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Patent Analysis of

Thick, tough, high tensile strength steel plate and production method therefor

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10000833

Application Number

US14/770853

Application Date

11 March 2014

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

JFE STEEL CORPORATION

Original Assignee (Applicant)

JFE STEEL CORPORATION

International Classification

C22C38/50,C22C38/54,C21D1/78,C21D6/00,C21D8/02

Cooperative Classification

C22C38/58,C21D1/25,C21D1/78,C21D6/004,C21D6/005

Inventor

KITSUYA, SHIGEKI,MATSUNAGA, NAOKI,ICHIMIYA, KATSUYUKI,HASE, KAZUKUNI,ENDO, SHIGERU

Abstract

A thick, high-toughness high-strength steel plate has excellent strength and toughness in the central area through the plate thickness. The thick steel plate has a specific chemical composition and includes a microstructure having, throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%. A continuously cast slab having the specific chemical composition is heated to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot worked with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, and thereafter hot rolled and heat treated.

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Claims

1. A thick, high-toughness high-strength steel plate having a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate comprising a microstructure having, throughout the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%, the yield strength of the steel plate is not less than 620 MPa, a reduction of area after fracture in a tensile test in the direction of the plate thickness of the steel plate is not less than 25%, an absorbed energy by Charpy impact test at −40° C. vE−40 of the steel plate is 70 J or more, the steel plate includes by mass %, C: 0.08 to 0.20%, Si: not more than 0.40%, Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%, P: not more than 0.015%, S: not more than 0.0050%, Cr: not more than 3.0%, Ni: not more than 5.0%, Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%, Al: 0.010 to 0.080%, N: not more than 0.0070% and B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%, the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities, andthe steel plate satisfies the relationship represented by Expression (1)

CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1) wherein the alloying element symbols indicate the respective contents (mass %) and are 0 when absent.

2. A method of manufacturing a thick, high-toughness high-strength steel plate having a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate including a microstructure having throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%, the method comprising: heating a continuously cast slab to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot working the slab at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, andhot rolling, quench hardening and tempering the steel, the continuously cast slab including, by mass %, C: 0.08 to 0.20%, Si: not more than 0.40%, Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%, P: not more than 0.015%, S: not more than 0.0050%, Cr: not more than 3.0%, Ni: not more than 5.0%, Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%, Al: 0.010 to 0.080%, N: not more than 0.0070% and B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%, the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities, the continuously cast slab satisfying the relationship represented by Expression (1):

CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1) wherein the alloying element symbols indicate the respective contents (mass %) and are 0 when absent, wherein the continuously cast slab is heated to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot worked at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, air cooled, heated again to Ac3 point to 1200° C., subjected to hot rolling including at least two or more passes with a rolling reduction per pass of not less than 4%, air cooled, heated to Ac3 point to 1050° C., quenched to 350° C. or below and tempered at 450° C. to 700° C., and wherein the yield strength is not less than 620 MPa.

3. The method according to claim 2, wherein the slab further includes, by mass %, one, or two or more of Cu: not more than 0.50%, Mo: not more than 1.00% and V: not more than 0.200%.

4. The method according to claim 2, wherein the slab further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.

5. The method according to claim 2, wherein the continuously cast slab is worked to reduce its width by not less than 100 mm before hot working and is thereafter hot worked with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%.

6. The method according to claim 3, wherein the slab further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.

7. The steel plate according to claim 1, wherein steel plate further includes, by mass %, one, or two or more of Cu: not more than 0.50%, Mo: not more than 1.00% and V: not more than 0.200%.

8. The steel plate according to claim 1, wherein steel plate further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.

9. The steel plate according to claim 7, wherein steel plate further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A thick, high-toughness high-strength steel plate having
    • a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate comprising a microstructure having, throughout the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%, the yield strength of the steel plate is not less than 620 MPa, a reduction of area after fracture in a tensile test in the direction of the plate thickness of the steel plate is not less than 25%, an absorbed energy by Charpy impact test at −40° C. vE−40 of the steel plate is 70 J or more, the steel plate includes by mass %, C: 0.08 to 0.20%, Si: not more than 0.40%, Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%, P: not more than 0.015%, S: not more than 0.0050%, Cr: not more than 3.0%, Ni: not more than 5.0%, Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%, Al: 0.010 to 0.080%, N: not more than 0.0070% and B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%, the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities, andthe steel plate satisfies the relationship represented by Expression (1) CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1) wherein the alloying element symbols indicate the respective contents (mass %) and are 0 when absent.
    • 7. The steel plate according to claim 1, wherein
      • steel plate further includes, by mass %, one, or two or more of Cu: not more than 0.50%, Mo: not more than 1.00% and V: not more than 0.200%.
    • 8. The steel plate according to claim 1, wherein
      • steel plate further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.
  • 2
    2. A method of manufacturing a thick, high-toughness high-strength steel plate having
    • a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate including a microstructure having throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%, the method comprising: heating a continuously cast slab to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot working the slab at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, andhot rolling, quench hardening and tempering the steel, the continuously cast slab including, by mass %, C: 0.08 to 0.20%, Si: not more than 0.40%, Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%, P: not more than 0.015%, S: not more than 0.0050%, Cr: not more than 3.0%, Ni: not more than 5.0%, Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%, Al: 0.010 to 0.080%, N: not more than 0.0070% and B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%, the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities, the continuously cast slab satisfying the relationship represented by Expression (1): CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1) wherein the alloying element symbols indicate the respective contents (mass %) and are 0 when absent, wherein the continuously cast slab is heated to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot worked at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, air cooled, heated again to Ac3 point to 1200° C., subjected to hot rolling including at least two or more passes with a rolling reduction per pass of not less than 4%, air cooled, heated to Ac3 point to 1050° C., quenched to 350° C. or below and tempered at 450° C. to 700° C., and wherein the yield strength is not less than 620 MPa.
    • 3. The method according to claim 2, wherein
      • the slab further includes, by mass %, one, or two or more of Cu: not more than 0.50%, Mo: not more than 1.00% and V: not more than 0.200%.
    • 4. The method according to claim 2, wherein
      • the slab further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.
    • 5. The method according to claim 2, wherein
      • the continuously cast slab is worked to reduce its width by not less than 100 mm before hot working and is thereafter hot worked with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%.
See all independent claims <>

Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to thick high-toughness high-strength steel plates with excellent strength, toughness and weldability used for steel structures such as buildings, bridges, marine vessels, marine structures, construction and industrial machineries, tanks and penstocks, and to methods of manufacturing such steel plates. The steel plates preferably have a plate thickness of 100 mm or more and a yield strength of 620 MPa or more.

BACKGROUND

In recent years, significant upsizing of steel structures has led to a marked increase in the strength and the thickness of steel that is used. Thick steel plates having a plate thickness of 100 mm or more are usually manufactured by slabbing a large steel ingot produced by an ingot making method, and hot rolling the resultant slab. In this ingot making-slabbing process, densely segregated areas in hot tops and negatively segregated areas in ingot bottoms have to be discarded. This causes low yields, high production costs and long work periods.

In contrast, a process using a continuously cast slab as the material steel is free from such concerns. However, the fact that the thickness of a continuously cast slab is less than that of an ingot slab causes the rolling reduction to the product thickness to be low. In the production of thick steel plates having increased strength, alloying elements are added in large amounts to ensure desired characteristics. This results in the occurrence of center porosities ascribed to center segregation, and the upsizing of steels consequently encounters the problematic deterioration of internal quality.

To solve this problem, the following techniques have been proposed for the purpose of improving the characteristics of center segregation areas by compressing center porosities during the process in which continuously cast slabs are worked into ultrathick steel plates.

Tetsu to Hagane (Iron and Steel), Vol. 66 (1980), No. 2, pp. 201-210 describes a technique in which center porosities are compressed by increasing the rolling shape factor during the hot rolling of a continuously cast slab. Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication Nos. 55-114404 and 61-273201 describe techniques in which center porosities in a continuously cast slab are compressed by working the continuously cast slab with rolls or anvils during its production in the continuous casting machine.

Japanese Patent No. 3333619 describes a technique in which a continuously cast slab is worked into a thick steel plate with a cumulative reduction of not more than 70% such that the slab is forged before hot rolling to compress center porosities. Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2002-194431 describes a technique in which a continuously cast slab is worked into an ultrathick steel plate by forging and thick plate rolling with a total working reduction of 35 to 67%. In that process, the central area through the plate thickness of the steel is held at a temperature of 1200° C. or above for at least 20 hours before forging and the steel is forged with a reduction of not less than 16% to eliminate center porosities and also to decrease or remedy the center segregation zone, thereby improving temper brittleness resistance characteristics.

Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2000-263103 describes a technique in which a continuously cast slab is cross forged and then hot rolled to remedy center porosities and center segregation. Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2006-111918 describes a technique related to a method of manufacturing thick steel plates with a tensile strength of not less than 588 MPa in which a continuously cast slab is held at a temperature of 1200° C. or above for at least 20 hours, forged with a reduction of not less than 17%, subjected to thick plate rolling with a total reduction including the forging reduction of 23 to 50%, and quench hardened two times after the thick plate rolling, thereby eliminating center porosities and also decreasing or remedying the center segregation zone.

Japanese Unexamined Patent Application Publication No. 2010-106298 describes a technique related to a method of manufacturing thick steel plates with excellent weldability and ductility in the plate thickness direction wherein a continuously cast slab having a prescribed chemical composition is reheated to 1100° C. to 1350° C. and thereafter worked at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of 0.05 to 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%.

The technique described in Tetsu to Hagane (Iron and Steel), Vol. 66 (1980), No. 2, pp. 201-210 requires that steel plates be repeatedly rolled with a high rolling shape factor to achieve good internal quality. However, such rolling is beyond the upper limit of equipment specifications of rolling machines and, consequently, manufacturing constraints are encountered.

The techniques of JP '404 and JP '201 have a problem in that large capital investments are necessary for adaptation of continuous casting facilities, and also have uncertainty about the strength of steel plates obtained. The techniques of JP '619, JP '431, JP '103, JP '918 and JP '298 are effective to remedy center porosities and improve center segregation zones. However, the yield strength of steel plates obtained is less than 620 MPa. Thick steel plates with a yield strength of 620 MPa or above decrease their toughness due to the increase in strength. Further, thick steel plates are cooled at a lower rate in the central area through the plate thickness than in the other areas. It is necessary to increase the amounts of alloying elements that are added to ensure strength in such central regions. Such thick steel plates containing large amounts of alloying elements increase their deformation resistance and, consequently, center porosities are not sufficiently compressed and tend to remain after the working. Thus, there is a concern that the steel plates will exhibit insufficient elongation and toughness in the central area through the plate thickness. As discussed above, there are no established techniques which realize thick high-toughness high-strength steel plates having a yield strength of 620 MPa or above, and methods of manufacturing such steel plates with existing facilities.

It could therefore be helpful to provide thick high-toughness high-strength steel plates with a yield strength of 620 MPa or above that contain large amounts of alloying elements and still have excellent strength and toughness in the central area through the plate thickness, as well as to provide methods of manufacturing such steel plates. The plate thickness of interest is 100 mm or more.

SUMMARY

We carried out extensive studies with respect to thick steel plates having a yield strength of not less than 620 MPa and a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm and found a relationship between the microstructure and the strength and toughness in the central area through the plate thickness. We thus provide:

    • 1. A thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate having a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate including a microstructure having, throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%.
    • 2. The thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in 1, wherein the yield strength is not less than 620 MPa.
    • 3. The thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in 1 or 2, wherein the reduction of area after fracture in a tensile test in the direction of the plate thickness of the steel plate is not less than 25%.
    • 4. A method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate having a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm, the steel plate including a microstructure having, throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction, an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80%, the method including heating a continuously cast slab to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot working the slab at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, and thereafter hot rolling, quench hardening and tempering the steel, the continuously cast slab including, by mass %, C: 0.08 to 0.20%, Si: not more than 0.40%, Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%, P: not more than 0.015%, S: not more than 0.0050%, Cr: not more than 3.0%, Ni: not more than 5.0%, Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%, Al: 0.010 to 0.080%, N: not more than 0.0070% and B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%, the balance being Fe and inevitable impurities, the continuously cast slab satisfying the relationship represented by Expression (1):

      CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1)

    • wherein the alloying element symbols indicate the respective contents (mass %) and are 0 when absent.
    • 5. The method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in 4, wherein the yield strength is not less than 620 MPa.
    • 6. The method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in 4 or 5, wherein the slab further includes, by mass %, one, or two or more of Cu: not more than 0.50%, Mo: not more than 1.00% and V: not more than 0.200%.
    • 7. The method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in any one of 4 to 6, wherein the slab further includes, by mass %, one or both of Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050% and REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%.
    • 8. The method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in any one of 4 to 7, wherein the continuously cast slab is heated to 1200° C. to 1350° C., hot worked at not less than 1000° C. with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%, allowed to cool naturally, heated again to Ac3 point to 1200° C., subjected to hot rolling including at least two or more passes with a rolling reduction per pass of not less than 4%, allowed to cool naturally, heated to Ac3 point to 1050° C., quenched to 350° C. or below and tempered at 450° C. to 700° C.
    • 9. The method of manufacturing a thick high-toughness high-strength steel plate described in 8, wherein the continuously cast slab is worked to reduce the width by not less than 100 mm before hot working and is thereafter hot worked with a strain rate of not more than 3/s and a cumulative working reduction of not less than 15%.

Thick steel plates with a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm achieve excellent internal quality in the central area through the plate thickness. Specifically, the thick steel plates exhibit a yield strength of not less than 620 MPa and have excellent toughness. Our manufacturing methods can produce such steel plates. Our steel sheets have marked effects in industry by making great contributions to the upsizing of steel structures, improving the safety of steel structures, enhancing the yields, and reducing the production work periods.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Examples of our methods and steel sheets will be described in detail below.

Microstructure

To ensure that thick steel plates having a plate thickness of not less than 100 mm exhibit a yield strength of not less than 620 MPa and excellent toughness, the microstructure has an average prior austenite grain size of not more than 50 μm and a martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction of not less than 80% throughout an entire region in the plate thickness direction. Phases other than the martensite and/or bainite phases are not particularly limited. The average prior austenite grain size is the average grain size of prior austenite at the center through the plate thickness.

Chemical Composition

The contents of the respective elements are all in mass %.

C: 0.080 to 0.200%

Carbon is an element useful to obtain the strength required for structural steel at low cost. Addition of 0.080% or more carbon is necessary to obtain this effect. If, on the other hand, more than 0.200% carbon is added, the toughness of base steel and welds is markedly decreased. Thus, the upper limit is 0.200%. The C content is preferably 0.080% to 0.140%.

Si: Not More than 0.40%

Silicon is added for the purpose of deoxidation. However, addition of more than 0.40% silicon results in a marked decrease in the toughness of base steel and weld heat affected zones. Thus, the Si content is limited to not more than 0.40%. The Si content is preferably 0.05% to 0.30%, and more preferably 0.10% to 0.30%.

Mn: 0.5 to 5.0%

Manganese is added to ensure the strength of the base steel. However, the effect is insufficient when the amount added is less than 0.5%. Adding more than 5.0% manganese not only decreases the toughness of base steel, but also facilitates occurrence of center segregation and increases the size of center porosities in the slabs. Thus, the upper limit is 5.0%. The Mn content is preferably 0.6 to 2.0%, and more preferably 0.6 to 1.6%.

P: Not More than 0.015%

If more than 0.015% phosphorus is added, the toughness of base steel and weld heat affected zones is markedly lowered. Thus, the P content is limited to not more than 0.015%.

S: Not More than 0.0050%

If more than 0.0050% sulfur is added, the toughness of base steel and weld heat affected zones is markedly lowered. Thus, the S content is limited to not more than 0.0050%.

Cr: Not More than 3.0%

Chromium is an element effective to increase the strength of the base steel. However, addition of an excessively large amount results in a decrease in weldability. Thus, the Cr content is limited to not more than 3.0%. The Cr content is preferably 0.1% to 2.0%.

Ni: Not More than 5.0%

Nickel is a useful element that increases the strength of steel and the toughness of weld heat affected zones. However, adding more than 5.0% nickel causes a significant decrease in economic efficiency. Thus, the upper limit of the Ni content is preferably 5.0% or less. The Ni content is more preferably 0.5% to 4.0%.

Ti: 0.005% to 0.020%

Titanium forms TiN during heating to effectively suppress coarsening of austenite and enhance the toughness of the base steel and weld heat affected zones. 0.005% or more titanium is added to obtain this effect. However, addition of more than 0.020% titanium results in coarsening of titanium nitride and, consequently, the toughness of base steel is lowered. Thus, the Ti content is limited to 0.005% to 0.020%. The Ti content is preferably 0.008% to 0.015%.

Al: 0.010 to 0.080%

Aluminum is added to deoxidize molten steel. However, the deoxidation effect is insufficient if the amount added is less than 0.010%. If more than 0.080% aluminum is added, the amount of aluminum dissolved in the base steel is so increased that the toughness of base steel is lowered. Thus, the Al content is limited to 0.010 to 0.080%. The Al content is preferably 0.030 to 0.080%, and more preferably 0.030 to 0.060%.

N: Not More than 0.0070%

Nitrogen has an effect of reducing the size of the microstructure by forming nitrides with elements such as titanium, and thereby enhances the toughness of base steel and weld heat affected zones. If, however, more than 0.0070% nitrogen is added, the amount of nitrogen dissolved in the base steel is so increased that the toughness of base steel is significantly lowered and further the toughness of weld heat affected zones is decreased due to formation of coarse carbonitride. Thus, the N content is limited to not more than 0.0070%. The N content is preferably not more than 0.0050%, and more preferably not more than 0.0040%.

B: 0.0003 to 0.0030%

Boron is segregated in austenite grain boundaries and suppresses ferrite transformation from the grain boundaries, thereby exerting an effect of enhancing hardenability. To ensure that this effect is produced sufficiently, 0.0003% or more boron is added. If the amount added is more than 0.0030%, boron is precipitated as carbonitride to cause a decrease in hardenability and a decrease in toughness. Thus, the B content is limited to 0.0003% to 0.0030%. The B content is preferably 0.0005 to 0.0020%.

CeqIIW≥0.57%

It is necessary to design the microstructure so that the central area through the plate thickness exhibits both a yield strength of not less than 620 MPa and excellent toughness. To ensure that the martensite and/or bainite phase area fraction will be 80% or more even in spite of the conditions in which the plate thickness is 100 mm or more and the central area through the plate thickness is cooled at a lower rate than the other areas, it is necessary that the components be added in such amounts that CeqIIW defined by Expression (1) below satisfies the relationship: CeqIIW≥0.57%:

CeqIIW=C+Mn/6+(Cu+Ni)/15+(Cr+Mo+V)/5≥0.57  (1)

wherein the element symbols indicate the contents (mass %) of the respective elements and are 0 when absent.

The aforementioned components constitute the basic chemical composition, and the balance is iron and inevitable impurities. The chemical composition may further include one, or two or more of copper, molybdenum and vanadium to enhance strength and toughness.

Cu: Not More than 0.50%

Copper increases the strength of steel without causing a decrease in toughness. However, adding more than 0.50% copper results in the occurrence of cracks on the steel plate surface during hot working. Thus, the content of copper, when added, is limited to not more than 0.50%.

Mo: Not More than 1.00%

Molybdenum is an element effective to increase the strength of the base steel. If, however, more than 1.00% molybdenum is added, hardness is increased by precipitation of alloy carbide and, consequently, toughness is decreased. Thus, the upper limit of molybdenum, when added, is limited to 1.00%. The Mo content is preferably 0.20% to 0.80%.

V: Not More than 0.200%

Vanadium is effective to increase the strength and toughness of base steel, and also effectively decreases the amount of solute nitrogen by being precipitated as VN. However, adding more than 0.200% vanadium results in a decrease in toughness due to the precipitation of hard VC. Thus, the content of vanadium, when added, is limited to not more than 0.200%. The V content is preferably 0.010 to 0.100%.

Further, one, or two or more of calcium and rare earth metals may be added to increase strength and toughness.

Ca: 0.0005 to 0.0050%

Calcium is an element useful to control the morphology of sulfide inclusions. 0.0005% or more calcium needs to be added to obtain its effect. If, however, the amount added exceeds 0.0050%, cleanliness is lowered and toughness is decreased. Thus, the content of calcium, when added, is limited to 0.0005 to 0.0050%. The Ca content is preferably 0.0005% to 0.0025%.

REM: 0.0005 to 0.0050%

Similar to calcium, rare earth metals have an effect of improving quality through formation of oxides and sulfides in steel. To obtain this effect, 0.0005% or more rare earth metals need to be added. The effect is saturated after the amount added exceeds 0.0050%. Thus, the content of rare earth metals, when added, is limited to 0.0005 to 0.0050%. The REM content is preferably 0.0005 to 0.0025%.

Manufacturing Conditions

The temperature “° C.” refers to the temperature in the central area through the plate thickness of the slab or the steel plate. In the method of manufacturing thick steel plates, casting defects such as center porosities in the steel are eliminated by subjecting the steel to hot working and, after air cooling and reheating or directly without cooling, subjecting the hot-worked steel to hot rolling to obtain a desired plate thickness. The temperature of the central area through the plate thickness may be obtained by a method such as simulation calculation using data such as plate thickness, surface temperature and cooling conditions. For example, the temperature in the center through the plate thickness may be obtained by calculating the temperature distribution in the plate thickness direction using a difference method.

Conditions for Hot Working of Steel

Heating Temperature: 1200° C. to 1350° C.

Steel having the aforementioned chemical composition is smelted by a usual known method in a furnace such as a converter furnace, an electric furnace or a vacuum melting furnace, and is continuously cast and rolled into a slab (a steel slab), which is reheated to 1200° C. to 1350° C. If the reheating temperature is less than 1200° C., hot working cannot ensure a prescribed cumulative working reduction and further the steel exhibits high deformation resistance during hot working and fails to ensure a sufficient working reduction per pass.

As a result, the number of passes is increased to cause a decrease in production efficiency. Further, the compression cannot remedy casting defects such as center porosities in the steel. For these reasons, the reheating temperature is limited to not less than 1200° C.

On the other hand, reheating at a temperature exceeding 1350° C. consumes excessively large amounts of energy, and scales formed during heating raise the probability of surface defects, thus increasing the load in maintenance after hot working. Thus, the upper limit is limited to 1350° C. Preferably, the hot working described below is performed after the continuously cast slab is worked in the width direction at least until an increase in slab thickness is obtained. This allows center porosities to be compressed more reliably.

Width Reduction Before Hot Working—not Less than 100 mm

Preferably, the slab is worked in the width direction before hot working and thereby the slab thickness is increased to ensure a margin for working. When this working is performed, reduction of width is preferably 100 mm or more because working by 100 mm or more gives rise to a thickness increase in an area that is distant from both ends of the slab width by ¼ of the slab width. This makes it possible to effectively compress the center porosities of the slab that frequently occur in this area. The width reduction that is 100 mm or more is the total of the width reduction at both ends of the slab width.

Working Temperature in Hot Working: Not Less than 1000° C.

If the working temperature during the hot working is less than 1000° C., hot working encounters high deformation resistance. Consequently, the load on the hot working machine is increased, and reliable compression of center porosities fails. Thus, the working temperature is limited to not less than 1000° C. The working temperature is preferably 1100° C. or more.

Cumulative Working Reduction During Hot Working: Not Less than 15%

If the cumulative working reduction during hot working is less than 15%, compression fails to remedy casting defects such as center porosities in the steel. Thus, the cumulative working reduction is limited to not less than 15%. When the plate thickness (the thickness) of the slab has been increased by hot working of the continuously cast slab in the width direction, the cumulative working reduction is the reduction from the increased thickness.

In the production of thick steel plates having a plate thickness of 120 mm or more, it is preferable that the hot working include one or more passes in which the working reduction per pass is 7% or more to reliably compress the center porosities. More preferably, the working reduction per pass is 10% and above.

Strain Rate During Hot Working: Not More than 3/s

If the strain rate during the hot working exceeds 3/s, the hot working encounters high deformation resistance. Consequently, the load on the hot working machine is increased, and compression of center porosities fails. Thus, the strain rate is limited to not more than 3/s.

At a strain rate of less than 0.01/s, hot working requires an extended time to cause a decrease in productivity. Thus, the strain rate is preferably not less than 0.01/s. More preferably, the strain rate is 0.05/s to 1/s. The hot working may be performed by a known method such as hot forging or hot rolling. Hot forging is preferable from the viewpoints of economic efficiency and high degree of freedom.

By performing the hot working under the aforementioned conditions, the central area through the plate thickness achieves stable enhancement in elongation in a tensile test.

Air Cooling after Hot Working

The hot-worked steel is subjected to hot rolling to obtain a desired plate thickness. The hot rolling is performed after air cooling and reheating or is carried out directly without cooling.

Hot Rolling Conditions

The hot-worked steel is hot rolled into a steel plate having a desired plate thickness. The steel plate is then subjected to quench hardening and tempering to ensure that a yield strength of not less than 620 MPa and good toughness are exhibited even in the central area through the plate thickness of the resultant steel plate.

Temperature of Reheating of Hot-Worked Steel: Ac3 Point to 1200° C.

To obtain an austenite single phase, the hot-worked steel is heated to or above the Ac3 transformation point. At above 1200° C., the austenite structure is coarsened to cause a decrease in toughness. Thus, the reheating temperature is limited to the Ac3 point to 1200° C. The Ac3 transformation point is a value calculated using Expression (2) below:

Ac3=937.2−476.5C+56Si−19.7Mn−16.3Cu−26.6Ni−4.9Cr+38.1Mo+124.8V+136.3Ti+198.4Al+3315B  (2).

In Expression (2), the element symbols indicate the contents (mass %) of the respective alloying elements.

Rolling Reduction Per Pass: Two or More Passes with 4% or More Reduction

Rolling with a reduction per pass of 4% or more ensures that the recrystallization of austenite is promoted over the entire region through the plate thickness. By performing such rolling two or more times, the austenite grains attain small and regular sizes. As a result, fine prior austenite grains are formed by quench hardening and tempering and, consequently, toughness may be enhanced. More preferably, the rolling reduction per pass is 6% or more.

Conditions for Heat Treatment after Hot Tolling

To obtain strength and toughness in the central area through the plate thickness, quench hardening and tempering are performed. In the quench hardening, the hot-rolled plate is allowed to cool naturally, reheated to the Ac3 point to 1050° C., and quenched from a temperature of not less than the Ar3 point to 350° C. or below. The reheating temperature is limited to 1050° C. or below because reheating at a high temperature exceeding 1050° C. causes the austenite grains to be coarsened and thus results in a marked decrease in the toughness of base steel. The Ar3 transformation point is a value calculated using Expression (3) below:

Ar3=910−310C−80Mn−20Cu−15Cr−55Ni−80Mo  (3).

In Expression (3), the element symbols indicate the contents (mass %) of the respective alloying elements.

A general quenching method in industry is water cooling. However, because the cooling rate is desirably as high as possible, any cooling methods other than water cooling may be adopted. Exemplary methods include gas cooling.

The tempering temperature is 450° C. to 700° C. Tempering at less than 450° C. produces a small effect in removing residual stress. If, on the other hand, the temperature exceeds 700° C., various carbides are precipitated and the microstructure of the base steel is coarsened to cause a marked decrease in strength and toughness. Thus, the tempering temperature is limited to 450° C. to 700° C.

When quench hardening is performed a plurality of times for the purpose of increasing the strength and the toughness of steel, it is necessary that the final quench hardening be performed such that the steel is heated to the Ac3 point to 1050° C., quenched to 350° C. or below and tempered at 450° C. to 700° C.

Examples

Steels Nos. 1 to 29 shown in Table 1 were smelted and shaped into slabs (continuously cast slabs) having a slab thickness of 310 mm. The slabs were then hot worked and hot rolled under various conditions, thereby forming steel plates with a plate thickness of 100 mm to 240 mm. Thereafter, the steel plates were quench hardened and tempered to give product specimens Nos. 1 to 39, which were subjected to the following tests.

Microstructure Evaluation

Samples having a 10×10 (mm) observation area were obtained from the surface and the center through the plate thickness of an L cross section of the steel as quenched. The microstructure was exposed with a Nital etching solution. Five fields of view were observed with a ×200 optical microscope, and the images were analyzed to measure fractions in the microstructure. To determine the average prior austenite grain size, L cross sectional observation samples were etched with picric acid to expose the prior y grain boundaries, and the images were analyzed to measure the circular equivalent diameters of the prior y grains, the results being averaged.

Evaluation of Porosities

A sample 12.5 in thickness and 50 in length (mm) was obtained from the central area through the plate thickness. The sample was inspected for 100 μm or larger porosities with an optical microscope.

Tensile Test

Round bars as tensile test pieces (diameter 12.5 mm, GL 50 mm) were obtained from the central area through the plate thickness of each of the steel plates, along a direction perpendicular to the rolling direction. The test pieces were tested to measure the yield strength (YS), the tensile strength (TS) and the total elongation (t. El).

Charpy Impact Test

Three Charpy test pieces with a 2 mm V notch were obtained from the central area through the plate thickness of each of the steel plates such that the rolling direction was the longitudinal direction. Each of the test pieces was subjected to a Charpy impact test at −40° C. to measure the absorbed energy (VE−40), and the results were averaged.

Tensile Test in Plate Thickness Direction

Three round bars as tensile test pieces (diameter 10 mm) were obtained along the direction of the plate thickness of each steel plate. The reduction of area after fracture was measured, and the results were averaged.

Tables 2 to 5 describe the manufacturing conditions and results of the above tests. From the tables, the steel plates of the steels Nos. 1 to 16 (the specimens Nos. 1 to 16) satisfying our chemical composition of steel achieved YS of not less than 620 MPa, TS of not less than 720 MPa, t. El of not less than 16%, base steel toughness (VE−40) of not less than 70 J, and a reduction of area of not less than 25%. Thus, the base steels exhibited excellent strength and toughness.

In the steel plates of Comparative Examples (the specimens Nos. 17 to 28) which were produced from the steels Nos. 17 to 28 having a chemical composition outside our range, the characteristics of base steel were inferior and corresponded to one or more of YS of less than 620 MPa, TS of less than 720 MPa, t. El of less than 16% and toughness (VE−40) of less than 70 J. In particular, the steel No. 28 failed to satisfy the Ceq requirement, and consequently the martensite and/or bainite fraction in the central area through the plate thickness was less than 80% to cause a decrease in yield strength. Thus, the corresponding steel plate did not achieve the target strength.

Further, as demonstrated by the specimens Nos. 29 to 39, even the steel plates satisfying our chemical composition of steel were unsatisfactory in one or more characteristics of YS, TS, t. El and toughness (vE−40) when the manufacturing conditions were outside our range. In particular, the specimen No. 39 had undergone an insufficient number of rolling passes with 4% or more reduction per pass. Consequently, it was impossible to control the average prior austenite grain size throughout the plate thickness to 50 μm or less, and the base steel exhibited poor toughness.


TABLE 1
Cate-
Chemical composition (mass %)
gories
Steel No.
C
Si
Mn
P
S
Cr
Ni
Ti
Al
N
Inv.
 1
0.083
0.15
1.4
0.006
0.0010
0.8
0.5
0.010
0.045
0.0032
Steels
 2
0.088
0.08
1.5
0.005
0.0011
0.6
0.9
0.008
0.048
0.0029
 3
0.085
0.20
4.0
0.004
0.0009
0.2
1.5
0.010
0.045
0.0030
 4
0.096
0.26
1.3
0.005
0.0004
1.2
2.0
0.009
0.050
0.0026
 5
0.102
0.18
0.9
0.006
0.0015
2.5
1.5
0.008
0.040
0.0032
 6
0.108
0.20
1.0
0.006
0.0010
0.7
0.9
0.009
0.050
0.0030
 7
0.118
0.22
1.1
0.005
0.0008
0.9
2.0
0.010
0.045
0.0028
 8
0.122
0.24
1.1
0.004
0.0006
0.8
2.6
0.011
0.038
0.0030
 9
0.124
0.13
1.0
0.003
0.0005
0.8
3.8
0.008
0.055
0.0030
10
0.130
0.23
1.0
0.005
0.0006
0.9
3.6
0.012
0.060
0.0040
11
0.135
0.19
1.3
0.005
0.0006
0.6
1.9
0.010
0.055
0.0032
12
0.158
0.22
1.2
0.004
0.0005
0.5
1.0
0.008
0.048
0.0029
13
0.175
0.26
0.8
0.003
0.0003
0.8
4.5
0.009
0.053
0.0025
14
0.195
0.20
0.6
0.006
0.0009
0.8
2.2
0.011
0.050
0.0028
15
0.116
0.25
1.5
0.006
0.0005
3.0
0.011
0.040
0.0032
16
0.122
0.10
1.5
0.003
0.0004
0.9
0.009
0.045
0.0028
Comp.
17
0.242
0.26
1.3
0.004
0.0008
1.0
0.6
0.012
0.040
0.0032
Steels
18
0.140
0.55
1.1
0.006
0.0007
0.8
1.0
0.009
0.045
0.0028
19
0.085
0.35
0.3
0.007
0.0009
1.2
0.9
0.009
0.050
0.0032
20
0.125
0.25
1.0
0.020
0.0012
1.0
0.9
0.009
0.043
0.0029
21
0.122
0.29
1.1
0.006
0.0005
0.8
2.0
0.003
0.050
0.0040
22
0.125
0.33
1.0
0.005
0.0006
1.0
1.9
0.024
0.035
0.0045
23
0.132
0.28
1.2
0.005
0.0009
1.1
2.0
0.009
0.003
0.0035
24
0.120
0.26
1.0
0.005
0.0009
0.9
1.9
0.011
0.095
0.0045
25
0.123
0.18
1.1
0.009
0.0006
0.8
2.0
0.010
0.040
0.0075
26
0.135
0.26
1.2
0.009
0.0008
0.8
1.9
0.008
0.050
0.0030
27
0.133
0.26
1.1
0.010
0.0010
0.8
2.0
0.008
0.050
0.0030
28
0.120
0.15
0.7
0.010
0.0015
0.6
1.0
0.012
0.035
0.0030
Cate-
Chemical composition (mass %)
Ac3
Ar3
gories
Steel No.
B
Cu
Mo
V
Ca
REM
CeqIIW
(° C.)
(° C.)
Inv.
 1
0.0009
0.25
0.30
0.020
0.0015
0.59
884
704
Steels
 2
0.0011
0.20
0.30
0.045
0.0018
0.60
871
676
 3
0.0012
0.10
0.15
0.040
0.93
812
465
 4
0.0009
0.25
0.74
845
628
 5
0.0010
0.10
0.15
0.040
0.90
850
672
 6
0.0012
0.25
0.45
0.040
0.0016
0.58
883
696
 7
0.0010
0.20
0.48
0.041
0.0018
0.73
848
620
 8
0.0011
0.19
0.50
0.039
0.0016
0.76
831
585
 9
0.0013
0.56
0.040
0.0015
0.82
803
526
10
0.0010
0.22
0.65
0.045
0.0018
0.87
812
522
11
0.0012
0.0016
0.60
821
651
12
0.0009
0.50
0.0018
0.62
854
663
13
0.0008
0.50
0.040
0.88
767
492
14
0.0012
0.65
0.0016
0.73
821
617
15
0.0010
0.15
0.45
0.045
0.68
820
550
16
0.0009
0.20
0.20
0.035
0.0020
0.61
873
719
Comp.
17
0.0009
0.20
0.45
0.038
0.0019
0.81
821
643
Steels
18
0.0015
0.15
0.50
0.66
881
669
19
0.0012
0.22
0.60
0.039
0.0025
0.58
920
740
20
0.0010
0.20
0.55
0.045
0.0018
0.68
879
679
21
0.0011
0.0019
0.60
830
662
22
0.0008
0.60
0.020
0.74
859
624
23
0.0012
0.35
0.76
827
619
24
0.0006
0.45
0.45
0.0022
0.71
852
630
25
0.0009
0.30
0.60
0.74
840
608
26
0.0001
0.25
0.48
0.0018
0.73
835
612
27
0.0040
0.25
0.49
0.0022
0.72
848
615
28
0.0009
0.25
0.45
0.040
0.0015
0.54
875
712
Note 1:
Underlined values are outside the inventive ranges.
Note 2:
The values of CeqIIW, Ac3 and Ar3 were calculated using Expressions (1) to (3), respectively.


TABLE 2
Hot working
Working
Working
Cumulative
Maximum
Draft in
Heating
start
finish
working
Strain
reduction
width
Specimen
Steel
Working
temp.
temp.
temp.
reduction
rate
per pass
direction
Treatment after hot
Categories
No.
No
method
(° C.)
(° C.)
(° C.)
(%)
(/s)
(%)
(mm)
working
Inv. Steels
1
1
Forging
1200
1185
1050
15
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
2
2
Rolling
1250
1230
1120
20
2.5
7
0
Hot rolling without cooling
3
3
Forging
1250
1230
1060
20
0.1
8
0
Air cooling
4
4
Forging
1200
1190
1030
15
0.1
5
0
Hot rolling without cooling
5
5
Rolling
1250
1220
1080
15
2
10
0
Air cooling
6
6
Rolling
1200
1150
1050
15
2
5
0
Air cooling
7
7
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
100
Air cooling
8
8
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
300
Air cooling
9
9
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
10
10
Forging
1270
1265
1080
25
0.1
10
200
Hot rolling without cooling
11
11
Rolling
1250
1230
1120
20
2.5
7
0
Air cooling
12
12
Forging
1250
1245
1150
15
1
7
0
Air cooling
13
13
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
300
Air cooling
14
14
Forging
1300
1290
1150
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
15
15
Forging
1250
1235
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
16
16
Forging
1230
1190
1050
15
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
Comp. Steels
17
17
Forging
1200
1190
1030
15
0.1
5
0
Air cooling
18
18
Forging
1200
1185
1050
15
0.1
10
100
Air cooling
19
19
Forging
1200
1185
1050
15
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
20
20
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
21
21
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
Note:
 outside the inventive ranges.


TABLE 3
Hot working
Heat-
Cumulative
Maximum
Draft in
ing
Working
Working
working
Strain
reduction
width
Treatment
Specimen
Steel
Working
temp.
start
finish
reduction
rate
per pass
direction
after hot
Categories
No.
No.
method
(° C.)
(° C.)
(° C.)
(%)
(/s)
(%)
(mm)
working
Comp. Steels
22
22
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
300
Air cooling
23
23
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
100
Air cooling
24
24
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
25
25
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
26
26
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
27
27
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
200
Air cooling
28
28
Forging
1270
1265
1100
20
0.1
10
100
Air cooling
29
7
Forging
1050
1045
850
15
0.1
3
0
Air cooling
30
7
Forging
1200
1185
900
15
0.1
4
100
Air cooling
31
7
Forging
1200
1190
1050
7
0.2
4
0
Air cooling
32
7
Rolling
1200
1170
1050
15
10
8
0
Air cooling
33
7
Forging
1250
1245
1150
15
0.1
8
200
Air cooling
34
9
Forging
1270
1265
1050
20
0.1
7
200
Air cooling
35
9
Forging
1270
1265
1050
20
0.1
8
200
Air cooling
36
9
Forging
1270
1260
1045
20
0.1
7
200
Air cooling
37
9
Forging
1250
1245
1050
20
0.1
8
100
Air cooling
38
9
Forging
1250
1240
1050
20
0.1
8
100
Air cooling
39
9
Forging
1270
1235
1045
20
0.1
8
100
Air cooling
Note:
Underlined values are outside the inventive ranges.


TABLE 4
Hot rolling
Base
Number of
Final heat treatment conditions
steel
Rolling
passes with
Cooling
Temper-
charac-
Speci-
Heating
reduc-
4% or more
Plate
Reheating
Holding
finish
ing
teristic
Cate-
men
Steel
temp
tion
reduction per
thickness
temp.
time
temp.
temp.
YS
gories
No.
No.
(° C.)
(%)
pass (times)
(mm)
(° C.)
(min.)
(° C.)
(° C.)
(MPa)
Inv.
1
1
1150
65
5
100
900
10
150
660
711
Steels
2
2
48
5
130
900
30
100
630
723
3
3
1200
48
4
130
900
30
100
630
721
4
4
20
3
210
1000
30
100
600
703
5
5
1150
43
4
150
1000
30
100
630
728
6
6
1100
51
4
130
930
30
100
630
739
7
7
1200
42
3
150
930
30
150
630
769
8
8
1200
37
3
180
900
30
100
630
745
9
9
1200
23
3
210
900
30
100
600
759
10
10
10
3
240
900
60
100
550
801
11
11
1150
60
5
100
900
10
200
630
739
12
12
1150
32
3
180
900
30
100
630
665
13
13
1200
37
4
180
900
30
100
500
798
14
14
1200
45
4
150
900
30
150
630
812
15
15
1200
45
4
150
900
30
100
630
721
16
16
1150
65
5
100
930
10
100
600
768
Comp.
17
17
1100
20
3
210
900
30
100
600
805
Steels
18
18
1150
64
5
100
900
30
150
660
769
19
19
1150
65
5
100
900
10
150
660
652
20
20
1200
45
4
150
900
30
150
630
775
21
21
1200
45
5
150
900
30
150
630
738
Base steel characteristics
Fraction in
Reduction
microstructure (%)
of
(Note 1)
area by
Average
Central
tension in
prior
area
Speci-
plate
austenite
Steel
through
Cate-
men
Steel
TS
t.El
vE-40
thickness
grain size
plate
plate
gories
No.
No.
(MPa)
(%)
(J)
diection (%)
Porosities
(μm)
surface
thickness
Inv.
1
1
795
18.6
138
37
Absent
40
≥80
≥80
Steels
2
2
803
16.1
141
28
Absent
38
≥80
≥80
3
3
806
17.2
123
32
Absent
40
≥80
≥80
4
4
795
16.5
116
30
Absent
43
≥80
≥80
5
5
804
16.8
135
29
Absent
46
≥80
≥80
6
6
812
16.2
132
28
Absent
36
≥80
≥80
7
7
845
19.2
151
39
Absent
41
≥80
≥80
8
8
809
18.1
216
38
Absent
39
≥80
≥80
9
9
832
17.5
225
36
Absent
43
≥80
≥80
10
10
865
18.8
193
35
Absent
46
≥80
≥80
11
11
801
16.6
163
28
Absent
33
≥80
≥80
12
12
748
21.5
186
35
Absent
30
≥80
≥80
13
13
859
20.2
198
36
Absent
36
≥80
≥80
14
14
883
18.5
128
37
Absent
44
≥80
≥80
15
15
806
17.3
203
36
Absent
32
≥80
≥80
16
16
845
18.3
115
38
Absent
29
≥80
≥80
Comp.
17
17
883
16.0
49
28
Absent
45
≥80
≥80
Steels
18
18
835
17.8
55
36
Absent
30
≥80
≥80
19
19
722
18.2
36
39
Absent
29
≥80
≥80
20
20
848
17.3
22
35
Absent
36
≥80
≥80
21
21
801
17.3
32
36
Absent
39
≥80
≥80
Note 1
Martensite and/or bainite area fraction


TABLE 5
Hot rolling
Base
Number of
Final heat treatment conditions
steel
passes with
Cooling
Temp-
charac-
Speci-
Heating
Rolling
4% or more
Plate
Reheating
Holding
finish
ering
teristic
Cate-
men
Steel
temp.
reduction
reduction per
thickness
temp.
time
temp.
temp.
YS
gories
No.
No.
(° C.)
(%)
pass (times)
(mm)
(° C.)
(min.)
(° C.)
(° C.)
(MPa)
Comp.
22
22
1200
48
4
150
900
30
150
630
768
Steels
23
23
1200
42
5
150
900
30
150
630
649
24
24
1200
45
4
150
900
30
150
630
750
25
25
1200
45
4
150
900
30
150
630
682
26
26
1200
34
4
180
900
30
100
630
539
27
27
1200
34
3
180
900
30
100
630
789
28
28
1200
31
3
180
900
30
100
630
563
29
7
1150
43
4
150
900
30
150
630
763
30
7
1150
46
4
150
900
30
150
630
748
31
7
1150
48
3
150
900
30
100
630
785
32
7
1100
43
3
150
900
30
150
630
761
33
7
800
48
4
150
900
30
100
630
735
34
9
1150
23
3
210
1100
10
150
600
762
35
9
1150
23
3
210
750
30
100
600
610
36
9
1100
23
3
210
900
30
450
600
593
37
9
1100
19
2
210
900
30
150
730
576
38
9
1100
19
3
210
900
30
150
380
871
39
9
1100
19
1
210
900
30
150
630
769
Reduction
Fraction in
of
microstructure (%)
area by
(Note 2)
tension in
Average
Central
Base steel
plate
prior
area
Speci-
characteristics
thickness
austenite
Steel
through
Cate-
men
Steel
TS
t. El
vE-40
direction
grain size
plate
plate
gories
No.
No.
(MPa)
(%)
(J)
(%)
Porosities
(μm)
surface
thickness
Comp.
22
22
830
17.0
29
35
Absent
46
≥80
≥80
Steels
23
23
726
17.4
24
36
Absent
43
≥80
≥80
24
24
803
18.2
41
35
Absent
45
≥80
≥80
25
25
733
17.1
39
36
Absent
40
≥80
≥80
26
26
634
19.1
19
35
Absent
42
≥80
  50
27
27
869
18.3
52
38
Absent
41
≥80
≥80
28
28
685
21.2
26
36
Absent
44
≥80
  45
29
7
829
10.5
103
16
Present
33
≥80
≥80
30
7
816
8.6
86
15
Present
39
≥80
≥80
31
7
863
6.9
92
18
Present
41
≥80
≥80
32
7
831
5.3
115
8
Present
39
≥80
≥80
33
7
819
16.1
48
36
Absent
112
≥80
  25
34
9
841
16.0
35
30
Absent
74
≥80
≥80
35
9
682
16.4
215
33
Absent
105
≥80
≥80
36
9
645
16.3
39
32
Absent
43
≥80
  30
37
9
633
16.2
221
35
Absent
45
≥80
≥80
38
9
1025
16.5
16
36
Absent
41
≥80
≥80
39
9
858
16.3
32
29
Absent
85
≥80
≥80
Note 1
Underlined values are outsidethe inventive ranges.
Note 2
Martensite and/or bainite area fraction

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23.0/100 Score

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65.51/100 Score

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80.98/100 Score

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Rolling method of ultrathick steel plate NIPPON KOKAN KK 30 January 1981 07 August 1982
High-strength steel plate with superior crack arrestability NIPPON STEEL CORPORATION 13 April 2007 24 December 2008
Production of continuous steel plate NIPPON STEEL CORP 28 February 1979 03 September 1980
板厚方向での均質性に優れ、靱性の異方性の小さい950N/mm2級調質高張力鋼板およびその製造方法 株式会社神戸製鋼所 26 March 1997 06 October 1998
連続鋳造製極厚鋼板の製造方法 KAWASAKI STEEL CORP 26 December 2000 10 July 2002
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