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Patent Analysis of

Gene for increasing plant weight and method for using the same

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10000764

Application Number

US15/045853

Application Date

17 February 2016

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

TOYOTA JIDOSHA KABUSHIKI KAISHA

Original Assignee (Applicant)

TOYOTA JIDOSHA KABUSHIKI KAISHA

International Classification

C12N15/82,C07K14/415

Cooperative Classification

C12N15/8247,C07K14/415,C12N15/82,C12N15/8261

Inventor

KONDO, SATOSHI,OHTO, CHIKARA,TAKAGI, MASARU,MATSUI, KYOKO,KOYAMA, TOMOTSUGU,MITSUDA, NOBUTAKA,MURAMOTO, NOBUHIKO,MITSUKAWA, NORIHIRO,TANAKA, TOMOKO

Abstract

A gene having novel functions is searched for, by which plant weight (that is, biomass level) can be increased and by which substance productivity can be increased or decreased. A chimeric protein is expressed in which a transcriptional factor comprising the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2, 4, or 6 is fused to a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor into a transcriptional repression factor.

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Claims

1. A method for producing a plant exhibiting an improved biomass level and having an improved productivity of a substance per individual plant compared with a wild type plant, comprising the steps of: introducing a fusion gene into a plant, wherein the fusion gene codes for a chimeric protein comprising a transcriptional factor comprising any one of the following proteins (a) to (b) and a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor into a transcriptional repression factor:(a) a protein comprising the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2; and(b) a protein comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 2 but with 1-20 amino acid changes, wherein said amino acid changes are selected from the group consisting of a deletion, a substitution, an addition, and an insertion, and wherein the protein has an activity of accelerating transcription, and selecting a plant having the introduced fusion gene, exhibiting an improved biomass level and having an improved productivity of a substance compared with a wild type plant.

2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the activity of accelerating transcription of the transcriptional factor is suppressed.

3. The method according to claim 1, wherein the chimeric protein has transcriptional repression factor activity.

4. The method according to claim 1, wherein the functional peptide has the amino acid sequence represented by any one of the following formulae (1) to (8):

X1-Leu-Asp-Leu-X2-Leu-X3 (SEQ ID NO: 14 with deletion of 0-10 residues from the N-terminus)  (1)(wherein X1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, X2 denotes Asn or Glu, and X3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues);

Y1-Phe-Asp-Leu-Asn-Y2-Y3 (SEQ ID NO: 15 with deletion of 0-10 residues from the N-terminus)  (2)(wherein Y1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, Y2 denotes Phe or Ile, and Y3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues);

Z1-Asp-Leu-Z2-Leu-Arg-Leu-Z3 (SEQ ID NO: 16 with deletion of 0-10 residues from the C-terminus and deletion of 0-2 residues from the N-terminus)  (3)(wherein Z1 denotes Leu, Asp-Leu, or Leu-Asp-Leu, Z2 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp, and Z3 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues);

Asp-Leu-Z4-Leu-Arg-Leu (SEQ ID NO: 17)  (4)(wherein Z4 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp);

α1-Leu-β1-Leu-γ1-Leu (SEQ ID NO: 18);  (5)

α1-Leu-β1-Leu-γ2-Leu (SEQ ID NO: 19);  (6)

α1-Leu-β1-Leu-Arg-Leu (SEQ ID NO: 20); and  (7)

α2-Leu-β1-Leu-Arg-Leu (SEQ ID NO: 21)  (8)(and in the formulae (5) to (8), α1 denotes Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, α2 denotes Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, β1 denotes Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr, Ser, or His, β2 denotes Asn, Arg, Thr, Ser, or His, γ1 denotes Arg, Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp, and γ2 denotes Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp).

5. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plant weight is significantly improved.

6. The method according to claim 1, wherein the substance productivity per individual plant is productivity of fats and oils contained in seeds.

7. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plant is an angiosperm.

8. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plant is a dicotyledon.

9. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plant is a plant of the family Brassicaceae.

10. The method according to claim 1, wherein the plant is Arabidopsis thaliana.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method for producing a plant exhibiting an improved biomass level and having an improved productivity of a substance per individual plant compared with a wild type plant, comprising the steps of: introducing a fusion gene into a plant, wherein the fusion gene codes for a chimeric protein comprising a transcriptional factor comprising any one of the following proteins
    • (a) to
    • (b) and a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor into a transcriptional repression factor:(a) a protein comprising the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2; and(b) a protein comprising the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO: 2 but with 1-20 amino acid changes, wherein said amino acid changes are selected from the group consisting of a deletion, a substitution, an addition, and an insertion, and wherein the protein has an activity of accelerating transcription, and selecting a plant having the introduced fusion gene, exhibiting an improved biomass level and having an improved productivity of a substance compared with a wild type plant.
    • 2. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the activity of accelerating transcription of the transcriptional factor is suppressed.
    • 3. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the chimeric protein has transcriptional repression factor activity.
    • 4. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the functional peptide has the amino acid sequence represented by any one of the following formulae (1) to (8): X1-Leu-Asp-Leu-X2-Leu-X3 (SEQ ID NO: 14 with deletion of 0-10 residues from the N-terminus)  (1)( wherein
    • 5. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the plant weight is significantly improved.
    • 6. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the substance productivity per individual plant is productivity of fats and oils contained in seeds.
    • 7. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the plant is an angiosperm.
    • 8. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the plant is a dicotyledon.
    • 9. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the plant is a plant of the family Brassicaceae.
    • 10. The method according to claim 1, wherein
      • the plant is Arabidopsis thaliana.
See all independent claims <>

Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a gene for increasing plant weight and a method for using the same.

BACKGROUND ART

The term “biomass” generally refers to the total amount of organisms that inhabit or organic matter that exists in a given area. Particularly regarding plants, plant biomass refers to the dry weight of the plants that exists in a given area. The unit of such biomass is quantified using mass or energy level. The expression “biomass is a synonym of a term “an amount of an organism.” In the case of plant biomass, the term “standing crop” is also used. Plant biomass is generated by fixing carbon dioxide in the air using solar energy, so that it can be captured as so-called carbon neutral energy. Therefore, an increase in such plant biomass has effects of terrestrial environmental protection, prevention of global warming, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Hence, technologies for increasing plant biomass have high industrial importance.

In addition, plants are cultivated for their partial tissues (e.g., seeds, roots, and leaf stems) or for production of various substances such as fats and oils. For example, as fats and oils produced by plants, soybean oil, sesame oil, olive oil, coconut oil, rice oil, cottonseed oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, safflower oil, palm oil, rapeseed oil, and the like are conventionally known and broadly used for household or industrial applications. Also, fats and oils produced by plants are used as raw materials for biodiesel fuel or bioplastics, allowing the applicability thereof to spread as alternatives to petroleum as energy sources.

Under such circumstances, improvement of productivity per unit of cultivated area is required for industrially successful fat and oil production using plants. Assuming that the number of cultivated plants per unit of cultivated area remains constant, it is understood that improvement in fat and oil production per individual plant is needed. When fats and oils are collected from seeds harvested from plant bodies, it is expected that improved fat and oil production per individual plant can be achieved by a technology for improving the seed yield per individual plant, a technology for improving the fat and oil contents in seeds, or the like.

Technologies for increasing the fat and oil production from plant seeds are mainly divided into those based on improved cultivation techniques and those based on development of cultivars for increased fat and oil production. Methods for developing cultivars with increased fat and oil production are mainly divided into conventional breeding techniques mainly composed of mating technologies and molecular breeding methods using genetic recombination. As technologies for increased fat and oil production using genetic recombination, A) a technology that involves altering the synthesis system for seed triacylglycerol (TAG), which is a major ingredient of plant fats and oils, and B) a technology that involves altering various control genes for controlling plant morphological formation, metabolism, and the expression of genes involved therein are known.

Possible examples of method A) above include methods for increasing the amount of TAG synthesized using sugar produced by photosynthesis as a raw material. These include (1) a method that involves enhancing activity for the synthesis of fatty acid or glycerol, which is a component of TAG from sugar; and (2) a method for enhancing the reaction by which TAG is synthesized from glycerol and fatty acid. Concerning such methods, the following technologies have been reported as technologies using genetic engineering techniques. An example of (1) is provided in a report (Plant Physiology (1997) Vol. 11, pp. 75-81) wherein it was noted that seed fat and oil contents were improved by 5% via overexpression of cytoplasmic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) of Arabidopsis thaliana in rapeseed plastids. Also, an example of (2) is provided in a report (Plant Physiology (2001), Vol. 126, pp. 861-874) concerning a technology for increased fat and oil production via overexpression of DGAT (diacylglycerol acyltransferase), which undergoes acyl transfer to the sn-3 position of diacylglycerol. In the report regarding this method, fat and oil contents and seed weights were increased as the DGAT expression levels were increased, so that the number of seeds per individual plant could increase. Arabidopsis thaliana seed fat and oil content was increased by 46% with the use of this method, and the fat and oil content per individual plant was increased by approximately 125% at maximum.

In addition, a possible example of method B) above is a method that involves controlling the expression of a transcriptional factor gene involved in control of the expression of a biosynthesis system enzyme gene. An example thereof is given in WO01/36597. In WO01/36597, a technique was employed that involves producing recombinant plants through exhaustive overexpression or knock-out of a transcriptional factor and then selecting a gene that enhances seed fat and oil contents. WO01/36597 states that seed fat and oil contents were increased by 23% through overexpression of the ERF subfamily B-4 transcriptional factor gene. However, WO01/36597 does not state increases or decreases in the fat and oil content per individual plant. Plant J. (2004) 40, 575-585 describes that seed fat and oil contents can be improved by overexpression of WRINKLED1, the transcriptional factor containing the AP2/EREB domain.

Furthermore, when a hydrocarbon component such as cellulose contained in plant bodies is glycosylated and then alcohol is produced by fermentation, fat and oil components contained in plants become impurities that can cause reduced glycosylation efficiency in a glycosylation step. Therefore, if fat and oil contents can be decreased, glycosylation efficiency in a glycosylation step can be improved and thus improved alcohol productivity can be expected. For example, Plant J. (2004) 40, 575-585 discloses that in the case of the WRI1/ASML1 (AP2 family transcriptional factor; AGI-code: AT3g54320)-deficient line, seeds were wrinkled and the fat and oil contents were decreased. Furthermore, WO01/35727 discloses the following: the seed fat and oil content was decreased by 13% through overexpression of AT3g23250 (MYB15); the seed fat and oil content was decreased by 12% through overexpression of AT1g04550 (IAA12); and the seed fat and oil content was decreased by 16% through overexpression of AT1g66390 (MYB90).

Moreover, several attempts to improve biomass have been carried out. For example, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 2000, Jan. 18: 97(2), 942-947 discloses that plant organ cell number, organ size, and individual plant size were increased through overexpression of the At4g37750 (AINTEGUMENTA) gene. Similarly, Plant Cell, 2003, September; 15(9), 1951-1961 discloses that when overexpression of At2g44080 (ARL) was caused, plant organ cell number, organ size, and individual plant size were increased. Also, Plant J. (2006) July, 47(1), 1-9 discloses that cell division was activated through overexpression of At1g105690 (AVP1), so that individual plant size was increased. Furthermore, Development 2006, January; 133 (2), 251-261 reports that when At5g62000 (ARF2) was deficient, seeds and flower organs became larger in size.

However, although the above molecular breeding methods for improvement of various characters have been developed, no technology has reached a practical level that would allow both increased biomass and improved or decreased fat and oil productivity.

This may be because truly excellent genes remain undiscovered and because novel recombinant cultivars effective at test stages are unable to exert effects as desired at practical stages under various natural environments. Furthermore, regarding quantitative character such as increased plant weight and productivity of a target substance, many genes are involved in various steps, ranging from control systems to metabolic systems. Hence, it has been difficult to discover and develop a truly excellent useful gene for improvement of quantitative characters. Objects required to address these problems are: discovery of a novel gene with drastically high effects; and development of a gene capable of exerting effects under practical environmental conditions, even if its effect levels are equivalent to those of conventional genes. Furthermore, it is expected that practical levels would be achieved by the simultaneous use of a plural number of genes, even if each of the genes has effect level equivalent to or lower than those of conventional genes. Accordingly, another object is to develop a plurality of genes having different functions.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

Object to be Achieved by the Invention

In view of the above-described circumstances, an object of the invention is to search for a gene having novel functions by which plant weight (that is, plant biomass level) can be increased and by means of which substance productivity can be increased or decreased, so as to provide a technology capable of improving the properties of plant bodies.

Means to Achieve the Object

As a result of intensive studies to achieve the above objects, the present inventors have discovered, that various quantitative characters can be improved, through expression of a chimeric protein in which a specific transcriptional factor is fused to a functional peptide (hereinafter, this may also be referred to as a repressor domain) that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor. Particularly, the present inventors have discovered that plant weight (that is, plant biomass level) can be increased and that substance productivity can be increased or decreased. Thus, the present inventors have completed the present invention.

The plant body according to the present invention expresses a chimeric protein wherein a transcriptional factor comprising any one of the following proteins (a) to (c) is fused to a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor:

(a) a protein comprising the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2, 4, or 6;

(b) a protein comprising an amino acid sequence that has a deletion, a substitution, an addition, or an insertion of one or a plurality of amino acids with respect to the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2, 4 or 6 and having activity of accelerating transcription; and

(c) a protein encoded by a polynucleotide hybridizing under stringent conditions to a polynucleotide that comprises a nucleotide sequence complementary to the nucleotide sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 1, 3, or 5 and having activity of accelerating transcription.

In the plant body according to the present invention, the transcriptional control activity and particularly the activity of accelerating transcription of a predetermined transcriptional factor is preferably suppressed by fusion of a functional peptide. Examples of the above functional peptide include the peptides represented by the following formulae (1) to (8), respectively:

X1-Leu-Asp-Leu-X2-Leu-X3  (1)

(wherein X1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, X2 denotes Asn or Glu, and X3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues.)

Y1-Phe-Asp-Leu-Asn-Y2-Y3  (2)

(wherein Y1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, Y2 denotes Phe or Ile, and Y3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues.)

Z1-Asp-Leu-Z2-Leu-Arg-Leu-Z3  (3)

(wherein Z1 denotes Leu, Asp-Leu, or Leu-Asp-Leu, Z2 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp, and Z3 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues.)

Asp-Leu-Z4-Leu-Arg-Leu  (4)

(wherein Z4 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp.)

alpha1-Leu-beta1-Leu-gamma1-Leu  (5)

alpha1-Leu-beta1-Leu-gamma2-Leu  (6)

alpha1-Leu-beta2-Leu-Arg-Leu  (7)

alpha2-Leu-beta1-Leu-Arg-Leu  (8)

(and in the formulae (5) to (8), alpha1 denotes Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, alpha2 denotes Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, beta1 denotes Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr, Ser, or His, beta2 denotes Asn, Arg, Thr, Ser, or His, gamma1 denotes Arg, Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp, and gamma2 denotes Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp.) The plant weight of the plant body according to the present invention is significantly improved. Here, the term “significantly” refers to a situation in which the plant weight is increased to a statistically significant extent compared with the plant weight of a plant body not expressing the above chimeric protein.

Also, in the plant body according to the present invention, substance productivity per individual plant, and particularly, the productivity of fats and oils contained in seeds, is significantly improved or decreased. Examples of specific tissues include seeds. Here, the term “significantly” refers to a situation in which substance productivity is increased or decreased to a statistically significant extent compared with substance productivity in a plant body not expressing the above chimeric protein.

Meanwhile, according to the present invention, the above-described chimeric protein, a gene encoding the chimeric protein, an expression vector containing the gene, and a transformant containing the gene can be provided.

Effect of the Invention

The plant body according to the present invention has improved plant weight; that is, it exhibits an improved biomass level. Therefore, by the use of the plant body according to the present invention, improvement can be achieved in terms of productivity of a substance that is produced using a plant body itself or a part of a plant body as a raw material, such as bioalcohol. Thus, a substance of interest can be produced at low cost according to the present invention.

BEST MODE OF CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

The present invention will be described in detail as follows.

The plant body according to the present invention expresses a chimeric protein in which a predetermined transcriptional factor is fused to a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor and has a significantly improved plant weight (that is, a plant biomass level) compared with that of wild-type plant bodies. Specifically, the plant body according to the present invention is produced by causing a desired (target) plant to express a transcriptional factor in the form of a chimeric protein with the above functional peptide, so as to significantly improve the plant biomass level of the plant. Also, the plant body of the present invention has significantly improved or decreased substance productivity per individual plant and particularly improved productivity of fats and oils contained in seeds, compared with wild-type plant bodies.

In particular, it is preferable that, in the plant body according to the present invention, the activity of accelerating transcription of the transcriptional factor is suppressed through fusion of the factor with the above functional peptide. That is, preferably, the plant body according to the present invention is characterized in that, as a result of expression of a chimeric protein in which the above functional peptide is fused to a transcriptional factor, the transcriptional repression effect resulting from the above functional peptide appears as a dominant character.

Here, the expression, “improvement of the plant weight” is synonymous with namely, “increased biomass,” that is; increased biomass per given area. Two technologies contribute to increase the biomass per given area: a technology for increasing the degree of dense planting (the number of plants per given area) and a technology for increasing the weight or energy level per individual plant. Hence, not only the dry weight per given area, but also the dry weight per individual plant can also be evaluated as plant biomass.

Accordingly, the biomass as defined in the present invention may be dry plant weight per individual plant, the dry weight (per individual plant) of the above ground part of a plant, or the weight of a specific tissue. Here, the term “tissue weight per individual plant” refers to the weight of at least one or more types of tissue selected from among seeds, roots, leaves, stems, flowers, pollens, and the like, composing a plant.

The term “substance productivity per individual plant” refers to the content per unit volume of one of various substances generated by plants. A substance to be used herein is not particularly limited and may be a substance that is originally generated by a plant body or a substance that is not originally generated by a plant body but can be generated by the plant body as a result of genetic engineering, or the like.

Particularly, if the content of a product of interest per tissue is increased, the present invention is industrially useful, since purification cost and transportation cost can be reduced. Particularly, a product of interest may be lignocellulose the weight of which accounts for most weight of the plant or plant oil that is industrially used as seed oil. Plant oil may be simple lipid that is an ester of fatty acid and alcohol, complex lipid containing phosphorus, sugar, nitrogen, and the like, or fatty acid itself. Alcohol of simple lipid may be high-molecular-weight higher alcohol or polyalcohol such as glycerol (glycerine). Fatty acid of simple lipid may be saturated fatty acid or unsaturated fatty acid, as well as, special fatty acid containing a hydroxyl group and an epoxy group. Simple lipid that is an ester of glycerol and fatty acid may be monoacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, or triacylglycerol.

Meanwhile, depending on the application of a plant body, a predetermined substance contained in the plant body may be an impurity. Therefore, the lower the productivity of a predetermined substance, the more decreased impurity content, leading to high industrial usefulness. For example, when lignocellulose contained in a plant body is glycosylated, a fat and oil component contained in the plant body as an impurity may adversely affect glycosylation efficiency. Hence, if the productivity of fats and oils is decreased, the efficiency of a glycosylation step of the production process for bioalcohol or the like using plant bodies can be improved.

The following explanation is given by exemplifying fats and oils as substances that improve or decrease productivity, but the technical scope of the present invention is not limited thereto. The present invention is similarly applicable to substances to be generated by plants other than fats and oils.

The plant body to be used herein is not particularly limited. Any plant can be a target. Particularly preferably such target plants are those conventionally used for production of fats and oils. Examples of such target plants include soybean, sesame, olive oil, coconut, rice, cotton, sunflower, corn, sugarcane, jatropha, palm coconut, tobacco, safflower, and rapeseed. Also, another possible target plant is Arabidopsis thaliana that has been broadly used as a model organism for plant gene analysis, for which a method for gene expression analysis has been established.

Also, the transcriptional repression is the activity of a chimeric protein comprising a transcriptional factor, by which a cis sequence to be recognized by the transcriptional factor or a cis sequence analogous thereto in another transcriptional factor is recognized, so as to aggressively suppress downstream gene expression. Transcriptional repression can also be referred to as a transcriptional repression factor. A technique for undergoing transcriptional repression possessed as activity by a chimeric protein comprising, a transcriptional factor is not particularly limited. Particularly, a method for constructing a chimeric protein (fusion protein) to which a repressor domain sequence or an SRDX sequence has been added is most preferable.

A repressor domain sequence in this technique is an amino acid sequence composing a peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor and the present inventors have discovered various types thereof. Regarding methods using repressor domain sequences, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-269177 A, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-269178 A, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-292776 A, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-292777 A, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-269176 A, JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2001-269179 A, International Patent Publication WO03/055903, Pamphlet, Ohta, M., Matsui, K., Hiratsu, K., Shinshi, H. and Ohme-Takagi, M., The Plant Cell, Vol. 13, 1959-1968, August, 2001, and Hiratsu, K., Ohta, M., Matsui, K., Ohme-Takagi, M., FEBS Letters 514 (2002) 351-354 can be referred to, for example. A repressor domain sequence is excised from Class II ERF (Ethylene Responsive Element Binding Factor) protein or a plant zinc finger protein (e.g., Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein) and has an extremely simple structure.

Examples of a transcriptional factor that is expressed in the form of a chimeric protein include a transcriptional factor (hereinafter, simply referred as the “transcriptional factor At3g04070.” The same applies to the following examples) specified under AGI code At3g04070 of Arabidopsis thaliana, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, and the transcriptional factor At3g45150. In addition, the transcriptional factor At3g04070 is a transcriptional factor belonging to the NAC family. The transcriptional factor At1g18330 is a transcriptional factor belonging to the single MYB (R3-MYB) family. The transcriptional factor At3g45150 is a transcriptional factor belonging to the TCP family. The amino acid sequence of the transcriptional factor At3g04070 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 2 and the nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding the transcriptional factor At3g04070 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 1. The amino acid sequence of the transcriptional factor At1g18330 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 4 and the nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding the transcriptional factor At1g18330 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 3. The amino acid sequence of the transcriptional factor At3g45150 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 6 and the nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding the transcriptional factor At3g45150 is shown in SEQ ID NO: 5.

Moreover, the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, and the transcriptional factor At3g45150 that are targets of a chimeric protein are not limited to those comprising amino acid sequences shown in SEQ ID NOS: 2, 4, and 6, respectively. Such a target transcriptional factor may comprise an amino acid sequence that has a deletion, a substitution, an addition, or an insertion of one or a plurality of amino acids with respect to the amino acid sequence shown in SEQ ID NO: 2, 4, or 6 and having activity of accelerating transcription. Here the term “a plurality of amino acids” refers to 1 to 20, preferably 1 to 10, more preferably 1 to 7, further more preferably 1 to 5, and particularly preferably 1 to 3 amino acids, for example. In addition, a deletion, a substitution, or an addition of amino acids can be performed by altering a nucleotide sequence encoding the above transcriptional factor by techniques known in the art. A mutation can be introduced into a nucleotide sequence by a known technique such as the Kunkel method or the Gapped duplex method or a method according thereto. For example, a mutation is introduced using a mutagenesis kit using site-directed mutagenesis (e.g., Mutant-K and Mutant-G (both of which are trade names, manufactured by TAKARA Bio)) or using a LA PCR in vitro Mutagenesis series kit (trade name, manufactured by TAKARA Bio). Also, a mutagenesis method may be a method that uses a chemical agent for mutation represented by EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate), 5-bromouracil, 2-aminopurine, hydroxylamine, N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, or other carcinogenic compounds or a method based on radiation treatment typically using an X ray, an alpha ray, a beta ray, a gamma-ray, or an ion beam or ultraviolet {UV} treatment.

Furthermore, examples of a transcriptional factor that is a target of a chimeric protein are not limited to the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, and the transcriptional factor At3g45150 of Arabidopsis thaliana. Examples thereof also include transcriptional factors (hereinafter, referred as homologous transcriptional factors) having the same functions in plants (e.g., the above-mentioned plants) other than Arabidopsis thaliana. Transcriptional factors homologous to the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, and the transcriptional factor At3g45150 can be searched for from plant genome information to be searched based on the amino acid sequence of the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, or the transcriptional factor At3g45150 or the nucleotide sequence of each gene thereof, as long as the plant genome information has been revealed. At this time, a homologous transcriptional factor is searched for as an amino acid sequence having 70% or more, preferably 80% or more, more preferably 90% or more, and most preferably 95% or more homology with respect to the amino acid sequence of the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, or the transcriptional factor At3g45150. Here, the value of homology refers to a value found using database that store a computer program mounting blast algorithm, gene sequence information, and default setting.

Moreover, when plant genome information is unknown, a homologous gene can be identified by extracting a genome from a target plant or constructing a cDNA library of a target plant, and then isolating a genomic region or cDNA hybridizing under astringent conditions to at least a part of a gene encoding the transcriptional factor At3g04070, the transcriptional factor At1g18330, or the transcriptional factor At3g45150. Here, the term “stringent conditions” refers to conditions where a so-called specific hybrid is formed, but no non-specific hybrid is formed. For example, hybridization is performed at 45 degrees C. using 6×SSC (sodium chloride/sodium citrate) and then washing is performed under conditions of 50 degrees C.-65 degrees C., 0.2-1×SSC, and 0.1% SDS. Alternatively, examples thereof include hybridization at 65 degrees C.-70 degrees C. using 1×SSC followed by washing at 65 degrees C.-70 degrees C. using 0.3×SSC. Hybridization can be performed by a conventionally known method such as a method described in J. Sambrook et al. Molecular Cloning, A Laboratory Manual, 2nd Ed., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (1989).

The plant body according to the present invention is characterized in that as a result of expression of the above-described chimeric protein of a transcriptional factor and a functional peptide, the plant weight (that is, a biomass level) is significantly improved, and that fat and oil production is significantly changed (improved or decreased). Particularly, the plant body according to the present invention is characterized in that, through preparation of such a chimeric protein, a target transcriptional factor is expressed in the form of the chimeric protein with suppressed activity of accelerating transcription, and transcriptional repression activity is expressed to recognize a cis sequence having homology with a cis sequence that is recognized by the target transcriptional factor. Furthermore, the plant body is also characterized in that the plant weight (that is, biomass level) is significantly improved, and that fat and oil production is significantly changed (improved or decreased) by varying the affinity specificity of the target transcriptional factor for another factor, nucleic acid, lipid, or carbohydrate. At this time, in the above plant body, a chimeric protein may be prepared via alteration of an endogenous transcriptional factor or a gene encoding a chimeric protein may be introduced and then the gene is expressed.

As an example, a preferable technique involves introducing a gene encoding chimeric protein (fusion protein) in which the above-described transcriptional factor is fused to a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor into a target plant and then causing expression of the chimeric protein (fusion protein) within the plant.

The term “transcriptional factor with suppressed activity of accelerating transcription” described in this Description is not particularly limited and refers to a transcriptional factor having significantly decreased activity of accelerating transcription that is originally possessed by the transcriptional factor. Also, the term “functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor” refers to, when it is fused to an arbitrary transcriptional factor to form a chimeric protein, a peptide that has functions so that the resulting transcriptional factor has significantly decreased activity of accelerating transcription that is originally possessed by the transcriptional factor (it may also be referred to as a transcriptional repression conversion peptide). Such “a functional peptide that converts an arbitrary transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor” is not particularly limited, but is preferably a peptide comprising an amino acid sequence known as particularly a repressor domain sequence or an SRDX sequence. Such transcriptional repression conversion peptide is described in detail in JP Patent Publication (Kokai) No. 2005-204657 A and all peptides disclosed in this publication can be used herein.

Examples of the transcriptional repression conversion peptide include the peptides of the amino acid sequences represented by the following formulae (1) to (8), respectively.

X1-Leu-Asp-Leu-X2-Leu-X3  (1)

(wherein X1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, X2 denotes Asn or Glu, and X3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues)

Y1-Phe-Asp-Leu-Asn-Y2-Y3  (2)

(wherein Y1 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues, Y2 denotes Phe or Ile, and Y3 denotes at least 6 amino acid residues)

Z1-Asp-Leu-Z2-Leu-Arg-Leu-Z3  (3)

(wherein Z1 denotes Leu, Asp-Leu, or Leu-Asp-Leu, Z2 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp, and Z3 denotes 0 to 10 amino acid residues)

Asp-Leu-Z4-Leu-Arg-Leu  (4)

(wherein Z4 denotes Glu, Gln, or Asp)

alpha1-Leu-beta1-Leu-gamma1-Leu  (5)

alpha1-Leu-beta1-Leu-gamma2-Leu  (6)

alpha1-Leu-beta2-Leu-Arg-Leu  (7)

alpha2-Leu-beta1-Leu-Arg-Leu  (8)

(and in the formulae (5) to (8), alpha1 denotes Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, alpha2 denotes Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser, beta1 denotes Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr, Ser, or His, beta2 denotes Asn, Arg, Thr, Ser, or His, gamma1 denotes Arg, Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp, and gamma2 denotes Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys, or Asp)

Transcriptional Repression Conversion Peptide of Formula (1)

In the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of the above formula (1), the number of amino acid residues denoted by X1 above may range from 0 to 10. Also, the specific types of amino acid composing the amino acid residues denoted by X1 are not particularly limited, and they may be of any type. The amino acid residues denoted by X1 are preferably as short as possible, in view of ease of synthesis of the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (1). The number of amino acid residues that are specifically denoted by X1 is preferably 5 or less.

Similarly, in the case of the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (1), the number of amino acid residues denoted by X3 above may be at least 6. Also, the specific types of amino acid composing amino acid residues denoted by X3 are not particularly limited, and they may be of any type.

Transcriptional Repression Conversion Peptide of Formula (2)

In the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (2) above, similarly to the case of X1 of the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (1) above, the number of amino acid residues denoted by Y1 above may range from 0 to 10. Also, the specific types of amino acid composing the amino acid residues denoted by Y1 are not particularly limited, and they may be of any type. The specific number of amino acid residues denoted by Y1 is preferably 5 or less.

In the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (2) above, similarly to the case of X3 of the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (1) above, the number of amino acid residues denoted by Y3 above may be at least 6. Also, the specific types of amino acid composing the amino acid residues denoted by Y3 are not particularly limited, and they may be of any type.

Transcriptional Repression Conversion Peptide of Formula (3)

In the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (3) above, the amino acid residues denoted by Z1 above includes 1 to 3 Leu residues. When the number of amino acids is 1, the amino acid is Leu. When the number of amino acids is 2, they are Asp-Leu. When the number of amino acids is 3, they are Leu-Asp-Leu.

Meanwhile, in the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (3) above, the number of amino acid residues denoted by Z3 above may range from 0 to 10. Also, the specific types of amino acid composing amino acid residues denoted by Z3 are not particularly limited, and they may be of any type. Specifically, the number of amino acid residues denoted by Z3 is more preferably 5 or less. Specific examples of amino acid residues denoted by Z3 include, but are not limited to, Gly, Gly-Phe-Phe, Gly-Phe-Ala, Gly-Tyr-Tyr, and Ala-Ala-Ala.

Moreover, the total number of amino acid residues in the transcriptional repression conversion peptide represented by formula (3) is not particularly limited. In view of the ease upon synthesis, the number thereof is preferably 20 amino acids or less.

Transcriptional Repression Conversion Peptide of Formula (4)

The transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (4) is a hexamer (6mer) consisting of 6 amino acid residues. In addition, when the amino acid residue denoted by Z4 in the transcriptional repression conversion peptide of formula (4) above is Glu, the amino acid sequence corresponds to a sequence ranging from amino acid 196 to amino acid 201 of Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein (SUP protein).

Various transcriptional repression conversion peptides explained above can alter the properties of the above described transcriptional factor by fusion thereof to the transcriptional factor, so as to form a chimeric protein (fusion protein). Specifically, through fusion to the above described transcriptional factor so as to form a chimeric protein (fusion protein), such peptide can alter the relevant transcriptional factor to a transcriptional repression factor or a negative transcription coupling factor. Furthermore, such peptide can also convert a transcriptional repression factor that is not dominant to a dominant transcriptional repression factor.

A chimeric protein (fusion protein) can also be produced by obtaining a fusion gene using a polynucleotide encoding the above transcriptional repression conversion peptide and a gene encoding a transcriptional factor. Specifically, a fusion gene is constructed by linking a polynucleotide (referred to as transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide) encoding the above transcriptional repression conversion peptide and a gene encoding the above transcriptional factor and then introduced into plant cells, so that a chimeric protein (fusion protein) can be produced by the cells. A specific example of the nucleotide sequence of the above transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide is not particularly limited, as long as it is based on genetic codes and contains a nucleotide sequence corresponding to the amino acid sequence of the above transcriptional repression conversion peptide. Also, if necessary, the above transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide may further contain a nucleotide sequence that serves as a joining site for linking with a transcriptional factor gene. Furthermore, when the amino acid reading frame of the above transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide does not agree with the reading frame of a transcriptional factor gene, such polynucleotide may contain an additional nucleotide sequence for their agreement. Furthermore, such polynucleotide may also contain various additional polypeptides such as a polypeptide having a linker function for linking a transcriptional factor and a transcriptional repression conversion peptide and polypeptides (e.g., His, Myc, or Flag) for epitope labeling of the chimeric protein (fusion protein). Furthermore, the above chimeric protein (fusion protein) may contain structures other than polypeptides, if necessary, such as a sugar chain and an isoprenoid group.

A method for producing plant bodies is not particularly limited, as long as it comprises a process for production of the above-described chimeric protein of a transcriptional factor and a transcriptional repression conversion peptide in plant bodies. An example thereof is a production method comprising the steps of constructing an expression vector, transformation, selection, and the like. Each step is specifically explained as follows.

Steps of Constructing Expression Vector

The step of constructing an expression vector is not particularly limited, as long as it is a step of constructing a recombinant expression vector containing a gene encoding the above transcriptional factor, a transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide, and a promoter. As a vector to be used as a template for a recombinant expression vector, various conventionally known vectors can be used. For example, plasmids, phages, or cosmids can be used. A vector can be appropriately selected therefrom depending on a plant cell into which the vector is introduced or a method employed for introduction. Specific examples thereof include pBR322, pBR325, pUC19, pUC119, pBluescript, pBluescriptSK, and pBI vectors. Particularly, when a method for introducing a vector into a plant body is a method using Agrobacterium, a pBI binary vector is preferably used. Specific examples of such pBI binary vector include pBIG, pBIN19, pBI101, pBI121, and pBI221.

A promoter to be used herein is not particularly limited, as long as it enables gene expression within a plant body. A known promoter can be preferably used. Examples of such promoter include a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CaMV35S), various actin gene promoters, various ubiquitin gene promoters, a promoter of a nopaline synthase gene, a tobacco PR1a gene promoter, a tomato ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxidase small subunit gene promoter, a napin gene promoter, and an oleosin gene promoter. Of these promoters, a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, actin gene promoters, or ubiquitin gene promoters can be more preferably used. The use of each of the above promoters enables strong expression of an arbitrary gene after its introduction into plant cells. A promoter is ligated to and introduced into a vector, so that a fusion gene can be expressed in which a gene encoding a transcriptional factor or a transcription coupling factor is linked to a transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide. The specific structure of a recombinant expression vector is not particularly limited.

In addition, a recombinant expression vector nay further contain other DNA segments in addition to a promoter and the above fusion gene. Examples of such other DNA segments are not particularly limited and include a terminator, a selection marker, an enhancer, and a nucleotide sequence for enhancing translation efficiency. Also, the above recombinant expression vector may further has a T-DNA region. A T-DNA region can enhance gene transfer efficiency particularly when the above recombinant expression vector is introduced into plant bodies using Agrobacterium.

A transcriptional terminator to be used herein is not particularly limited, as long as it has functions as a transcription termination site and may be a known transcriptional terminator. For example, specifically, a transcription termination region (Nos terminator) of a nopaline synthase gene, a transcription termination region (CaMV35S terminator) of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S, and the like can be preferably used. Of these examples, the Nos terminator can be more preferably used. In the above recombinant vector, a transcriptional terminator is placed at an appropriate position, so as to be able to prevent the occurrence of phenomena such as the synthesis of unnecessarily long transcripts and reduced number of copies of a plasmid because of a strong promoter, after introduction into plant cells.

As a transformant selection marker, a drug resistance gene can be used, for example. A specific example of such drug resistance gene is a drug resistance gene against hygromycin, bleomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, or the like. Hence, transformed plant bodies can be easily selected through selection of plant bodies that can grow in medium containing the above antibiotic.

An example of a nucleotide sequence for enhancing translation efficiency is a tobacco mosaic virus-derived omega sequence. The omega sequence is placed in the untranslated region (5′ UTR) of a promoter, allowing the translation efficiency of the above fusion gene to be enhanced. As described above, the above recombinant expression vector can contain various DNA segments depending on purpose.

A method for constructing a recombinant expression vector is not particularly limited. The above promoter, a gene encoding a transcriptional factor, and a transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide, as well as (if necessary) the above other DNA segments are introduced in a predetermined order into a vector appropriately selected as a template. For example, a fusion gene is constructed by linking a gene encoding a transcriptional factor and a transcriptional repression conversion polynucleotide. Next the fusion gene and a promoter (and if necessary, a transcriptional terminator and the like) are linked to construct an expression cassette and then the expression cassette is introduced into a vector.

Upon construction of a chimeric gene (fusion gene) and that of an expression cassette, for example, cleavage sites of DNA segments are treated to have protruding ends complementary from each other. Reaction is performed using a ligation enzyme, making it possible to determine the order of the DNA segments. In addition, when an expression cassette contains a terminator, from upstream, a promoter, the above chimeric gene, and a terminator should be placed in this order. Also, reagents for construction of a recombinant expression vector; that is, the types of restriction enzyme and ligation enzyme, for example, are also not particularly limited. Commercially available reagents may be appropriately selected and then used.

Moreover, a method for proliferating the above recombinant expression vector (production method) is also not particularly limited. Conventionally known methods can be used herein. In general, such vector may be proliferated within Escherichia coli as a host. At this time, a preferred type of Escherichia coli may be selected depending on the type of a vector.

Transformation Step

A transformation step that is performed in the present invention is a step of introducing the above fusion gene into plant cells using the above recombinant expression vector, so that the fusion gene is expressed. A method for introducing such gene into plant cells using a recombinant expression vector (transformation method) is not particularly limited. Any appropriate conventionally known method can be employed depending on plant cells. Specifically, for example, a method that uses Agrobacterium or a method that involves directly introducing such gene into plant cells can be employed herein. As such method that uses Agrobacterium, for example, a method described in Bechtold, E., Ellis, J. and Pelletier, G. (1993) In Planta Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer by infiltration of adult Arabidopsis plants. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris Sci. Vie, 316, 1194-1199, or a method described in Zyprian E, Kado Cl, Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation by novel mini-T vectors in conjunction with a high-copy vir region helper plasmid. Plant Molecular Biology, 1990, 15(2), 245-256, can be employed.

As a method that involves direct introduction of DNA containing a recombinant expression vector and a target gene, into plant cells microinjection, electroporation, a polyethylene glycol method, a particle gun method, protoplast fusion, a calcium phosphate method, or the like can be employed.

Also, when a method that involves direct introduction of DNA into plant cells is employed, DNA to be used herein contains at least transcriptional units that are required for the expression of a target gene such as a promoter and a transcriptional terminator, and the target gene. Vector functions are not essential herein. Furthermore, even if DNA contains only the protein coding region of a target gene having no transcriptional unit, such DNA can also be used herein, as long as it can be integrated into a host transcriptional unit and the target gene can be expressed.

Examples of plant cells, into which DNA containing the above recombinant expression vector and a target gene or DNA containing only target gene DNA without containing any expression vector is introduced, include cells of each tissue in plant organs such as flowers, leaves, and roots, calli, and suspension-cultured cells. In a method for producing the plant body according to the present invention, as the above recombinant expression vector, an appropriate vector may be adequately constructed depending on the type of a plant body to be produced. Alternatively, a versatile recombinant expression vector is constructed in advance and then the vector may be introduced into plant cells. Specifically, the method for producing the plant body according to the present invention may or may not comprise a step of constructing DNA for transformation using the above recombinant expression vector.

Other Steps and Methods

A method for producing the plant body according to the present invention comprises at least the above transformation step. Furthermore, the method may also comprise a step of constructing DNA for transformation using the above recombinant expression vector and may further comprise other steps. Specifically, an example of such steps is a selection step of selecting an appropriate transformant from transformed plant bodies.

A selection method is not particularly limited. For example, selection can be carried out based on drug resistance such as hygromycin resistance. Selection can also be carried out based on dry weights of plant bodies themselves or dry weights of arbitrary organs or tissues after transformants are grown. For example, an example of a selection method based on dry weights is a method that involves collecting the above-ground parts of plant bodies, performing dry treatment under predetermined conditions, measuring the weights, and then comparing the weights with the dry weights of the above-ground parts of untransformed plant bodies (see Examples described later).

In the method for producing the plant body according to the present invention, the above fusion gene is introduced into plant bodies, so as to make it possible to obtain, from the plant bodies, progeny with significantly improved fat and oil contents through sexual reproduction or asexual reproduction. Also, it becomes possible to obtain, from the plant bodies or the progeny thereof, plant cells and propagation materials such as seeds, fruits, stocks, call, tubers, cuttings, and masses so as to mass-produce the plant bodies based on them. Therefore, the method for producing the plant body according to the present invention may comprise a propagation step (mass-production step propagation of plant bodies after selection.

In addition, examples of the plant body of the present invention include at least any one of grown individual plants, plant cells, plant tissues, calli, and seeds. Specifically, in the present invention, they are all regarded as plant bodies, as long as they are in a state such that they can be finally grown to individual plants. Also, examples of the above plant cells include plant cells of various forms. Examples of such plant cells include suspension-cultured cells, protoplasts, and leaf sections. Plant bodies can be obtained by growing and causing differentiation of these plant cells. In addition, regeneration of plant bodies from plant cells can be carried out by a conventionally) known method depending on the type of plant cell. Therefore, the method for producing the plant body according to the present invention may comprise a regeneration step for regenerating plant bodies from plant cells or the like.

Also, the method for producing the plant body according to the present invention is not limited to a method that involves transformation using a recombinant expression vector, and other methods may also be employed. Specifically, for example, the above chimeric protein (fusion protein) may be directly administered to plant bodies. In this case, a chimeric protein (fusion protein) is administered to plant bodies in their early life, so that fat and oil contents can be improved at sites of plant bodies that are finally used. Moreover, a method for administration of a chimeric protein (fusion protein) is also not particularly limited, and various known methods may be employed for such purpose.

As explained above, according to the present invention, through expression of a chimeric protein of a predetermined transcriptional factor and the above functional peptide, plant bodies can be provided, wherein plant weights (that is, biomass levels) are improved and substance productivity per individual plant is changed (improved or decreased) compared with that of wild-type plant bodies. When the above chimeric protein is expressed by plant bodies, the activity for accelerating transcription of a target transcriptional factor may be suppressed or transcriptional repression effects may be exerted on the homologous sequence of a cis sequence that is recognized by the target transcriptional factor. Furthermore, the chimeric protein may act to alter the affinity specificity of another factor, DNA, RNA, lipid, or carbohydrate that has affinity for the target transcriptional factor or transcription coupling factor. Alternatively, the chimeric protein may act to improve the affinity of a substance that has no affinity for the target transcriptional factor. In the plant body according to the present invention, a target transcriptional factor of a chimeric protein, a transcriptional factor that recognizes a cis sequence having homology with a cis sequence to be recognized by the target transcriptional factor, a transcriptional factor having homology with the target transcriptional factor of the chimeric protein, other factors having affinity for the target transcriptional factor of the chimeric protein, and the like are similarly expressed. However, gene expression to be controlled can be suppressed dominant-negatively because of the above-described action and effects of the chimeric protein. Accordingly, it is thought that in the plant body according to the present invention, the expression level of a gene group involved in plant growth as well as the expression level of a gene group involved in fat and oil production and/or decomposition of the produced fats and oils are changed, as a result, the biomass levels are significantly improved and fat and oil contents are significantly changed.

Here, the expression, “fat and oil contents are significantly changed” refers to a case in which fat and oil levels are improved although the seed mass per grain remains unchanged compared with that of wild-type plants; a case in which fat and oil levels are improved while the seed mass per grain is significantly increased or decreased compared with that of wild-type plants; or a case in which fat and oil contents in seeds are improved or decreased compared with those of wild-type plants. In any case, the level of fats and oils produced by an individual plant is changed.

More specifically, when a chimeric protein of the transcriptional factor At3g04070 or the transcriptional factor At1g18330 is expressed, the biomass level in the plant body is increased, but the fat and oil content is decreased. In contrast, when a chimeric protein of the transcriptional factor At3g45150 is expressed, both the biomass level and the fat and oil content are increased.

Among examples of the plant body according to the present invention, plant bodies in which fat and oil contents are increased can be used for a method for producing plant-derived fats and oils. For example, fats and oils can be produced by growing the plant body according to the present invention, harvesting seeds, and then collecting fat and oil components from the harvested seeds. Particularly, a method for producing fats and oils using the plant body according to the present invention can be said to be excellent in productivity because the fat and oil content of the thus produced individual plant is high. That is to say, if it is assumed that the number of cultivated plants per unit of cultivated area stays constant, the fat and oil level produced per unit of cultivated area can be significantly improved through the use of the plant body according to the present invention. Therefore, the use of the plant body according to the present invention makes it possible to significantly reduce the production costs of fats and oils.

Furthermore, a method for producing fats and oils using the plant body according to the present invention can be said to be excellent in productivity because of resulting high fat and oil contents in seeds per unit of weight.

In addition, examples of fats and oils to be produced by the method for producing fats and oils using the plant body according to the present invention are not particularly limited and include plant-derived fats and oils such as soybean oil, sesame oil, olive oil, coconut oil, rice oil, cottonseed oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, safflower oil, and rapeseed oil. Moreover, the thus produced fats and oils can be broadly used for household and industrial applications. The fats and oils can further be used as raw materials for biodiesel fuel. Specifically, through the use of plant bodies according to the present invention, the above-mentioned fats and oils for household or industrial applications, biodiesel fuel, or the like can be produced at low cost.

In addition, among examples of the plant body according to the present invention, plant bodies with decreased fat and oil contents can be used for a method for producing bioalcohol using lignocellulose contained in plants. Specifically, bioalcohol with excellent glycosylation efficiency and low impurity content can be produced due to the low levels of tat and oil components (which are impurities) in the step of glycosylating lignocellulose.

EXAMPLES

The present invention will be described in detail using examples as follows, but the technical scope of the present invention is not limited by these examples.

Example 1

Amplification of Transcriptional Factor Gene

A DNA fragment of the coding region of transcriptional factor At3g04070 excluding the termination codon was amplified by PCR using primers described below from an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. PCR was performed in 25 cycles each consisting of 94 degrees C. for 1 minute, 47 degrees C. for 2 minutes and an extension reaction at 74 degrees C. for 1 minute. Next, PCR products were separated and collected by agarose gel electrophoresis.


Forward primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 7)
GATGATAAGCAAGGATCCAAGATCGAGTTT 
Reverse primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 8)
GCCTTGATATTGAAGGTGAGAACTCATCAT 

Preparation of Modified Transcriptional Factor

A p35SSXG vector having an Sma I site and a repressor domain (amino acid sequence: GLDLDLELRLGFA (SEQ ID NO: 9)) sequence downstream of a CaMV35S promoter was used to add a repressor domain sequence to the 3′ end of the transcriptional factor gene encoded by the DNA fragment. To link the transcriptional factor gene sequence and the repressor domain sequence, the vector was digested with Sma I and then the PCR amplified fragment encoding the above transcriptional factor was inserted. Thus, p35SSXG (At3g04070) was prepared.

Construction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Expression Vector

For gene transfer into plants using Agrobacterium, pBCKH was used as a binary vector. This vector was constructed by incorporating a Gateway vector conversion system cassette (Invitrogen) into the Hind III site of pBIG (Hygr) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 203 (1990)). To incorporate the modified transcriptional factor gene sequence into the vector, the vector and p35SSXG (At3g04070) were mixed and then a recombination reaction was carried out using GATEWAY LR clonase (Invitrogen). Thus, pBCKH-p35SSXG (At3g04070) was constructed.

Introduction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Gene Expression Vector Into Plant

Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia (Col-0)) was used as a plant for introduction of the modified transcriptional factor. Gene transfer was carried out according to Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana by Vacuum Infiltration (http://www.bch.msu.edu/pamgreen/protocol.htm). However, plants were only infected by immersing them in an Agrobacterium solution without performing decompression treatment. Specifically, the modified transcriptional factor expression vector pBCKH-p35SSXG (At3g04070) was introduced into soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (C58C1Rifr) pMP90 (Gmr) (konez and Schell 1986) strain by electroporation. The thus introduced bacteria were cultured in 1 liter of YEP medium containing an antibiotic (kanamycin (Km): 50 microgram/ml; gentamicin (Gm): 25 microgram/ml rifampicin (Rif): 50 microgram/ml) until OD600 reached 1. Subsequently, bacteria were collected from the culture solution and then suspended in 1 liter of medium for infection (infiltration medium containing 2.2 g of MS salt, 1× B5 vitamins, 50 g of sucrose, 0.5 g of MES, 0.044 micro M benzylaminopurine, and 400 microliter of Silwet per liter; pH 5.7).

Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown for 14 days were immersed in the solution for 1 minute for infection. After infection, cultivation was continued to fructification. Harvested seeds (T1 seeds) were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on a sterilized hygromycin selective medium (4.3 g/l MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, 0.5 g/l MES, pH 5.7, 0.8% agar, 30 mg/l hygromycin, and 250 mg/l Vancomycin). Ten (10) lines of transformed plant bodies (T1 plants) that had grown on the above hygromycin selective medium were selected per modified transcription gene. Plants were then transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. They were cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 60 to 80 micro mol m−2s−1. Thus, seeds (T2 seeds) were obtained.

Analysis of T2 Seed

Ten (10) lines into which At3g04070-SRDX had been introduced were each analyzed. Fat and oil contents were measured for T1 generation plants and T2 seeds.

Quantitative analysis of fats and oils was conducted using MARAN-23 (Resonance Instruments Ltd., UK) H-NMR and analysis software RI-NMR Ver. 2.0, so that 2 mg to 10 mg of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were measured. A calibration curve was produced using olive oil as a standard substance for fats and oils. Thus, fat and oil contents (% by weight) in seeds were found.

The results of analyzing T2 seeds of the 10 lines produced for the At3g04070-SRDX gene are summarized in Table 1. The seed fat and oil content of control WT into which no gene had been introduced was 34.9+/−3.8%. The fat and oil contents of lines into which the modified transcriptional factor gene had been introduced were 19.5% at minimum and 29.4% at maximum.


TABLE 1
Line name
Fat and oil content
At3g04070SRDX-1
19.5%
At3g04070SRDX-2
19.9%
At3g04070SRDX-3
23.3%
At3g04070SRDX-4
27.4%
At3g04070SRDX-5
26.8%
At3g04070SRDX-6
28.0%
At3g04070SRDX-7
28.6%
At3g04070SRDX-8
29.4%
At3g04070SRDX-9
25.5%
At3g04070SRDX-10
24.1%
WT(n = 34)
34.9 ± 3.8%

Analysis of Biomass

T2 seeds of 2 lines out of 10 lines into which the At3g04070-SRDX gene had been introduced were germinated and then cultivated. The biomass level per individual plant was measured.

First, T2 plants were cultivated for analysis of T3 plant bodies. T2 seeds were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on sterilized medium for germination (4.3 g/l MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, pH 5.7, 0.8% agar, and 10 mg/l hygromycin). Three (3) weeks after germination, the thus grown individual plants into which the gene had been introduced (specifically, 5 to 6 transformed plant bodies (T2 plants) per line) were transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. As control plants, four non-recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transplanted. They were further cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 30 to 45 micro mol m−2s−1 for 11 weeks.

Above-the-ground plant bodies were put into paper bags and then dried under conditions of 22 degrees C. and humidity of 60% for 2 weeks. Total biomass weight levels were then determined. The results are shown in Table 2.


TABLE 2
Biomass weight
Percentage
Biomass weight
increase in
Sample name
(mg)
biomass
At3g04070SRDX-1-1
915.5
4.0%
At3g04070SRDX-1-2
978.6
11.1%
At3g04070SRDX-1-3
936.2
6.3%
At3g04070SRDX-1-4
1048.0
19.0%
At3g04070SRDX-1-5
910.0
3.3%
At3g04070SRDX-1-6
946.9
7.5%
average
955.9
8.6%
At3g04070SRDX-2-1
1019.7
15.8%
At3g04070SRDX-2-2
1037.2
17.8%
At3g04070SRDX-2-3
1016.6
15.4%
At3g04070SRDX-2-4
987.7
12.2%
At3g04070SRDX-2-5
1027.2
16.6%
average
1017.7
15.6%
WT1
903.4
WT2
880.3
WT3
911.1
WT4
827.6
average
880.6

As a result, the biomass level per individual plant of the line into which the At3g04070-SRDX gene had been introduced was increased by 19% at maximum compared with that of the wild-type plants. Also, the biomass levels of the two lines were increased by 8.6% and 15.6%, respectively, on average. Hence, the biomass production per individual plant could be increased through introduction of the above modified transcriptional factor gene At3g04070-SRDX into which the repressor domain had been added. In addition, regarding At3g04070, functions relating to biomass have never before been reported.

Example 2

Amplification of Transcriptional Factor Gene

A DNA fragment of the coding region of transcriptional factor At1g18330 excluding the termination codon was amplified by PCR using primers described below from Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. PCR was performed in 25 cycles each consisting of 94 degrees C. for 1 minute, 47 degrees C. for 2 minutes, and an extension reaction at 74 degrees C. for 1 minute. Next, PCR products were separated and collected by agarose gel electrophoresis.


Forward primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 10)
GATGGCCGCTGAGGATCGAAGTGAGGAACT 
Reverse primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 11)
GCATATACGTGCTCTTTGGCTTTTCTTTTC

Preparation of Modified Transcriptional Factor

A p35SSXG vector having Sma I site and a repressor domain (amino acid sequence: GLDLDLELRLGFA (SEQ ID NO: 9)) sequence downstream of a CaMV35S promoter was used to add a repressor domain sequence to the 3′ end of the transcriptional factor gene encoded by the DNA fragment. To link the transcriptional factor gene sequence and the repressor domain sequence, the vector was digested with Sma I and then the PCR amplified fragment encoding the above transcriptional factor was inserted. Thus, p35SSXG (At1g18330) was prepared.

Construction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Expression Vector

For gene transfer using Agrobacterium into plants, pBCKH was used as a binary vector. This vector was constructed by incorporating a cassette of a Gateway vector conversion system (Invitrogen) into Hind III site of pBIG (Hygr) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 203 (1990)). To incorporate the modified transcriptional factor gene sequence into the vector, the vector and p35SSXG (At1g18330) were mixed and then a recombination reaction was carried out using GATEWAY LR clonase (Invitrogen). Thus, pBCKH-p35SSXG (At1g18330) was constructed.

Introduction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Gene Expression Vector Into Plant

Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia (Col-0)) was used as a plant for introduction of the modified transcriptional factor. Gene transfer was carried out according to Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana by Vacuum Infiltration (http://www.bch.msu.edu/pamgreen/protocol.htm). However, plants were only infected by immersing them in an Agrobacterium solution without performing decompression treatment. Specifically, the modified transcriptional factor expression vector pBCKH-p35SSXG (At1g18330) was introduced into soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (C58C1Rifr) pMP90 (Gmr) (konez and Schell 1986) strain by electroporation. The thus introduced bacteria were cultured in 1 liter of YEP medium containing an antibiotic (kanamycin (Km) 50 microgram/ml, gentamicin (Gm) 25 microgram/ml, and rifampicin (Rif) 50 microgram/ml) until OD600 reached 1. Subsequently, bacteria were collected from the culture solution and then suspended in 1 liter of medium for infection (Infiltration medium containing 2.2 g of MS salt, 1× B5 vitamins, 50 g of sucrose, 0.5 g of MES, 0.044 micro M benzylaminopurine, and 400 microliter of Silwet per liter; pH5.7).

Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown for 14 days were immersed in the solution for 1 minute for infection. After infection, cultivation was continued to fructification. Harvested seeds (T1 seeds) were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on sterilized hygromycin selective medium (4.3 g/l MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, 0.5 g/l MES, PH 5.7, 0.8% agar, 30 mg/l hygromycin, and 250 mg/l Vancomycin). Ten (10) lines of transformed plant bodies (T1 plants) that had grown on the above hygromycin selective medium were selected per modified transcription gene. Plants were then transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. They were cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 60 to 80 micro mol m−2s−1. Thus, seeds (T2 seeds) were obtained.

Analysis of T2 Seed

Ten (10) lines into which At1g18330-SRDX had been introduced were each analyzed. Fat and oil contents were measured for T1 generation plants and T2 seeds. Quantitative analysis of fats and oils was conducted using MARAN-23 (Resonance Instruments Ltd., UK) H-NMR and analysis software RI-NMR Ver. 2.0, so that 2 mg to 10 mg of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were measured. A calibration curve was produced using olive oil as a standard substance for fats and oils. Thus, fat and oil contents (% by weight) in seeds were found.

The results of analyzing T2 seeds of the 10 lines produced for the At1g18330-SRDX gene are summarized in Table 3. The seed fat and oil content of control WT into which no gene had been introduced was 34.9+/−3.8%. The fat and oil contents of lines into which the modified transcriptional factor gene had been introduced were 22.0% at minimum and 33.7% at maximum.


TABLE 3
Percentage
Gene name
Lipid level
decrease
At1g18330-1
33.7%
−3.6%
At1g18330-2
30.2%
−13.5%
At1g18330-3
30.6%
−12.3%
At1g18330-4
24.7%
−29.3%
At1g18330-5
26.2%
−24.9%
At1g18330-6
26.5%
−24.2%
At1g18330-7
22.8%
−34.6%
At1g18330-8
22.0%
−37.0%
At1g18330-9
26.9%
−23.0%
At1g18330-10
32.8%
−5.9%
WT(n = 34)
34.9 ± 3.8%

Analysis of Biomass

T2 seeds of 1 line out of the 10 lines into which the At1g18330-SRDX gene had been introduced were germinated and then cultivated. The biomass level per individual plant was measured. First, T2 plants were cultivated for analysis of T3 plant bodies. T2 seeds were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on sterilized medium for germination (4.3 g/l MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, pH 5.7, 0.8% agar, and 10 mg/l hygromycin). Three (3) weeks after germination, the thus grown individual plants into which the gene had been introduced (specifically, 4 transformed plant bodies (T2 plants)) were transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. As control plants, four non-recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transplanted. They were further cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 30 to 45 micro mol m−2s−1 for 11 weeks.

Above-the-ground plant bodies were put into paper bags and then dried under conditions of 22 degrees C. and humidity of 60% for 2 weeks. Total biomass weight levels were then determined. The results are shown in Table 4.


TABLE 4
Percentage
Biomass weight
increase in
Sample name
(mg)
biomass
At1g18330SRDX-5-1
978.8
13.9%
At1g18330SRDX-5-2
1202.5
39.9%
At1g18330SRDX-5-3
1015.9
18.2%
At1g18330SRDX-5-4
884.8
3.0%
average
1020.5
18.8%
WT1
698.0
WT2
958.6
WT3
884.1
WT4
896.2
average
859.2

As a result, the biomass level per individual plant of the line into which the At1g18330-SRDX gene had been introduced was increased by 39.9% at maximum compared with that of the wild-type plants. Also, the biomass level per individual plant of each line was increased by 18.8%, on average. Hence, the biomass production per individual plant could be increased through introduction of the above modified transcriptional factor gene At1g18330-SRDX into which the repressor domain had been added. In addition, regarding At1g18330, there is a report that flowering is delayed by functional deficiency, but there is no report that it relates to biomass.

Example 3

Amplification of Transcriptional Factor Gene

A DNA fragment of the coding region of transcriptional factor At3g45150 excluding the termination codon was amplified by PCR using primers described below from Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. PCR was performed in 25 cycles each consisting of 94 degrees C. for 1 minute, 47 degrees C. for 2 minutes, and an extension reaction at 74 degrees C. for 1 minute. Next, PCR products were separated and collected by agarose gel electrophoresis.


Forward primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 12)
ATGGATTCGAAAAATGGAATTAAC 
Reverse primer 1
(SEQ ID NO: 13)
AACTGTGGTTGTGGCTGTTGTTG 

Preparation of Modified Transcriptional Factor

A p35SSXG vector having an Sma I site and a repressor domain (amino acid sequence: GLDLDLELRLGFA (SEQ ID NO: 9)) sequence downstream of a CaMV35S promoter was used to add a repressor domain sequence to the 3′ end of the transcriptional factor gene encoded by the DNA fragment. To link the transcriptional factor gene sequence and the repressor domain sequence, the vector was digested with Sma I and then the PCR amplified fragment encoding the above transcriptional factor was inserted. Thus, p35SSXG (At3g45150) was prepared.

Construction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Expression Vector

For gene transfer using Agrobacterium into plants, pBCKH was used as a binary vector. This vector was constructed by incorporating a cassette of a Gateway vector conversion system (Invitrogen) into a Hind III site of pBIG (Hygr) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 203 (1990)). To incorporate the modified transcriptional factor gene sequence into the vector, the vector and p35SSXG (At3g45150) were mixed and then a recombination reaction was carried out using GATEWAY LR clonase (Invitrogen). Thus, pBCKH-p35SSXG (At3g45150) was constructed.

Introduction of Modified Transcriptional Factor Gene Expression Vector Into Implant

Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia (Col-0)) was used as a plant for introduction of the modified transcriptional factor. Gene transfer was carried out according to Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana by Vacuum Infiltration (http://www.bch.msu.edu/pamgreen/protocol.htm). However, plants were only infected by immersing them in an Agrobacterium solution without performing decompression treatment. Specifically, the modified transcriptional factor expression vector pBCKH-p35SSXG (At3g45150) was introduced into soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV3101 (C58C1Rifr) pMP90 (Gmr) (konez and Schell 1986) strain by electroporation. The thus introduced bacteria were cultured in 1 liter of YEP medium containing an antibiotic (kanamycin (Km) 50 microgram/ml, gentamicin (Gm) 25 microgram/ml, and rifampicin (Rif) 50 microgram/ml) until OD600 reached 1. Subsequently, bacteria were collected from the culture solution and then suspended in 1 liter of medium for infection (Infiltration medium containing 2.2 g of MS salt, 1× B5 vitamins, 50 g of sucrose, 0.5 g of MES, 0.044 micro M benzylaminopurine, and 400 microliter of Silwet per liter; pH5.7).

Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown for 14 days were immersed in the solution for 1 minute for infection. After infection, cultivation was continued to fructification. Harvested seeds (T1 seeds) were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on sterilized hygromycin selective medium (4.3 g/l MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, 0.5 g/l MES, pH 5.7, 0.8% agar, 30 mg/l hygromycin, and 250 mg/l Vancomycin). Ten (10) lines of transformed plant bodies (T1 plants) that had grown on the above hygromycin selective medium were selected per modified transcription gene. Plants were then transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. They were cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 60 to 80 micro mol m−2s−1. Thus, seeds (T2 seeds) were obtained.

Analysis of Fat and Oil Content in T2 Seed

Ten (10) lines into which At3g45150-SRDX had been introduced were each analyzed. Fat and oil contents were measured for T1 generation plants and T2 seeds. Quantitative analysis of fats and oils was conducted using MARAN-23 (Resonance Instruments Ltd., UK) H-NMR and analysis software RI-NMR. Ver. 2.0, so that 2 mg to 10 mg of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were measured. A calibration curve was produced using olive oil as a standard substance for fats and oils. Thus, fat and oil contents (% by weight) in seeds were found.

As a result of analyzing T2 seeds of the 10 lines produced for the At3g45150-SRDX gene, the fat and oil contents in T2 seeds of the 10 lines were 46.4%, 40.7%, 40.0%, 35.7%, 35.4%, 34.8%, 33.6%, 31.1%, 30.6%, and 26.7% (46.4% at maximum and 26.7% at minimum). The seed fat and oil content of control WT into which no gene had been introduced was 34.9+/−3.8%. From these lines, the line with the fat and oil content of 40.7% was used for the subsequent experiments.

Cultivation Test and Analysis of Biomass and Fat and Oil Content

T2 seeds of 1 line out of the 10 lines into which the At305150-SRDX gene had been introduced were germinated and then cultivated. The biomass level per individual plant was measured. First, T2 plants were cultivated for analysis of T3 plant bodies. T2 seeds were sterilized in 50% bleach with 0.02% Triton X-100 solution for 7 minutes, rinsed 3 times with sterile water, and then germinated on sterilized medium for germination (4.3 MS salts, 0.5% sucrose, pH 5.7, 0.8% agar, and 10 mg/l hygromycin). Three (3) weeks after germination, the thus grown individual plants into which the gene had been introduced (specifically, 5 transformed plant bodies (T2 plants)) were transplanted into pots with a diameter of 50 mm containing vermiculite mixed with soil. As control plants, four non-recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transplanted. They were further cultivated at 22 degrees C. under 16-hour-light/8-hour-dark photoperiods and light intensity ranging from approximately 30 to 45 micro mol m−2s−1 for 11 weeks.

Above-the-ground plant bodies were put into paper bags and then dried under conditions of 22 degrees C. and humidity of 60% for 2 weeks. Total biomass weight levels were then determined and the above fat and oil contents were measured. The results are shown in Table 5.


TABLE 5
Percentage
Biomass
Percentage
Fat and oil
increase
weight
increase in
content in
in fats
Sample name
(mg)
biomass
seed
and oils
At3g45150SRDX-27-1
893.7
25.9%
36.0%
3.1%
At3g45150SRDX-27-2
875.3
23.3%
36.6%
4.9%
At3g45150SRDX-27-3
1115.7
57.2%
37.1%
6.5%
At3g45150SRDX-27-5
820.1
15.6%
35.1%
0.7%
At3g45150SRDX-27-6
827.7
16.6%
35.9%
3.0%
average
906.5
27.7%
36.1%
3.7%
WT1
818.7
35.3%
WT2
784.5
34.8%
WT3
627.5
35.2%
WT4
608.0
34.1%
average
709.6
34.9%

As a result, the biomass level per individual plant of the line into which the At3g45150-SRDX gene had been introduced was increased by 57.2% at maximum compared with that of the wild-type plants. The biomass level per individual plant of each line was increased by 27.7% on average. Also, when the fat and oil contents in dry seeds were measured by pulse NMR, they were confirmed to be improved by 6.5% at maximum and 3.7% on average. Hence, the biomass production per individual plant could be increased through introduction of the above modified transcriptional factor gene At3g45150-SRDX into which the repressor domain had been added. In addition, regarding At3g45150, there is a report that functional deficiency induces underdevelopment of pollens, but there is no report that this matter relates to biomass.

<160> NUMBER OF SEQ ID NOS: 21

<210> SEQ ID NO: 1

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<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: CDS

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1080)

<400> SEQENCE: 1

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Met Ile Ser Lys Asp Pro Arg Ser Ser Leu Pro Pro Gly Phe Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

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His Pro Thr Asp Glu Glu Leu Ile Leu His Tyr Leu Arg Lys Lys Val

20 25 30

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Ser Ser Ser Pro Val Pro Leu Ser Ile Ile Ala Asp Val Asp Ile Tyr

35 40 45

aaa tcc gat cca tgg gat tta cca gct aag gct cca ttt ggg gag aaa 192

Lys Ser Asp Pro Trp Asp Leu Pro Ala Lys Ala Pro Phe Gly Glu Lys

50 55 60

gag tgg tat ttt ttc agt ccg agg gat agg aaa tat cca aac gga gca 240

Glu Trp Tyr Phe Phe Ser Pro Arg Asp Arg Lys Tyr Pro Asn Gly Ala

65 70 75 80

aga cca aac aga gca gct gcg tct gga tat tgg aaa gca acc gga aca 288

Arg Pro Asn Arg Ala Ala Ala Ser Gly Tyr Trp Lys Ala Thr Gly Thr

85 90 95

gat aaa ttg att gcg gta cca aat ggt gaa ggg ttt cat gaa aac att 336

Asp Lys Leu Ile Ala Val Pro Asn Gly Glu Gly Phe His Glu Asn Ile

100 105 110

ggt ata aaa aaa gct ctt gtg ttt tat aga gga aag cct cca aaa ggt 384

Gly Ile Lys Lys Ala Leu Val Phe Tyr Arg Gly Lys Pro Pro Lys Gly

115 120 125

gtt aaa acc aat tgg atc atg cat gaa tat cgt ctt gcc gat tca tta 432

Val Lys Thr Asn Trp Ile Met His Glu Tyr Arg Leu Ala Asp Ser Leu

130 135 140

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Ser Pro Lys Arg Ile Asn Ser Ser Arg Ser Gly Gly Ser Glu Val Asn

145 150 155 160

aat aat ttt gga gat agg aat tct aaa gaa tat tcg atg aga ctg gat 528

Asn Asn Phe Gly Asp Arg Asn Ser Lys Glu Tyr Ser Met Arg Leu Asp

165 170 175

gat tgg gtt ctt tgc cgg att tac aag aaa tca cac gct tca ttg tca 576

Asp Trp Val Leu Cys Arg Ile Tyr Lys Lys Ser His Ala Ser Leu Ser

180 185 190

tca cct gat gtt gct ttg gtc aca agc aat caa gag cat gag gaa aat 624

Ser Pro Asp Val Ala Leu Val Thr Ser Asn Gln Glu His Glu Glu Asn

195 200 205

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Asp Asn Glu Pro Phe Val Asp Arg Gly Thr Phe Leu Pro Asn Leu Gln

210 215 220

aat gat caa ccc ctt aaa cgc cag aag tct tct tgt tcg ttc tca aac 720

Asn Asp Gln Pro Leu Lys Arg Gln Lys Ser Ser Cys Ser Phe Ser Asn

225 230 235 240

tta cta gac gct aca gat ttg acg ttt ctc gca aat ttt cta aac gaa 768

Leu Leu Asp Ala Thr Asp Leu Thr Phe Leu Ala Asn Phe Leu Asn Glu

245 250 255

acc ccg gaa aat cgt tct gaa tca gat ttt tct ttc atg att ggc aat 816

Thr Pro Glu Asn Arg Ser Glu Ser Asp Phe Ser Phe Met Ile Gly Asn

260 265 270

ttc tct aat cct gac att tac gga aac cat tac ttg gat cag aag tta 864

Phe Ser Asn Pro Asp Ile Tyr Gly Asn His Tyr Leu Asp Gln Lys Leu

275 280 285

ccg cag ttg agc tct ccc act tca gag aca agc ggc atc gga agc aaa 912

Pro Gln Leu Ser Ser Pro Thr Ser Glu Thr Ser Gly Ile Gly Ser Lys

290 295 300

aga gag aga gtg gat ttt gcg gaa gaa acg ata aac gct tcg aag aag 960

Arg Glu Arg Val Asp Phe Ala Glu Glu Thr Ile Asn Ala Ser Lys Lys

305 310 315 320

atg atg aac aca tat agt tac aat aat agt ata gat caa atg gat cat 1008

Met Met Asn Thr Tyr Ser Tyr Asn Asn Ser Ile Asp Gln Met Asp His

325 330 335

agt atg atg caa caa cct agt ttc ctg aac cag gaa ctc atg atg agt 1056

Ser Met Met Gln Gln Pro Ser Phe Leu Asn Gln Glu Leu Met Met Ser

340 345 350

tct cac ctt caa tat caa ggc tag 1080

Ser His Leu Gln Tyr Gln Gly

355

<210> SEQ ID NO: 2

<211> LENGTH: 359

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<400> SEQENCE: 2

Met Ile Ser Lys Asp Pro Arg Ser Ser Leu Pro Pro Gly Phe Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

His Pro Thr Asp Glu Glu Leu Ile Leu His Tyr Leu Arg Lys Lys Val

20 25 30

Ser Ser Ser Pro Val Pro Leu Ser Ile Ile Ala Asp Val Asp Ile Tyr

35 40 45

Lys Ser Asp Pro Trp Asp Leu Pro Ala Lys Ala Pro Phe Gly Glu Lys

50 55 60

Glu Trp Tyr Phe Phe Ser Pro Arg Asp Arg Lys Tyr Pro Asn Gly Ala

65 70 75 80

Arg Pro Asn Arg Ala Ala Ala Ser Gly Tyr Trp Lys Ala Thr Gly Thr

85 90 95

Asp Lys Leu Ile Ala Val Pro Asn Gly Glu Gly Phe His Glu Asn Ile

100 105 110

Gly Ile Lys Lys Ala Leu Val Phe Tyr Arg Gly Lys Pro Pro Lys Gly

115 120 125

Val Lys Thr Asn Trp Ile Met His Glu Tyr Arg Leu Ala Asp Ser Leu

130 135 140

Ser Pro Lys Arg Ile Asn Ser Ser Arg Ser Gly Gly Ser Glu Val Asn

145 150 155 160

Asn Asn Phe Gly Asp Arg Asn Ser Lys Glu Tyr Ser Met Arg Leu Asp

165 170 175

Asp Trp Val Leu Cys Arg Ile Tyr Lys Lys Ser His Ala Ser Leu Ser

180 185 190

Ser Pro Asp Val Ala Leu Val Thr Ser Asn Gln Glu His Glu Glu Asn

195 200 205

Asp Asn Glu Pro Phe Val Asp Arg Gly Thr Phe Leu Pro Asn Leu Gln

210 215 220

Asn Asp Gln Pro Leu Lys Arg Gln Lys Ser Ser Cys Ser Phe Ser Asn

225 230 235 240

Leu Leu Asp Ala Thr Asp Leu Thr Phe Leu Ala Asn Phe Leu Asn Glu

245 250 255

Thr Pro Glu Asn Arg Ser Glu Ser Asp Phe Ser Phe Met Ile Gly Asn

260 265 270

Phe Ser Asn Pro Asp Ile Tyr Gly Asn His Tyr Leu Asp Gln Lys Leu

275 280 285

Pro Gln Leu Ser Ser Pro Thr Ser Glu Thr Ser Gly Ile Gly Ser Lys

290 295 300

Arg Glu Arg Val Asp Phe Ala Glu Glu Thr Ile Asn Ala Ser Lys Lys

305 310 315 320

Met Met Asn Thr Tyr Ser Tyr Asn Asn Ser Ile Asp Gln Met Asp His

325 330 335

Ser Met Met Gln Gln Pro Ser Phe Leu Asn Gln Glu Leu Met Met Ser

340 345 350

Ser His Leu Gln Tyr Gln Gly

355

<210> SEQ ID NO: 3

<211> LENGTH: 1119

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: CDS

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1119)

<400> SEQENCE: 3

atg ctc tgt ttt gtt cgc ttt cag gct ggt ttt gtg aga att ata gtt 48

Met Leu Cys Phe Val Arg Phe Gln Ala Gly Phe Val Arg Ile Ile Val

1 5 10 15

gca gca aga aag cgt ttc aga tat ttt tta atg gcc gct gag gat cga 96

Ala Ala Arg Lys Arg Phe Arg Tyr Phe Leu Met Ala Ala Glu Asp Arg

20 25 30

agt gag gaa cta agc agc aat gta gaa aat gga agt tgc aat tcc aat 144

Ser Glu Glu Leu Ser Ser Asn Val Glu Asn Gly Ser Cys Asn Ser Asn

35 40 45

gaa gga att aat cct gaa acc agc agt cat tgg att gaa aac gtt gtc 192

Glu Gly Ile Asn Pro Glu Thr Ser Ser His Trp Ile Glu Asn Val Val

50 55 60

aag gtt agg aaa ccg tac aca gta act aag cag aga gag aag tgg agt 240

Lys Val Arg Lys Pro Tyr Thr Val Thr Lys Gln Arg Glu Lys Trp Ser

65 70 75 80

gag gaa gag cat gat agg ttt ctt gaa gct atc aag ctt tat ggt cgt 288

Glu Glu Glu His Asp Arg Phe Leu Glu Ala Ile Lys Leu Tyr Gly Arg

85 90 95

ggt tgg cgt caa atc caa gaa cac ata ggt aca aaa acc gct gta cag 336

Gly Trp Arg Gln Ile Gln Glu His Ile Gly Thr Lys Thr Ala Val Gln

100 105 110

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Ile Arg Ser His Ala Gln Lys Phe Phe Ser Lys Met Ala Gln Glu Ala

115 120 125

gac agt aga agt gaa gga tcg gtt aaa gcg att gtg atc ccg cct cct 432

Asp Ser Arg Ser Glu Gly Ser Val Lys Ala Ile Val Ile Pro Pro Pro

130 135 140

cgt cca aag aga aaa ccg gca cat cct tat cct cgg aaa tcg cct gtt 480

Arg Pro Lys Arg Lys Pro Ala His Pro Tyr Pro Arg Lys Ser Pro Val

145 150 155 160

cca tat act cag tct cct cca cca aat ttg tca gct atg gag aaa gga 528

Pro Tyr Thr Gln Ser Pro Pro Pro Asn Leu Ser Ala Met Glu Lys Gly

165 170 175

acc aag tct cca acc tca gtg tta tca tcg ttt ggt tca gag gat caa 576

Thr Lys Ser Pro Thr Ser Val Leu Ser Ser Phe Gly Ser Glu Asp Gln

180 185 190

gtc aat aga tgc tct tcg cct aat tcg tgt acc agt gac atc caa tcc 624

Val Asn Arg Cys Ser Ser Pro Asn Ser Cys Thr Ser Asp Ile Gln Ser

195 200 205

att ggt gca act tcc att gat aaa aag aat aac tac aca aca tcc aag 672

Ile Gly Ala Thr Ser Ile Asp Lys Lys Asn Asn Tyr Thr Thr Ser Lys

210 215 220

caa cct ttc aaa gat gat tct gac att ggt tca aca ccc att tca agc 720

Gln Pro Phe Lys Asp Asp Ser Asp Ile Gly Ser Thr Pro Ile Ser Ser

225 230 235 240

att act ctt ttc ggg aag att gtc ctt gtc gcg gaa gaa tct cac aaa 768

Ile Thr Leu Phe Gly Lys Ile Val Leu Val Ala Glu Glu Ser His Lys

245 250 255

cca tcc tct tac aat gat gat gat ctt aaa caa atg acg tgt cag gag 816

Pro Ser Ser Tyr Asn Asp Asp Asp Leu Lys Gln Met Thr Cys Gln Glu

260 265 270

aat cac tac tca ggg atg cta gtt gac act aat tta tct ctt ggt gta 864

Asn His Tyr Ser Gly Met Leu Val Asp Thr Asn Leu Ser Leu Gly Val

275 280 285

tgg gaa acg ttt tgt act ggt tct aat gca ttt ggc tcg gtt aca gaa 912

Trp Glu Thr Phe Cys Thr Gly Ser Asn Ala Phe Gly Ser Val Thr Glu

290 295 300

gca tct gag aac ttg gag aaa agt gca gag ccg ata agt tct tca tgg 960

Ala Ser Glu Asn Leu Glu Lys Ser Ala Glu Pro Ile Ser Ser Ser Trp

305 310 315 320

aaa cgg tta agc tcc tta gaa aaa caa gga tct tgt aat cct gta aat 1008

Lys Arg Leu Ser Ser Leu Glu Lys Gln Gly Ser Cys Asn Pro Val Asn

325 330 335

gca agt ggg ttc agg cca tac aag aga tgc cta tca gaa aga gaa gta 1056

Ala Ser Gly Phe Arg Pro Tyr Lys Arg Cys Leu Ser Glu Arg Glu Val

340 345 350

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Thr Ser Ser Leu Thr Leu Val Ala Ser Asp Glu Lys Lys Ser Gln Arg

355 360 365

gca cgt ata tgc tag 1119

Ala Arg Ile Cys

370

<210> SEQ ID NO: 4

<211> LENGTH: 372

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<400> SEQENCE: 4

Met Leu Cys Phe Val Arg Phe Gln Ala Gly Phe Val Arg Ile Ile Val

1 5 10 15

Ala Ala Arg Lys Arg Phe Arg Tyr Phe Leu Met Ala Ala Glu Asp Arg

20 25 30

Ser Glu Glu Leu Ser Ser Asn Val Glu Asn Gly Ser Cys Asn Ser Asn

35 40 45

Glu Gly Ile Asn Pro Glu Thr Ser Ser His Trp Ile Glu Asn Val Val

50 55 60

Lys Val Arg Lys Pro Tyr Thr Val Thr Lys Gln Arg Glu Lys Trp Ser

65 70 75 80

Glu Glu Glu His Asp Arg Phe Leu Glu Ala Ile Lys Leu Tyr Gly Arg

85 90 95

Gly Trp Arg Gln Ile Gln Glu His Ile Gly Thr Lys Thr Ala Val Gln

100 105 110

Ile Arg Ser His Ala Gln Lys Phe Phe Ser Lys Met Ala Gln Glu Ala

115 120 125

Asp Ser Arg Ser Glu Gly Ser Val Lys Ala Ile Val Ile Pro Pro Pro

130 135 140

Arg Pro Lys Arg Lys Pro Ala His Pro Tyr Pro Arg Lys Ser Pro Val

145 150 155 160

Pro Tyr Thr Gln Ser Pro Pro Pro Asn Leu Ser Ala Met Glu Lys Gly

165 170 175

Thr Lys Ser Pro Thr Ser Val Leu Ser Ser Phe Gly Ser Glu Asp Gln

180 185 190

Val Asn Arg Cys Ser Ser Pro Asn Ser Cys Thr Ser Asp Ile Gln Ser

195 200 205

Ile Gly Ala Thr Ser Ile Asp Lys Lys Asn Asn Tyr Thr Thr Ser Lys

210 215 220

Gln Pro Phe Lys Asp Asp Ser Asp Ile Gly Ser Thr Pro Ile Ser Ser

225 230 235 240

Ile Thr Leu Phe Gly Lys Ile Val Leu Val Ala Glu Glu Ser His Lys

245 250 255

Pro Ser Ser Tyr Asn Asp Asp Asp Leu Lys Gln Met Thr Cys Gln Glu

260 265 270

Asn His Tyr Ser Gly Met Leu Val Asp Thr Asn Leu Ser Leu Gly Val

275 280 285

Trp Glu Thr Phe Cys Thr Gly Ser Asn Ala Phe Gly Ser Val Thr Glu

290 295 300

Ala Ser Glu Asn Leu Glu Lys Ser Ala Glu Pro Ile Ser Ser Ser Trp

305 310 315 320

Lys Arg Leu Ser Ser Leu Glu Lys Gln Gly Ser Cys Asn Pro Val Asn

325 330 335

Ala Ser Gly Phe Arg Pro Tyr Lys Arg Cys Leu Ser Glu Arg Glu Val

340 345 350

Thr Ser Ser Leu Thr Leu Val Ala Ser Asp Glu Lys Lys Ser Gln Arg

355 360 365

Ala Arg Ile Cys

370

<210> SEQ ID NO: 5

<211> LENGTH: 498

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: CDS

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(498)

<400> SEQENCE: 5

atg gat tcg aaa aat gga att aac aac agc caa aag gca aga agg act 48

Met Asp Ser Lys Asn Gly Ile Asn Asn Ser Gln Lys Ala Arg Arg Thr

1 5 10 15

cca aaa gac cgc cat ttg aaa att ggt ggc cgt gat cgt cgc att cgg 96

Pro Lys Asp Arg His Leu Lys Ile Gly Gly Arg Asp Arg Arg Ile Arg

20 25 30

atc ccg ccg agt gtt gct ccc caa cta ttt aga ttg aca aaa gaa ctc 144

Ile Pro Pro Ser Val Ala Pro Gln Leu Phe Arg Leu Thr Lys Glu Leu

35 40 45

ggc ttt aaa acc gat ggt gaa act gtc agt tgg ctc ctc cag aat gcc 192

Gly Phe Lys Thr Asp Gly Glu Thr Val Ser Trp Leu Leu Gln Asn Ala

50 55 60

gag cct gcc att ttc gca gcc acg gga cat ggt gtc acc acc acc tcc 240

Glu Pro Ala Ile Phe Ala Ala Thr Gly His Gly Val Thr Thr Thr Ser

65 70 75 80

aat gaa gat atc cag cca aat agg aat ttt cct agt tac acc ttt aat 288

Asn Glu Asp Ile Gln Pro Asn Arg Asn Phe Pro Ser Tyr Thr Phe Asn

85 90 95

ggt gat aat att agt aat aac gtt ttc cct tgt acg gtt gta aat act 336

Gly Asp Asn Ile Ser Asn Asn Val Phe Pro Cys Thr Val Val Asn Thr

100 105 110

ggt cat cgt cag atg gtg ttt ccg gtt tct aca atg aca gat cat gca 384

Gly His Arg Gln Met Val Phe Pro Val Ser Thr Met Thr Asp His Ala

115 120 125

cct tca act aat tac agt act att agt gat aat tac aat tcc acc ttt 432

Pro Ser Thr Asn Tyr Ser Thr Ile Ser Asp Asn Tyr Asn Ser Thr Phe

130 135 140

aat ggt aat gct acc gcc agt gat aca aca tca gca gca aca aca aca 480

Asn Gly Asn Ala Thr Ala Ser Asp Thr Thr Ser Ala Ala Thr Thr Thr

145 150 155 160

gcc aca acc aca gtt tga 498

Ala Thr Thr Thr Val

165

<210> SEQ ID NO: 6

<211> LENGTH: 165

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Arabidopsis thaliana

<400> SEQENCE: 6

Met Asp Ser Lys Asn Gly Ile Asn Asn Ser Gln Lys Ala Arg Arg Thr

1 5 10 15

Pro Lys Asp Arg His Leu Lys Ile Gly Gly Arg Asp Arg Arg Ile Arg

20 25 30

Ile Pro Pro Ser Val Ala Pro Gln Leu Phe Arg Leu Thr Lys Glu Leu

35 40 45

Gly Phe Lys Thr Asp Gly Glu Thr Val Ser Trp Leu Leu Gln Asn Ala

50 55 60

Glu Pro Ala Ile Phe Ala Ala Thr Gly His Gly Val Thr Thr Thr Ser

65 70 75 80

Asn Glu Asp Ile Gln Pro Asn Arg Asn Phe Pro Ser Tyr Thr Phe Asn

85 90 95

Gly Asp Asn Ile Ser Asn Asn Val Phe Pro Cys Thr Val Val Asn Thr

100 105 110

Gly His Arg Gln Met Val Phe Pro Val Ser Thr Met Thr Asp His Ala

115 120 125

Pro Ser Thr Asn Tyr Ser Thr Ile Ser Asp Asn Tyr Asn Ser Thr Phe

130 135 140

Asn Gly Asn Ala Thr Ala Ser Asp Thr Thr Ser Ala Ala Thr Thr Thr

145 150 155 160

Ala Thr Thr Thr Val

165

<210> SEQ ID NO: 7

<211> LENGTH: 30

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 7

gatgataagc aaggatccaa gatcgagttt 30

<210> SEQ ID NO: 8

<211> LENGTH: 30

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 8

gccttgatat tgaaggtgag aactcatcat 30

<210> SEQ ID NO: 9

<211> LENGTH: 13

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 9

Gly Leu Asp Leu Asp Leu Glu Leu Arg Leu Gly Phe Ala

1 5 10

<210> SEQ ID NO: 10

<211> LENGTH: 30

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 10

gatggccgct gaggatcgaa gtgaggaact 30

<210> SEQ ID NO: 11

<211> LENGTH: 30

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 11

gcatatacgt gctctttggc ttttcttttc 30

<210> SEQ ID NO: 12

<211> LENGTH: 24

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 12

atggattcga aaaatggaat taac 24

<210> SEQ ID NO: 13

<211> LENGTH: 23

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic oligonucleotide primer

<400> SEQENCE: 13

aactgtggtt gtggctgttg ttg 23

<210> SEQ ID NO: 14

<211> LENGTH: 21

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic polypeptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(10)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is any amino acid

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (14)..(14)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is Asn or Glu

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (16)..(21)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is any amino acid

<400> SEQENCE: 14

Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Leu Asp Leu Xaa Leu Xaa

1 5 10 15

Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa

20

<210> SEQ ID NO: 15

<211> LENGTH: 21

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic polypeptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(10)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is any amino acid

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (15)..(15)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is Phe or Ile

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (16)..(21)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is any amino acid

<400> SEQENCE: 15

Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Phe Asp Leu Asn Xaa Xaa

1 5 10 15

Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa

20

<210> SEQ ID NO: 16

<211> LENGTH: 19

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic polypeptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (6)..(6)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is Glu, Gln or Asp

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (10)..(19)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa is any amino acid

<400> SEQENCE: 16

Leu Asp Leu Asp Leu Xaa Leu Arg Leu Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa Xaa

1 5 10 15

Xaa Xaa Xaa

<210> SEQ ID NO: 17

<211> LENGTH: 6

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic peptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (3)..(3)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Glu, Gln, or Asp

<400> SEQENCE: 17

Asp Leu Xaa Leu Arg Leu

1 5

<210> SEQ ID NO: 18

<211> LENGTH: 6

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic peptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (3)..(3)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr,

Ser, or His

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (5)..(5)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Arg, Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His,

Lys, or Asp

<400> SEQENCE: 18

Xaa Leu Xaa Leu Xaa Leu

1 5

<210> SEQ ID NO: 19

<211> LENGTH: 6

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic peptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (3)..(3)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr,

Ser, or His

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (5)..(5)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Gln, Asn, Thr, Ser, His, Lys,

or Asp

<400> SEQENCE: 19

Xaa Leu Xaa Leu Xaa Leu

1 5

<210> SEQ ID NO: 20

<211> LENGTH: 6

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic peptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (3)..(3)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asn, Arg, Thr, Ser, or His

<400> SEQENCE: 20

Xaa Leu Xaa Leu Arg Leu

1 5

<210> SEQ ID NO: 21

<211> LENGTH: 6

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Synthetic peptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(1)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asn, Glu, Gln, Thr, or Ser

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (3)..(3)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Xaa represents Asp, Gln, Asn, Arg, Glu, Thr,

Ser, or His

<400> SEQENCE: 21

Xaa Leu Xaa Leu Arg Leu

1 5

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Patent Valuation

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Reveal the value <>

25.33/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

100.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

66.07/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

76.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

24.07/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
乳酸菌を利用した低タンパク質米の調製法並びにその 加工品 新潟県 25 January 1993 09 August 1994
Method of producing sterile plant, plant obtained by using the same and use thereof NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY,JAPAN SCI & TECH AGENCY 07 January 2005 20 September 2006
アブラナのホスホエノールピルビン酸 カルボキシラーゼ遺伝子 株式会社三井業際植物バイオ研究所 09 September 1992 05 April 1994
Safety device INTERN STANDARD ELECTRIC CORP 02 May 1984 08 January 1985
Image processing method for taking out glandular cavity of stomack tissue 東亜医用電子株式会社 25 July 1988 05 February 1990
See full citation <>

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