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Patent Analysis of

Compositions and method for use of recombinant T cell receptors for direct recognition of tumor antigen

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10000546

Application Number

US14/774723

Application Date

13 March 2014

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

HEALTH RESEARCH, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

HEALTH RESEARCH, INC.

International Classification

C12N15/00,C12N5/0783,A61K39/00,C07K14/725,C12N15/85

Cooperative Classification

C07K14/7051,A61K39/0011,C12N5/0636,C12N15/85,A61K2039/5156

Inventor

ODUNSI, KUNLE,MATSUZAKI, JUNKO,TSUJI, TAKEMASA

Patent Images

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US10000546 Compositions 1 US10000546 Compositions 2 US10000546 Compositions 3
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Abstract

Provided are compositions and methods for prophylaxis and/or therapy of a variety of cancers which express a NY-ESO-1 antigen. Included are recombinant T cell receptors (TCRs), polynucleotides encoding them, expression vectors that include the polynucleotides, and cells into which the polynucleotides have been introduced to produce modified cells, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, and progenitor cells, such as haematopoietic stem cells. The modified cells are capable of direct recognition of a cancer cell expressing a NY-ESO-1 antigen by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cell without presentation of the antigen by antigen presenting cells. In embodiments, the NY-ESO-1 antigen is displayed by the tumor cells. Also included is a method for prophylaxis and/or therapy of cancer by administering modified cells that express a recombinant TCR. Methods for making expression vectors and/or cells which express a recombinant TCR and identifying TCRs to make the expression vectors are also included.

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Claims

1. A modified human T cell comprising a recombinant polynucleotide encoding a T cell receptor (TCR), wherein the recombinant polynucleotide encodes a TCR alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 and a TCR beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, wherein the T cell is capable of direct recognition of a cancer cell expressing a NY-ESO-1 antigen, wherein the direct recognition of the cancer cell comprises human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cell.

2. The modified cell of claim 1, wherein the sequence encoding the alpha chain and/or the beta chain does not comprise introns.

3. An expression vector encoding a T cell receptor (TCR), wherein the TCR comprises an alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 and a beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:4.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A modified human T cell comprising
    • a recombinant polynucleotide encoding a T cell receptor (TCR), wherein the recombinant polynucleotide encodes a TCR alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 and a TCR beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, wherein the T cell is capable of direct recognition of a cancer cell expressing a NY-ESO-1 antigen, wherein the direct recognition of the cancer cell comprises human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cell.
    • 2. The modified cell of claim 1, wherein
      • the sequence encoding the alpha chain and/or the beta chain does not comprise
  • 3
    3. An expression vector encoding a T cell receptor (TCR), wherein
    • the TCR comprises
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Description

FIELD

The present disclosure relates generally to immunotherapy and more specifically to recombinant T cell receptors that can impart direct tumor recognition capability to T cells.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ helper T cells play critical roles in the induction and maintenance of anti-tumor immune responses by providing “CD4-help”. Activation of CD4+ T cells at the local tumor sites is believed to help overcome multiple immuno-suppression mechanisms and promote tumor eradication by the immune system. However, because of the frequent lack of functional antigen-presenting cells at the local tumor sites, activation of the CD4+ T cells and therefore the provision of CD4-help at the local tumor site is severely limited. There is accordingly an ongoing and unmet need to provide new compositions and methods such that activation of CD4+ T cells and therefore provision of CD4-help can be achieved.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure provides compositions and methods for prophylaxis and/or therapy of a variety of cancers. In general, the cancers are those which express the well-known the NY-ESO-1 antigen. In embodiments, the disclosure includes recombinant T cell receptors (TCRs), polynucleotides encoding them, expression vectors comprising the polynucleotides, cells into which the polynucleotides have been introduced, including but not necessarily limited CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, and progenitor cells, such as haematopoietic stem cells. In embodiments, the cells into which the polynucleotides are introduced are lymphoid progenitor cells, immature thymocytes (double-negative CD4−CD8−) cells, or double-positive thymocytes (CD4+CD8+). In embodiments, the progenitor cells comprise markers, such as CD34, CD117 (c-kit) and CD90 (Thy-1).

In one aspect the disclosure includes a modified human T cell comprising a recombinant polynucleotide encoding a TCR, wherein the T cell is capable of direct recognition of a cancer cell expressing a NY-ESO-1 antigen, wherein the direct recognition of the cancer cell comprises human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cell. In particular embodiments, the TCR encoded by the polynucleotide and expressed by the cell has a TCR alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 and a TCR beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:4, or a TCR alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:7 and a TCR beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:8, or a TCR alpha chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:11 and a TCR beta chain having the sequence of SEQ ID NO:12. All combination of such alpha and beta chains are included in the disclosure. In an embodiment, the modified cell of claim 1, wherein the sequence encoding the alpha chain and/or the beta chain does not comprise introns. In embodiments, the TCRs of this disclosure include amino acid sequences that are 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, or 99% amino acid sequence identify across the length of the amino acid sequences disclosed herein.

In another aspect the disclosure includes a method for prophylaxis and/or therapy of an individual diagnosed with, suspected of having or at risk for developing or recurrence of a cancer, wherein the cancer comprises cancer cells which express NY-ESO-1 antigen. This approach comprises administering to the individual modified human T cells comprising a recombinant polynucleotide encoding a TCR, wherein the T cells are capable of direct recognition of the cancer cells expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen, and wherein the direct recognition of the cancer cells comprises HLA class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cells. In embodiments, the cells comprising the recombinant TCR are human CD4+ T cells. In embodiments, the cells comprising the recombinant TCR that is administered to the individual are allogeneic, syngeneic, or autologous cells. Thus, in one embodiment, the cells are obtained from a first individual, modified, and administered to a second individual who is in need thereof. In another embodiment, the cells are removed from the individual prior, modified to express the recombinant TCR, and administered back to the same individual.

In embodiments, the cancer that expresses the NY-ESO-1 antigen is selected from bladder cancer cells, brain cancer cells, breast cancer cells, gastric cancer cells, esophageal cancer cells, head and neck cancer cells, hepatobiliary cancer cells, kidney cancer cells, ovary cancer cells, non-small cell lung cancer cells, myeloma, prostate cancer cells, sarcoma cells, testicular cancer cells, melanoma cells, and combinations thereof.

In another aspect the disclosure includes one or more expression vectors. The expression vector(s) encode a TCR that is capable of imparting to a cell which expresses it the capability to directly a cancer cell expressing a NY-ESO-1 antigen, wherein the direct recognition of the cancer cell comprises HLA class II-restricted binding of the TCR to the NY-ESO-1 antigen expressed by the cancer cell.

In another approach, methods for making expression vectors and/or cells which express a recombinant TCR. The method involves obtaining a plurality of T cells from an individual, identifying T cells that are capable of direct recognition of a cancer cell displaying a NY-ESO-1 antigen in an HLA class II-restricted manner without antigen presenting cells presenting the NY-ESO-1 antigen to the T cells, determining the sequence of the alpha chain of the TCR and the sequence of the beta chain of the TCR, and introducing into an expression vector a polynucleotide sequence encoding the alpha chain of the TCR and the beta chain of the TCR. In an embodiment, this method comprises introducing the expression vector into a cell such that the TCR is expressed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1. (A) Direct recognition of cancer cells by JM CD4+ T cell clone. Interferon (IFN)-γ and CD107 expression of NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide-specific tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone (Clone: JM) (TR-CD4) and non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone (NTR-CD4) after coculture with NY-ESO-1-expressing SK-MEL-37 (SK37) and NY-ESO-1-negative SK-MEL-29 (SK29) with or without pulsing with the cognate NY-ESO-1157-170 (ESO-1157-170) peptide was investigated by intracellular cytokine staining. (B) Differences in intracellular and extracellular NY-ESO-1 recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones. NY-ESO-1-negative SK-MEL-29 was unpulsed (Unpulsed) or pulsed with NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide (Peptide) or recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein (Protein), or was infected with adenovirus vector which induce intracellular NY-ESO-1 expression. Recognition by TR-CD4, NTR-CD4 and NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cell clone was evaluated by IFN-γ ELISPOT assay.

FIG. 2. (A) TR-CD4 (Clone: JM) were co-cultured with SK-MEL-37. Culture supernatant was harvested after 1-4 days of culture. The levels of the indicated cytokines and lytic molecules in the supernatant were measured by ELISA. (B) TR-CD4 and NTR-CD4 was co-cultured with SK-MEL-37 and expression of the early apoptosis marker, Annexin-V, on SK-MEL-37 (SK37) was measured by flow-cytometry.

FIG. 3. NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cell clone (ESO-CD8) was co-cultured with SK-MEL-37 at 1:2 ratio in the presence or absence of the indicated ratios of TR-CD4 (Clone: JM). Cytotoxic activity by ESO-CD8 on SK-MEL-37 was evaluated by CFSE-based cytotoxicity assay.

FIG. 4. (A) NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cell clone (ESO-CD8) was stimulated with or without SK-MEL-37 (SK37) in the presence or absence of TR-CD4 (clone: JM). After 4 days, the number of CD8+ T cells were enumerated by trypan blue exclusion assay combined with CD8 staining by flow-cytometry. (B) ESO-CD8 was stimulated with SK37 in the presence or absence of TR-CD4. Before (day 0) and after (day 1 and day 2) stimulation, expression of activation markers (CD25, CD69 and CD122) or central T cell differentiation markers (CD62L, CCR7 and CD127) on ESO-CD8 was measured by flow-cytometry.

FIG. 5. (A) SK-MEL-37 was inoculated in SCID mice (6 mice/group) with or without tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone (JM: TR-CD4), non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone (NTR-CD4), and/or NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cell clone (ESO-CD8). Tumor growth was measured every 2-3 day. (B) Tumor was excised and weighted at day 45 after inoculation.

FIG. 6. (A) Retrovirus vector used in the experiments. LTR: long-terminal repeat; ψ: packaging signal; MCS: multiple cloning site; IRES: internal ribosome entry site; eGFP: enhanced green fluorescent protein. (B) TCR expressing cassette. (I) TCR β and α chain-coding cDNA sequences are connected by a GSG (Gly-Ser-Gly) linker and a P2A ribosomal skipping sequence. (II) TCR β and α chain-coding cDNA sequences are connected by a furin protease recognition site (RAKR (Arg-Ala-Lys-Arg)), a SGSG (Ser-Gly-Ser-Gly) linker, V5 epitope, and a P2A ribosomal skipping sequence.

FIG. 7. Polyclonally activated PBMC were transduced with retroviral vector (A: JM-TCR; B: SB95-TCR). They were cocultured with peptide-pulsed (Pulsed) or unpulsed (Unpulsed) HLA-DRB1*01+DPB1*04+ cells for 20 hours. IFN-γ level in the supernatant was measured by ELISA. NY-ESO-1157-170 and NY-ESO-191-110 peptides were used as the cognate peptides for JM-TCR and SB95-TCR, respectively.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present disclosure relates to immune cells, including but not necessarily limited to T cells, that have been engineered to be capable of direct recognition of tumor antigen and MHC class II-expressing cancer cells. In embodiments, the immune cells are CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, or their progenitor cells such hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In embodiments, the hematopoietic/progenitor cells are characterized by one or more markers selected from CD34, CD117 (c-kit) and CD90 (Thy-1).

It is well known that CD4+ T cells typically recognize peptide fragments presented on MHC class II (HLA class II in humans) by antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition to antigen-presenting cells, many human cancer cells are also known to express MHC class II constitutively or in an IFN-γ-inducible manner, but the role of MHC class II expression on human cancer cells remains largely unknown.

We have now discovered that there are two distinct types of tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. One type of tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is referred to herein as tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4). This type of CD4+ T cell directly recognizes MHC (HLA in humans) class II-expressing cancer cells in antigen-specific and MHC class II-restricted manner. In contrast, another type of previously known, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is referred to herein as non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (NTR-CD4). This type of T cell only recognizes exogenous tumor antigen peptides after processing by antigen-presenting cells. FIGS. 1A and 1B depict data demonstrating these distinct functions and reveal direct recognition of cancer cells by TR-CD4.

Because of their different abilities in direct recognition of cancer cells, these two types of CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4 and NTR-CD4) are believed to play different roles at the local tumor site. Without intending to be constrained by any particular theory, it is believed that TR-CD4 cells provide CD4-help by direct recognition of cancer cells. The present invention takes advantage of this function to provide TCR polypeptides and recombinant polynucleotides encoding them for use in novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatment modalities and compositions. By engineering T cells to express the TCRs further described herein, we can endow any CD4+ cell with the capability to directly recognize tumor antigen-expressing cancer cells, without requiring presentation of the antigen by an antigen-presenting cell. Thus, the present invention includes compositions and methods that are useful for creating and using TR-CD4 cells for improved care of cancer patients.

Previous attempts at making and using recombinant TCRs have been made. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 8,008,438 (the '438 patent) discloses recombinant TCRs which bind to the peptide sequence SLLMWITQC from the NY-ESO-1 protein (NY-ESO-1:157-165). However, and importantly, the disclosure in the '438 patent pertains to classic CD8+ TCRs, which only recognize the NY-ESO-1:157-165 peptide in the context of the HLA-A*0201 class I restriction element. This constitutes a significant dissimilarity from the present invention because, as described above, the recombinant TCRs of the present invention are class II restricted. Moreover, and as also described above, unlike canonical class II restriction, cells engineered to express a recombinant TCR of the invention surprisingly do not require the assistance of antigen presenting cells to recognize the antigens to which they are specific. Instead, they can recognize the antigens as they exist in vivo as a peptide displayed by the tumor cells. Further, the TCRs of the present invention recognize peptides by those disclosed in the '438 patent. Accordingly, the present invention is a significant and unexpected departure from the prior art. In an embodiment, a TR-CD4 is a CD4+ cell that exhibits cytokine secretion (such as IFN-gamma production) when the TR-CD4 is directly exposed to cells which express an antigen for which the TCR is specific in an HLA-II context. The ability to confer capability for direct recognition of NY-ESO-1-expressing tumors by CD4+ T cells by introducing a TCR from a naturally occurring cell having this capability was unexpected.

In one embodiment, the invention includes transforming any CD4+ T cell into a TR-CD4 by introducing a polynucleotide encoding a recombinant TCR of the invention into polyclonally expanded CD4+ T cells and allowing expression of the TCR polypeptide coding region(s) of the polynucleotide.

In various embodiments, the present invention provides isolated and/or recombinant polynucleotides encoding particular TCR polypeptides, cells engineered to express the TCR polypeptides, pharmaceutical formulations comprising cells which express the TCR polypeptides, and methods of using the pharmaceutical formulations to achieve a prophylactic and/or therapeutic effect against cancer in a subject. In certain embodiments, the invention provides mixtures of cells expressing TCRs, or cells expressing more than one TCR described herein, that are specific for distinct cancer antigens, thus presenting cell populations that can be considered polyvalent with respect to the TCRs. As used in this disclosure, a “recombinant TCR” means a TCR that is expressed from a polynucleotide that was introduced into the cell, meaning prior to the introduction of the polynucleotide the TCR was not encoded by a chromosomal sequence in the cell.

The TCRs provided by the invention are capable of recognizing NY-ESO-1;157-170 which is an antigen that consists of the amino acid sequence SLLMWITQCFLPVF, or are capable of recognizing NY-ESO-1;95-106, which is an antigen that consists of the amino acid sequence PFATPMEAELAR. As described above, in certain embodiments, the cells provided by the invention are engineered CD4+ T cells that are capable of recognizing these antigens via TCRs which interact with the antigen in association with HLA class II molecules, wherein the HLA class II molecules and antigen are displayed by tumor cells.

The invention includes each and every polynucleotide sequence that encodes one or more TCR polypeptides of the invention and disclosed herein, including DNA and RNA sequences, and including isolated and/or recombinant polynucleotides comprising and/or consisting of such sequences. The invention also includes cells which comprise the recombinant polynucleotides. The cells can be isolated cells, cells grown and/or expanded and/or maintained in culture, and can be prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell cultures can be used, for example, to propagate or amplify the TCR expression vectors of the invention. In embodiments, the cells can comprise packaging plasmids, which, for example, provide some or all of the proteins used for transcription and packaging of an RNA copy of the expression construct into recombinant viral particles, such as pseudoviral particles. In embodiments, the expression vectors are transiently or stably introduced into cells. In embodiments, the expression vectors are integrated into the chromosome of cells used for their production. In embodiments, polynucleotides encoding the TCRs which are introduced into cells by way of an expression vector, such as a viral particle, are integrated into one or more chromosomes of the cells. Such cells can be used for propagation, or they can be cells that are used for therapeutic and/or prophylactic approaches. The eukaryotic cells include CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, and their progenitor cells into which a TCR expression construct of the invention has been introduced. The CD4+ T cells can be from any source, including but not limited to a human subject who may or may not be the eventual recipient of the CD4+ T cells once they have been engineered to express a TCR according to the invention.

Expression vectors for use with embodiments of this disclosure can be any suitable expression vector. In embodiments, the expression vector comprises a modified viral polynucleotide, such as from an adenovirus, a herpesvirus, or a retrovirus, such as a lentiviral vector. The expression vector is not restricted to recombinant viruses and includes non-viral vectors such as DNA plasmids and in vitro transcribed mRNA.

With respect to the polypeptides that are encoded by the polynucleotides described above, in certain aspects the invention provides functional TCRs which comprises a TCR α and a TCR β chain, wherein the two chains are present in a physical association with one another (e.g., in a complex) and are non-covalently joined to one another, or wherein the two chains are distinct polypeptides but are covalently joined to one another, such as by a disulfide or other covalent linkage that is not a peptide bond. Other suitable linkages can comprise, for example, substituted or unsubstituted polyalkylene glycol, and combinations of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol in the form of, for example, copolymers. In other embodiments, two polypeptides that constitute the TCR α and a TCR β chain can both be included in a single polypeptide, such as a fusion protein. In certain embodiments, the fusion protein comprises a TCR α chain amino acid sequence and a TCR β chain amino acid sequence that have been translated from the same open reading frame (ORF), or distinct ORFs, or an ORF that contain a signal that results in non-continuous translation. In one embodiment, the ORF comprises a P2A-mediated translation skipping site positioned between the TCR α and TCR β chain. Constructs for making P2A containing proteins (also referred to as 2A Peptide-Linked multicistronic vectors) are known in the art. (See, for example, Gene Transfer: Delivery and Expression of DNA and RNA, A Laboratory Manual, (2007), Friedman et al., International Standard Book Number (ISBN) 978-087969765-5. Briefly, 2A peptide sequences, when included between coding regions, allow for stoichiometric production of discrete protein products within a single vector through a novel cleavage event that occurs in the 2A peptide sequence. 2A peptide sequences are generally short sequence comprising 18-22 amino acids and can comprise distinct amino-terminal sequences. Thus, in one embodiment, a fusion protein of the invention includes a P2A amino acid sequence. In embodiments, a fusion protein of the invention can comprise a linker sequence between the TCR α and TCR β chains. In certain embodiments, the linker sequence can comprise a GSG (Gly-Ser-Gly) linker or an SGSG (Ser-Gly-Ser-Gly) linker. In certain embodiments, the TCR α and TCR β chains are connected to one another by an amino acid sequence that comprises a furin protease recognition site, such as an RAKR (Arg-Ala-Lys-Arg) site.

In one embodiment, the expression construct that encodes the TCR can also encode additional polynucleotides. The additional polynucleotide can be such that it enables identification of TCR expressing cells, such as by encoding a detectable marker, such as a fluorescent or luminescent protein. The additional polynucleotide can be such that it encodes an element that allows for selective elimination of TCR expressing cells, such as thymidine kinase gene. In embodiments the additional polynucleotides can be such that they facilitate inhibition of expression of endogenously encoded TCRs. In an embodiment, the expression construct that encodes the TCR also encodes a polynucleotide which can facilitate RNAi-mediated down-regulation of one or more endogenous TCRs For example, see Okamoto S, et al. (2009) Cancer Research, 69:9003-9011, and Okamoto S, et al. (2012). Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids, 1, e63. In an embodiment, the expression construct that encodes the TCR can encode an shRNA or an siRNA targeted to an endogenously encoded TCR. In an alternative embodiment, a second, distinct expression construct that encodes the polynucleotide for use in downregulating endogenous TCR production can be used.

FIG. 6 provides representative configurations of TCR polypeptides of the invention and polynucleotides/expression vectors encoding them. In one embodiment, as outlined in FIG. 6, an amino acid sequence that is C-terminal to the TCR β chain protein is removed by furin protease-mediated cleavage, resulting in functional TCR α and β chain proteins. It will be also recognized from FIG. 6 that the TCR chains can be expressed from an expression construct such that the β chain is oriented N-terminally in relation to the α chain, and thus TCRs of the invention can also comprise this chain orientation, or other orientations. In alternative embodiments, the TCR α and β chain proteins can be expressed from distinct expression vectors introduced into the same cell.

In connection with the present invention, we have also made the following discoveries: in certain instances, intracellular tumor antigen is loaded on HLA class II through recycling of the HLA class II in tumors; direct tumor recognition by tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells leads to in vivo tumor growth inhibition; CD4+ T cells efficiently augment CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity through direct tumor recognition; CD4+ T cells support proliferation, survival, and memory differentiation of cognate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells through direct tumor recognition without antigen presenting cells. It is expected that practicing the present invention in a clinical setting will also result in direct tumor recognition by the engineered tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells and lead to in vivo tumor growth inhibition in human subject, and will also result in the efficient augmentation of CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity by the engineered CD4+ T cells, and that the engineered CD4+ T cells will support proliferation, survival, and memory differentiation of cognate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in human subjects who receive CD4+ T cells engineered according to the invention.

With respect to use of the engineered CD4+ T cells of the present invention, the method generally comprises administering an effective amount (typically 1010 cells by intravenous or intraperitoneal injections) of a composition comprising the CD4+ T cells to an individual in need thereof. An individual in need thereof, in various embodiments, is an individual who has or is suspected of having, or is at risk for developing a cancer which is characterized by malignant cells that express NY-ESO-I. As is well known in the art, NY-ESO-I is expressed by a variety of cancer cells and tumor types. In particular and non-limiting examples, such cancers include cancers of the bladder, brain, breast, ovary, non-small cell lung cancer, myeloma, prostate, sarcoma and melanoma. Specific embodiments include but are not limited to liposarcomas and intrahepatic cholagiocarcinoma. The individual may have early-stage or advanced forms of any of these cancers, or may be in remission from any of these cancers. In one embodiment, the individual to whom a composition of the invention is administered is at risk for recurrence for any cancer type that expresses NY-ESO-1. In certain embodiments, the individual has or is suspected of having, or is at risk for developing or recurrence of a tumor comprising cells which express a protein comprising the amino acid sequences defined by NY-ESO-1:157-170 and/or NY-ESO-1:95-106. In embodiments, the disclosure includes recombinant TCRs that are specific for peptide fragments of NY-ESO-1 that are between 15 and 24 amino acid residues long, wherein such peptides are presented in a complex with HLA-II. In embodiments, the disclosure includes recombinant TCRs that are specific for peptides that are in a complex with HLA-II, wherein the peptides comprise or consist of the amino acid sequences of NY-ESO-1:157-170 and/or NY-ESO-1:95-106.

The present disclosure includes recombinant TCRs, cells expressing them, and therapeutic/prophylactic methods that involve presentation of NY-ESO-1 antigens in conjunction with any HLA-class II complex that will be recognized by the TCRs. In embodiments, the HLA-II is selected from HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR. In embodiments, the NY-ESO-1 antigen is recognized by the TCR in conjunction with HLA-DRB1*01 or HLA-DPB1*04.

We demonstrate in this invention that TR-CD4 we created produce multiple molecules through direct recognition of cancer cells, which induced apoptosis in cancer cells (FIGS. 2A and 2B) Importantly, TR-CD4 were found to efficiently enhance the cytotoxic activity of tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells via direct recognition of cancer cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells (FIG. 3). Furthermore, CD8+ T cells co-stimulated with TR-CD4 by cancer cells actively proliferated and upregulated central memory T cell markers (FIGS. 4A and 4B).

TR-CD4 showed significant in vivo anti-tumor activity to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in immuno-deficient mice (FIG. 5). In addition, TR-CD4 and tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells co-operatively inhibited in vivo tumor growth (FIG. 5). Thus, the data presented herein strongly suggest that the recruitment of TR-CD4 at the local tumor site potentiate the anti-tumor immune responses, and accordingly will likely make an effective and heretofore unavailable therapeutic approach for widespread use in the clinic.

The following description provides illustrative examples of materials and methods used to make and use various embodiments of the invention.

To develop a method to efficiently generate a large number of TR-CD4 by gene-engineering with tumor-recognizing T cell receptor (TCR) gene, full length TCR gene from three TR-CD4 clones were cloned and sequenced by using 5′-RACE-PCR technique. The following TCRs were created:

    • 1. HLA-DRB1*01-restricted NY-ESO-1:96-106-specific TR-CD4 (referred to herein as Clone: “SB95”)
    • 2. HLA-DPB1*04-restricted NY-ESO-1:157-170-specific TR-CD4 (referred to herein as Clone: “5B8”)
    • 3. HLA-DPB1*04-restricted NY-ESO-1:157-170-specific TR-CD4 (referred to herein as Clone: “JM”)

TCR genes from SB95 and JM were inserted into retroviral expression vectors (such as MSCV-derived pMIG-II or pMIG-w vectors). A 5B8 TCR-expressing vector is made in the same manner.

Retroviral transduction of these TCR genes efficiently transferred reactivity against cognate peptides to polyclonally expanded T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences presented below represent those used to demonstrate the invention. The invention includes any and all polynucleotide sequences encoding the amino acid sequences of the TCR constructs described herein. Further, variations in amino acid sequences in the TCRs are contemplated, so long as they do not adversely affect the function of the TCR. In various embodiments, a TCR comprising one or more amino acid changes as compared to the sequences presented herein will comprise conservative amino acid substitutions or other substitutions, additions or deletions, so long as the cells expressing the recombinant TCRs of the invention can directly and specifically recognize tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1, wherein that recognition is dependent on expression of NY-ESO-1 and presentation of peptides processed from it in an HLA class II restricted manner by the tumor cells. In embodiments, a TCR of the present invention comprises any amino acid sequence that facilitates direct recognition of the tumor antigen on the tumor cells, without participation of an antigen presenting cells. In embodiments, the amino acid sequence of a TCR provided by this disclosure is at least 95%, 96%, 97%, 98% or 99% similar to an amino acid sequences provided in the sequence listing that is part of this disclosure. In various embodiments, any TCR of the invention can have a Koff value for its cognate epitope as defined herein that is essentially the same as the Koff for the cognate epitope exhibited by a TCR of a naturally occurring TR-CD4 for the same epitope. In embodiments, the TCR amino acid sequences can comprise changes in their constant region. In this regard, it is known in the art that in general, the constant region of a TCR does not substantially contribute to antigen recognition. For example, it is possible to replace a portion of the human constant region of a TCR with a murine sequence and retain function of the TCR. (See, for example, Goff S L et al. (2010) Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, 59: 1551-1560). Thus, various modifications to the TCR sequences disclosed herein are contemplated, and can include but are not limited to changes that improve specific chain pairing, or facilitate stronger association with T cell signaling proteins of the CD3 complex, or inhibit formation of dimers between the endogenous and introduced TCRs. In embodiments, the amino acid changes can be present in the CDR region, such as the CDR3 region, including but not necessarily limited to substitutions of one, two, three, or more amino acids in the CDR3 sequence. In embodiments, the amino acid changes have no effect on the function of the TCR.

In specific and illustrative embodiments, the polynucleotide sequences encoding the TCRs of the invention, and the amino acid sequences of the TCR α and TCR β chains encoded by the polynucleotides are as follows, wherein translation initiation and stop codons in the polynucleotide sequences are bold:


“JM” HLA-DPB1 *0401/0402-restricted NY-ESO-1157-170-specific 
tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone
(a) cDNA nucleotide sequences of TCR α and β chains
TCR α chain
(SEQ ID NO: 1)
CACACAGCCAAATTCAATGGAGAGTAACGAAGAAGAGCCTGTTCACTTGCCTTGTAACCAC
TCCACAATCAGTGGAACTGATTACATACATTGGTATCGACAGCTTCCCTCCCAGGGTCCAGA
GTACGTGATTCATGGTCTTACAAGCAATGTGAACAACAGAATGGCCTCTCTGGCAATCGCTG
AAGACAGAAAGTCCAGTACCTTGATCCTGCACCGTGCTACCTTGAGAGATGCTGCTGTGTAC
TACTGCATCCCTAATAACAATGACATGCGCTTTGGAGCAGGGACCAGACTGACAGTAAAAC
CAAATATCCAGAACCCTGACCCTGCCGTGTACCAGCTGAGAGACTCTAAATCCAGTGACAA
GTCTGTCTGCCTATTCACCGATTTTGATTCTCAAACAAATGTGTCACAAAGTAAGGATTCTG
ATGTGTATATCACAGACAAAACTGTGCTAGACATGAGGTCTATGGACTTCAAGAGCAACAG
TGCTGTGGCCTGGAGCAACAAATCTGACTTTGCATGTGCAAACGCCTTCAACAACAGCATTA
TTCCAGAAGACACCTTCTTCCCCAGCCCAGAAAGTTCCTGTGATGTCAAGCTGGTCGAGAAA
AGCTTTGAAACAGATACGAACCTAAACTTTCAAAACCTGTCAGTGATTGGGTTCCGAATCCT
TCR β chain
(SEQ ID NO: 2)
TGGAGTCACTCAAACTCCAAGATATCTGATCAAAACGAGAGGACAGCAAGTGACACTGAGC
TGCTCCCCTATCTCTGGGCATAGGAGTGTATCCTGGTACCAACAGACCCCAGGACAGGGCCT
TCAGTTCCTCTTTGAATACTTCAGTGAGACACAGAGAAACAAAGGAAACTTCCCTGGTCGAT
TCTCAGGGCGCCAGTTCTCTAACTCTCGCTCTGAGATGAATGTGAGCACCTTGGAGCTGGGG
GACTCGGCCCTTTATCTTTGCGCCAGCAGCTTCCCCAGGGAACCTAACTATGGCTACACCTT
CGGTTCGGGGACCAGGTTAACCGTTGTAGAGGACCTGAACAAGGTGTTCCCACCCGAGGTC
GCTGTGTTTGAGCCATCAGAAGCAGAGATCTCCCACACCCAAAAGGCCACACTGGTGTGCC
TGGCCACAGGCTTCTTCCCTGACCACGTGGAGCTGAGCTGGTGGGTGAATGGGAAGGAGGT
GCACAGTGGGGTCAGCACGGACCCGCAGCCCCTCAAGGAGCAGCCCGCCCTCAATGACTCC
AGATACTGCCTGAGCAGCCGCCTGAGGGTCTCGGCCACCTTCTGGCAGAACCCCCGCAACC
ACTTCCGCTGTCAAGTCCAGTTCTACGGGCTCTCGGAGAATGACGAGTGGACCCAGGATAG
GGCCAAACCCGTCACCCAGATCGTCAGCGCCGAGGCCTGGGGTAGAGCAGACTGTGGCTTT
ACCTCGGTGTCCTACCAGCAAGGGGTCCTGTCTGCCACCATCCTCTATGAGATCCTGCTAGG
GAAGGCCACCCTGTATGCTGTGCTGGTCAGCGCCCTTGTGTTGATGGCCATGGTCAAGAGAA
(b) amino acid sequences of TCR α and β chains (TCR variable  
regions are in italic, CDR3 regions are in bold)
TCR α chain
(SEQ ID NO: 3)
MKLVTSTTVLLSLGIMGDAKTTQPNSMESNEEEPVHLPCNHSTISGTDYI  
50
HWYRQLPSQGPEYVIHGLTSNVNNRMASLAIAEDRKSSTLILHRATLRDA
100
150
DFDSQTNVSQSKDSDVYITDKTVLDMRSMDFKSNSAVAWSNKSDFACANA 
200
FNNSIIPEDTFFPSPESSCDVKLVEKSFETDTNLNFQNLSVIGFRILLLK 
250
VAGFNLLMTLRLWSS 
TCR β chain
(SEQ ID NO: 4)
MGSRLLCWVLLCLLGAGPVKAGVTQTPRYLIKTRGQQVTLSCSPISGHRS  
50
VSWYQQTPGQGLQFLFEYFSETQRNKGNFPGRFSGRQFSNSRSEMNVSTL 
100
150
EAEISHTQKATLVCLATGFFPDHVELSWWVNGKEVHSGVSTDPQPLKEQP 
200
ALNDSRYCLSSRLRVSATFWQNPRNHFRCQVQFYGLSENDEWTQDRAKPV 
250
TQIVSAEAWGRADCGFTSVSYQQGVLSATILYEILLGKATLYAVLVSALV 
300
LMAMVKRKDF 
“5B8” HLA-DPB1 *0401/0402-restricted NY-ESO-1157-170-specific 
tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cell clone
(a) cDNA nucleotide sequences of TCR α and β chains
TCR α chain
(SEQ ID NO: 5)
CCCTGAGTTGCACATATGACACCAGTGAGAATAATTATTATTTGTTCTGGTACAAGCAGCCT
CCCAGCAGGCAGATGATTCTCGTTATTCGCCAAGAAGCTTATAAGCAACAGAATGCAACGG
AGAATCGTTTCTCTGTGAACTTCCAGAAAGCAGCCAAATCCTTCAGTCTCAAGATCTCAGAC
TCACAGCTGGGGGACACTGCGATGTATTTCTGTGCTTTCTCGAGAGGGAGTGGAGGTAGCA
ACTATAAACTGACATTTGGAAAAGGAACTCTCTTAACCGTGAATCCAAATATCCAGAACCCT
GACCCTGCCGTGTACCAGCTGAGAGACTCTAAATCCAGTGACAAGTCTGTCTGCCTATTCAC
CGATTTTGATTCTCAAACAAATGTGTCACAAAGTAAGGATTCTGATGTGTATATCACAGACA
AAACTGTGCTAGACATGAGGTCTATGGACTTCAAGAGCAACAGTGCTGTGGCCTGGAGCAA
CAAATCTGACTTTGCATGTGCAAACGCCTTCAACAACAGCATTATTCCAGAAGACACCTTCT
TCCCCAGCCCAGAAAGTTCCTGTGATGTCAAGCTGGTCGAGAAAAGCTTTGAAACAGATAC
GAACCTAAACTTTCAAAACCTGTCAGTGATTGGGTTCCGAATCCTCCTCCTGAAAGTGGCCG
TCR β chain
(SEQ ID NO: 6)
TGGAGTCTCCCAGTCCCCCAGTAACAAGGTCACAGAGAAGGGAAAGGATGTAGAGCTCAGG
TGTGATCCAATTTCAGGTCATACTGCCCTTTACTGGTACCGACAGAGCCTGGGGCAGGGCCT
GGAGTTTTTAATTTACTTCCAAGGCAACAGTGCACCAGACAAATCAGGGCTGCCCAGTGATC
GCTTCTCTGCAGAGAGGACTGGGGGATCCGTCTCCACTCTGACGATCCAGCGCACACAGCA
GGAGGACTCGGCCGTGTATCTCTGTGCCAGCAGCTTAGTCCCCGACAGTGCCTACGAGCAGT
ACTTCGGGCCGGGCACCAGGCTCACGGTCACAGAGGACCTGAAAAACGTGTTCCCACCCGA
GGTCGCTGTGTTTGAGCCATCAGAAGCAGAGATCTCCCACACCCAAAAGGCCACACTGGTA
TGCCTGGCCACAGGCTTCTACCCCGACCACGTGGAGCTGAGCTGGTGGGTGAATGGGAAGG
AGGTGCACAGTGGGGTCAGCACGGACCCGCAGCCCCTCAAGGAGCAGCCCGCCCTCAATGA
CTCCAGATACTGCCTGAGCAGCCGCCTGAGGGTCTCGGCCACCTTCTGGCAGAACCCCCGCA
ACCACTTCCGCTGTCAAGTCCAGTTCTACGGGCTCTCGGAGAATGACGAGTGGACCCAGGAT
AGGGCCAAACCTGTCACCCAGATCGTCAGCGCCGAGGCCTGGGGTAGAGCAGACTGTGGCT
TCACCTCCGAGTCTTACCAGCAAGGGGTCCTGTCTGCCACCATCCTCTATGAGATCTTGCTA
GGGAAGGCCACCTTGTATGCCGTGCTGGTCAGTGCCCTCGTGCTGATGGCCATGGTCAAGAG
(b) amino acid sequences of TCR α and β chains (TCR variable  
regions are in italic, CDR3 regions are in bold)
TCR α chain
(SEQ ID NO: 7)
MAQTVTQSQPEMSVQEAETVTLSCTYDTSENNYYLFWYKQPPSRQMILVI 
50
100
150
NVSQSKDSDVYITDKTVLDMRSMDFKSNSAVAWSNKSDFACANAFNNSII 
200
PEDTFFPSPESSCDVKLVEKSFETDTNLNFQNLSVIGFRILLLKVAGFNL 
250
LMTLRLWSS 
TCR β chain
(SEQ ID NO: 8)
MGTRLLFWVAFCLLGADHTGAGVSQSPSNKVTEKGKDVELRCDPISGHTA 
50
LYWYRQSLGQGLEFLIYFQGNSAPDKSGLPSDRFSAERTGGSVSTLTIQR 
100
150
SEAEISHTQKATLVCLATGFYPDHVELSWWVNGKEVHSGVSTDPQPLKEQ 
200
PALNDSRYCLSSRLRVSATFWQNPRNHFRCQVQFYGLSENDEWTQDRAKP 
250
VTQIVSAEAWGRADCGFTSESYQQGVLSATILYEILLGKATLYAVLVSAL 
300
VLMAMVKRKDSRG 
“SB95” HLA-DRB1*0101-restricted NY-ESO-195-106-specific tumor-
recognizing CD4+ T cell clone
(a) cDNA nucleotide sequences of TCR α and β chains
TCR alpha
(SEQ ID NO: 9)
GTCGGTGACCCAGCTTGGCAGCCACGTCTCTGTCTCTGAGGGAGCCCTGGTTCTGCTGAGGT
GCAACTACTCATCGTCTGTTCCACCATATCTCTTCTGGTATGTGCAATACCCCAACCAAGGA
CTCCAGCTTCTCCTGAAGCACACAACAGGGGCCACCCTGGTTAAAGGCATCAACGGTTTTGA
GGCTGAATTTAAGAAGAGTGAAACCTCCTTCCACCTGACGAAACCCTCAGCCCATATGAGC
GACGCGGCTGAGTACTTCTGTGCTGTGAGTGATTCTAGGGCTGCAGGCAACAAGCTAACTTT
TGGAGGAGGAACCAGGGTGCTAGTTAAACCAAATATCCAGAACCCTGACCCTGCCGTGTAC
CAGCTGAGAGACTCTAAATCCAGTGACAAGTCTGTCTGCCTATTCACCGATTTTGATTCTCA
AACAAATGTGTCACAAAGTAAGGATTCTGATGTGTATATCACAGACAAAACTGTGCTAGAC
ATGAGGTCTATGGACTTCAAGAGCAACAGTGCTGTGGCCTGGAGCAACAAATCTGACTTTG
CATGTGCAAACGCCTTCAACAACAGCATTATTCCAGAAGACACCTTCTTCCCCAGCCCAGAA
AGTTCCTGTGATGTCAAGCTGGTCGAGAAAAGCTTTGAAACAGATACGAACCTAAACTTTCA
AAACCTGTCAGTGATTGGGTTCCGAATCCTCCTCCTGAAAGTGGCCGGGTTTAATCTGCTCA
TCR beta
(SEQ ID NO: 10)
GAAAGTAACCCAGAGCTCGAGATATCTAGTCAAAAGGACGGGAGAGAAAGTTTTTCTGGAA
TGTGTCCAGGATATGGACCATGAAAATATGTTCTGGTATCGACAAGACCCAGGTCTGGGGCT
ACGGCTGATCTATTTCTCATATGATGTTAAAATGAAAGAAAAAGGAGATATTCCTGAGGGG
TACAGTGTCTCTAGAGAGAAGAAGGAGCGCTTCTCCCTGATTCTGGAGTCCGCCAGCACCA
ACCAGACATCTATGTACCTCTGTGCCAGCAGATTCCCCGGGACAGCCTATAATTCACCCCTC
CACTTTGGGAATGGGACCAGGCTCACTGTGACAGAGGACCTGAACAAGGTGTTCCCACCCG
AGGTCGCTGTGTTTGAGCCATCAGAAGCAGAGATCTCCCACACCCAAAAGGCCACACTGGT
GTGCCTGGCCACAGGCTTCTTCCCTGACCACGTGGAGCTGAGCTGGTGGGTGAATGGGAAG
GAGGTGCACAGTGGGGTCAGCACGGACCCGCAGCCCCTCAAGGAGCAGCCCGCCCTCAATG
ACTCCAGATACTGCCTGAGCAGCCGCCTGAGGGTCTCGGCCACCTTCTGGCAGAACCCCCGC
AACCACTTCCGCTGTCAAGTCCAGTTCTACGGGCTCTCGGAGAATGACGAGTGGACCCAGG
ATAGGGCCAAACCCGTCACCCAGATCGTCAGCGCCGAGGCCTGGGGTAGAGCAGACTGTGG
CTTTACCTCGGTGTCCTACCAGCAAGGGGTCCTGTCTGCCACCATCCTCTATGAGATCCTGCT
AGGGAAGGCCACCCTGTATGCTGTGCTGGTCAGCGCCCTTGTGTTGATGGCCATGGTCAAGA
(b) amino acid sequence of TCR α and β chains (TCR variable  
regions are in italic, CDR3 regions are in bold)
TCR α chain
(SEQ ID NO: 11)
MLLLLVPVLEVIFTLGGTRAQSVTQLGSHVSVSEGALVLLRCNYSSSVPP 
50
YLFWYVQYPNQGLQLLLKHITGATLVKGINGFEAEFKKSETSFHLTKPSA 
100
150
SSDKSVCLFTDFDSQTNVSQSKDSDVYITDKTVLDMRSMDFKSNSAVAWS 
200
NKSDFACANAFNNSIIPEDTFFPSPESSCDVKLVEKSFETDTNLNFQNLS 
250
VIGFRILLLKVAGFNLLMTLRLWSS 
TCR β chain
(SEQ ID NO: 12)
MGIRLLCRVAFCFLAVGLVDVKVTQSSRYLVKRTGEKVFLECVQDMDHEN 
50
MFWYRQDPGLGLRLIYFSYDVKMKEKGDIPEGYSVSREKKERFSLILESA 
100
150
SEAEISHTQKATLVCLATGFFPDHVELSWWVNGKEVHSGVSTDPQPLKEQ 
200
PALNDSRYCLSSRLRVSATFWQNPRNHFRCQVQFYGLSENDEWTQDRAKP 
250
VTQIVSAEAWGRADCGFTSVSYQQGVLSATILYEILLGKATLYAVLVSAL 
300
VLMAMVKRKDF 

Description of TCR expression vector. Viral transduction was performed using a murine stem cell virus vector pMSCV-derived plasmid such as pMIG-II and pMIG-w (FIG. 6A). TCR-expressing constructs were inserted into multiple cloning site (MCS) of pMIG plasmid. pMIG plasmids have IRES-GFP after multiple cloning sites so that transduction efficacy is monitored by GFP expression.

To induce equimolar expression of TCR α and β chain proteins, cDNAs encoding TCR α and β chain were connected by a linker sequence including P2A translation skipping site (FIG. 6B(I)). Using this sequence, mRNA is transcribed as one sequence. Because of the ribosomal skipping by P2A sequence, two proteins were translated from the mRNA, to produce TCRβ-P2A fusion protein and P(Pro)-TCRα chain protein.

To avoid potential functional inhibition by P2A peptides added after the TCR β chain protein in TCR-expressing cassette (I), another TCR-expressing cassette that introduces the furin protease recognition site (RAKR) after TCR β chain gene was constructed (FIG. 6B(II). In this expression cassette, additional peptide after the TCR β chain protein is removed by furin protease-mediated cleavage, resulting in expression of TCR α and β chain proteins with minimal modification. In particular, in expression cassettes with or without RAKR sequences, no amino acid is removed relative to the sequences presented herein. However, for a cassette without RAKR (FIG. 6B(I)), GSG linker and P2A sequences are attached to the C-terminus of beta chain, and a Proline (from P2A) is attached to the N-terminus of alpha chain. For a cassette with RAKR (FIG. 6B(II)), Arginine (from RAKR) is attached to the C-terminus of the beta chain and Proline (from P2A) is attached to the N-teminus of alpha chain. Thus, in embodiments, the expression vector encodes a fusion protein comprising TCR amino acid sequences. In embodiments, the only TCR amino acid sequence is selected from the TCR amino acid sequences presented herein.

The TCR-expressing sequences were cloned into multiple cloning site of pMIG plasmid. Retrovirus was produced transiently or stably using GP2-293 and PT67 packaging cell lines purchased from Clontech. Briefly, GP2-293 stably expresses viral gag-pol gene and they transiently produce after co-transfection with pMIG and pVSV-G VSV-G viral envelope-expressing plasmids. PT67 stably expresses viral gag-pol and 10A1 viral envelope genes. After infection with retrovirus produced from GP2-293, PT67 is integrated with the expression construct from pMIG, and therefore stably (continuously) produces retrovirus. In an embodiment, promoter activity of 5′-LTR (long terminal repeat) is used to drive transgene expression. However, other promoters such as EF-1α promoter can be introduced for enhancement of transgene expression.

Infection of retrovirus to PBMC-derived T cells. Whole PBMC were obtained by a density gradient separation method and stored in a liquid nitrogen tank in 90% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) until use. PBMC (3−4×106 cells/well in a 24-well culture plate) were polyclonally activated by 10 lag/ml phytohemaglutinin (PHA) for 2 days in culture medium (RPMI1640 medium containing 10% FBS, L-Glutamine, Streptomycin, Penicillin and human recombinant IL-2). 1×105 preactivated PBMC in 100 μl culture medium were added to wells of a 96-well culture plate pre-coated with 20-25 μg/ml retronectin in PBS and blocked with 2% bovine serum albumin (BSA) in PBS. In some experiments, 5 μg/ml anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (Clone:OKT3) was co-coated with retronectin. 100 μl supernatant containing retrovirus was added to PBMC and incubated for 24 hours. Retrovirus infection was performed 2-3 times every 24 hours. After infection, cells were expanded for 10-14 days and used for functional assays.

Results

High-titer retrovirus-producing PT67 clones were established. The following retrovirus-producing clones were established.

    • (1) pMIG-II/JM-TCR(II)
    • (2) pMIG-II/SB95 -TCR(II)
    • (3) pMIG-w/JM-TCR(I)
    • (4) pMIG-w/SB95-TCR(I)
    • (5) pMIG-w/JM-TCR(II)
    • (6) pMIG-w/SB95-TCR(II)

In the enumerated list above, (I) and (II) refer to expression cassettes without and with the furin protease recognition site (RAKR), respectively, as shown in FIG. 6B. The transduction efficacy measured by GFP expression after a single infection to Jurkat cells was: 60% for (1); 55% for (2); 75% for (3); 75% for (4); 64% for (5); and 62% for (6).

Retrovirus vectors (1) and (2) were transduced to polyclonally activated PBMC. Transduction efficacy as measured by GFP expression was about 40-50%. The reactivity of retrovirally expressed TCR was tested against the same NY-ESO-1-derived cognate peptides (NY-ESO-1:91-110 for SB95-TCR and NY-ESO-1:157-170 for JM-TCR) that were recognized by the original TR-CD4 clones. Significantly more IFN-γ was produced against peptide-pulsed target cells than peptide-unpulsed target cells (FIG. 7), which demonstrates that the cloned TCR genes are functional to transfer the same antigen specificity of original TR-CD4 clones when they are transduced by viral vectors. Functional testing of the remaining TCR expression vectors can be performed in the same manner, such as by infecting activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with retrovirus carrying any TCR gene disclosed herein. TCR gene-transduced and untransduced cells can be cocultured for 24 hours with NY-ESO-1-expressing cell lines or tumor samples, and IFN-γ produced by the transduced cells determined using any suitable means, such as by ELISA. IFN-γ level in the supernatant by TCR gene-transduced cells will be higher when co-cultured with cells that express NY-ESO-1 or NY-ESO-1 peptide-pulsed cells, whereas cells cocultured with cells that do not express NY-ESO-1 will have significantly less IFN-γ production. Likewise, negative controls, such as untransduced cells, will have significantly less IFN-γ production. Thus, transfection with a representative recombinant TCR will result in the capability of the cells into which a polynucleotide encoding the TCR to have the same antigen-specificity which directly recognizes NY-ESO-1 antigen on cancer cells.

Although the invention has been described in detail for the purposes of illustration, it is understood that such detail is solely for that purpose, and variations can be made therein by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention which is defined by the following claims.

<160> NUMBER OF SEQ ID NOS: 12

<210> SEQ ID NO: 1

<211> LENGTH: 798

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 1

atgaagttgg tgacaagcat tactgtactc ctatctttgg gtattatggg tgatgctaag 60

accacacagc caaattcaat ggagagtaac gaagaagagc ctgttcactt gccttgtaac 120

cactccacaa tcagtggaac tgattacata cattggtatc gacagcttcc ctcccagggt 180

ccagagtacg tgattcatgg tcttacaagc aatgtgaaca acagaatggc ctctctggca 240

atcgctgaag acagaaagtc cagtaccttg atcctgcacc gtgctacctt gagagatgct 300

gctgtgtact actgcatccc taataacaat gacatgcgct ttggagcagg gaccagactg 360

acagtaaaac caaatatcca gaaccctgac cctgccgtgt accagctgag agactctaaa 420

tccagtgaca agtctgtctg cctattcacc gattttgatt ctcaaacaaa tgtgtcacaa 480

agtaaggatt ctgatgtgta tatcacagac aaaactgtgc tagacatgag gtctatggac 540

ttcaagagca acagtgctgt ggcctggagc aacaaatctg actttgcatg tgcaaacgcc 600

ttcaacaaca gcattattcc agaagacacc ttcttcccca gcccagaaag ttcctgtgat 660

gtcaagctgg tcgagaaaag ctttgaaaca gatacgaacc taaactttca aaacctgtca 720

gtgattgggt tccgaatcct cctcctgaaa gtggccgggt ttaatctgct catgacgctg 780

cggctgtggt ccagctga 798

<210> SEQ ID NO: 2

<211> LENGTH: 798

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 2

atgaagttgg tgacaagcat tactgtactc ctatctttgg gtattatggg tgatgctaag 60

accacacagc caaattcaat ggagagtaac gaagaagagc ctgttcactt gccttgtaac 120

cactccacaa tcagtggaac tgattacata cattggtatc gacagcttcc ctcccagggt 180

ccagagtacg tgattcatgg tcttacaagc aatgtgaaca acagaatggc ctctctggca 240

atcgctgaag acagaaagtc cagtaccttg atcctgcacc gtgctacctt gagagatgct 300

gctgtgtact actgcatccc taataacaat gacatgcgct ttggagcagg gaccagactg 360

acagtaaaac caaatatcca gaaccctgac cctgccgtgt accagctgag agactctaaa 420

tccagtgaca agtctgtctg cctattcacc gattttgatt ctcaaacaaa tgtgtcacaa 480

agtaaggatt ctgatgtgta tatcacagac aaaactgtgc tagacatgag gtctatggac 540

ttcaagagca acagtgctgt ggcctggagc aacaaatctg actttgcatg tgcaaacgcc 600

ttcaacaaca gcattattcc agaagacacc ttcttcccca gcccagaaag ttcctgtgat 660

gtcaagctgg tcgagaaaag ctttgaaaca gatacgaacc taaactttca aaacctgtca 720

gtgattgggt tccgaatcct cctcctgaaa gtggccgggt ttaatctgct catgacgctg 780

cggctgtggt ccagctga 798

<210> SEQ ID NO: 3

<211> LENGTH: 265

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 3

Met Lys Leu Val Thr Ser Ile Thr Val Leu Leu Ser Leu Gly Ile Met

1 5 10 15

Gly Asp Ala Lys Thr Thr Gln Pro Asn Ser Met Glu Ser Asn Glu Glu

20 25 30

Glu Pro Val His Leu Pro Cys Asn His Ser Thr Ile Ser Gly Thr Asp

35 40 45

Tyr Ile His Trp Tyr Arg Gln Leu Pro Ser Gln Gly Pro Glu Tyr Val

50 55 60

Ile His Gly Leu Thr Ser Asn Val Asn Asn Arg Met Ala Ser Leu Ala

65 70 75 80

Ile Ala Glu Asp Arg Lys Ser Ser Thr Leu Ile Leu His Arg Ala Thr

85 90 95

Leu Arg Asp Ala Ala Val Tyr Tyr Cys Ile Pro Asn Asn Asn Asp Met

100 105 110

Arg Phe Gly Ala Gly Thr Arg Leu Thr Val Lys Pro Asn Ile Gln Asn

115 120 125

Pro Asp Pro Ala Val Tyr Gln Leu Arg Asp Ser Lys Ser Ser Asp Lys

130 135 140

Ser Val Cys Leu Phe Thr Asp Phe Asp Ser Gln Thr Asn Val Ser Gln

145 150 155 160

Ser Lys Asp Ser Asp Val Tyr Ile Thr Asp Lys Thr Val Leu Asp Met

165 170 175

Arg Ser Met Asp Phe Lys Ser Asn Ser Ala Val Ala Trp Ser Asn Lys

180 185 190

Ser Asp Phe Ala Cys Ala Asn Ala Phe Asn Asn Ser Ile Ile Pro Glu

195 200 205

Asp Thr Phe Phe Pro Ser Pro Glu Ser Ser Cys Asp Val Lys Leu Val

210 215 220

Glu Lys Ser Phe Glu Thr Asp Thr Asn Leu Asn Phe Gln Asn Leu Ser

225 230 235 240

Val Ile Gly Phe Arg Ile Leu Leu Leu Lys Val Ala Gly Phe Asn Leu

245 250 255

Leu Met Thr Leu Arg Leu Trp Ser Ser

260 265

<210> SEQ ID NO: 4

<211> LENGTH: 310

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 4

Met Gly Ser Arg Leu Leu Cys Trp Val Leu Leu Cys Leu Leu Gly Ala

1 5 10 15

Gly Pro Val Lys Ala Gly Val Thr Gln Thr Pro Arg Tyr Leu Ile Lys

20 25 30

Thr Arg Gly Gln Gln Val Thr Leu Ser Cys Ser Pro Ile Ser Gly His

35 40 45

Arg Ser Val Ser Trp Tyr Gln Gln Thr Pro Gly Gln Gly Leu Gln Phe

50 55 60

Leu Phe Glu Tyr Phe Ser Glu Thr Gln Arg Asn Lys Gly Asn Phe Pro

65 70 75 80

Gly Arg Phe Ser Gly Arg Gln Phe Ser Asn Ser Arg Ser Glu Met Asn

85 90 95

Val Ser Thr Leu Glu Leu Gly Asp Ser Ala Leu Tyr Leu Cys Ala Ser

100 105 110

Ser Phe Pro Arg Glu Pro Asn Tyr Gly Tyr Thr Phe Gly Ser Gly Thr

115 120 125

Arg Leu Thr Val Val Glu Asp Leu Asn Lys Val Phe Pro Pro Glu Val

130 135 140

Ala Val Phe Glu Pro Ser Glu Ala Glu Ile Ser His Thr Gln Lys Ala

145 150 155 160

Thr Leu Val Cys Leu Ala Thr Gly Phe Phe Pro Asp His Val Glu Leu

165 170 175

Ser Trp Trp Val Asn Gly Lys Glu Val His Ser Gly Val Ser Thr Asp

180 185 190

Pro Gln Pro Leu Lys Glu Gln Pro Ala Leu Asn Asp Ser Arg Tyr Cys

195 200 205

Leu Ser Ser Arg Leu Arg Val Ser Ala Thr Phe Trp Gln Asn Pro Arg

210 215 220

Asn His Phe Arg Cys Gln Val Gln Phe Tyr Gly Leu Ser Glu Asn Asp

225 230 235 240

Glu Trp Thr Gln Asp Arg Ala Lys Pro Val Thr Gln Ile Val Ser Ala

245 250 255

Glu Ala Trp Gly Arg Ala Asp Cys Gly Phe Thr Ser Val Ser Tyr Gln

260 265 270

Gln Gly Val Leu Ser Ala Thr Ile Leu Tyr Glu Ile Leu Leu Gly Lys

275 280 285

Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Val Leu Val Ser Ala Leu Val Leu Met Ala Met

290 295 300

Val Lys Arg Lys Asp Phe

305 310

<210> SEQ ID NO: 5

<211> LENGTH: 780

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 5

atggcccaga cagtcactca gtctcaacca gagatgtctg tgcaggaggc agagactgtg 60

accctgagtt gcacatatga caccagtgag aataattatt atttgttctg gtacaagcag 120

cctcccagca ggcagatgat tctcgttatt cgccaagaag cttataagca acagaatgca 180

acggagaatc gtttctctgt gaacttccag aaagcagcca aatccttcag tctcaagatc 240

tcagactcac agctggggga cactgcgatg tatttctgtg ctttctcgag agggagtgga 300

ggtagcaact ataaactgac atttggaaaa ggaactctct taaccgtgaa tccaaatatc 360

cagaaccctg accctgccgt gtaccagctg agagactcta aatccagtga caagtctgtc 420

tgcctattca ccgattttga ttctcaaaca aatgtgtcac aaagtaagga ttctgatgtg 480

tatatcacag acaaaactgt gctagacatg aggtctatgg acttcaagag caacagtgct 540

gtggcctgga gcaacaaatc tgactttgca tgtgcaaacg ccttcaacaa cagcattatt 600

ccagaagaca ccttcttccc cagcccagaa agttcctgtg atgtcaagct ggtcgagaaa 660

agctttgaaa cagatacgaa cctaaacttt caaaacctgt cagtgattgg gttccgaatc 720

ctcctcctga aagtggccgg gtttaatctg ctcatgacgc tgcggctgtg gtccagctga 780

<210> SEQ ID NO: 6

<211> LENGTH: 942

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 6

atgggcacca ggctcctctt ctgggtggcc ttctgtctcc tgggggcaga tcacacagga 60

gctggagtct cccagtcccc cagtaacaag gtcacagaga agggaaagga tgtagagctc 120

aggtgtgatc caatttcagg tcatactgcc ctttactggt accgacagag cctggggcag 180

ggcctggagt ttttaattta cttccaaggc aacagtgcac cagacaaatc agggctgccc 240

agtgatcgct tctctgcaga gaggactggg ggatccgtct ccactctgac gatccagcgc 300

acacagcagg aggactcggc cgtgtatctc tgtgccagca gcttagtccc cgacagtgcc 360

tacgagcagt acttcgggcc gggcaccagg ctcacggtca cagaggacct gaaaaacgtg 420

ttcccacccg aggtcgctgt gtttgagcca tcagaagcag agatctccca cacccaaaag 480

gccacactgg tatgcctggc cacaggcttc taccccgacc acgtggagct gagctggtgg 540

gtgaatggga aggaggtgca cagtggggtc agcacggacc cgcagcccct caaggagcag 600

cccgccctca atgactccag atactgcctg agcagccgcc tgagggtctc ggccaccttc 660

tggcagaacc cccgcaacca cttccgctgt caagtccagt tctacgggct ctcggagaat 720

gacgagtgga cccaggatag ggccaaacct gtcacccaga tcgtcagcgc cgaggcctgg 780

ggtagagcag actgtggctt cacctccgag tcttaccagc aaggggtcct gtctgccacc 840

atcctctatg agatcttgct agggaaggcc accttgtatg ccgtgctggt cagtgccctc 900

gtgctgatgg ccatggtcaa gagaaaggat tccagaggct ag 942

<210> SEQ ID NO: 7

<211> LENGTH: 259

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 7

Met Ala Gln Thr Val Thr Gln Ser Gln Pro Glu Met Ser Val Gln Glu

1 5 10 15

Ala Glu Thr Val Thr Leu Ser Cys Thr Tyr Asp Thr Ser Glu Asn Asn

20 25 30

Tyr Tyr Leu Phe Trp Tyr Lys Gln Pro Pro Ser Arg Gln Met Ile Leu

35 40 45

Val Ile Arg Gln Glu Ala Tyr Lys Gln Gln Asn Ala Thr Glu Asn Arg

50 55 60

Phe Ser Val Asn Phe Gln Lys Ala Ala Lys Ser Phe Ser Leu Lys Ile

65 70 75 80

Ser Asp Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Thr Ala Met Tyr Phe Cys Ala Phe Ser

85 90 95

Arg Gly Ser Gly Gly Ser Asn Tyr Lys Leu Thr Phe Gly Lys Gly Thr

100 105 110

Leu Leu Thr Val Asn Pro Asn Ile Gln Asn Pro Asp Pro Ala Val Tyr

115 120 125

Gln Leu Arg Asp Ser Lys Ser Ser Asp Lys Ser Val Cys Leu Phe Thr

130 135 140

Asp Phe Asp Ser Gln Thr Asn Val Ser Gln Ser Lys Asp Ser Asp Val

145 150 155 160

Tyr Ile Thr Asp Lys Thr Val Leu Asp Met Arg Ser Met Asp Phe Lys

165 170 175

Ser Asn Ser Ala Val Ala Trp Ser Asn Lys Ser Asp Phe Ala Cys Ala

180 185 190

Asn Ala Phe Asn Asn Ser Ile Ile Pro Glu Asp Thr Phe Phe Pro Ser

195 200 205

Pro Glu Ser Ser Cys Asp Val Lys Leu Val Glu Lys Ser Phe Glu Thr

210 215 220

Asp Thr Asn Leu Asn Phe Gln Asn Leu Ser Val Ile Gly Phe Arg Ile

225 230 235 240

Leu Leu Leu Lys Val Ala Gly Phe Asn Leu Leu Met Thr Leu Arg Leu

245 250 255

Trp Ser Ser

<210> SEQ ID NO: 8

<211> LENGTH: 313

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 8

Met Gly Thr Arg Leu Leu Phe Trp Val Ala Phe Cys Leu Leu Gly Ala

1 5 10 15

Asp His Thr Gly Ala Gly Val Ser Gln Ser Pro Ser Asn Lys Val Thr

20 25 30

Glu Lys Gly Lys Asp Val Glu Leu Arg Cys Asp Pro Ile Ser Gly His

35 40 45

Thr Ala Leu Tyr Trp Tyr Arg Gln Ser Leu Gly Gln Gly Leu Glu Phe

50 55 60

Leu Ile Tyr Phe Gln Gly Asn Ser Ala Pro Asp Lys Ser Gly Leu Pro

65 70 75 80

Ser Asp Arg Phe Ser Ala Glu Arg Thr Gly Gly Ser Val Ser Thr Leu

85 90 95

Thr Ile Gln Arg Thr Gln Gln Glu Asp Ser Ala Val Tyr Leu Cys Ala

100 105 110

Ser Ser Leu Val Pro Asp Ser Ala Tyr Glu Gln Tyr Phe Gly Pro Gly

115 120 125

Thr Arg Leu Thr Val Thr Glu Asp Leu Lys Asn Val Phe Pro Pro Glu

130 135 140

Val Ala Val Phe Glu Pro Ser Glu Ala Glu Ile Ser His Thr Gln Lys

145 150 155 160

Ala Thr Leu Val Cys Leu Ala Thr Gly Phe Tyr Pro Asp His Val Glu

165 170 175

Leu Ser Trp Trp Val Asn Gly Lys Glu Val His Ser Gly Val Ser Thr

180 185 190

Asp Pro Gln Pro Leu Lys Glu Gln Pro Ala Leu Asn Asp Ser Arg Tyr

195 200 205

Cys Leu Ser Ser Arg Leu Arg Val Ser Ala Thr Phe Trp Gln Asn Pro

210 215 220

Arg Asn His Phe Arg Cys Gln Val Gln Phe Tyr Gly Leu Ser Glu Asn

225 230 235 240

Asp Glu Trp Thr Gln Asp Arg Ala Lys Pro Val Thr Gln Ile Val Ser

245 250 255

Ala Glu Ala Trp Gly Arg Ala Asp Cys Gly Phe Thr Ser Glu Ser Tyr

260 265 270

Gln Gln Gly Val Leu Ser Ala Thr Ile Leu Tyr Glu Ile Leu Leu Gly

275 280 285

Lys Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Val Leu Val Ser Ala Leu Val Leu Met Ala

290 295 300

Met Val Lys Arg Lys Asp Ser Arg Gly

305 310

<210> SEQ ID NO: 9

<211> LENGTH: 828

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 9

atgctcctgc tgctcgtccc agtgctcgag gtgattttta ccctgggagg aaccagagcc 60

cagtcggtga cccagcttgg cagccacgtc tctgtctctg agggagccct ggttctgctg 120

aggtgcaact actcatcgtc tgttccacca tatctcttct ggtatgtgca ataccccaac 180

caaggactcc agcttctcct gaagcacaca acaggggcca ccctggttaa aggcatcaac 240

ggttttgagg ctgaatttaa gaagagtgaa acctccttcc acctgacgaa accctcagcc 300

catatgagcg acgcggctga gtacttctgt gctgtgagtg attctagggc tgcaggcaac 360

aagctaactt ttggaggagg aaccagggtg ctagttaaac caaatatcca gaaccctgac 420

cctgccgtgt accagctgag agactctaaa tccagtgaca agtctgtctg cctattcacc 480

gattttgatt ctcaaacaaa tgtgtcacaa agtaaggatt ctgatgtgta tatcacagac 540

aaaactgtgc tagacatgag gtctatggac ttcaagagca acagtgctgt ggcctggagc 600

aacaaatctg actttgcatg tgcaaacgcc ttcaacaaca gcattattcc agaagacacc 660

ttcttcccca gcccagaaag ttcctgtgat gtcaagctgg tcgagaaaag ctttgaaaca 720

gatacgaacc taaactttca aaacctgtca gtgattgggt tccgaatcct cctcctgaaa 780

gtggccgggt ttaatctgct catgacgctg cggctgtggt ccagctga 828

<210> SEQ ID NO: 10

<211> LENGTH: 936

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 10

atgggaatca ggctcctctg tcgtgtggcc ttttgtttcc tggctgtagg cctcgtagat 60

gtgaaagtaa cccagagctc gagatatcta gtcaaaagga cgggagagaa agtttttctg 120

gaatgtgtcc aggatatgga ccatgaaaat atgttctggt atcgacaaga cccaggtctg 180

gggctacggc tgatctattt ctcatatgat gttaaaatga aagaaaaagg agatattcct 240

gaggggtaca gtgtctctag agagaagaag gagcgcttct ccctgattct ggagtccgcc 300

agcaccaacc agacatctat gtacctctgt gccagcagat tccccgggac agcctataat 360

tcacccctcc actttgggaa tgggaccagg ctcactgtga cagaggacct gaacaaggtg 420

ttcccacccg aggtcgctgt gtttgagcca tcagaagcag agatctccca cacccaaaag 480

gccacactgg tgtgcctggc cacaggcttc ttccctgacc acgtggagct gagctggtgg 540

gtgaatggga aggaggtgca cagtggggtc agcacggacc cgcagcccct caaggagcag 600

cccgccctca atgactccag atactgcctg agcagccgcc tgagggtctc ggccaccttc 660

tggcagaacc cccgcaacca cttccgctgt caagtccagt tctacgggct ctcggagaat 720

gacgagtgga cccaggatag ggccaaaccc gtcacccaga tcgtcagcgc cgaggcctgg 780

ggtagagcag actgtggctt tacctcggtg tcctaccagc aaggggtcct gtctgccacc 840

atcctctatg agatcctgct agggaaggcc accctgtatg ctgtgctggt cagcgccctt 900

gtgttgatgg ccatggtcaa gagaaaggat ttctga 936

<210> SEQ ID NO: 11

<211> LENGTH: 275

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 11

Met Leu Leu Leu Leu Val Pro Val Leu Glu Val Ile Phe Thr Leu Gly

1 5 10 15

Gly Thr Arg Ala Gln Ser Val Thr Gln Leu Gly Ser His Val Ser Val

20 25 30

Ser Glu Gly Ala Leu Val Leu Leu Arg Cys Asn Tyr Ser Ser Ser Val

35 40 45

Pro Pro Tyr Leu Phe Trp Tyr Val Gln Tyr Pro Asn Gln Gly Leu Gln

50 55 60

Leu Leu Leu Lys His Thr Thr Gly Ala Thr Leu Val Lys Gly Ile Asn

65 70 75 80

Gly Phe Glu Ala Glu Phe Lys Lys Ser Glu Thr Ser Phe His Leu Thr

85 90 95

Lys Pro Ser Ala His Met Ser Asp Ala Ala Glu Tyr Phe Cys Ala Val

100 105 110

Ser Asp Ser Arg Ala Ala Gly Asn Lys Leu Thr Phe Gly Gly Gly Thr

115 120 125

Arg Val Leu Val Lys Pro Asn Ile Gln Asn Pro Asp Pro Ala Val Tyr

130 135 140

Gln Leu Arg Asp Ser Lys Ser Ser Asp Lys Ser Val Cys Leu Phe Thr

145 150 155 160

Asp Phe Asp Ser Gln Thr Asn Val Ser Gln Ser Lys Asp Ser Asp Val

165 170 175

Tyr Ile Thr Asp Lys Thr Val Leu Asp Met Arg Ser Met Asp Phe Lys

180 185 190

Ser Asn Ser Ala Val Ala Trp Ser Asn Lys Ser Asp Phe Ala Cys Ala

195 200 205

Asn Ala Phe Asn Asn Ser Ile Ile Pro Glu Asp Thr Phe Phe Pro Ser

210 215 220

Pro Glu Ser Ser Cys Asp Val Lys Leu Val Glu Lys Ser Phe Glu Thr

225 230 235 240

Asp Thr Asn Leu Asn Phe Gln Asn Leu Ser Val Ile Gly Phe Arg Ile

245 250 255

Leu Leu Leu Lys Val Ala Gly Phe Asn Leu Leu Met Thr Leu Arg Leu

260 265 270

Trp Ser Ser

275

<210> SEQ ID NO: 12

<211> LENGTH: 311

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: human

<400> SEQENCE: 12

Met Gly Ile Arg Leu Leu Cys Arg Val Ala Phe Cys Phe Leu Ala Val

1 5 10 15

Gly Leu Val Asp Val Lys Val Thr Gln Ser Ser Arg Tyr Leu Val Lys

20 25 30

Arg Thr Gly Glu Lys Val Phe Leu Glu Cys Val Gln Asp Met Asp His

35 40 45

Glu Asn Met Phe Trp Tyr Arg Gln Asp Pro Gly Leu Gly Leu Arg Leu

50 55 60

Ile Tyr Phe Ser Tyr Asp Val Lys Met Lys Glu Lys Gly Asp Ile Pro

65 70 75 80

Glu Gly Tyr Ser Val Ser Arg Glu Lys Lys Glu Arg Phe Ser Leu Ile

85 90 95

Leu Glu Ser Ala Ser Thr Asn Gln Thr Ser Met Tyr Leu Cys Ala Ser

100 105 110

Arg Phe Pro Gly Thr Ala Tyr Asn Ser Pro Leu His Phe Gly Asn Gly

115 120 125

Thr Arg Leu Thr Val Thr Glu Asp Leu Asn Lys Val Phe Pro Pro Glu

130 135 140

Val Ala Val Phe Glu Pro Ser Glu Ala Glu Ile Ser His Thr Gln Lys

145 150 155 160

Ala Thr Leu Val Cys Leu Ala Thr Gly Phe Phe Pro Asp His Val Glu

165 170 175

Leu Ser Trp Trp Val Asn Gly Lys Glu Val His Ser Gly Val Ser Thr

180 185 190

Asp Pro Gln Pro Leu Lys Glu Gln Pro Ala Leu Asn Asp Ser Arg Tyr

195 200 205

Cys Leu Ser Ser Arg Leu Arg Val Ser Ala Thr Phe Trp Gln Asn Pro

210 215 220

Arg Asn His Phe Arg Cys Gln Val Gln Phe Tyr Gly Leu Ser Glu Asn

225 230 235 240

Asp Glu Trp Thr Gln Asp Arg Ala Lys Pro Val Thr Gln Ile Val Ser

245 250 255

Ala Glu Ala Trp Gly Arg Ala Asp Cys Gly Phe Thr Ser Val Ser Tyr

260 265 270

Gln Gln Gly Val Leu Ser Ala Thr Ile Leu Tyr Glu Ile Leu Leu Gly

275 280 285

Lys Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Val Leu Val Ser Ala Leu Val Leu Met Ala

290 295 300

Met Val Lys Arg Lys Asp Phe

305 310

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Patent Valuation

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24.87/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

38.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

72.49/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

55.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

24.96/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Methods and compositions relating to isoleucine boroproline compounds DARA BIOSCIENCES, INC. 09 July 2003 22 April 2004
Methods for up-regualting antigen expression of tumors CYTOCURE LLC 29 August 2003 16 December 2004
Mhc multimers, methods for their generation, labeling and use DAKO DENMARK A/S 22 December 2009 01 July 2010
Novel MHC class ii restricted t cell epitopes from the cancer anitgen, ny ESO-1 THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AS REPRESENTED BY THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 28 September 2009 28 January 2010
MHC Multimers in Cancer Vaccines and Immune Monitoring DAKO DENMARK A/S 01 October 2009 29 December 2011
See full citation <>

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