metal nitrite salt may be a sodium nitrite.

A cementitious composition of the invention may comprise a hydraulic cement; an aggregate; a superplasticizer; and at least one water soluble salt selected from the group consisting of water soluble silicates, acetates, sulfates, thiosulfates, carbonates, nitrates, nitrites, bromides, chlorides, thiocyanates, and hydroxides of one or more alkali metals or alkaline earth metals, and mixtures thereof.

In certain embodiments of the invention, at least one water soluble salt is blended with the cementitious composition. In other embodiments of the invention, at least a portion of the at least one water soluble salt may additionally be infused as an aqueous solution in the aggregate.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt has a concentration in the aqueous solution of from about 8% to about 20% by weight based on a total weight of the aqueous composition. According to more specific embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt is selected from the group consisting of sodium acetate, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, potassium carbonate, sodium sulfate, potassium sulfate, sodium chloride, sodium silicate, sodium thiosulfate hydrate, and sodium thiocynate.

In some embodiments of the invention, the aggregate is a porous lightweight aggregate.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt comprises a sodium thiosulfate and a sodium thiocyanate. Further pursuant to this embodiment of the invention, the concentration of the sodium thiocyanate is from about 0.28% to about 0.55% based upon a total weight of cementitious composition. In certain other embodiments of the invention, a concentration of the sodium thiocyanate may be up to about 0.09% by weight based upon the total weight of the cementitious composition.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method of manufacturing a hardened concrete comprising preparing a fresh concrete mixture by blending together an aggregate, at least one water soluble salt, hydraulic cement and water, the water including both water of hydration and excess water, and allowing the water of hydration to react with the hydraulic cement to form hydrated cement paste having pores and capillaries. In certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt enhances the retention of the excess water by the pores and capillaries of the cement paste and inhibits diffusion of water through the concrete to a surface of the hardened concrete, thereby allowing the hardened concrete to more quickly achieve a desired internal humidity and surface dryness compared to concrete made in the absence of the at least one salt.

In an embodiment of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt may be selected from the group consisting of salts of lithium, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and mixtures thereof. In certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt is selected from the group consisting of water soluble silicates, acetates, sulfates, thiosulfates, carbonates, nitrates, nitrites, bromides, chlorides, thiocyanates, and hydroxides of one or more alkali metals or alkaline earth metals, and mixtures thereof.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt allows the concrete to achieve a 75% internal relative humidity with less total evaporation of water from the concrete compared to a concrete substantially free of the at least one water soluble salt. In other embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt has less autogenous and/or drying shrinkage of the hardened concrete compared to a concrete substantially free of the at least one water soluble salt. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt permits faster surface drying at a higher water-cementitious materials ratio and with less superplasticizer compared to a concrete substantially free of the at least one water soluble salt.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the aggregate may comprise a porous aggregate and the at least one water soluble salt may reduce the inflow and outflow of water from pores and capillaries of the porous aggregate in comparison to a concrete substantially free of the at least one water soluble salt.

According to certain embodiments of the invention, the at least one water soluble salt is added to the fresh concrete mixture upon blending together the aggregate, at least one water soluble salt, hydraulic cement, and water. In certain embodiments of the invention, at least a portion of the at least one water soluble salt is indirectly added to the fresh concrete mixture by infusing a porous lightweight aggregate with an aqueous solution of the at least one salt prior to blending together the aggregate, at least one water soluble salt, hydraulic cement, and water.

In an embodiment of the invention, infusing the porous lightweight aggregate with the aqueous solution improves workability of the fresh concrete mixture compared to a concrete made in the absence of infusing the porous lightweight aggregate with the aqueous solution. In certain embodiments, infusing the porous lightweight aggregate with the aqueous solution improves pumpability and decreases workability loss when pumping the fresh concrete mixture under pressure compared to concrete made in the absence of infusing the porous lightweight aggregate with the aqueous solution.

An additional aspect of the invention provides a concrete manufactured according to any of the methods of the invention.

These embodiments of the invention and other aspects and embodiments of the invention will become apparent upon review of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. The invention, though, is pointed out with particularity by the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

Having thus described the invention in general terms, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, which are not necessarily drawn to scale, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a chart illustrating the percentage of water loss of porous lightweight aggregates treated by tap water (Sample 43) and solutions of seven different salts (Samples 44-50) after drying for 27 hours;

FIG. 2 is a chart illustrating unfilled pore space of porous lightweight aggregates treated by tap water (Sample 43) and solutions of seven different salts (Samples 44-50) after drying for 27 hours and then being re-immersed for 30 minutes, as indicated by weight percent of water needed to fully saturate the unfilled space of the aggregates;

FIG. 3 is a chart illustrating water vapor emission of concrete made from aggregates treated by tap water (Sample 51) and four solutions of different salts (Samples 52-55);

FIG. 4 is a chart illustrating water vapor emission of concrete made from aggregates treated by tap water (Sample 56) and four solutions (Samples 57-60), wherein aggregates were soaked in water (Sample 56) or boiled in aqueous solutions (Samples 57, 58, and 59) or partially dried then dipped in an aqueous solution of 15% NaAc and 5% NaCl (Sample 60);

FIG. 5 is a chart illustrating the close correlation between water evaporation rate of lightweight concrete and the number of days required for the concrete to reach 75% relative humidity;

FIG. 6 is a chart illustrating the number of days required for lightweight concrete containing various salts to reach 75% relative humidity;

FIG. 7 is a chart illustrating the number of days required for normal weight concrete containing various salts to reach 75% relative humidity;

FIG. 8 is a graphical representation showing the relative humidity over time for two exemplary embodiments of cementitious mixes of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a chart illustrating the relative humidity over time for cementitious compositions having various concentration of sodium nitrite according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a chart illustrating the relative humidity over time for cementitious compositions having various concentrations of sodium nitrite according to another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 11 is a graphical representation showing the relative humidity over time for cementitious compositions having various concentrations of sodium nitrite according to

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention now will be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which some, but not all embodiments of the inventions are shown. Preferred embodiments of the invention may be described, but this invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein. Rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. The embodiments of the invention are not to be interpreted in any way as limiting the various inventions described herein.

Although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation. All terms, including technical and scientific terms, as used herein, have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs unless a term has been otherwise defined. It will be further understood that terms, such as those defined in commonly used dictionaries, should be interpreted as having a meaning as commonly understood by a person having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. It will be further understood that terms, such as those defined in commonly used dictionaries, should be interpreted as having a meaning that is consistent with their meaning in the context of the relevant art and the present disclosure. Such commonly used terms will not be interpreted in an idealized or overly formal sense unless the disclosure herein expressly so defines otherwise.

As used in the specification and in the appended claims, the singular forms “a”, “an”, and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. For example, reference to “a concrete” includes a plurality of such concrete.

Exemplary compositions of the invention are described in the examples presented herein. As a person having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs would appreciate, variations or modifications from these exemplary compositions, as detailed in the specification and as further set forth in the claims that follow, are intended to be included within the scope of the present invention.

As used herein, “wt %” or “weight percent” or “% by weight” or “percent by weight” and any variations thereof, unless specifically stated to the contrary, means a weight percentage of the component based on the total weight of the composition or article in which the component is included. “Wt %” or “weight percent” or “% by weight” or “percent by weight” and any variations thereof, when referring to a cementitious mix, means a weight percentage of the component based on the total weight of the cementitious compounds in the cementitious mix or the weight of the cementitious mix on a water-free basis.

The terms “attenuated water vapor emission” or “decreasing the rate of water vapor emission,” as may be used interchangeably herein, as well as any variation thereof, means a cementitious composition that ultimately provides a cementitious mix that produces a hardened concrete demonstrating a reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a desired water vapor emissions rate. In an embodiment of the invention, the desired water vapor emissions rate, for example, is 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h. In certain embodiments of the invention, the attenuated water vapor emission may be measured based on the number of days required to achieve a desired internal relative humidity, for example, a 75% relative humidity.

As a person having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention relates would appreciate, a cementitious composition having an attenuated water vapor emission or demonstrating a decrease in the rate of water vapor emission may, depending upon the time during or after curing or hardening, demonstrates a smaller rate of water vapor emissions than a conventional cementitious composition.

The term “concrete structure,” as used herein, is intended to be broadly defined to refer to any structure that is composed, in at least significant part, of a concrete which has cured and hardened. A concrete structure includes, but is not limited to, a bridge, a roadway, a parking lot, a sidewalk, a curb, a parking garage, a floor, a patio slab, a support column, a pier, a marine structure, a piling, a conduit and any other paved surface whether located inside or outside.

As used herein, a “cement replacement” is a compound that partially substitutes for a compound that functions as the primary cement compound, such as, for example, a hydraulic cement, in a cementitious composition. Without intending to be bound by theory, the cement replacement itself may have binding properties similar to a cement. As such, any compound that can be chemically reacted or hydrolyzed by water to ultimately form other compounds that promote the hardening of a cement may, in certain embodiments, be a cement replacement. In some embodiments of the invention, the cement replacement may demonstrate cementitious properties because of their mere presence with another component of cement in the cementitious composition. A pozzolan is a non-limiting example of cement replacement that demonstrates cementitious properties when in the presence of another component of cement in the cementitious composition.

In certain embodiments of the invention, a cement replacement may be chosen to impart additional properties to the cement. In a non-limiting example, calcium carbonate may not only function as a cement replacement, but may also act as any one of a filler, a densifier, an accelerator of hydration, and any combination thereof. The compositions of the invention, in certain embodiments, may include these types of compounds as well.

The terms “cementitious composition” or “cementitious mix” or “concrete composition or “concrete mixture,” as may be used interchangeably herein, refer to the final mixture that comprises the compounds intended to be part of the formulation used to pour or cast a concrete. Such compositions or mixes or mixtures may refer to a composition that includes a cement material and, optionally, any of a pozzolan, one or more fillers, adjuvants, additives, dispersants, and other aggregates and/or materials that, typically upon being combined with water, form a slurry that hardens to a concrete upon curing. Cement materials include, but are not limited to, hydraulic cement, gypsum, gypsum compositions, lime and the like.

For example a cementitious composition or a cementitious mix or a concrete composition or a concrete mixture may comprise cementitious materials, optional admixtures, and aggregates. In a non-limiting example, the cementitious mix or concrete mixture, in certain embodiments, comprises a cementitious composition and the desired amount of water. Non-limiting examples of “cementitious materials” may include hydraulic cement, non-hydraulic cement, gypsum, gypsum compositions, lime, pozzolan, granulated blast-furnace slag, and the like.

As used herein, when not otherwise specified, the term “concrete” may refer to the concrete mixture in either its fresh/unhardened state or its set/hardened state. A concrete in a fresh/unhardened may additionally be referred to as a “freshly mixed concrete,” and a concrete in a set/hardened state may additionally be referred to as a “hardened concrete.”

The term “air entrainment” refers to the inclusion of air in the form of very small bubbles during the mixing of concrete. Air entrainment may confer frost resistance on hardened concrete or improve the workability of a freshly mixed concrete.

As used herein, the term “fine calcium carbonate” means a calcium carbonate having a particle size of less than about 200 microns, less than about 150 microns, less than about 100 microns, and, preferably, less than about 75 microns. In certain embodiments of the invention, the fine calcium carbonate is introduced as part of a mixture that includes other compounds, such as, for example, alkaline earth and alkali metal carbonates. Of course, another source of fine calcium carbonate is limestone, for example, the crushed limestone marketed under the tradename of limestone fines available from Omya, Inc. (Alpharetta, Ga.). Limestone fines are generally understood to be small particulates of limestone, typically less than 65 mesh, though not intended to be limiting, generated when limestone is crushed or pulverized. In an exemplary embodiment of the invention, the fine calcium carbonate has a particle size of less than about 75 microns and is filtered from a ground mixture comprising calcium carbonate by using a standard sieve size having 75 micron openings or a varying plurality of openings of +/−75 microns.

The term “granulated blast furnace slag” refers to the glassy, granular material formed when molten blast-furnace slag (a by-product of iron manufacture) is rapidly quenched. Granulated blast furnace slag may be blended in a pulverized state with Portland cement to form hydraulic mixtures. Granulated blast furnace slag may consist essentially of silica, or aluminosilica glass containing calcium and other basic elements. The pulverized form of granulated blast furnace slag may also be referred to as “ground granulated blast furnace slag, which is also referred to as “GGBFS” in certain figures provided herein.

As used herein, the term “ultrafine calcium carbonate” means a calcium carbonate containing material having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 25 microns, less than or equal to about 10 microns, less than or equal to about 5 microns, and, preferably, less than or equal to about 3 microns. In certain embodiments of the invention, the ultrafine calcium carbonate may be introduced as part of a mixture that includes other compounds, such as, for example, alkaline earth and alkali metal carbonates. A non-limiting example of an ultrafine calcium carbonate is limestone that has been crushed and screened having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 25 microns, less than or equal to about 10 microns, less than or equal to about 5 microns, and, preferably, less than or equal to about 3 microns. Any material comprising an ultrafine calcium carbonate may be suitable for use in certain embodiments of the invention.

“Internal relative humidity” (IRH) of a concrete described herein may be determined using the procedure developed by the ASTM committee F.06, also known as the F2170 (2002) standard entitled “In-Situ Testing of Concrete Relative Humidity,” which is commonly used in Europe. In an exemplary representation of measuring internal relative humidity, the F-2170-02 test procedure involves drilling holes to a depth equal to 40% of the thickness of the concrete slab. The hole is partially lined with a plastic sleeve that is capped at the entrance of the hole. The apparatus is allowed to acclimate to an equilibrium level for 72 hours prior to inserting a probe for measuring the internal relative humidity. The floor covering industry requires the internal relative humidity reading not to exceed 75% prior to application of a flooring adhesive.

The term “pounds per cubic yard,” representing a mass based amount in pounds of a compound per cubic yard of a cementitious mix or a concrete, may also interchangeably be expressed as “lb/yd3” or “pcy.”

The term “pozzolan,” as used herein, refers to a siliceous or siliceous and aluminous material that, by itself, possesses substantially little or no cementitious value, but when, in particular, in a finely divided form or an ultrafinely divided form, and in the presence of water, chemically reacts with calcium hydroxide to form compounds possessing cementitious properties. Non-limiting examples of pozzolans include fly ash, silica fume, micronized silica, volcanic ashes, calcined clay, and metakaolin.

As used herein, the term “highly reactive pozzolan” are pozzolans that readily react with free lime to form a siliceous binder. Non-limiting examples of highly reactive pozzolans include silica fume and metakaolin.

The term “slump,” as used herein when referring to a cementitious mix, means the amount of subsidence of a cementitious composition. Conventionally, slump has been measured by the ASTM C143 (2008 is the most recent specification) standard test procedure, which measures the amount of subsidence of a cementitious composition after removing a supporting cone, as specified in the test procedure.

The term “shrinkage reducing agent,” as used herein, refers to an agent that is capable of curbing the shrinkage of a cementitious mix as it cures or hardens. Non-limiting examples of shrinkage reducing agents include polypropylene glycol, in particular, polypropylene glycol with a number average molecular weight of from about 200 to about 1,500, more preferably, from about 500 to about 1,500, and, even more preferably, from about 500 to 1,000, and derivatives of polypropylene glycol, such as, for example, copolymers comprising polypropylene glycol(meth)acrylic acid ester and polypropylene glycol mono(meth)allyl ether. Other non-limiting examples of polypropylene glycol derivatives include propylene glycol diglycidyl ether, tripropylene glycol diglycidyl ether, and the like. In certain preferred embodiments of the invention, certain species of polypropylene glycol in the oligomer range may act as anti-shrinkage agents for hydraulic concrete.

Plasticizers, water reducers, or dispersants, as used interchangeably herein, are chemical admixtures that may be added to concrete mixtures to improve workability. These agents may be manufactured from lignosulfonates.

The term “superplasticizer,” as used herein, is, generally, a water reducer, in particular, a high-range water reducer, or an additive that reduces the amount of water needed in a cementitious mix while still maintaining the workability, fluidity, and/or plasticity of the cementitious mix. Superplasticizers may include, but are not limited to formaldehyde condensates of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of methylolation and sulfonation products of each of naphthalene, melamine, phenol, urea, and aniline, examples of which include metal naphthalenesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates, metal melaminesulfonate-formaldehyde condensates, phenolsulfonic acid-formaldehyde condensate, and phenol-sulfanilic acid-formaldehyde co-condensates. Superplasticizers may also include the polymers and copolymers obtained by polymerizing at least one monomer selected from the group consisting of unsaturated monocarboxylic acids and derivatives thereof, and unsaturated dicarboxylic acids and derivatives thereof. Indeed, in preferred embodiments of the invention, the superplasticizer comprises a polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

The term “polycarboxylate superplasticizer” encompasses a homopolymer, a copolymer, and any combination thereof comprising a polycarboxylic to which other functional groups may be bonded. Preferably, these other functional groups are capable of attaching to cement particles and other functional groups for dispersing the attached cement particle within an aqueous environment. Specifically, polycarboxylate superplasticizers are polymers with a carbon backbone having pendant side chains with the characteristic that at least a portion of the side chains are attached to the carbon backbone through a carboxyl group or an ether group. An exemplary polycarboxylate superplasticizer is given by Formula (I).

According to Formula (I):

D=a component selected from the group consisting of the structure according to Formula II, the structure according to Formula III, and combinations thereof.

Additionally, according to Formulas (I), (II), and (III):

X=H, CH3, C2 to C6 alkyl, phenyl, substituted phenyl;

Y1=H, —COOM;

R=H, CH3;

Y2=H, —SO3M, —PO3M, —COOM, —OR3, —COOR3, —CH2OR3, —CONHR3, —CONHC(CH3)2, CH2SO3M, —COO(CHR4)nOH where n=2 to 6;

R1, R2, R3, R5 are each independently —(CH2CHRO)mR4 random copolymer of oxyethylene units and oxypropylene units where m=10 to 500 and wherein the amount of oxyethylene in the random copolymer is form about 60% to about 100% and the amount of oxypropylene in the random copolymer is from about 0% to about 40%;

R4=H, methyl, C2 to C6 alkyl;

M=alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, ammonia, amine, methyl, C2 to C6 alkyl;

a=0-0.8;

b=0.2-1.0;

c=0-0.5; and

d=0-0.5.

a, b, c, d, d1, and d2 represent the mole fraction of each unit and the sum of a, b, c, and d is 1.0. The sum of d1 and d2 must be equal to d.

The term “water to cementitious ratio” or “w/c” is defined as the ratio of the mass of the water to the mass of the cementitious materials immediately present in the cementitious mix formed upon mixing a cementitious composition with the desired amount of water. Generally, when the cementitious composition also comprises a pozzolan, the mass of the pozzolan will be added to the mass of the cement in determining the water to cementitious ratio. Generally, the mass of water used in calculating w/c will not include the water contained in aggregates.

The term “water-cementitious materials ratio” or “w/cm,” which may also be referred to as the “water-binder ratio,” is the mass ratio of available water to the amount of cement plus pozzolan plus slag in a paste, mortar, or concrete.

The terms “water vapor emission rate,”“water vapor emissions rate,”“water vapor emission,” and “water vapor emissions,” as may be used interchangeably herein, refers to the amount of water, typically represented as mass, e.g., pounds, emitted from a 1,000 square foot surface area of concrete over a 24 hour period. The water vapor emission rate, in an embodiment of the invention, may be measured by the test described in ASTM F1869 (2004) entitled the “Standard Test Method for Measuring Moisture Vapor Emission Rate of Concrete Sub-Floor Using Anhydrous Calcium Chloride.” ASTM F1869 measures the vapor emission rate by placing an airtight dome containing a specified weight of calcium chloride over the hardened concrete for a defined period of time.

The term “workability,” as used herein, is the relative ease that a freshly mixed paste, mortar, or concrete may be mixed, placed, compacted, and/or finished. The homogeneity of such mixtures may also influence the workability. In certain cementitious mixtures or mortar mixtures, workability may refer to the consistency and feel of the cementitious mixture or the mortar mixture. The requisite workability can vary based on the use of the cementitious and/or the mortar mixture. For example, depending on the application, the viscosity of the mixture may vary—e.g., a higher viscosity for applications where rapid flowability is not desired or a lower viscosity where rapid flowability is required, such as when performs are used. Of course, as understood in the art, other physical property parameters may also affect the workability of the mixture.

The disclosure herein, in certain embodiments, provide composition and methods for maintaining or altering the ionic concentration of the water in concrete and/or lightweight aggregates in order to accommodate an amount of water in excess of that needed to react with the cements, which is typically required to provide desired workability. In general, concrete requires water for cement hydration as well as water of convenience to provide workability and facilitate placement. The water of hydration must typically be consumed and the water of convenience largely evaporated before proper permanent bonding of water-based adhesives can be assured. Unfortunately, the time necessary to accommodate the requisite evaporation and hydration can be approximately one month per inch of concrete floor depth. Placement of floor coverings using current water-soluble adhesives must often be delayed until the residual concrete water has sufficiently dissipated to provide an internal humidity of no more than about 75%.

Generally, water vapor emission may be proportional to the state of relative dryness of the body of the concrete structure. Once isolated from external sources of water, water vapor emissions are derived from the amount of water that is used in excess of that needed to harden the cementitious materials, i.e., the water of convenience. Depending upon the atmospheric temperature and humidity at the surface and the thickness of the concrete, the elimination of excess water through water vapor emissions can take several months to reach a level that is compatible with the application of a coating or an adhesive (e.g., to reduce risk of delamination).

A lightweight coarse aggregate may be designed into a concrete mix to reduce building dead load and increase fire resistance. This lightweight material commonly comprises an expanded shale or clay with a density of about ½ that of normal stone coarse aggregate and is capable of producing lightweight concrete that weighs from 800 to 1000 pounds less per cubic yard. The weight reduction provided by the lightweight aggregate is achieved by creating a highly porous internal structure in the lightweight aggregate that can, however, absorb up to 30% water by weight. This water is in addition to the normal water required to provide desired slump and can impart additional water to the concrete mix equal to 2 to 3 times of the amount of water that must normally evaporate, thereby increasing the time to dry for adhesive or epoxy application by a similar amount. This additional time is beyond the tolerance of many fast-track construction schedules and increases the likelihood of bond failure and delamination should this drying time be truncated.

In certain embodiments of the invention, water soluble salts may be used to alter the ionic concentration of the water in concrete and thereby control the internal relative humidity of concrete as it is drying. According to one embodiment, one or more water soluble salts are incorporated into the cement paste upon mixing the cementitious components together. According to another embodiment, one or more water soluble salts can be incorporated into the pores of a lightweight aggregate and thereby indirectly incorporated into the cement paste when mixing the cementitious components together. Either method allows for improved water retention within the fine pores of the cementitious material over time, improved initial concrete workability, and limited water-vapor emission, enabling the resulting low-density concretes to attain a desired relative humidity in a shorter time. If water is made available to the mix by virtue of its being absorbed and then desorbed by lightweight aggregate, then its introduction should be anticipated by adjusting the ionic concentration of salt added to the aggregates to yield a cement paste having a desired ionic concentration.

According to certain embodiments of the invention, autogenous and drying shrinkage of concrete may be substantially reduced or, in certain embodiments, eliminated altogether. Finer cements, slags and pozzolans may lead to the production of smaller pores in the calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) gel. This results in increased autogenous and drying shrinkage due to the magnified effect of surface tension as pore radii diminish (Young-Laplace equation or Kelvin). As the cement particles hydrate, they consume about 20% of their weight in water and at the same time lose about 10% of their volume, resulting in chemical shrinkage or autogenous shrinkage. The large capillaries dry first, resulting in a shift to progressively smaller capillaries and gel pores.

Introducing salt into the capillaries and gel pores of cement paste reduces the relative humidity (RH) within concrete by virtue of the salt effect on relative humidity and its effect on the micro pore surface tension and pressure differential across the meniscus. As a consequence of lower w/cm and smaller pores, high performance concrete in general, and fast drying normal-weight aggregate concretes specifically, suffer from increased autogenous and drying shrinkage resulting in a potential for micro cracks and macro cracks leading to early deterioration. This phenomenon can be utilized to advantage in several ways. First, the small pores thus formed reduce the internal relative humidity (IRH) of concrete, particularly in the presence of increasing salt concentration. Second, if the lightweight coarse aggregate is water soaked with liquid water (not vapor) into its capillaries, then its introduction into a soluble salt treated mortar will result in an osmotic pressure. This pressure drives water and water vapor into the hydrated cement voids space, which offsets the tendency of the paste to undergo autogenous and drying shrinkage. This is a surprising and unexpected result.

It is conventionally believed that small particles (e.g., light weight fines) are needed for moisture sourcing dispersion. However, according to certain embodiments of the invention, well soaked coarse lightweight aggregate in a salt-dosed HPC mix may “eliminate” drying and autogenous shrinkage. If a lightweight concrete is pumped, for instance, the expected pressure may diminish the osmotic effect by forcing salts into the lightweight aggregates. The drying shrinkage attenuation will remain but autogenous shrinkage may return to significant, but diminished, extent.

This insight on shrinkage leads to new large volume uses for concrete. For example, in warehouse floor slabs or stores where concrete joints must be dowelled for load transfer, curling (top to bottom of slab drying differential) pulls the slab off subgrade support and creates surface irregularities. Both shrinkages contribute to this negative effect. Now, in a temperature-controlled environment, expanses of concrete can be longer than 100 feet without a joint, leading to reduced installation expense in reinforcing steel and jointing. This is an important improvement over conventional concrete methodologies for producing fast drying concrete, particularly those which rely on large doses of superplasticizer and low w/cm (less than 0.4), which produce large increases in autogenous and drying shrinkages.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the water vapor emission rate, as well as other properties, such as, for example, internal relative humidity, a required amount of water content of the concrete, and the required water to cementitious ratio, are determined by a process or procedure as provided in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/503,622 issued as U.S. Pat. No. 8,220,344 entitled “Method for Estimating Properties of Concrete” fully incorporated herein by reference. The process or procedure, otherwise known as the “mortar method,” comprises a procedure for preparing a representative mortar sample, typically substantially free of any coarse aggregate, having a water to cementitious ratio that is consistent with that of the concrete to be proportioned. Preferably, the prepared mortar mixture to be tested will have substantially the same ratio of compounds of the cementitious mix. The prepared sample mixture is cast into a small mold having a preferred surface to volume ratio of about 0.67 in−1 (6 inch×6 inch panels having a volume of about 54 cubic inches) to simulate the drying experienced by concrete that is exposed to the atmosphere at only one surface. The mortar is cast to a depth, which preferably approximates the depth of concrete that is immediately reactive to atmospheric temperature and moisture gradients. In certain embodiments of the invention, the mortar is cast to a depth of about 1½ inches. The cast samples of mortar are cured and periodically weighed at measured intervals in order to determine the amount of daily water loss. The water vapor loss is used to estimate the drying rate or some other property of a concrete based upon a correlation.

An aspect of various embodiments of the invention described herein relates to a cementitious composition, specifically to a cementitious composition resulting in a concrete having a decreased or an attenuated rate of water vapor emissions. The cementitious compositions are formulated to include a hydraulic cement and at least one water vapor attenuation agent. Non-limiting examples of water vapor attenuation agents include an ultrafine calcium carbonate containing material (simply referred to herein as an ultrafine calcium carbonate), having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 25 microns, less than or equal to about 10 microns, less than or equal to about 5 microns, and, preferably, less than or equal to about 3 microns; a highly reactive pozzolan; a shrinkage reducing agent; an alkali metal halide salt; an alkali metal nitrate salt; an alkali metal nitrite salt; and at least one superplasticizer. More preferably, the at least one superplasticizer comprises a polycarboxylate superplasticizer. Even more preferably, the alkali metal nitrite salt is a sodium nitrite.

In other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition additionally comprises a cement replacement. In other preferred embodiments of the invention, the cement replacement comprises a finely divided material that comprises a material whose particle size is less than about 75 microns. In certain preferred embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a finely divided limestone or a fine calcium carbonate. In other preferred embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a pozzolan, which, without intending to be limiting, reacts with water and the lime released from cement hydration to form densifying calcium silicates. In certain embodiments of the invention, the pozzolan may comprise any natural pozzolan; any artificial pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; and any combination thereof. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a ground slag, preferably, a ground granulated blast furnace slag.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method of manufacturing concrete having improved water retention and surface drying characteristics, comprising: (1) preparing a fresh concrete mixture by blending an aggregate (e.g., porous lightweight aggregate) with hydraulic cement, water and one or more water soluble salts; (2) allowing water to react with hydraulic cement to form hydration products, which hardens the fresh concrete mixture to form hardened concrete; and (3) the salt retaining water within the fine capillary pores of the cement paste. The salt inhibits diffusion of excess water not used in hydration of cement from the pores of the cement paste, thereby causing the surface of the hardened concrete to more quickly achieve a desired internal humidity compared to hardened concrete made using the salt.

Examples of metal cations that may be suitable for salts in certain embodiments of the invention include, but are not limited to, lithium, potassium, sodium, alkaline earth metals, and combinations thereof. Examples of anions that may be suitable for salts in certain embodiments of the invention include, but are not limited to, acetate, sulfate, thiosulfate, bromide, chloride, thiocyanate, nitrite, nitrate, hydroxide, silicate, and combinations thereof. Further pursuant to these certain embodiments useful salts include, but are not limited to, sodium acetate (NaAc), sodium nitrate (NaNO3), sodium nitrite (NaNO2), potassium carbonate (KCO3), sodium sulfate (Na2SO4), potassium sulfate (K2SO4), sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium silicate (NaSiO3), sodium thiosulfate hydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O), and sodium thiocynate (NaSCN).

Without intending to be bound by theory, an advantage to incorporating one or more water soluble salts into cement paste to yield faster drying concrete may be the sequestration of most of the mix water in the small pores that exist within the concrete, particularly within cement paste. In certain embodiments of the invention, about 50% of the paste fraction of concrete is made up of capillary and calcium silicate gel pores. Higher cementitious concretes can be about ⅓ by volume, or 9 cubic feet of paste out of the 27 cubic feet in a yard, with the balance being made up of aggregate, according to certain embodiments of the invention. In a properly designed mix, according to certain embodiments of the invention, pore volume can, therefore, account for up to 4½ cubic feet of the water (280 pounds).

A problem that may conventionally be experienced with producing micro pores of sufficient quantity to absorb and hold this water in a non-evaporable state is that the size of the pores is typically a function of the water-cementitious (w/cm) ratio. It is generally accepted by a person having ordinary skill in the art that pore size does not substantially exist or become discontinuous, even with extended cure times, above water-cementitious ratios of about 0.6 or 0.7. As the water-cement ratio decreases from these levels, smaller pores may be formed. When the water-cement ratio drops below 0.4, sufficient micro pores are usually present to impact internal relative humidity and thus measurably affect drying time to 75%. This lower level of water dictates a very stiff (low slump) workability that will not pump easily unless augmented with substantial amounts of super-plasticizer, which is tolerable in standard weight concrete but, as previously pointed out, is difficult to manage in lightweight concrete.

Physical upper limits exist on cementitious levels as well, since their relative fineness begins to require increasing amounts of water after the content surpasses about 800 pounds per cubic yard. In the usual proportions found in lightweight concrete, the aggregate alone can hold from 70 pounds to as much as 250 pounds of water. The dichotomy then becomes: more cementitious binder cannot be added nor can more water easily be withdrawn.

In various embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions can include compounds or be compounded to demonstrate a number of advantageous properties or features. In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious compositions include compounds or are compounded to reduce the amount of water of convenience. In other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions include certain compounds and are compounded in such a way so as to augment the effectiveness of a superplasticizer. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions increase packing, or decrease intersticial spacing, of an aggregate that has been included in the composition, thereby effectively reducing permeability. In still yet other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions include compounds or are compounded such that the cements that are included in the composition consume much of the water present, preferably in such a manner so as to reduce excessive production of reaction heat. In certain embodiments, a concrete composition of the invention has an advantage of improved workability. In certain embodiments, a concrete composition of the invention has a feature of accelerated drying.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the resulting concrete composition forms a concrete having some of the aforementioned properties. In other embodiments of the invention, the resulting concrete composition forms a lightweight concrete having at least some of the aforementioned properties. In certain embodiments of the invention, the resulting concrete composition forms a low density concrete have at least some of the aforementioned properties.

The inventive cementitious compositions, without intending to be bound by theory, offer improvements over other cementitious compositions known in the art by providing a concrete that demonstrates a reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a desired water vapor emission rate, otherwise known herein as an “attenuated water vapor emission” or “decreasing the rate of water vapor emission.” In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition having a decreased rate of water vapor emission from concrete achieves a water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 50 days, less than or equal to about 36 days, less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 28 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, less than or equal to about 15 days, less than or equal to about 12 days, less than or equal to about 10 days, and less than or equal to about 7 days. Preferred embodiments of the invention are those cementitious compositions that achieve a water vapor emission rate of about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h at any time less than or equal to about 30 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 25 days, and, even more preferably less than or equal to about 15 days.

In various embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions provide a reduction in the number of days needed to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75%. The cementitious compositions, according to certain embodiments of the invention, will produce a hardened concrete that has a 75% internal relative humidity in less than about 50 days; preferably, less than about 36 days; more preferably, less than about 30 days; even more preferably, less than about 28 days; still even more preferably, less than about 22 days; and, yet still even more preferably, less than about 17 days.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions offer the improvement of providing a finished concrete that allows the application of coatings and adhesives much sooner than concretes produced by conventional cementitious compositions known in the art.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious compositions are used to prepare a concrete structure for a flooring application. While not intending to be bound by theory, upon being mixed with water, the cementitious compositions consume and emit water in such a manner that little water remains in the hardened concrete to disturb water-based glues that are affixed to or coated onto the hardened concrete, which act as floor coverings.

The inventors have discovered that it is important not only to reduce the need for the amount of excess water to be added to the cementitious composition in preparing a cementitious mix, but to also include certain compounds in the formulation and to compound the formulation of the cementitious compositions in such a way that excess water is more favorably and rapidly removed than that which can be achieved by conventional cementitious compositions.

In various embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions may include compounds or be compounded to demonstrate a number of advantageous features and/or properties. In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious compositions include compounds or are compounded to reduce the amount of water of convenience. In other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions include certain compounds and are compounded in such a way so as to augment the effectiveness of a superplasticizer. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions increase packing, or decrease interstitial spacing, of an aggregate that has been included in the composition, thereby effectively reducing permeability. In still yet other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions include compounds or are compounded such that the cements that are included in the composition consume much of the water present, preferably, in such a manner so as to reduce excessive production of reaction heat.

In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions include a water vapor attenuation agent, as further described herein. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition is formulated to include a water vapor attenuation agent that is a water “scavenger”—i.e., a compound that consumes mix water. Without intending to be limiting, compounds that are characterized as water scavengers are particularly useful in embodiments of the invention when a water to cement ratio higher than about 0.3, or more, is needed to achieve a certain desired degree of plasticity or workability for pouring a cementitious mix produced from the cementitious composition. For example, the inventors have discovered that ultrafine calcium carbonates and highly reactive pozzolans are particularly useful in scavenging excess water.

Furthermore, it has been found that a cementitious mix made with cementitious compositions having a highly reactive pozzolan, without limitation, such as metakaolin and/or silica fume, continue to hydrate at relative humidity levels substantially below those cementitious mixes formed from a cementitious composition of a Portland cement, slag, and other pozzolans lending to their ability to scavenge water. In an embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent of the cementitious composition is a highly reactive pozzolan; an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns; and any combination thereof having a concentration in the range of from about 0.5 wt % to about 25 wt %, preferably, from about 3 wt % to about 18 wt %, and, more preferably, from about 3 wt % to about 13 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition.

In an embodiment of the invention, cementitious compositions having a water vapor attenuation agent that is considered a water scavenger, which may include an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns; a highly reactive pozzolan; and any combination thereof, are capable of consuming at least about 5, at least about 10, at least about 20, at least about 30, at least about 40, and at least about 50 pounds of water per cubic yard of concrete over conventional cementitious mixes.

In yet other embodiments of the invention, smaller pore formation is preferred in the finished concrete. Smaller pore formation, depending on the formulation of the cementitious mix, may lead to a concrete having a decreased rate of or an attenuated water vapor emission earlier in the curing or hardening process. Without intending to be bound by theory, a reduction in pore size results in an inhibition of capillary water movement, which may lead to lower apparent internal relative humidity and a reduction in the water vapor emission rate. While a lower water to cement ratio would be expected, in certain situations, to reduce the pore size, the inventor has discovered that the use of a shrinkage reducing agent, preferably, in conjunction with a highly reactive pozzolan, such as, for example metakaolin or even silica fume, or in conjunction with an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns, results in a cement having a reduction in pore size.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions may comprise soluble ionic salts. Without intending to be bound by the theory, soluble ionic salts may sequester water based on the principle that water vapor concentration, and, therefore, the relative humidity over a salt solution is less than that over that of pure water. Water may be present in both the gas and the liquid phase, whereas the scarcely volatile salt molecules may only be present in the liquid phase. The salt ions dilute the water and hinder the escape of water molecules into the air—i.e., the presence of the salt ions changes the equilibrium between the vapor and liquid phase. The rate of return of water molecules to the liquid surface is proportional to their concentration in the gas, where there are no salt ions to interfere. The system therefore adjusts to equilibrium where there are fewer water molecules in the air than there would be over a pure water surface. The relative humidity is therefore lower than 100%. Françcois-Marie Raoult developed the following formula to represent this concept:

P=pi*xi

where,

    • P=total vapor pressure
    • pi*=vapor pressure of water
    • xi=moles of water/(moles of water+moles of salts)

If, on the other hand, a binary ionic salt such as sodium acetate (anhydrous) is used, then:

xi=moles of water/(moles of water+2*moles of salt)

According to certain exemplary experimental results, the closeness of results calculated by Raoult's law is shown by the data in Table 2.

The salts of Table 2 were placed into aqueous solutions in a closed container with an inserted humidity probe and allowed to stabilize over 48 hours. Analogizing this data to concrete, if it is assumed that the cementitious materials contain 0.6% alkali as Na2O then in an 800 pound cementitious mix, for example, the moles of NaOH would be as follows:

Na2O+H2O=2NaOH,0.006×800×80/62=6.2/40=0.155


TABLE 2
NaNO2
NaNO3
NaC2H3O2
Raoult
Solution
Solution
Solution
Calculated
RH
RH
RH
RH
1 molar
93
93
93
97
3 molar
82
89
86
90
6 molar
75
80
75
82
RH = relative humidity

Additional salt addition may also raise the surface tension of water by about 5% and create a thickening of the water-ionic layer along the walls of the pores, thus effectively reducing their volume and providing an enhancement to negative pore pressure forecast by the Kelvin equation. The Kelvin equation can be used to describe the phenomenon of capillary condensation due to the presence of a curved meniscus, according to the following formula:

lnPvPsat=-2HγVlRT

where,

    • Pv=equilibrium vapor pressure
    • Psat=saturation vapor pressure
    • H=mean curvature of meniscus
    • γ=liquid/vapor surface tension
    • V1=liquid molar volume
    • R=ideal gas constant
    • T=temperature

An additional enhancement, although relatively smaller than the previous mentioned effects, is the expansion of the water lubrication capability by salt addition of a salt. The data in Table 3 was obtained by adding several separate salts to water and observing the expansion or displacement that occurred.


TABLE 3
displacement
%
1 molar
2.4
3 molar
5.2
6 molar
16

The inventors have found that the combination of the sum of these effects permits the construction of a concrete with enhanced capacity to sequester water in a non-evaporable state. As the data set forth in Table 4 demonstrates, excursions well beyond the maximum 0.4 water-cement ratio typically required for fast drying and HPC concrete are now possible.


TABLE 4
Grade
pounds
Type IV
120
pounds
pounds
ASTM c330
Lightweight
pounds
pounds
Type F
ASTM c33
ASTM c33
½″
moisture
cement
slag
pounds
Sand
#67 Stone
Lightweight
% dry wt
Mix 1
300
300
0
1400
1700
0
n/a
Mix 2
300
300
0
1400
1700
0
n/a
Mix 3
300
300
0
1400
1700
0
28.2
Mix 4
400
400
0
1400
0
750
28.2
Mix 5
400
400
0
1400
0
750
28.2
Mix 6
400
400
0
1400
0
750
28.2
Mix 7
600
0
200
1400
0
750
28.2
Mix 8
600
0
200
1400
0
750
28.2
Mix 9
300
300
0
1400
1700
0
n/a
Days to
Total
ASTM
W/Cs
Pounds
Salt
Salt
Salt
Salt
F 2170
(Includes
Mix
NaOH
NaNO2
NaNO3
NaC2H3O2
75%
lightweight
Water
pounds
pounds
pounds
pounds
IRH
W/Cs
water).
Mix 1
325
0
0
0
0
 50+
0.54
0.54
Mix 2
325
0
0
0
20
23
0.54
0.54
Mix 3
325
4
0
0
20
14
0.54
0.54
Mix 4
325
0
0
0
0
 50+
0.61
Mix 5
325
0
20
0
0
19
0.61
Mix 6
325
4
20
0
0
12
0.61
Mix 7
325
4
20
0
0
45
0.61
Mix 8
325
0
0
0
0
100+
0.61
Mix 9
325
0
0
35
0
26
0.54

As can be readily observed, the drying time with both stone and lightweight concretes can be considerably shortened by increasing the concentration of single or combinations of salts. Care should be exercised to ensure that the salts do not cause efflorescence, react adversely with the concrete hydration, or strongly deliquesce.

The preponderance of the aggregate and mix water sequestered within the treated concrete at an internal relative humidity of 75% as is shown in the data set forth in Table 5.

The data in Table 5 demonstrates that the amount of water remaining in fast-dry design lightweight concrete has been reduced to 7.6 ft3 after reaching an internal relative humidity of 75%


TABLE 5
Mix
cement
250
250 F.
pounds
slag
550
Oven Loss:
361
sand
1400
Evaporation:
25
Lightweight
1006
Retained in
116
Concrete:
Water
325
Total
502
Lightweight
21.4% of dry Wt.
Moisture:
mix water
0.41
% Water
W/Cs
Total W/Cs
0.63
retained in concrete
95
NaNO2
35
cubic feet
7.6
water retained
in concrete @ 75%
internal RH:
Total Water:
502
Chemically bound
23%
Water:

The laboratory work with this system showed an unusual result in that evaporation pans of treated concrete made from the same samples of salt treated concrete reflected the same pattern as the internal relative humidity (IRH) specimens. It can be concluded from this that the evaporation rate is related to the formation of a discontinuous pore system and therefore indicative of small pore formations in the capillary system.

The low water vapor emission rate and relatively fast attainment of 75% IRH in lightweight concrete led to an investigation of volume change in this type of concrete. Data relating to shrinkage is set forth in Table 6.

The volume change of Table 6 was measured in standard ASTM C-157 molds during the first 24 hours. One end plate was anchored and the other plate was left free to move. The mold was lined with thin plastic to minimize friction. An additional stainless steel stud was screwed into the free end plate so that it passed through the end of the mold. A magnetically held dial micrometer stem was positioned to indicate any bar movement following initial set. The concrete bar was sealed in plastic after casting. At 24 hours the dial was read and the bar stripped from the mold, wrapped completely in 3 layers of plastic sheet with the embedded steel studs protruding. The bar was then measured in standard ASTM C-157 devices. At 7 days after casting the bar was again measured. Any change was added to the 24 hour reading and considered to constitute autogenous shrinkage. The bar was then unwrapped and allowed to dry for an additional 28 days in a standard lab environment. Drying shrinkage was computed by comparing the 7 day dimension to the one obtained after 28 days of drying. A negative number indicates expansion.


TABLE 6
Dry
Dry
lbs
lbs
Normal
Modified LW HPC
Cement
600
400
GGBFS
0
400
Type F Ash
200
0
Sand
1250
1400
1/2″ lightweight
0
850
Stone
1700
Water
325
325
plasticizer
14 oz.
16 oz.
W/C
0.41
0.41
PCF
151
126
AE
1.30%
1.3%
Total W/C
0.43
0.63
Agg. Water
13
186
NaNO2
0
20
NaOH
0
4
7 day autogenous %
0.016
−0.001
28 Day air dry %
0.041
−0.003
Total %
0.057
−0.004

The lightweight concrete contains plain water while the surrounding mortar contains about a 1.1-1.3 molar initial concentration of binary salts. As the cement hydrates and this concentration increases, a semi-permeable gel membrane is grown around the coarse lightweight aggregate particles. The salt imbalance causes sufficient osmotic pressure to fill in the voids that normally develop due to chemical shrinkage and thereby prevents autogenous shrinkage. This type of concrete formulation loses very little water before coming to equilibrium with a 50% RH environment. The lightweight water reserve is known to replenish this loss as well.

The osmotic pressure π, is given by van′t Hoff's formula, which is identical to the pressure formula of an ideal gas:

π=cRT

where,

    • c=molar concentration of the solute,
    • R=0.082 (liter·bar)/(deg·mol), is the gas constant, and
    • T=temperature on the absolute temperature scale (Kelvin).

For example, water that contains 78 gram/liter of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) typical of the mix in the above example, has an ionic concentration of c=2.39 mol/liter. Inserting the values into the van′t Hoff formula, for the ambient temperature T=396 K, yields the osmotic pressure:

π=2.39·0.082·296=58 bar=841 psi

The water pressure could have destructive consequences if its source were to be unlimited, but the lightweight holds a finite amount of relatively pure solvent and removal of water results in a negative partial pressure in the lightweight particle sufficient to establish equilibrium.

The data in exemplary samples of Table 7 illustrate the effect of the addition of salt to stone and lightweight aggregate concrete. The evaporation rate was measured by weighing 6×6 inch pans of concrete as they dried. Note that the addition of salt lowered the evaporation rate.


TABLE 7
Cement
300
300
250
250
lbs
GGBFS
300
300
550
550
lbs
Sand
1400
1400
1400
1400
lbs
½″ lightweight
0
0
850
850
lbs
Stone
1700
1700
0
0
lbs
Water
325
325
325
325
lbs
plasticizer
6
6
16
16
oz
W/Cs
0.54
0.54
0.41
0.41
lb/lb
Moisture loss to
73
31
12
14
lbs
75% IRH
NaNO2
0
20
35
35
lbs
NaOH
0
4
0
0
lbs

Furthermore, it has discovered that, in addition to their ability to reduce the extent of shrinkage in a cementitious mix, certain shrinkage reducing agents are capable of lowering the apparent internal relative humidity as well as reducing the moisture vapor emission rate in a cementitious mix. Without intending to be bound by theory, the presence of certain shrinkage reducing agents in the cementitious mix achieves this result by inhibiting small capillary water movement in the cementitious mix.

In an embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent is a shrinkage reducing agent having a concentration in a range of from about 0.1 wt % to about 5 wt %, preferably, from about 0.3 wt % to about 5 wt %, and, preferably, from about 0.5 wt % to about 3 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition. In certain embodiments of the invention, the shrinkage reduction agent is a liquid having a concentration in a range of from about 4 ounces to about 60 ounces, from about 6 ounces to about 48 ounces, and from about 8 ounces to about 36 ounces for every 100 pounds of cementitious composition. While the shrinkage reducing agent can be any shrinkage reducing agent known in the art, preferred shrinkage reducing agents for use in certain compositions of the invention include polypropylene glycol, any copolymers thereof, any derivatives thereof, and any combination thereof.

In certain preferred embodiments of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent comprises a shrinkage reducing agent and another compound, such as a water scavenger, for ultimately consuming the mix water. Without intending to be limiting, a shrinkage reducing agent will not necessarily act to consume the mix water. Hence, the combination of a shrinkage reducing agent and another compound capable of consuming the mix water is preferred in certain embodiments of the invention. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent comprises a shrinkage reducing agent and any of a highly reactive pozzolan; an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns; and combinations thereof. The concentration of the shrinkage reducing agent is from about 0.1 wt % to about 5 wt %, from about 0.3 wt % to about 5 wt %, and, preferably, from about 0.5 wt % to about 3 wt %, and the concentration of any of a highly reactive pozzolan, preferably, silica fume and, more preferably, metakaolin; an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, limestone having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns, and combinations thereof is from about 0.5 wt % to about 25 wt %, preferably, from about 3 wt % to about 18 wt %, and, more preferably, from about 3 wt % to about 13 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition.

Another aspect of the invention involves provides a cementitious composition or concrete composition having water soluble salts in the cement paste and cementitious mixtures by infusing a porous lightweight aggregate with a water-salt solution to yield a treated porous lightweight aggregate having improved water saturation and water retention. According to an embodiment of the invention, it may be advantageous and desirable to anticipate and accommodate the amount of water available in excess of that needed to react with the cements, as well as the resulting salt concentration in the cement paste. If water is made available to the mix by virtue of its being absorbed and then desorbed by lightweight aggregate, then the introduction of water should be anticipated by adjusting the ionic concentration.

According to an embodiment of the invention, the porous lightweight aggregates may be treated with salts or solutions of salts. The treated aggregates may be mixed with cementitious materials, admixtures, and water to manufacture various concrete mixtures, which can be used in applications where ordinary low-density concretes are suitable. In certain embodiments, pretreatment of lightweight aggregates permits retention of water in their small capillary pores, thus retaining water during storage, as well as facilitating rapid large capillary pore rewetting when making fresh concrete.

One method, according to an embodiment of the invention, involves infusing porous lightweight aggregates with water to yield treated porous lightweight aggregates having improved water saturation and water retention. This method may comprise providing a porous lightweight aggregate having pores and capillaries, and treating the porous lightweight aggregate with an aqueous solution comprising water and at least one salt. Without intending to be bound by theory, the salt may enhance penetration of aqueous solution into pores and capillaries of the porous lightweight aggregate and help retain water within the capillaries over time. In various embodiments of the invention, the porous lightweight aggregates are treated with salts by soaking or quenching the aggregates in an aqueous solution of the salt.

A porous lightweight aggregate having improved water saturation and water retention can be manufactured according to a method comprising: (1) providing a porous lightweight aggregate having pores and capillaries and (2) treating the porous lightweight aggregate with an aqueous solution comprising water and at least one salt. The at least one salt enhances penetration of the aqueous solution into the pores and capillaries of the porous lightweight aggregate and helps retain water within the capillaries over time, as compared to the porous lightweight aggregate treated with only water without the salt.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method of manufacturing freshly mixed concrete having improved workability comprising: (1) providing a porous lightweight aggregate infused with an aqueous solution comprising water and at least one salt, and (2) preparing a fresh concrete mixture by blending the porous lightweight aggregate with hydraulic cement and water. Without intending to be bound by theory, the salt may enhance penetration of the aqueous solution into pores and capillaries of the porous lightweight aggregate and help retain water within the capillaries over time compared to the porous lightweight aggregate only treated with water without the salt. The treated porous lightweight aggregate can lead to enhanced workability of fresh concrete compared to fresh concrete made using the porous lightweight aggregate without treatment with the salt.

Another aspect of the invention relates to a method of manufacturing low-density hardened concrete having improved drying characteristics, comprising: (1) providing a porous lightweight aggregate infused with an aqueous solution comprising water and at least one salt; (2) preparing a fresh concrete mixture by blending the porous lightweight aggregate with hydraulic cement and water; and (3) allowing the water to react with the hydraulic cement to form crystalline hydration products, which hardens the fresh concrete mixture to form the low-density hardened concrete. According to an embodiment of the invention, the at least one salt used in this method may lead to enhanced initial penetration of the aqueous solution into the pores and capillaries of the porous lightweight aggregate and helps retain water within the capillaries over time. The salt, according to an embodiment of the invention, may inhibit or slow diffusion of water from the porous lightweight aggregate, thereby causing the hardened concrete to more quickly achieve a desired internal humidity compared to hardened concrete made using the porous lightweight aggregate in the absence of the at least one salt. Slow release of water over time may promote internal curing of the cementitious binder, particularly at low water-to-cement ratios, thereby increasing strength and durability over time, according to certain embodiments of the invention.

An aspect of the invention provides a concrete manufactured according to the methods provided herein. In an embodiment of the invention, a concrete formed from a cementitious composition or cementitious mixture having a lightweight aggregate treated with water-soluble solutions as provided herein may result in: (1) high or nearly complete saturation of the pores and capillaries of lightweight aggregates with water during treatment, (2) prolonged water retention by the treated porous aggregates to better survive and prevent premature drying during shipment and storage, (3) improved workability of freshly mixed concrete since the infused aggregates will absorb little, if any, of the water added during mixing to provide desired workability, (4) limiting release of water and/or water vapor from the porous aggregates during and after hardening of the concrete structure, thereby enabling low-density concrete to attain and maintain a desired level of internal relative humidity (e.g., 75% or below) within a shorter period of time, and (5) slow release of water from the porous aggregates over time after the concrete has reached a desired level of internal relative humidity to promote “internal curing” of the cement binder over time, which can increase concrete strength, particularly in low water-to-cement ratio concrete.

In other embodiments of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent may comprise a water soluble salt that is an inorganic accelerator. In certain preferred embodiments of the invention, the inorganic accelerator includes one or more of an alkali metal halide salt. For example, the alkali metal halide salt may be any of a sodium halide, a potassium halide, a lithium halide, and any combination thereof. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the halide group may be represented by a chloride or a bromide. Indeed any combination of alkali metal chloride salts and alkali metal bromide salts may be included in the cementitious composition.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises an alkali metal nitrite salt. In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises any combination of the aforementioned inorganic accelerators further combined with the alkali metal nitrite salt. In certain preferred embodiments, the ratio of alkali metal halide salts to alkali metal nitrite salts is such that the halide and nitrite ion concentration is substantially the same in the cementitious mix. In other embodiments of the invention, the inorganic accelerator itself may be an alkali metal nitrite salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and any combination thereof. Pursuant to these aforementioned embodiments, the alkali metal nitrite salt may be a sodium nitrite.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the halide group may be substituted by a pseudo halogen, such as a thiocyanate. The concentration of alkali metal halide salts in the cementitious mix, expressed based on a sodium chloride equivalent, may be in a range of from about 0.2 wt % to about 4 wt %, preferably, from about 0.5 wt % to about 2.5 wt %. For example, if sodium nitrite were to be used as the inorganic accelerator in the cementitious composition, its concentration would be in a range of from about 0.24 wt % to about 4.72 wt %, preferably, from about 0.59 wt % to about 2.95 wt %—i.e., the concentrations based on sodium chloride expressed above multiplied by the molecular weight of sodium nitrite and divided by the molecular weight of sodium chloride. In certain embodiments of the invention, the sodium nitrite has a concentration at most about 7.5 wt %. In certain other preferred embodiments of the invention, the concentration of sodium nitrite is from about 1.0 wt % to about 7.5 wt %. In yet certain other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt having a concentration of from about 1.0 wt % to about 7.5 wt %. In still certain other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises at least one of a sodium nitrite having a concentration of from about 1.0 wt % to about 7.5 wt %.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the inventors have discovered that the mass-based presence of an alkali metal halide salt may be more preferred especially since the mass of the remaining cementitious mix may be influenced by the other compounds and their varying densities. For example, according to an embodiment of the invention, an amount of alkali metal halide salts in the cementitious mix may be from about 10 pounds per cubic yard (“pcy”) to about 60 pcy. In other embodiments of the invention, the amount of alkali metal halide salts in the cementitious mix may be from about 15 pcy to about 50 pcy. In still other embodiments of the invention, the amount of alkali metal halide salts in the cementitious mix may be from about 20 pcy to about 40 pcy.

According to certain embodiments of the invention, an amount of at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt in the cementitious mix may be from about 10 pcy to about 60 pcy. In other embodiments of the invention, the amount of at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt in the cementitious mix may be from about 15 pcy to about 50 pcy. In still other embodiments of the invention, the amount of at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt in the cementitious mix may be from about 20 pcy to about 40 pcy.

According to certain other embodiments of the invention, an amount of sodium nitrite in the cementitious mix may be from about 10 pcy to about 60 pcy. In other embodiments of the invention, the amount of sodium nitrite in the cementitious mix may be from about 15 pcy to about 50 pcy. In still other embodiments of the invention, the amount of sodium nitrite in the cementitious mix may be from about 20 pcy to about 40 pcy.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the amount of any of an alkali metal halide salt; at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt; or sodium nitrite may vary depending upon the type of cement used in the cementitious mix. In certain other embodiments of the invention, the amount of any of an alkali metal halide salt; at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt; or sodium nitrite may vary depending upon the types of compounds and even perhaps their concentrations in the cementitious mix. Having the benefit of this disclosure, drying curves may be developed by a person having ordinary skill in the art, similar to those shown in FIGS. 9-11, for example, which are discussed in more detail in the examples, to determine the amount of any of an alkali metal halide salt; at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt; or sodium nitrite.

By way of example, but without intending to be limiting, the drying curve of FIG. 9 shows that perhaps the most appropriate amount of sodium nitrite to be used in the cementitious mix is on the order of about 20 lb/yd3. On the other hand, the drying curve of FIG. 10 shows that for this type of cement, which is different than the cement used in the samples of FIG. 9, the most appropriate amount of sodium nitrite to be used in the cementitious mix is on the order of at least about 30 lb/yd3 or maybe up to 40 lb/yd3 depending upon the preferred drying characteristics to be achieved over time.

As further illustrated by the samples in FIG. 8, the presence of another compound of the invention may be used to reduce the amount of any of an alkali metal halide salt; at least one of an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, and an alkali metal nitrite salt; or sodium nitrite in the cementitious mix. For example, the use of 15% by weight of silica fume in the cementitious mix may reduce the amount of sodium nitrite used in the cementitious mix from about 30 lb/yd3 to about 20 lb/yd3.

The cementitious compositions of the invention may be formulated by a proper selection of any combination of a cement; a binder and/or filler, including any pozzolan; an adjuvant and/or an additive; an aggregate; and a water vapor attenuation agent, as disclosed herein. The cementitious compositions of the various embodiments of the invention may comprise a superplasticizer, even more preferably, a polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition includes a cement. In certain embodiments of the invention, the cement is any hydraulic cement. Non-limiting examples of hydraulic cements suitable for use in certain cementitious compositions of the invention include any class of Portland cement; masonry cement; alumina cement; refractory cement; magnesia cements, such as magnesium phosphate cement and magnesium potassium phosphate cement; calcium-based cements, such as calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfoaluminate cement, and calcium sulfate hemi-hydrate cement; natural cement; hydraulic hydrated lime; any complex derivative thereof; and any combination thereof.

Aggregates useful in the cementitious compositions of the invention include, but are not limited to, sand, stone, gravel, and any combination thereof. Aggregates may be further classified as coarse aggregates that include, for example, gravel, crushed stone, or iron blast furnace slag, and fine aggregates, which typically include a sand. As non-limiting examples, stone can include limestone, granite, sandstone, brownstone, river rock, conglomerate, calcite, dolomite, serpentine, travertine, slate, bluestone, gneiss, quarizitic sandstone, quartizite, and any combination thereof.

Other specialty aggregates include heavyweight aggregates and lightweight aggregates. Heavyweight aggregates can include, but are not limited to, barite, magnetite, limonite, ilmenite, iron, and steel.

Common lightweight aggregates that are found in certain embodiments of the invention include, but are not limited to, slag, fly ash, silica, shale, diatomonous shale, expanded slate, sintered clay, perlite, vermiculite, and cinders. In certain embodiments of the invention, insulating aggregates may also be used. Non-limiting examples of insulating aggregates include pumice, perlite, vermiculite, scoria, and diatomite. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition may additionally comprise any of the aggregates selected from expanded shale, expanded slate, expanded clay, expanded slag, fumed silica, pelletized aggregate, processed fly ash, tuff, and macrolite. In still other embodiments of the invention, an aggregate may comprise a masonry aggregate non-limiting examples of which include shale, clay, slate, expanded blast furnace slag, sintered fly ash, coal cinders, pumice, and scoria.

In certain embodiments of the invention, an aggregate may comprise any combination of coarse aggregates and fine aggregates. Coarse aggregates are generally considered those aggregate materials retained on a number 4 sieve. Fine aggregates are generally considered those aggregate materials that pass through the number 4 sieve. For example, refer to ASTM C33 (2007), which supersedes ASTM C33 (2003), and ASTM C125 (2007), which supersedes ASTM C 125 (2002) and ASTM C 125 (2000a) standard specifications for concrete additives for a more comprehensive description of how to distinguish between fine aggregates and coarse aggregates.

The cementitious compositions may comprise a cement replacement. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cement replacement comprises a finely divided material, preferably, the finely divided material comprising at least one of a finely divided limestone or a fine calcium carbonate whose particle size is less than about 75 microns, a finely divided pozzolan and/or slag whose particle size is less than about 75 microns, and a finely divided highly reactive pozzolan whose particle size is less than about 75 microns. In certain embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a finely divided limestone or a fine calcium carbonate. In other embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a pozzolan, which, without intending to be limiting, reacts with water and the lime released from cement hydration to form densifying calcium silicates. In certain embodiments of the invention, the pozzolan may comprise any natural pozzolan; any artificial pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; and any combination thereof. In yet other embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a ground slag, preferably, a ground granulated blast furnace slag.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a cement replacement. In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a cement replacement, the cement replacement comprising a finely divided material. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a fine calcium carbonate. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the fine calcium carbonate has a particle size of less than about 75 microns. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises limestone fines, and the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to the total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.01 to about 1.0, from about 0.03 to about 0.8, from about 0.05 to about 0.8, from about 0.2 to about 0.8, and from about 0.3 to about 0.7. In other embodiments of the invention the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to the total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.05 to about 0.4, and from about 0.1 to about 0.3. In a certain preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to the total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.03 to about 0.8.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cement replacement may comprise a densifying precursor. As used herein, the term “precursor” refers to a compound, complex or the like that, after at least one of becoming chemically activated, becoming hydrated, or through at least one other preparation step becomes converted into a desired form to serve to further densify a concrete. In certain embodiments of the invention, the densifying precursor is a densifying calcium silicate precursor.

In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a pozzolan and/or a slag. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the pozzolan and/or the slag have a particle size of less than about 75 microns. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the pozzolan and/or slag have a particle size of less than about 45 microns. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises any of a pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; a hydraulic addition, such as, for example, a ground granulated blast furnace slag; and any combination thereof, and the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.05 to about 0.8, from about 0.20 to about 0.80, and, preferably, from about 0.13 to about 0.75. In another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a highly reactive pozzolan and the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to total weight of the cementitious composition, preferably, from about 0.05 to about 0.2, and, more preferably, from about 0.06 to about 0.10. In certain embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a pozzolan selected from the group consisting of any natural pozzolan; any artificial pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; and any combination thereof.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition includes an admixture and/or additive including such admixtures or additives that function as accelerators, shrinkage reducing agents retarders, thickeners, tracers, air-entraining agents, air detraining agents, corrosion inhibitors, pigments, wetting agents, antifoaming and/or defoaming agents, any polymer that is water soluble, water repellants, fibers, damp proofing agents, gas formers, permeability reducers, pumping aids, viscosity control additives, other rheology modifying additives, fungicidal and/or germicidal agents, insecticidal agents, finely divided mineral admixtures, alkali-reactivity reducers, pH control agents and/or buffers, bonding admixtures, strength enhancing agents, shrinkage reduction agents, water reduction additives, and any mixture thereof.

In an embodiment of the invention, in addition to the water vapor attenuation agent, as further described herein, the cementitious composition comprises a cement, preferably, a hydraulic cement, having a concentration from about 10 wt % to about 80 wt %, and from about 25 wt % to about 70 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition. In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a cement, preferably, a hydraulic cement, having a concentration from about 8 wt % to about 35 wt %, from about 10 wt % to about 30 wt %, from about 12 wt % to about 25 wt %, and from about 14 wt % to about 21 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition may additionally comprise, at least one of any aggregate, a pozzolan, and any combination thereof.

Cementitious compositions of the invention may comprise porous or non-porous lightweight aggregates or admixture to reduce the density and weight of concretes formed therefrom. Porous lightweight aggregates are readily available from natural sources and are inexpensive to procure, manufacture and process. Examples of porous light-weight aggregates include, but are not limited to, slag, shale, clay, slate, expanded slag, expanded shale, expanded clay, expanded slate, expanded slag, cinders, scoria, pumice, tuff, perlite, and vermiculite.

The porous lightweight aggregate, in an embodiment of the invention, may be either structural aggregates having compression strength greater than 2500 psi, or non-structural aggregates having compression strength of 2500 psi or less. Examples of structural lightweight aggregates include shale, clay or slate expanded by rotary kiln or sintering; cinders; and expanded slag. Examples of non-structural lightweight porous aggregates include scoria, pumice, perlite and vermiculite.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a fine aggregate having a concentration from about 50 wt % to about 85 wt %, from about 60 wt % to about 80 wt %, and from about 65 wt % to about 75 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition. In another embodiment of the invention, the aggregate comprises at least one fine aggregate and at least one coarse aggregate having a weight ratio of fine aggregate to total aggregate of from about 0.25 to about 1.00, from about 0.30 to about 0.75, from about 0.35 to about 0.65, from about 0.40 to about 0.55, and from about 0.40 to about 0.50. In certain embodiments of the invention, the fine aggregate may be a porous lightweight aggregate.

The water retention of cement paste and/or lightweight aggregate and water-vapor emission of concrete may be affected by salts dissolved in solutions filling the pores of the aggregates and/or by salts directly added to cement paste, according to certain embodiments of the invention. Salts that form hydrates when exposed to water are preferred, as larger hydrate salts can be deposited in fine pores and aid in impeding water movement from cement paste and/or aggregates. Furthermore, salts having a critical relative humidity of less than 75% tend to buffer the internal relative humidity, according to certain other embodiments of the invention. If these salts react with the lime (calcium hydroxide) liberated by the cement hydration, an additional benefit may be obtained, according to an embodiment of the invention. Complementary to this, the use of low water-cementitious material (w/cm) ratios, which enhance mortar desiccation rate, will leave substantial amounts of material under-hydrated. Moisture from lightweight particles, as opposed to the pressurized water outflow into the plastic concrete as free water, in lower w/cm ratio concretes (<0.45), may create an area of more completely hydrated material in the interfacial zone. A lower permeability may result, encapsulating some of the moisture within the lightweight aggregate particle itself, thereby further preventing water vapor movement into the surrounding mortar.

Non-limiting examples of metal cations for salts used in certain embodiments of the invention include lithium, potassium, sodium, alkaline earth metals, and combinations thereof. Non-limiting examples of anions of salts used in embodiments of the invention include acetate, sulfate, thiosulfate, bromide, chloride, thiocyanate, nitrite, nitrate, hydroxide, silicate, and combinations thereof. Non-limiting examples of salts used in certain embodiments of the invention include sodium acetate (NaAc), sodium nitrate (NaNO3), sodium nitrite (NaNO2), potassium carbonate (KCO3), sodium sulfate (Na2SO4), potassium sulfate (K2SO4), sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium silicate (NaSiO3), sodium thiosulfate hydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O), and sodium thiocynate (NaSCN).

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; a ground granulated blast furnace slag; and any combination thereof having a concentration from about 5 wt % to about 30 wt %, from about 6 wt % to about 25 wt %, from about 7 wt % to about 20 wt %, and from about 13 wt % to about 17 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition. In other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a highly reactive pozzolan, such as, for example, metakaolin, silica fume, and the like, including any combinations thereof, having a concentration from about 0.1 wt % to about 5 wt %, 0.5 wt % to about 2.5 wt %, and from about 1.0 wt % to about 2.0 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition. In certain embodiments of the invention, a material selected from the group consisting of a pozzolan, a ground granulated blast furnace slag, and any combination thereof can be a very fine particulate material that reduces the voidage in the cementitious composition resulting in an improved moisture resistance of the finished concrete.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition comprises a fine calcium carbonate having a concentration from about 0.03 wt % to about 80 wt %, from about 0.05 wt % to about 25 wt %, from about 0.1 wt % to about 15 wt %, and, preferably, from about 0.13 wt % to about 7 wt % based on the total weight of the cementitious composition.

In other embodiments, the inventive cementitious composition comprises a dispersant. A non-limiting example of a dispersant includes any polycarboxylate dispersant, with or without polyether units. Polycarboxylate dispersants include those disclosed in U.S. Pat. Publ. No. 2008/0156225 to Bury, entitled “Rheology Modifying Additive for Cementitious Compositions,” fully incorporated herein by reference. Dispersants may additionally include chemicals that function as any one of a plasticizer, a water reducer, a high range water reducer, a fluidizer, an antiflocculating agent, or a superplasticizer. Exemplary superplasticizers are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Publ. No. 2008/0087199 to Gartner, entitled “Cement Shrinkage Reducing Agent and Method for Obtaining Cement Based Articles Having Reduced Shrinkage,” fully incorporated herein by reference. Dispersants may be selected that function as a superplasticizer.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition further comprises a superplasticizer. Any superplasticizer disclosed herein or otherwise known in the art may be used in the cementitious compositions of various embodiments of the invention. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer comprises a polycarboxylate admixture. A non-limiting example of a commercially available polycarboxylate superplasticizer includes GLENIUM® 3000 available from BASF Corporation. GLENIUM 3000 comprises a polymer with a carbon backbone having pendant side chains with the characteristic that at least a portion of the side chains are attached to the carbon backbone through a carboxyl group or an ether group. GLENIUM 3000 is a liquid at ambient conditions having a specific gravity of approximately 1.08.

For example, using a cementitious mix of 658 lb/yd3 of Type III cement, slump of 6 inches, air content of 5-6%, concrete temperature of 65° F., and curing temperature of 65° F., it has been reported that GLENIUM 3000 provides a greater than 2 times increase in compressive strength in concrete after 8 hours of curing and an improvement of approximately 30% after 12 hours of curing compared to that of a conventional superplasticizer. For a cementitious mix of 658 lb/yd3 of Type I cement, slump of 8-9 inches, non-air-entrained, concrete temperature of 70° F., dosage of admixtures adjusted to obtain 30% water reduction, GLENIUM 3000 has been shown to reduce the initial set time by as much as 2 hours and 33 minutes compared to that of a conventional superplasticizer.

In an embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer is in the form of a liquid. In certain embodiments of the invention, the amount of superplasticizer added to the cementitious composition is from about 2 ounces to about 30 ounces, from about 4 ounces to about 24 ounces, from about 4 ounces to about 20 ounces, and from about 8 ounces to about 20 ounces for every 100 pounds of hydraulic cement in the cementitious composition. In certain preferred embodiments of the invention, the superplasticizer added to the cementitious composition is from about 4 ounces to about 16 ounces, more preferably, about 5 ounces to about 8 ounces, and, even more preferably, about 8 ounces for every 100 pounds of hydraulic cement in the cementitious composition.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition may comprise a water reducer. A non-limiting example of a water reducer admixture includes POLYHEED® 997, an ASTM C494 type A water reducer, supplied by BASF Corporation. In certain embodiments of the invention, it is more preferred to use a water reducer with a superplasticizer in order to achieve a greater reduction in the amount of water mixed with the cementitious composition.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition may additionally comprise prepuff particles such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. Publ. No. 2008/0058446 to Guevare et al., entitled “Lightweight Concrete Compositions,” fully incorporated herein by reference. In an exemplary embodiment, the prepuff particles are polymer particles having an average particle size of at least about 0.2 mm, at least about 0.3 mm, at least about 0.5 mm, at least about 0.9 mm, and at least about 1 mm up to at most about 8 mm, at most about 6 mm, at most about 5 mm, at most about 4 mm, at most about 3 mm, and at most about 2.5 mm.

As disclosed herein, the cementitious composition is combined with water, which functions as chemical water or hydration water and as excess water that, among other things, serves to plasticize the cementitious mix to render it more flowable. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the excess water, otherwise known as water of convenience, is minimized. In other preferred embodiments of the invention, water vapor attenuation agents are selected to consume or scavenge certain amounts of the water of convenience. In yet other preferred embodiments of the invention, the water of convenience is both minimized and consumed or scavenged based on the use of certain one or more water vapor attenuation agents.

While it is well-known in the art to include additives such as a plasticizer, more preferably, a superplasticizer, in order to reduce the amount of water of convenience needed, conventionally, the dependence on excess water has not been entirely eliminated. For example, conventional cement mixtures tend to have water to cementitious ratios on the order of 0.4 or higher. Specialty formulations that include a superplasticizer have been disclosed that reduce the water to cementitious ratio to 0.25 or higher, for example, similar to those compositions disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,858,074 to Anderson et al., entitled “High Early-Strength Cementitious Composition.”

In certain embodiments, the cementitious compositions are combined with water having a water to cementitious ratio of less that about 0.5, less than about 0.4, less than about 0.35, less than about 0.3, and less than about 0.25. In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions are mixed with water in a water to cementitious ratio of about 0.2 or higher. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cementitious compositions are mixed with water in a water to cementitious ratio of from about 0.2 to about 0.25. Based on knowledge prior to the information provided in this disclosure, a person having ordinary skill in the art would have been motivated merely to minimize, within certain limits, depending on other factors, the water to cementitious ratio of the cementitious mix. However, as this disclosure teaches, the inventive cementitious compositions may be formulated with one or more water vapor attenuation agents that allow higher water to cementitious ratios while still attenuating or decreasing the rate of water vapor emissions in the cementitious mix.

Another aspect of the invention provides methods of preparing cementitious compositions. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, a cementitious composition prepared according to certain embodiments of the invention is used to further prepare a concrete having an attenuated or decreased rate of water vapor emission after curing or hardening. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition is proportioned to achieve rapid drying, which can be measured, for example, by the ASTM test procedures for vapor emissions or internal relative humidity, as described herein. In certain other embodiments of the invention, the cementitious composition is proportioned to achieve a desired property of a hardened concrete, which preferably can be measured using any of the various inventive procedures defined herein.

In an embodiment of the invention, a method for preparing a cementitious composition comprises the steps of mixing a hydraulic cement with a water vapor attenuation agent that may include any of an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns; a highly reactive pozzolan, preferably, silica fume and, more preferably, metakaolin; a shrinkage reducing agent, preferably, any one of polypropylene glycol, any copolymer thereof, any derivative thereof, and any combination thereof; an inorganic accelerator, preferably, an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal pseudo halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, preferably, sodium nitrite, and any combination thereof; and combinations thereof. In an embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent has a concentration between about 0.5% to about 18% by weight based on a total weight of cementitious compounds. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition will be used to form a cementitious mix that produces a concrete having an attenuated water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2 24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, and, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days after hardening.

In an embodiment of the invention, the method for preparing the cementitious composition may additionally include the step of adding a cement replacement. The cement replacement may comprise a finely divided material. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material has a particle size of less than about 75 microns. For example, a finely divided material having a particle size of less than about 75 microns may be the material retained on a standard sieve having 75 micron openings. Alternatively, a finely divided material having a particle size of less than about 75 microns may be the material that passes through a standard sieve having a varying plurality of openings of +/−75 micron. In another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material has a particle size of less than about 45 microns. In yet another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a material that passes through a standard sieve size of 200.

In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a fine calcium carbonate. In another embodiment of the invention the finely divided material comprises limestone fines, the limestone fines comprising calcium carbonate. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to the total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.03 to about 0.8, and, alternatively, from about 0.05 to about 0.4.

In another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material is selected from the group consisting of a pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; a ground granulated blast furnace slag; and any combination thereof. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.03 to about 0.8, and, alternatively, from about 0.15 to about 0.8.

In still another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a highly reactive pozzolan selected from the group consisting of silica fume, metakaolin, and any combination thereof. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to cement of from about 0.05 to about 0.20.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cement replacement comprises a densifying precursor. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the densifying precursor is a densifying calcium silicate precursor.

In an embodiment of the invention, the method for preparing a cementitious composition includes the step of including a superplasticizer. The superplasticizer has a concentration in a range from about 4 ounces to about 20 ounces for every 100 pounds of the total weight of the cementitious composition. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer includes a polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

In an embodiment of the invention, the method for preparing a cementitious composition additionally comprises the step of incorporating an aggregate in the cementitious composition. In an embodiment of the invention, the aggregate comprises at least one of a fine aggregate, a course aggregate, and combinations thereof.

In another embodiment of the invention, a method for preparing a cementitious composition comprises the steps of mixing a hydraulic cement with a pozzolan, an aggregate, and a water vapor attenuation agent and adding an admixture comprising a superplasticizer. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious composition is used to prepare a cementitious mix that achieves a water vapor emission rate of 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, and, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method for the treatment of porous aggregates used certain cementitious compositions or concrete compositions of the invention. In an embodiment of the invention, treatment of porous aggregates comprises heating the aggregates and quenching the hot aggregates with a solution of one or more salts. In alternative embodiments of the invention, porous aggregates may be soaked in solutions without first heating the aggregates. In other embodiments of the invention, the soaked aggregates may be boiled in the solution. In certain embodiments of the invention the solution of one or more salts is an aqueous solution. In certain embodiments of the invention, the concentration of the one or more salts in the solution is in a range of from about 1% by weight to about 20% by weight base on a total weight of the solution. In certain other embodiments of the invention, the concentration of the one or more salts in the solution is in a range of from about 5% by weight to about 20% by weight base on a total weight of the solution. In yet certain other embodiments of the invention, the concentration of the one or more salts in the solution is in a range of from about 5% by weight to about 15% by weight base on a total weight of the solution. In still certain other embodiments of the invention, the concentration of the one or more salts in the solution is in a range of from about 8% by weight to about 20% by weight base on a total weight of the solution.

In embodiments of the invention when the aggregates are heated before quenching by the solution, they can be heated to a temperature higher than 200° F., more preferably higher than 250° F., and more preferably in the range of 300-400° F. An example embodiment of the soaking or quenching solution is a solution of sodium acetate in a concentration of 1 to 2.5 mol/L. Without intending to be bound by theory, lightweight aggregates treated in this fashion may have extended moisture retention, and the resulting low-density concrete may have an accelerated speed to reach 75% internal relative humidity, improved internal curing and other enhanced concrete characteristics.

In an embodiment of the invention, a process for treating porous aggregates used in certain cementitious compositions of the invention utilizes hot finished and sized product or lightweight clinker, and quenches and cools the aggregate in an aqueous chemical bath so that a substantial amount of the capillaries of the lightweight become filled with solution. The preferred lightweight or clinker temperature is about 350° F. (177° C.). The steam, initially quench generated, may be forced into the smaller capillaries where it condenses and fills the smaller capillaries with water. The solute may become dispersed through much of this system, increasing the water vapor retention by lowering the vapor pressure and modifying the water in the micro pores (less than 0.01 mm) and in mid-range pores as relatively non-evaporable water. Because smaller pores in many lightweights may constitute a substantial amount of the total void system, this sequestered water is infused through certain methods of the invention can measurably impact the amount available to the mortar system as self-desiccation and atmospheric vapor emissions decrease the internal relative concrete humidity to the desired 75% range.

In certain embodiments of the invention, salts may be directly attached to outer surfaces of aggregates (e.g., to improve hydration of the binder). For instance, certain chemicals or vectors that effect change in the concrete as a consequence of their dissolution into the paste may be attached to the lightweight aggregate by allowing a short surface drying time and then applying the appropriate solution to the aggregate or leaving the soak or quench solution on the surface to evaporate and deposit its solute. In a preferred embodiment, an example solution to achieve this result comprises 15 wt % NaAc and 5 wt % NaCl.

An aspect of the invention provides porous lightweight aggregates treated with salt for improved water saturation and water retention manufactured. Without intending to be bound by theory, the salt is intended to enhance penetration of aqueous solution into pores and capillaries of the porous lightweight aggregate and helps retain water within the capillaries over time, as compared to porous lightweight aggregate treated with only water without the salt. Small pores of the lightweight aggregates may be filled with solutions to higher levels than typically achievable with the conventional use of water alone. The solution-filled aggregates of the invention may retain water in the pores for prolonged periods and may facilitate rewetting of larger pores. According to certain embodiments of the invention, higher levels of water saturation of the lightweight aggregates may prevent absorption of water when using a concrete pump, avoiding loss of workability or plasticity. Moreover, such treated porous aggregates yield concrete with lower internal humidity.

Another aspect of the various embodiments of the invention provides a cementitious mix comprising any of the cementitious compositions of the invention. In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious mix comprises an amount of water sufficient to provide a water to cementitious ratio of from about 0.05 to about 0.6; from about 0.1 to about 0.5; preferably, from about 0.2 to about 0.4; and, more preferably, from about 0.25 to about 0.35.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious mix comprises a hydraulic cement, an aggregate, a cement replacement, a water vapor attenuation agent, water, and a superplasticizer. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cement replacement is a densifying calcium silicate precursor. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer is a polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

According to certain embodiments of the invention, the cementitious mix comprises a hydraulic cement having a concentration from about 10 wt % to about 30 wt % based on a total weight of cementitious compounds; an aggregate having a concentration from about 25 wt % to about 70 wt % based on the total weight of cementitious compounds; a densifying calcium silicate precursor having a concentration from about 3 wt % to about 80 wt % based on the total weight of cementitious compounds; a water vapor attenuation agent having a concentration from about 0.5 wt % to about 18 wt % based on the total weight of cementitious compounds; an amount of water sufficient to provide a water to cementitious ratio of from about 0.2 to about 0.4; and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer having a concentration from about 4 ounces to about 16 ounces per 100 pounds of cementitious compounds.

In an exemplary embodiment of the invention, the cementitious mix comprises a hydraulic cement having a concentration from about 10 wt % to about 30 wt % based on a total weight of cementitious compounds; an aggregate having a concentration from about 25 wt % to about 70 wt %, preferably, from about 45 wt % to about 65 wt % based on the total weight of cementitious compounds; a densifying calcium silicate precursor having a concentration from about 3 wt % to about 80 wt %, preferably, from about 5 wt % to about 25 wt % based on the total weight of cementitious compounds; an amount of water sufficient to provide a water to cementitious ratio of from about 0.2 to about 0.4; and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer having a concentration from about 4 ounces to about 16 ounces per 100 pounds of cementitious compounds. In another embodiment of the invention, the polycarboxylate superplasticizer has a concentration of from about 5 ounces to about 8 ounces per 100 pounds of cementitious compounds. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious mix is used to prepare a concrete having an attenuated water vapor emission.

An aspect of the invention provides methods of manufacturing freshly mixed concrete having improved workability and faster surface drying. An embodiment of a method of the invention comprises: (1) adding a salt directly to the concrete mix and/or providing a porous lightweight aggregate infused with an aqueous solution comprising water and at least one salt; (2) preparing a fresh concrete mixture by blending aggregate, hydraulic cement, salt and water; and (3) permitting the concrete to harden. Without intending to be bound by theory, the salt may enhance retention of water within the cement paste capillaries and/or the pores of lightweight aggregate over time. A reduced IRH, hastened surface drying, and inhibition of autogenous and drying shrinkage may be realized in certain concrete mixes of the invention. The salt may also enhance wetting of the pores of a porous lightweight aggregates, which may result in an increased workability of the fresh concrete mixture when compared to a fresh concrete mixture conventionally made without using the salt.

When using porous aggregates, relatively brief storage of such materials in normal (50%) atmospheric relative humidity will rapidly desiccate particles saturated only with plain water. In contrast, aggregates infused with aqueous salt solution of the invention loses water by evaporation at a slower rate and quickly rehydrates as large voids refill with water to a saturated condition upon contact with concrete mix water. The need for additional mix water to compensate for pump pressure workability loss may also be minimized. Further, the concrete mix can better accommodate the use of super-plasticizers since the loss of the more efficient plasticized mix water under the influence of pump pressure is minimized. Plasticizers can reduce water contents by 10% or more, thereby speeding the internal drying process.

After the fresh concrete mixture exits the concrete pump, the salt prevents air-pressurized water from being released back to the non-aggregate components of the concrete, which allows the fresh concrete to maintain desired workability and avoid problems associated with excess water, such as bleeding and segregation. Furthermore, the salt inhibits or slows diffusion of water from the porous lightweight aggregate and cement paste, thereby causing the hardened concrete to more quickly achieve a desired internal humidity (e.g., 75% or less) compared to hardened concrete made in the absence of the salt.

Furthermore, the water contained in pores of lightweight aggregates may be gradually released and react with cementitious binder materials after the concrete reaches a desired internal relative humidity, which results in prolonged hydration and internal curing and a resulting increase in long-term strength of the concrete manufactured using the cementitious compositions or according to certain methods of the invention.

When structural lightweight aggregates are used to make low-density concretes according to the disclosed inventive processes, the resulting concrete would have density and compressive strength suitable for structural application, with density in the range of 80-120 lb/ft3 (pcf) and compressive strength in the range of 2500-6000 psi. When non-structural lightweight aggregates are used, concretes are suitable as fill concrete or insulating concrete when the density is in the range of 50-90 pcf and compressive strength 1000-2000 psi; or as insulating concrete when density is smaller than 50 pcf and compressive strength is in the range of 300-1000 psi.

Another aspect of various embodiments of the invention provides methods of preparing a concrete structure using cementitious compositions of the invention to form a concrete having an attenuated or reduced water vapor emission upon hardening. In an embodiment of the invention, a particular curing regimen may be applied to a poured cementitious mix that allows any excess water to be more quickly emitted or dissipated as the concrete cures or hardens resulting in a reduced or an attenuated water vapor emission after hardening resulting in a concrete that achieves a water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 50 days, less than or equal to about 36 days, less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 28 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days, and, yet even more preferably, less than or equal to about 7 days.

In an embodiment of the invention, a method for preparing a concrete structure using a cementitious composition comprises the steps of mixing a hydraulic cement and a water vapor attenuation agent; adding any of a cement replacement, an admixture, and a superplasticizer; and blending an amount of water into the cementitious composition to prepare a cementitious mix. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious mix will produce a hardened concrete having an attenuated water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2 24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 50 days, less than or equal to about 36 days, less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 28 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days, and, yet even more preferably, less than or equal to about 7 days.

In yet another embodiment of the invention, a method for preparing a concrete structure using a cementitious composition comprises the steps of providing the cementitious composition having a hydraulic cement, a water vapor attenuation agent, optionally, a cement replacement, and, optionally, a superplasticizer; and blending an amount of water into the cementitious composition to prepare a cementitious mix. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious mix will produce a hardened concrete having an attenuated water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 50 days, less than or equal to about 36 days, less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 28 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days, and, yet even more preferably, less than or equal to about 7 days.

Generally, the method of using the cementitious composition additionally comprises the steps of using the cementitious mix to form a cementitious segment or a preform of the concrete structure and curing the cementitious segment or preform of the concrete structure to a hardened concrete. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious segment may be subjected to additional processing steps. For example, a trowel may be applied to the cementitious segment to, for example, smooth the surface of the cementitious segment and/or to even the distribution of the cementitious mix in a form.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the methods of use may additionally comprise the step of applying a regimen and/or technique that facilitates a more rapid curing of the cementitious mix to a hardened concrete. Any technique known in the art may be used to more rapidly cure the cementitious mix. Non-limiting examples of such techniques include applying a moisture barrier between a moisture source and the formed cementitious segment; maintaining the movement of air at the surface of the cementitious segment being cured to ensure water that evolves from the segment is removed; heating, for example, with thermal and/or radiant heat, the cementitious segment being cured; and controlling humidity between the moisture barrier and the formed cementitious segment by the maintaining and heating steps.

In an embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent may include any of an ultrafine calcium carbonate, preferably, having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns; a highly reactive pozzolan, preferably, silica fume and, more preferably, metakaolin; a shrinkage reducing agent, preferably, any one of polypropylene glycol, any copolymer thereof, any derivative thereof, and any combination thereof; an inorganic accelerator, preferably, an alkali metal halide salt, an alkali metal pseudo halide salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, an alkali metal nitrate salt, preferably, sodium nitrite, and any combination thereof; and combinations thereof. In an embodiment of the invention, the water vapor attenuation agent has a concentration between about 0.5% to about 18% by weight based on a total weight of cementitious compounds.

In an embodiment of the invention, the cement replacement comprises a finely divided material. In certain embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material has a particle size of less than about 75 microns. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material is a material that passes through a standard sieve size of 200.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a cement replacement. In an embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a fine calcium carbonate. In another embodiment of the invention the finely divided material comprises limestone fines, the limestone fines comprising calcium carbonate. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to the total weight of the cementitious composition of from about 0.03 to about 0.8, more preferably, from about 0.07 to about 0.4.

In another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material is selected from the group consisting of a pozzolan, such as, for example, a fly ash; a ground granulated blast furnace slag; and any combination thereof. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to cement of from about 0.15 to about 0.8.

In still another embodiment of the invention, the finely divided material comprises a highly reactive pozzolan selected from the group consisting of silica fume, metakaolin, and any combination thereof. Further to this embodiment, the cementitious composition has a ratio by weight of finely divided material to cement of from about 0.06 to about 0.105.

In certain embodiments of the invention, the cement replacement comprises a densifying precursor. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the densifying precursor is a densifying calcium silicate precursor.

In an embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer has a concentration in a range from about 4 ounces to about 20 ounces for every 100 pounds of hydraulic cement in the cementitious composition. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the superplasticizer at least includes a polycarboxylate superplasticizer.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the amount of water and a ratio by weight of the water vapor attenuation agent to the hydraulic cement, which may encompass any of the other compounds as disclosed herein, are proportioned to hydrolyze the cementitious composition and allow the prepared cementitious mix to achieve a desired level of plasticity. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the amount of water and a ratio by weight of the water vapor attenuation agent and/or finely divided material to the hydraulic cement, which may encompass any of the other compounds as disclosed herein, are proportioned to achieve a desired level of plasticity while achieving a desired property of the concrete. In certain embodiments, the desired property of the concrete is any of minimizing an amount of time needed to achieve a water vapor emission of the concrete, minimizing an amount of time needed to achieve an internal relative humidity of the concrete, a reduced shrinkage of the concrete, a maximum heat of hydration, and any combination thereof. Without intending to be limiting, a reduced shrinkage of the concrete will reduce the curling or warping of the concrete when used in flooring applications and allow for better control of joint spacing between concrete segments.

In an embodiment of the invention, the method for preparing a cementitious composition additionally comprises the step of incorporating an aggregate into the cementitious composition. In an embodiment of the invention, the aggregate comprises at least one of a fine aggregate, a course aggregate, and any combination thereof.

In another embodiment of the invention, a method for preparing a cementitious composition comprises the steps of mixing a hydraulic cement with a water vapor attenuation agent, a pozzolan and an aggregate, adding an admixture comprising a superplasticizer, and blending an amount of water into the cementitious composition to prepare a cementitious mix. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the cementitious mix will produce a hardened concrete having an attenuated water vapor emission rate of between about 3 lb/1000 ft2 24 h to about 5 lb/1000 ft2·24 h in less than or equal to about 50 days, less than or equal to about 36 days, less than or equal to about 30 days, less than or equal to about 28 days, less than or equal to about 25 days, less than or equal to about 21 days, less than or equal to about 18 days, preferably, less than or equal to about 15 days, more preferably, less than or equal to about 12 days, even more preferably, less than or equal to about 10 days, and, yet even more preferably, less than or equal to about 7 days.

The combination of steps for preparing a cementitious composition for use in preparing a concrete structure may be varied depending upon the desired application of the finished concrete structure. For example, in many circumstances, a concrete structure used in flooring must assure that a dry substrate is available allowing a coating and/or sealant to be applied within a reasonable amount of time. While not intending to be limiting, the compositions and methods of the invention are suitable for such applications because they provide a relatively fast drying cementitious mix with an attenuated or reduced water vapor emissions after cure. Typically, the cementitious mixes for such applications are typically characterized by an appropriate mix of cementitious compounds—i.e., cement(s), slag(s), water vapor attenuation agent(s), and/or pozzolans—available to react with the residual water allowing the water vapor emissions to be reduced to about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h and an internal relative humidity of about 75% to be achieved in 45 days. The rule-of-thumb for more conventional compositions is 1 month for every inch of concrete thickness (e.g., 5 months for a commonly used 5 inch concrete structure).

Another aspect of the invention provides cementitious compositions manufactured using any of the aforementioned methods of the invention. Yet another aspect of the invention provides a concrete manufactured using any of the aforementioned methods of the invention.

As disclosed herein, the critical parameters for achieving a relatively fast drying concrete using the cementitious compositions of the inventions and methods as disclosed herein include any of the water to cementitious ratio; employing a curing technique that is adequate to assure eventual water impermeability; type and amount of the one or more water vapor attenuation agents included in the cementitious composition; optionally, the use of a sufficiently fine material to create a dense mass; and any combination thereof.

As a person having ordinary skill in the art having the benefit of this disclosure would understand, care must be exercised in blending any pozzolan in order to control the heat of hydration, or else thermal cracking of the concrete could become problematic rendering, for the most part, the use of any pozzolan virtually ineffective. As a person having ordinary skill in the art having the benefit of this disclosure would further understand, care must also be exercised in proportioning and compounding the cementitious mix. For example, a cementitious mix that is too sticky will be difficult to pump and finish using conventional techniques.

EXAMPLES

Examples 1-2

The purpose of the tests in EX. 1 were to demonstrate the effect of the concentration of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer and the use of a water reducer on the use of chemically bound water and the extent of shrinkage realized by the concrete sample mixes of Table 8.


TABLE 8
Sample 1
Sample 2
Sample 3
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Portland Cement, Type I-II, lb
800
517
611
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,300
1,525
1,500
1 inch Stone, ASTM C33, lb
1,850
1,850
1,850
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16.0
8.0
POLYHEED 997, oz/100 lb cement
5.3
Water, lb
225
290
228
water to cement ratio
0.28
0.56
0.37
Air Content, %
1.7
3.4
5.4
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
155
147
148
Yield, ft3/yd3
26.9
28.1
28.1
Slump, inches
>6.00
4.25
5.25

The data in Table 9 shows the shrinkage results for the concrete mixes of the examples. The specimens were tested according to the ASTM C157 (2006) protocol. Each shrinkage sample was cured at 73° F. and 100% humidity for 24 hours, and followed by a curing step while immersed in water for 7 days. Drying was conducted at 50% relative humidity and 73° F.


TABLE 9
Sample 1
Sample 2
Sample 3
Days Drying
Shrinkage, %
14
0.0133
0.0193
0.0133
21
0.0203
0.0290
0.0183
28
0.0227
0.0343
0.0217
35
0.0243
0.0387
0.0230
42
0.0303
0.0487
0.0300
56
0.0350
0.0560
0.0353

The cementitious composition of sample 2, which uses a water reducer instead of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer shows the greatest amount of shrinkage. The cementitious compositions of samples 1 and 3 show that the amount of shrinkage can be somewhat maintained with varying concentrations of cement in the composition by changing the proportion of superplasticizer to control the water.

The purpose of the test in EX. 2 was to show that the need for additional water with an increasing concentration of cement in a cementitious composition can be offset by increasing the use of a superplasticizer and also by increasing the concentration of the superplasticizer in the cementitious composition. As the sample mixes illustrated in Table 8 show, sample 3 has 94 lbs more concrete than sample 2, and yet has a much smaller demand for water as a result of using a superplasticizer versus that of using a water reducer. Sample 1 contains 189 lbs more cement than sample 3 and yet has a lower water to cementitious ratio as are result of increasing the concentration of superplasticizer in the cementitious composition.

Example 3

The purpose of the tests in EX. 3 were to demonstrate the effect of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer on the reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a desired rate of water vapor emissions using the concrete sample mixes of Table 10.


TABLE 10
Sample 4
Sample 5
Sample 6
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Portland Cement, Type I-II, lb
800
517
611
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,300
1,525
1,500
1 inch Stone, ASTM C33, lb
1,850
1,850
1,850
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16.0
8.0
POLYHEED 997, oz/100 lb cement
5.3
Water, lb
225
281
228
water to cement ratio
0.28
0.54
0.37
Air Content, %
3.4
N/A
5.6
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
155
146
147
Yield, ft3/yd3
27.0
28.2
28.2
Slump, inches
>6.00
4.50
5.00

The curing data and number of days required to achieve a water vapor emission rate of 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 hr shown in Table 11 were obtained by casting each of the samples in a 2 foot×2 foot×5½ inch deep panel lined with polyethylene. Immediately prior to initial set, each panel was given a steel trowel finish and sealed for the noted cure period at 73° F. Following the cure period, the concrete slabs were unsealed and allowed to dry at 50% relative humidity and 73° F. in a drying room. The water vapor emissions data was obtained by averaging two calcium chloride dome tests conducted according to the ASTM F1869 test standard.


TABLE 11
Sample 4
Sample 5
Sample 6
Curing Time, days
28
28
28
Drying Time needed for
17
>50
22
3 lb/1000 ft2.24 hr Emissions, days

The mixture of sample 5 has a water to cementitious ratio that is greater than that of samples 4 and 6; however, the sample requires greater than 50 days drying in order to achieve a water vapor emissions rate of 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 hr. The mix of sample 6 shows a superplasticizer helps to attenuate the water vapor emissions over that of the water reducer used in the mix of sample 5. Sample 4 shows that increasing the concentration of the superplasticizer further reduces the amount of drying time needed to achieve the desired water vapor emissions rate.

Example 4

The purpose of the tests in EX. 4 were to demonstrate the effect of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer along with the presence of a reactive pozzolan on the amount of time needed to reduce the internal relative humidity to a desired value using the concrete sample mixes of Table


TABLE 12
Sample 7
Sample 8
Sample 9
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Hanson Cement, Type I-II, lb
517
740
740
Silica Fume, lb
60
Metakaolin, lb
60
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,525
1,200
1,200
Sand, ASTM C33 #67, lb
1,950
1,950
1,950
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16.2
16.2
POLYHEED 997, oz/100 lb cement
5.0
Colloid Defoamer, oz
0.5
0.5
0.5
Water, lb
264
186
197
water to cement ratio
0.51
0.23
0.25
Mix Temperature, ° F.
65
66
67
Air Content, %
1.3
3.6
1.1
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
152
156
156
Yield, ft3/yd3
28.1
26.5
26.7
Slump, inches
5.75
flowing
flowing

Each sample was cast in a 2 foot×2 foot×5½inch deep panel lined with polyethylene. Immediately prior to initial set, each panel was given a steel trowel finish and sealed for a 13-day cure period at 73° F. Following the cure period, the concrete slabs were unsealed and allowed to dry at 50% relative humidity and 73° F. in a drying room. The relative humidity was obtained according to the ASTM F 2170 test procedure using in situ probes. The curing data and number of days required to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75% for the cured concrete samples are shown in Table 13.


TABLE 13
Sample 7
Sample 8
Sample 9
Curing Time, days
13
13
13
Drying Time needed to Achieve
>63
28
28
75% Relative Humidity, days

The cementitious composition of sample 7, which used only the water reducer, produced a concrete having an internal relative humidity of 87.3% at the end of 63 days. Samples 8 and 9 comprising silica fume and metakaolin, respectively, as well as a superplasticizer produced a concrete that required only 28 days of drying time to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75%.

Example 5

The purpose of the tests in EX. 5 were to demonstrate the effect of partial substitution with a finely divided material (finely divided limestone) generally smaller than a U.S. standard sieve size 200. The sieve produced a finely divided material having a particle size of less than about 75 microns. #3 limestone fines represent a finely divided reactive material, the ASTM C33 sand is a fine aggregate, and the Cupertino lime is a coarse aggregate. Samples 10, 11, and 12 of Table 14 also include a superplasticizer.


TABLE 14
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
10
11
12
13
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Cement, lb
500
500
800
500
#3 Limestone Fines, lb
270
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,700
1,510
1,450
1,470
Cupertino Lime, St.
1,800
1,800
1,800
1,800
¾, lb
GLENIUM 3000,
16
 16
 16
oz/100 lb cement
POLYHEED 997,
5
oz/100 lb cement
Water, lb
213
172
200
269
water to cement ratio
0.43
   0.34
   0.25
0.54
Mix Time, min
20
 17
 14
10
Mix Temperature, ° F.
82
 86
 89
88
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
153
157
157
150
Yield, ft3/yd3
27.5
  27.1
  27.1
26.9
Slump (Spread), inches
5
 (24)
 (27)

The number of days required to achieve a water vapor emission rate of 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 hr for the cementitious mixes shown in Table 14 were obtained by casting each of the samples in a 2 foot×2 foot×5½ inch deep panel lined with polyethylene. The plates, not subjected to a sealed cure time, were allowed to dry at 50% relative humidity and 73° F. in a drying room. The water vapor emissions data were obtained by using the calcium chloride dome tests according to the ASTM F1869 test standard. The results are shown in Table 15.


TABLE 15
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
10
11
12
13
Drying Time needed for
>53
36
36
>53
3 lb/1000 ft2 · 24 hr
Emissions, days

As this data shows, the addition of a finely divided calcium carbonate enables the amount of excess water to be further reduced.

Example 6

The purpose of the tests in EX. 6 were to demonstrate the effect of partial substitution with a finely divided material (finely divided ground granulated blast furnace slag and finely divided type F fly ash) generally smaller than a U.S. standard sieve size 200 or particles having a size less than about 75 microns along with a superplasticizer in the cementitious compositions using the sample mixes of Table 16.


TABLE 16
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
14
15
16
17
18
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Cement, lb
800
600
400
560
680
Ground Slag, lb
200
400
Fly Ash - Type F, lb
240
120
Sand, lb
1,300
1,300
1,300
1,300
1,300
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
8
8
8
8
8
Water, lb
195
190
190
210
198
water to cement ratio
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.26
0.25
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
151
150
149
144
148
Yield, cc3
950
957
960
1006
971
Slump (Spread), inches
flowing
flowing
flowing
flowing
flowing

The sample mixes were analyzed using the mortar method, as further disclosed herein. Mortar of the same workability level as the concrete of the investigation was mixed and cast in 6 inch×6 inch plastic pans to a depth of 1⅝ inches. The samples were cured unsealed for 24 hours and then sealed for a 14-day cure. Vapor loss measurements were determined based on the changes in weight of the samples and is reported in Table 17.


TABLE 17
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
14
15
16
17
18
Total Water Vapor
3.7
2.9
4.4
7.4
5.6
Loss, gr

Increasing the amount of ground granulated blast furnace slag, as shown in samples 15 and 16, resulted in the same water to cementitious ratio and produced a vapor loss in the same range as sample 14, the control mix. Substitution of type F fly ash in samples 17 and 18 resulted in progressively higher vapor emissions over the curing period, but represent rates that still are within a satisfactory range.

Example 7

The sample mixes of Tables 18A & 18B were used to analyze the variations in water loss measured from the 6 inch×6 inch mortar samples pans for mixes comprising cements and sands from five different regions. The average vapor loss for these samples was 6.34, while the standard deviation for the sample was 1.08.


TABLE 18A
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
19
20
21
22
23
Cement, gr
Permanente, CA
650
Maryland
650
Texas
650
Michigan
650
Tennessee
650
Sand, gr
Seacheldt
1,430
1,430
1,430
1,430
1,430
Maryland
Texas
Michigan
Tennessee
Glenium 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16
16
16
16
16
Water, gr
190
208
208
216
210
water to cement ratio
0.29
0.32
0.32
0.33
0.32
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
149
148
148
146
147
Yield, cc3
953
968
967
985
976
Slump, inches
8.0
6.3
6.0
5.5
5.5
Mix Temperature, ° F.
75.0
76.0
75.0
76.0
75.0
Vapor Loss, gr
8.0
6.3
6.0
5.5
5.5


TABLE 18B
Sample
Sample
Sample
Sample
24
25
26
27
Cement, gr
Permanente, CA
Maryland
650
Texas
650
Michigan
650
Tennessee
650
Sand, gr
Seacheldt
Maryland
1,430
Texas
1,430
Michigan
1,430
Tennessee
1,430
Glenium 3000,
35
16
16
16
oz/100 lb cement
Water, gr
224
204
216
206
water to cement ratio
0.34
0.32
0.33
0.32
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
144
148
146
149
Yield, cc3
1003
970
988
960
Slump, inches
5.0
8.0
5.5
7.3
Mix Temperature, ° F.
75.0
76.0
75.0
75.0
Vapor Loss, gr
5.0
8.0
5.5
7.3

Examples 8-9

The purpose of the tests in EX. 8 were to demonstrate the effect of the concentration of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer and the use of a water reducer on the use of chemically bound water and the extent of shrinkage realized by the concrete sample mixes of Table 19.


TABLE 19
Sample 28
Sample 29
Sample 30
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Portland Cement, Type I-II, lb
800
517
611
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,300
1,525
1,500
1 inch Stone, ASTM C33, lb
1,850
1,850
1,850
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16.0
8.0
POLYHEED 997, oz/100 lb cement
5.3
Water, lb
225
290
228
water to cement ratio
0.28
0.56
0.37
Air Content, %
1.7
3.4
5.4
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
155
147
148
Yield, ft3/yd3
26.9
28.1
28.1
Slump, inches
>6.00
4.25
5.25

The data in Table 20 shows the shrinkage results for the concrete mixes of the examples. The specimens were tested according to the ASTM C157 (2006) protocol. Each sample was cured at 73° F. and 100% relative humidity for 24 hours, and followed by a curing step while immersed in water for 7 days. Drying was conducted at 50% relative humidity and 73° F.


TABLE 20
Sample 28
Sample 29
Sample 30
Days Drying
Shrinkage, %
14
0.0133
0.0193
0.0133
21
0.0203
0.0290
0.0183
28
0.0227
0.0343
0.0217
35
0.0243
0.0387
0.0230
42
0.0303
0.0487
0.0300
56
0.0350
0.0560
0.0353

The cementitious composition of sample 29, which uses a water reducer instead of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer, shows the greatest amount of shrinkage. The cementitious compositions of samples 28 and 30 show that the amount of shrinkage can be somewhat maintained with varying concentrations of cement in the composition by changing the proportion of superplasticizer to control the water.

The purpose of the test in EX. 9 was to show that the need for additional water with an increasing concentration of cement in a cementitious composition can be offset by increasing the use of a superplasticizer and also by increasing the concentration of the superplasticizer in the cementitious composition. As the sample mixes illustrated in Tables 19 and 20 show, sample 30 has 94 lbs more concrete than sample 29, and yet has a much smaller demand for water as a result of using a superplasticizer versus using a water reducer. Sample 28 contains 189 lbs more cement than sample 30 and yet has a lower water to cement ratio as a result of increasing the concentration of superplasticizer in the cementitious composition.

Examples 10-12

The purposes of the tests in EXS. 10-12 were to demonstrate the effects of a shrinkage reducing agent on the reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a desired rate of water vapor emissions, the autogenous shrinkage, and a reduced apparent weight loss due to water vapor using the mortar method with the concrete sample mixes in Table 21.


TABLE 21
Sample 31
Sample 32
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
cement, lb/yard
balance
balance
metakaolin, lb/yard
60
60
polypropylene glycol, oz/yard
190
water to cement ratio
same
same

The data in Table 22 shows the moisture vapor emission rate (MVER) in measurement units of lb/1000 ft2·24 h over the drying cycle. The MVER is measured using the ASTM F1869 test standard.


TABLE 22
Sample 31
Sample 32
Days Drying
MVER, lb/1000 ft2 · 24 h
4
7.2
4.0
8
5.6
3.2
11
3.7
2.5

Sample 32, the concrete mix with polypropylene glycol, the shrinkage reducing agent, shows an accelerated attenuation of the moisture vapor emission rate over the drying cycle.

The relative humidity, obtained according to the ASTM F 2170 test procedure, for these two samples over the drying cycle is shown in Table 23.


TABLE 23
Sample 31
Sample 32
Days Drying
Relative Humidity, psi
4
79.0
75.9
7
82.0
81.0
8
81.0
80.0
11
82.0
75.0

The difference in relative humidity supports a showing of acceleration in water reduction over the curing cycle for the sample having the shrinkage reducing agent.

The loss in 6×6 inch pan weight attributable to water over the drying cycle is shown in Table 24.


TABLE 24
Sample 31
Sample 32
Low
Average
High
Low
Average
High
Days Drying
Loss in Pan Weight, lb
1
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
−0.94
−0.99
−1.02
−0.22
−0.44
−0.64
6
−1.32
−1.34
−1.36
−0.51
−0.68
−0.86
8
−1.65
−1.69
−1.71
−0.68
−0.86
−1.07
11
−2.11
−2.17
−2.19
−0.61
−0.86
−1.14

The apparent weight loss for the sample having the shrinkage reducing agent is reduced over the drying cycle further confirming that propylene glycol, the shrinkage reducing agent, acts to decrease the rate of water vapor emissions from the concrete.

Example 13

The purpose of the test in EX. 13 was to demonstrate the effect of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer along with the presence of a reactive pozzolan on the amount of time needed to reduce the internal relative humidity to a desired value using the concrete sample mixes of Table 25.


TABLE 25
Sample 33
Sample 34
Sample 35
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
Hanson Cement, Type I-II, lb
517
740
740
Silica Fume, lb
60
Metakaolin, lb
60
Sand, ASTM C33, lb
1,525
1,200
1,200
Sand, ASTM C33 #67, lb
1,950
1,950
1,950
GLENIUM 3000, oz/100 lb cement
16.2
16.2
POLYHEED 997, oz/100 lb cement
5.0
Colloid Defoamer, oz
0.5
0.5
0.5
Water, lb
264
186
197
water to cement ratio
0.51
0.23
0.25
Mix Temperature, ° F.
65
66
67
Air Content, %
1.3
3.6
1.1
Density, lb/ft3 (pcf)
152
156
156
Yield, ft3/yd3
28.1
26.5
26.7
Slump, inches
5.75
flowing
flowing

Each sample was cast in a 2 foot×2 foot×5½inch deep panel lined with polyethylene. Immediately prior to initial set, each panel was given a steel trowel finish and sealed for a 13-day cure period at 73° F. Following the cure period, the concrete slabs were unsealed and allowed to dry at 50% relative humidity and 73° F. in a drying room. The relative humidity was obtained according to the ASTM F 2170 test procedure using in situ probes. The curing data and number of days required to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75% for the cured concrete samples are shown in Table 26.


TABLE 26
Sample 33
Sample 34
Sample 35
Curing Time, days
13
13
13
Drying Time needed to Achieve
>63
28
28
75% Relative Humidity, days

The cementitious composition of sample 33, which used only the water reducer, produced a concrete having an internal relative humidity of 87.3% at the end of 63 days. Samples 34 and 35 comprising silica fume and metakaolin, respectively, as well as a superplasticizer produced a concrete that required only 28 days of drying time to achieve an internal relative humidity of 75%.

Example 14

The purpose of the tests in EX. 14 were to demonstrate the effects of an ultrafine calcium carbonate—i.e., limestone having an average particle size less than or equal to about 3 microns—and a highly reactive pozzolan on the reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a desired rate of water vapor emissions using the concrete sample mixes of Table 27.


TABLE 27
Sample 36
Sample 37
Sample 38
Sample 39
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
mortar, lb/yard
balance
balance
balance
balance
3 micron limestone
0
50
100
0
metakaolin, lb/yard
0
0
0
50
water to cement ratio
same
same
same
same
curing time, days
45
28
14
7

The drying results for these mixes were determined by the mortar method using 6×6 inch pans.

As the data in Table 27 shows, the overall curing time needed to achieve a water vapor emission rate of about 3 lb/1000 ft2·24 h is reduced by including 3 micron limestone (i.e., limestone having an average particle size of less than or equal to about 3 microns) and metakaolin in the cementitious mix. Increasing amounts of 3 micron limestone further decreases the number of days required to dry the mixture. Metakaolin of sample 39 provides a larger reduction in drying time than the 3 micron limestone of samples 37 and 38 when measured on a weight basis.

Example 15

The purpose of the tests in EX. 15 was to demonstrate the effect of an inorganic accelerator on the reduction in relative humidity for the cementitious compositions using the sample mixes of Table 28.


TABLE 28
Sample 40
Sample 41
Sample 42
Compound/Property
Concrete Mix
cement, lb/yard
balance
balance
balance
sodium chloride, lb/yard
 0
11
20
water to cement ratio
same
same
same
days to 75% relative humidity
29
19
17

As shown by samples 41 and 42 over control sample 40, concrete mixtures comprising sodium chlorides as an inorganic accelerator, indeed, even increasing amounts of the use of the sodium chloride, show a reduction in the amount of time needed to achieve a 75% relative humidity.

Example 16

The purpose of the tests in EX. 16 was to demonstrate the improvement in water retention of lightweight aggregates treated with the various aqueous solutions. In EX. 16, lightweight aggregates were heated, quenched, air dried, and re-immersed in water or solutions. Lightweight aggregates of ⅜ inch average diameter were heated to 350° F., then quenched in 7 different chemical solutions in Samples 44-50, which were aqueous solutions containing one of NaNO3, NaNO2, K2CO3, NaAc, Na2SO4, K2SO4 and NaCl, respectively in each of the samples. Concentrations of the solutions were 2.4 mol/L, except for K2SO4 (Sample 46), which was less than 2.4 molar due to solubility limitations. A water quenched aggregate was provided as a control in Sample 43. The aggregates were allowed to lab air dry at standard conditions for 27 hours, at 73+/−3° F. and 50% relative humidity.

The efficacy of water retention of the aggregates is inversely indicated by weight percentage of water loss as shown in FIG. 1. The anhydrous sodium acetate (NaAc) of Example 5 reduced the water evaporation to about 41% of that of plain water.

The same aggregates as in Samples 44-50 were re-immersed in water for 30 minutes after being allowed to dry, which is the normal delivery time for ready-mixed concrete. The solution treated aggregates of these Samples 51-57 not only lost less water during drying as indicated in FIG. 1, but also re-absorbed more water when re-immersed for 30 minutes, as indicated in FIG. 2, which plots the unfilled water weight percentage relative to the weight of the aggregates. Assuming the 25% weight gain by quenching with solution indicates full saturation of the lightweight, the graph displays the remaining capillary space in the lightweight after being placed in the concrete mix prior to pump delivery.

The usual weight of lightweight coarse aggregate per cubic yard of concrete ranges from 750 to 900 pounds. If the sodium acetate treated material of Sample 47 were pumped at high pressure, it is estimated that the absorption of free water by the aggregates would be about 28-34 pounds. If the water quenched material of Sample 43 were to be utilized, the potential absorption of free water by the aggregates would be about 73-88 pounds.

Solution quenching or soaking lightweight aggregates, therefore, will prolong moisture condition during transport and storage. In addition, the air space in the pores of treated lightweight aggregates can be more easily and fully filled with water, reducing the quantity and rate of water emissions from the concrete in which they are contained.

Example 17

The purpose of the tests in EX. 17 was to demonstrate that even partially filling the lightweight pores with various ionic solutes resulted in lower levels of water vapor emission in the low-density concrete products. The water-cement ratio was <0.45 in added water based on saturated surface dried (SSD) aggregates. The water in the lightweight (not included in this calculation) was about 60 additional pounds. The emissions were obtained from the same concrete mix using differing solute-treated lightweight coarse aggregates. All aggregates were boiled and cooled in solution, or in the case of the tap water, were soaked for 7 days. The concretes were flushed to remove external deposits and then cast in 6×6×2.5 inch rectangular pans, sealed for 3 days to cure and then weighed at intervals to measure moisture vapor emissions until they reached the same level of moisture content of 7.8% of dry weight. Vapor loss measurements were determined based on the changes in weight of the samples and is shown in FIG. 3. The temperature was 73° F.+/−3 and about 50% relative humidity.

As shown in FIG. 3, water and four salt solutions were used to treat the aggregates: tap water (H2O, Sample 51), sodium silicate 8 wt % aqueous solution (NaSi, Sample 52), 20 wt % aqueous solution of anhydrous sodium acetate (NaAc, Sample 53), 20 wt % aqueous solution of potassium sulfate (K2SO4, Sample 54), and 20 wt % aqueous solution of potassium carbonate (K2CO3, Sample 55). While the concrete made with NaAc treated aggregates (Sample 53) has a water vapor emission of about 12 grams, the concrete made with tap water treated aggregates (Sample 51) has a water vapor emission of about 30 grams.

Example 18

Certain vectors or chemicals that effect change in the concrete as a consequence of their dissolution into the paste may be attached to the lightweight aggregate by allowing a short surface drying time and then applying the appropriate solution to the aggregate or leaving the soak or quench solution on the surface to evaporate and deposit its solute.

The purpose of the tests in EX. 18 was to demonstrate the advantage of using the absorbent lightweight as a carrier or vector for materials that accelerate hydration of the cementitious medium thereby promoting densification and hydration. FIG. 4 shows water vapor emission of concrete made from aggregates treated by tap water (Sample 56) and four solutions (Samples 57-60), wherein aggregates were soaked in water (Sample 56) or boiled in aqueous solutions (Samples 57, 58, and 59) or partially dried then dipped in an aqueous solution of 15% NaAc and 5% NaCl (Sample 60).

Vapor loss measurements are provided in FIG. 4 for concretes made from boiled and soaked aggregates versus dipped aggregates. The measurements were determined based on the changes in weight of the samples. In contrast to Samples 51-55, aggregates were not flushed before being blended in concrete mixtures.

The “NaAC/NaCl” dipped Sample 60 portrays concrete made with a lightweight partially dried (1.8% internal moisture), immersed for 5 seconds in the noted solution, allowed to surface dry, and placed in a concrete mix proportioned the same as the other samples. The noted solution is an aqueous solution with 15 wt % of sodium acetate and 5 wt % of sodium chloride.

As evident in FIG. 4, the aggregates that were dipped in the noted solution can be made into a concrete with much lower water vapor emission rate than a concrete made with aggregates treated with water only, such that the rate approximates a concrete made from aggregates boiled and soaked with the same salt solution.

Example 19

The purpose of the test in EX. 19 was to demonstrate the effect of the direct addition of salt(s) rather than infusion of the aggregates, according to certain other embodiments of the invention.

One or more salts from any of Samples 43-60 are added directly to concrete having either stone or lightweight aggregate in an amount in a range of about 5 pounds to about 60 pounds of salt (dry weight) per cubic yard of concrete, or about 10 pounds to about 50 pounds, or about 15 pounds to about 40 pounds per cubic yard of concrete (e.g., in the amounts listed above in Tables 5-7). The resulting concrete provides for adequate drying for application of adhesive or water impermeable coating within 60 days or less.

FIG. 5 is a graph showing representative samples of lightweight concrete that have been tested and which illustrate the close correlation between the water evaporation rate and the number of days required for the concrete to reach 75% relative humidity. The X axis is the test number in a sequence of results chosen at random out of 270 tests that were run. The right vertical axis depicts the number of days required to reach 75% IRH on a test cylinder of concrete with an imbedded humidity probe. The left vertical axis depicts the mass of water vapor that escaped from a sample in an evaporative pan made from the same batch.

The data in FIG. 5 illustrates the dichotomy that a higher moisture loss strongly correlates with a prolonged time to reach a state of 75% IRH. This is the very opposite of standard concrete in which high moisture loss would normally indicate higher drying rate and faster time to reach 75% IRH. Since the water contents are the same in each companion sample, it would indicate that the internal pore structure appears to be taking up the available water as it forms, thus inhibiting evaporation as the small pores form and reduce internal humidity. As set forth in the research described below, the smaller pores contain water that is largely non-evaporable, thus the Kelvin equation reflects this with the pore size controlling the IRH of a system.

Yang, et al., “Self-desiccation mechanism of high-performance concrete,” Research Lab of Materials Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200433, China, received Jul. 9, 2003, revision accepted Mar. 15, 2004, explained the phenomenon as follows.

Abstract: Investigations on the effects of W/C ratio and silica fume on the autogenous shrinkage and internal relative humidity of high performance concrete (HPC), and analysis of the self-desiccation mechanisms of HPC showed that the autogenous shrinkage and internal relative humidity of HPC increases and decreases with the reduction of W/C respectively; and that these phenomena were amplified by the addition of silica fume. Theoretical analyses indicated that the reduction of IRH in HPC was not due to shortage of water, but due to the fact that the evaporable water in HPC was not evaporated freely. The reduction of internal relative humidity or the so-called self-desiccation of HPC was chiefly caused by the increase in mole concentration of soluble ions in HPC and the reduction of pore size or the increase in the fraction of micro pore water in the total evaporable water (Tr/Tte ratio).

Autogenous shrinkage is a term that describes the change in volume of the concrete that is driven by internal forces as opposed to external forces such as evaporation or temperature change. Yang, et al. continue in this vein and conclude that “Theoretical analyses and calculation showed that the reduction of IRH in HPC is not due to shortage of water, but due to the fact that the evaporable water in HPC is not evaporated freely. The main reasons behind the reduction of internal relative humidity or so-called self-desiccation are the increase in mole concentration of soluble ions and the reduction of pore size or the increase in the fraction of micro-pore water in the total evaporable water.” This analysis was based on the availability of ions from the cement assuming soluble alkali cement content of 0.6% as sodium oxide or hydrated, 6 pounds of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in a mix similar to the HPC mix set forth in Table II above.

Example 20

The purpose of the test in EX. 20 was to illustrate the beneficial effect on drying time by incorporating hydrophilic salts directly into concrete during the mixing process. Samples 61-64 demonstrate short drying times using hydrophilic salts in lightweight concrete. Samples 65-68 demonstrate short drying times using hydrophilic salts in normal weight concrete. FIG. 6 shows days to 75% humidity for the compositions of Samples 61-64 having about 1.1 wt % NaNO2, about 0.3 wt % TS, 0.8 wt % TS, and about 1.25 wt % TS, respectively. FIG. 7 shows days to 75% humidity for the compositions of Samples 65-68 having about 0.28 wt % TS and about 0.09 wt % TC, about 0.28 wt % TS, about 0.55 wt % TS and about 0.09 wt % TC, and about 0.55 wt % TS, respectively. (Note: “TS”=Sodium Thiosulfate, Na2S2O3.5H2O, M.W. 248; “TC”=Sodium Thiocyanate, NaSCN, M.W 80).

Concrete compositions were made according to Samples 61-68 having the following compositions and data as set forth in Table 8 below.


TABLE 8
Sample
Component (lbs)
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
Cement
400
400
400
400
300
300
300
300
Slag (GGBFS)
400
400
400
400
300
300
300
300
ASTM c-33 Sand
1400
1400
1400
1400
1300
1300
1300
1300
Lightweight 17%
950
950
950
950
0
0
0
0
water by dry wt.
Pea Gravel
0
0
0
0
1700
1700
1700
1700
Water
325
325
325
325
325
325
325
325
Na2S2O3•5H2O
0
10
25
40
10
10
20
20
NaNO2
35
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NaSCN
0
0
0
0
3.2
0
3.2
0
Other Data
Time to
4:10
4:00
3:45
3:00
3:30
3:45
3:30
3:15
Temperature Rise
Water reducer:
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
oz/100 lbs

It has been found that additions of sodium or potassium thiosulfate (known as “hypo” in photography) impart significant acceleration of hardening to concrete mixtures. This chemical, or mixtures containing it as a partial component, are effective in increasing the rate of internal humidity reduction. Complementary to this, limited amounts of sodium or potassium thiocyanate may be used as well. The thiocyanate ion in concentrations greater than 1% by weight of cement is known create a condition that can be corrosive to reinforcement and is therefore limited for durability reasons. If the concrete is to be dry in service, larger amounts may be used (assuming prior investigation of galvanic activity potential).

Example 21

The purpose of the test in EX. 21 was to illustrate the beneficial effect on relative humidity over time by using sodium nitrite substantially free of a silica fume in a cementitious mix according to an embodiment of the invention and sodium nitrate and a silica fume in a cementitious mix according to another embodiment of the invention. Sample 69 is a cementitious mix having about 30 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite but substantially free of silica fume. Sample 70 is a cementitious mix having about 20 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite and about 15% by weight of the cementitious mix. FIG. 8 is a graphical representation showing the relative humidity over time for these two exemplary embodiments of cementitious mixes of the invention. As shown in FIG. 8, Sample 70 having silica fume and 20 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite has about a 4% reduction in average relative humidity in comparison to Sample 69 having 30 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite but being substantially free of silica fume. Indeed, as further shown in FIG. 8, the relative humidity of the cementitious mix having both the sodium nitrite and silica fume begins to experience relative humidities that are lower than that of Sample 69 after about 22 days of drying.

Example 22

The purpose of the test in EX. 22 was to illustrate the beneficial effect on relative humidity over time by using increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite in a cementitious mix according to an embodiment of the invention. Sample 71 has no sodium nitrite, while samples 72, 73, 74, and 75 have 10 lb/yd3, 20 lb/yd3, 30 lb/yd3, and 40 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite, respectively. As shown in FIG. 9, which is a chart illustrating the relative humidity over time for cementitious compositions having various concentration of sodium nitrite according to certain embodiments of the invention, the cements having greater amounts of sodium nitrite—i.e., on the order of 30 lb/yd3 to even 40 lb/yd3—exhibit the greatest relative reductions in relative humidity over the course of drying the concrete. As further shown in FIG. 9, the use of these higher concentrations of sodium nitrite lead to relative humidities that are about 20% less than the relative humidity of the concrete substantially free of sodium nitrite after about 25 days of drying time. According to these examples, the use of on the order of 40 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite results in a reduction in relative humidity of about 9% in comparison to the relative humidity of a concrete having about 10 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite.

Example 23

The purpose of the test in EX. 23 was to illustrate the beneficial effect on relative humidity over time by using increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite in a cementitious mix according to another embodiment of the invention having a different kind of cement than that used in EX 22. Sample 76 has no sodium nitrite, while samples 77, 78, 79, and 80 have 10 lb/yd3, 20 lb/yd3, 30 lb/yd3, and 40 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite, respectively. As shown in FIG. 9, which is a chart illustrating the relative humidity over time for cementitious compositions having various concentration of sodium nitrite according to certain embodiments of the invention, the cements having greater amounts of sodium nitrite—i.e., on the order of 30 lb/yd3 to even 40 lb/yd3—exhibit the greatest relative reductions in relative humidity over the course of drying the concrete. As further shown in FIG. 10, the use of these higher concentrations of sodium nitrite lead to relative humidities that are about 20% less than the relative humidity of the concrete substantially free of sodium nitrite after about 25 days of drying time. Furthermore, the use of on the order of 40 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite results in a reduction in relative humidity of about 6% in comparison to the relative humidity of a concrete having about one-half of that concentration of sodium nitrite. EX. 22 and EX. 23 show the unexpected results that can be achieved based upon the mere differences in types of cement that are used.

Example 24

The purpose of the test in EX. 24 was to illustrate the extent of reductions in relative humidity over time by using increasing concentrations of sodium nitrite in a cementitious mix according to yet another embodiment of the invention. Sample 81 has no sodium nitrite, while samples 82, 83, and 84 have 20 lb/yd3, 30 lb/yd3, and 40 lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite, respectively. As shown in FIG. 11, which is a graph illustrating the internal relative humidity over time for the cementitious compositions of samples 81-84. In the exemplary examples of FIG. 11, the cementitious composition of Sample 84 having about 40 pcy or lb/yd3 of sodium nitrite generally provides the lowest internal relative humidity for these concretes.

All publications mentioned herein, including patents, patent applications, and journal articles are incorporated herein by reference in their entireties including the references cited therein, which are also incorporated herein by reference. The publications discussed herein are provided solely for their disclosure prior to the filing date of the present application. Nothing herein is to be construed as an admission that the present invention is not entitled to antedate such publication by virtue of prior invention. Neither should the citation of documents herein be construed as an admission that the cited documents are considered material to the patentability of the claims of the various embodiments of the invention. Further, the dates of publication provided may be different from the actual publication dates which may need to be independently confirmed.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the invention set forth herein will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which this invention pertains having the benefit of the teachings presented in the descriptions herein and the associated drawings. For example, though various methods are disclosed herein, one skilled in the art will appreciate that various other methods now know or conceived in the art will be applied to a subject in conjunction with the methods of treatments or therapies disclosed herein. Therefore, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed and that modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Method for preparation of a coated basic component for hydraulic compositions, coated basic component for concrete production, admixture for concrete production and method for preparation of a hydraulic composition SIKA TECHNOLOGY AG 06 September 2004 08 March 2006
Low density cements for use in cementing operations BAKER HUGHES INCORPORATED 14 September 2007 19 March 2008
Verfahren zur Prüfung von Frischbeton sowie Vorrichtung zum Durchführen des Verfahrens DYCKERHOFF & WIDMANN AG 07 October 1982 12 April 1984
New concrete composition LAFARGE 24 January 2007 20 August 2008
BETON A FAIBLE TENEUR EN CLINKER LAFARGE 25 September 2007 27 March 2009
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US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 1 US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 2 US10000414 Accelerated drying concrete compositions 3