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Patent Analysis of

Blood factor monitoring assay and uses thereof

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10001495

Application Number

US14/416214

Application Date

25 July 2013

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

BIOVERATIV THERAPEUTICS INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

BIOGEN IDEC MA INC.

International Classification

G01N33/86,G01N33/92

Cooperative Classification

G01N33/86,G01N33/92,G01N2333/755,G01N2333/9645,G01N2800/224

Inventor

SOMMER, JURG

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10001495 Blood factor monitoring assay 1 US10001495 Blood factor monitoring assay 2 US10001495 Blood factor monitoring assay 3
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Abstract

The present disclosure provides methods and compositions for diagnosing and treating subject having a bleeding disorder. The disclosed methods comprise contacting a sample, e.g., a blood or plasma sample obtained from the patient, with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. Also provided is a global hemostasis test based on the integration of clotting time (Ct) and pharmacokinetics data. The methods and compositions presented can be applied to point-of-care diagnostic systems.

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Claims

1. A method of treating a bleeding disorder in a patient in need thereof comprising: a) measuring the time between contacting of a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture dried on a solid substrate and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein the activation mixture comprises (i) an activated Factor IX (FIXa) and (ii) a phospholipid mixture, wherein the Ct is used to determine a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter of a coagulation factor, wherein the coagulation factor comprises a Factor VIII (FVIII), wherein the PK parameter is a terminal half-life (HL) or a time to trough (T),wherein the HL is calculated according to the following formula:

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2), wherein A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively,wherein the T is calculated according to the following formula:

T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough), wherein A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough, and b) administering an effective amount of the coagulation factor at a dosing interval based on the PK parameter.

2. A method of treating a bleeding disorder in a patient in need thereof comprising: a) measuring the time between contacting of a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture dried on a solid substrate and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein the activation mixture comprises (i) an activated Factor XI (FXIa) and (ii) a phospholipid mixture, wherein the Ct is used to determine a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter of a coagulation factor, wherein the coagulation factor comprises a Factor IX (FIX), wherein the PK parameter is a terminal half-life (HL) or a time to trough (T),wherein the HL is calculated according to the following formula:

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2), wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively,wherein the T is calculated according to the following formula:

T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough), wherein for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough, and b) administering an effective amount of the coagulation factor at a dosing interval based on the PK parameter.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the correlation between Ct and a coagulation factor level (% Factor) is calculated based on the following formula:

Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and B is a patient-specific off-set value.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising monitoring the efficacy of the coagulation factor administered to the patient.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the PK parameter is terminal half-life (HL).

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the PK parameter is time to trough (T).

7. The method of claim 6, wherein the patient is administered a new dose of the coagulation factor every T interval.

8. The method of claim 1, wherein the sample is selected from the group consisting of whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, and other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor.

9. The method of claim 8, wherein the sample further comprises an added inhibitor.

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment.

11. The method of claim 1, wherein the FVIII is a chimeric FVIII polypeptide comprising FVIII and a non-FVIII polypeptide, wherein the non-FVIII polypeptide increases a half-life of the FVIII and comprises Fc, albumin, a PAS sequence, transferrin, C-terminal peptide of hCG (CTP), polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydryoxyethyl starch (HES), or two or more combinations thereof.

12. The method of claim 2, wherein the FIX is a chimeric FIX polypeptide comprising FIX and a non-FIX polypeptide, wherein the non-FIX polypeptide increases a half-life of the FIX and comprises Fc, albumin, a PAS sequence, transferrin, C-terminal peptide of hCG (CTP), polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydryoxyethyl starch (HES), or two or more combination thereof.

13. The method of claim 11, wherein the chimeric FVIII polypeptide comprises a monomer dimer hybrid comprising the FVIII and an Fc.

14. The method of claim 12, wherein the chimeric FIX polypeptide comprises a monomer dimer hybrid comprising the FIX and an Fc.

15. The method of claim 2, wherein the correlation between Ct and a coagulation factor level (% Factor) is calculated based on the following formula:

Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B, wherein A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and B is a patient-specific off-set value.

16. The method of claim 2, further comprising monitoring the efficacy of the coagulation factor administered to the patient.

17. The method of claim 2, wherein the PK parameter is terminal half-life (HL).

18. The method of claim 2, wherein the PK parameter is time to trough (T).

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the patient is administered a new dose of the coagulation factor every T interval.

20. The method of claim 2, wherein the sample is selected from the group consisting of whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, and other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the sample further comprises an added inhibitor.

22. The method of claim 2, wherein the Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method of treating a bleeding disorder in a patient in need thereof comprising:
    • a) measuring the time between contacting of a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture dried on a solid substrate and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein the activation mixture comprises (i) an activated Factor IX (FIXa) and (ii) a phospholipid mixture, wherein the Ct is used to determine a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter of a coagulation factor, wherein the coagulation factor comprises a Factor VIII (FVIII), wherein the PK parameter is a terminal half-life (HL) or a time to trough (T),wherein the HL is calculated according to the following formula: HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2), wherein A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively,wherein the T is calculated according to the following formula: T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough), wherein A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough, and
    • b) administering an effective amount of the coagulation factor at a dosing interval based on the PK parameter.
    • 3. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the correlation between Ct and a coagulation factor level (% Factor) is calculated based on the following formula: Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B wherein
    • 4. The method of claim 1, further comprising
      • monitoring the efficacy of the coagulation factor administered to the patient.
    • 5. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the PK parameter is terminal half-life (HL).
    • 6. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the PK parameter is time to trough (T).
    • 8. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the sample is selected from the group consisting of
    • 10. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment.
    • 11. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the FVIII is a chimeric FVIII polypeptide comprising
  • 2
    2. A method of treating a bleeding disorder in a patient in need thereof comprising:
    • a) measuring the time between contacting of a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture dried on a solid substrate and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein the activation mixture comprises (i) an activated Factor XI (FXIa) and (ii) a phospholipid mixture, wherein the Ct is used to determine a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter of a coagulation factor, wherein the coagulation factor comprises a Factor IX (FIX), wherein the PK parameter is a terminal half-life (HL) or a time to trough (T),wherein the HL is calculated according to the following formula: HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2), wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively,wherein the T is calculated according to the following formula: T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough), wherein for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough, and
    • b) administering an effective amount of the coagulation factor at a dosing interval based on the PK parameter.
    • 12. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the FIX is a chimeric FIX polypeptide comprising
    • 15. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the correlation between Ct and a coagulation factor level (% Factor) is calculated based on the following formula: Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B, wherein
    • 16. The method of claim 2, further comprising
      • monitoring the efficacy of the coagulation factor administered to the patient.
    • 17. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the PK parameter is terminal half-life (HL).
    • 18. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the PK parameter is time to trough (T).
    • 20. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the sample is selected from the group consisting of
    • 22. The method of claim 2, wherein
      • the Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment.
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Description

REFERENCE TO A SEQUENCE LISTING SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY

The content of the electronically submitted sequence listing (Name: 2159_3840001_SequenceListing.txt; Size: 112,914 bytes; and Date of Creation: Jan. 16, 2015) is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to the field of therapeutics for hemostatic disorders.

Background Art

Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder in which blood clotting is disturbed by a lack of certain plasma clotting factors in the coagulation cascade (FIG. 1). Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B are two different types of hemophilia that are caused by deficiencies in Factor VIII (FVIII) and Factor IX, respectively.

Hemophilia A is characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage and excessive bleeding after trauma. Over time, the repeated bleeding into muscles and joints, which often begins in early childhood, results in hemophilic arthropathy and irreversible joint damage. This damage is progressive and can lead to severely limited mobility of joints, muscle atrophy and chronic pain (Rodriguez-Merchan, E. C., Semin. Thromb. Hemost. 29:87-96 (2003), which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety).

Hemophilia B (also known as Christmas disease) is one of the most common inherited bleeding disorders in the world. It results in decreased in vivo and in vitro blood clotting activity and requires extensive medical monitoring, throughout the life of the affected individual. In the absence of intervention, the afflicted individual will suffer from spontaneous bleeding in the joints, which produces severe pain and debilitating immobility; bleeding into muscles results in the accumulation of blood in those tissues; spontaneous bleeding in the throat and neck can cause asphyxiation if not immediately treated; renal bleeding; and severe bleeding following surgery, minor accidental injuries, or dental extractions also are prevalent.

Treatment of hemophilia is by replacement therapy targeting restoration of Factor VIII and Factor IX activity. Treatment of hemophilia A is by replacement therapy targeting restoration of FVIII activity to 1 to 5% of normal levels to prevent spontaneous bleeding (Mannucci, P. M., et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 344:1773-1779 (2001), which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety). There are plasma-derived and recombinant FVIII products available to treat bleeding episodes on-demand or to prevent bleeding episodes from occurring by treating prophylactically. Based on the half-life of these products treatment regimens require frequent intravenous administration. Such frequent administration is painful and inconvenient.

Treatment of hemophilia B occurs by replacement of the missing clotting factor by exogenous factor concentrates highly enriched in Factor IX, but is also problematic. Generating such a concentrate from blood is fraught with technical difficulties. Purification of Factor IX from plasma (plasma derived Factor IX; pdFIX) almost exclusively yields active Factor IX. However, such purification of factor IX from plasma is very difficult because Factor IX is only present in low concentration in plasma (5 ug/mL. Andersson, Thrombosis Research 7: 451 459 (1975). Further, purification from blood requires the removal or inactivation of infectious agents such as HIV and HCV. In addition, pdFIX has a short half-life and therefore requires frequent dosing. Recombinant factor IX (rFIX) is also available, but suffers from the same short half-life and need for frequent dosing (e.g., 2-3 times per week for prophylaxis) as pdFIX. rFIX also has a lower incremental recovery (K value) compared to pdFIX, which necessitates the use of higher doses of rFIX than those for pdFIX.

Reduced mortality, prevention of joint damage and improved quality of life have been important achievements due to the development of plasma-derived and recombinant Factor VIII and Factor IX products. Prolonged protection from bleeding would represent another key advancement in the treatment of hemophilia patients. In order to address this need, recombinant Factor VIII and Factor IX proteins expressed as Fc fusions are in development. However, methods of determining appropriate dosage of these products, which have unique pharmacokinetic properties in humans have not yet been developed. Therefore, there remains a need for improved methods of treating hemophilia due to Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiencies that are more tolerable and more effective than current therapies.

Coagulation assays have gained acceptance as an important tool for management of patients being treated for coagulation disorders. These treatments are also applicable to patients on anticoagulation therapy for the prevention of clots in their blood vessels. In these assays, a sample of the patient's blood or plasma is tested for coagulation time or “clotting time” which time is related to the amount of coagulation factors in the patient's blood (or to the patient's dosage of anticoagulant in the case of patients undergoing antocoagulation therapy). Coagulation assays are also required prior to surgical procedures even for patients not suffering from bleeding disorders or on anticoagulation therapy. This is because the medical professionals need to clearly know the bleeding susceptibility before they are operated on.

A variety of coagulation test are presently in use and among the most popular is the “Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time” (aPTT) test (see FIG. 2). Blood coagulation tests have tended to be complex, and the bulk of them are performed generally in centralized clinical laboratories. Clinical or a doctor's office visits or a regular basis to monitor coagulation factor levels can be very inconvenient and expensive. Most of apparatus and methods known for measuring coagulation time in blood samples cannot be used for home testing (see, e.g., U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,695,842; 3,836,333; 4,197,734; 3,486,859; 4,797,369; 3,890,098; 4,725,554; 5,284,624; 3,951,606; 4,659,550; and 5,302,348). The disadvantages of these methods, beside cost and the challenge of operation, include the fact that most do not measure coagulation directly. The large blood volume requirements of some of these methods made them impractical for home use. Many of these methods are also limited by what kinds of coagulation tests they can perform due to the reagent chemistry requirements and the detectable signal generated.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The present disclosure provides a composition for the measurement of coagulation factor activity in a sample comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the composition is dried onto a solid substrate. The present disclose also provides a composition for the measurement of coagulation time in a sample comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the composition is dried onto a solid substrate. In some aspects, the solid substrate is selected from the group consisting of paper, plastic, glass, ceramic material, metal, and combinations thereof. In other aspects, the solid substrate is a surface on a test strip, test stick, reaction chamber, cartridge, chip, well plate, or array used in an apparatus to measure coagulation factor activity or coagulation time.

In some aspects, the coagulation factor is selected from the group consisting of FVII, FVIII, and FIX. In other aspects, the coagulation factor is a Factor VIII protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, the coagulation factor is a Factor IX protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In other aspects, the activated coagulation factor is a Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, Factor IXa is present in the composition prior to drying within a range of 0.01 to 0.05 U/mL. In other aspects, the activated coagulation factor is a Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, Factor XIa is present in the composition prior to drying within a range of 0.01 to 0.05 U/mL.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 2 phospholipids. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 3 phospholipids. In some aspects, the phospholipids are selected from the group consisting of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and combinations thereof. In other aspects, the phospholipids are natural phospholipids, synthetic phospholipids, or combinations thereof. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture further comprises cholesterol. In some aspects, the cholesterol content in the phospholipid mixture is from about 1 to about 20 mole-% of cholesterol.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture is in vesicle form. In other aspects, the vesicles are small unilamellar vesicles. In some aspects, the composition further comprises divalent cations. In other aspects, the divalent cations are calcium ions. In some aspects, the sample is selected from the group consisting of whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, or other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor. In other cases, the sample is decalcified.

In some aspects, the measurement is carried in a point of care test system. In some aspects, the measurement is carried out in a mechanical or optical analytical system.

The present disclosure provides a composition for the measurement of the Factor VIII activity of a Factor VIII protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof in a sample comprising 80% of 0.1 mg/mL Factor IXa and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprising 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said composition is dried onto a solid substrate. Also provided is a composition for the measurement of the Factor IX activity of a Factor IX protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof in a sample comprising 80% Factor XIa suspension and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprising 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said composition is dried onto a solid substrate. The exact amount of FXIa needed varies depending on the specific activity of this reagent and is titrated for optimal amount and can include approximately 0.1 mg/mL.

The present disclosure also provides a kit for performing a measurement of coagulation factor activity or coagulation time in a sample comprising a composition disclosed herein in one or more vials. Also provided is a kit for performing a measurement of coagulation factor activity or coagulation time in a sample comprising a composition disclosed herein in a non-dry form in one or more vials and instructions for drying said composition onto a solid substrate. The instant disclosure also provides a sample holder for performing a blood coagulation assay, comprising a surface coated with any of the activation mixtures disclosed herein. In some aspects, the sample holder is selected from the group consisting of a test strip, a test stick, a reaction chamber, a cartridge, a chip, a well plate, and an array.

The present disclosure provides a method for determining clotting time in a patient having a bleeding disorder, comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; and, (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the blood sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct).

Also provided is a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient will benefit from administration of a treatment; and, (c) administering the treatment to the patient if Ct indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment. The present disclosure also provides a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient will benefit from administration of a treatment; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to administer the treatment to the patient if Ct indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment.

The present disclosure provides a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (c) administering an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted. Also provides is a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to optimize the treatment administered, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted.

The present disclosure also provides a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (c) providing a treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof. Also provided is a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to provide treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof.

The present disclosure also provides a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) comparing the measured Ct with the Ct obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (d) maintaining or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard. Also provided is a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating, the clotting time (Ct); (c) comparing the measured Ct with the Ct obtained from a corresponding, standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to maintain or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard.

The present disclosure also provides a method for determining a coagulation factor level in a bleeding disorder patient, comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate:

(b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), and, (c) correlating the Ct value with the level of coagulation factor in the sample. In some aspects, the correlation between Ct and coagulation factor level (% Factor) is calculated according to the formula:

Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B  [Formula I]

wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and B is patient-specific off-set value.

The present disclosure also provides a method for determining a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter in a bleeding disorder patient, comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) correlating a PK with the calculated Ct value, thereby determining the value of the PK parameter.

The present disclosure provides a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment; and, (d) administering the treatment to the patient if the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment. Also provides is a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to administer the treatment to the patient if the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment. Also provided is method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (d) administering an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted. The present disclosure also provides a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to administer an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the therapy is maintained or adjusted.

Also provided is a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (d) providing treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof. Also provides is a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to provide therapy to treat the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof.

The present disclosure also provides a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct; (d) comparing the PK parameter with the PK obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (e) maintaining or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard. Also provided is a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct; (d) comparing the PK parameter with the PK obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (e) instructing a healthcare provider to maintain or adjust the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard.

In some aspects, the PK is terminal half-life (HL). In other aspects, the PK is time to through (T). In some aspects, HL is calculated according to the formula:

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2)  [Formula II]

wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response. T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively.

In some aspects, T is calculated according to the formula:

T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough)  [Formula III]

wherein for each coagulation factor A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough. In some aspects, the patient is administered a new dose of coagulation factor every T interval.

In some aspects, the sample is selected from the group consisting of whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, or other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor. In some aspects, the sample is whole blood. In other aspects, the blood is venous blood. In some aspects, the blood is fingerstick blood. In some aspects, the sample is plasma. In some aspects, the sample is frozen and thawed prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture. In other aspects, the sample is has not been frozen and thawed prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture. In some aspects, the sample is decalcified. In some aspects, the decalcified sample is recalcified prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture. In other aspects, the decalcified sample is recalcified after contacting the sample with the activation mixture.

In some aspects, the sample further comprises an added purified coagulation factor. In other aspects, the sample further comprises an added inhibitor. In some aspects, the purified coagulation factor is selected from the group consisting of Factors II, Factor VII, Factor VIII, Factor IX, Factor X, Factor XI, Factor XII, Factor XIII, Fibrinogen, vWF, Tissue Factor, and combinations thereof. In some aspects, the inhibitor is selected from the group consisting of CTI, aprotinin, ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA), D-Phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1-arginine chloromethyl ketone-Factor VIIa (FPRCK-FVIIa), anti-coagulation factor monoclonal antibodies, and combinations thereof. In some aspects, the sample is diluted with substrate sample. In specific aspects, one part of sample is diluted with three parts of substrate sample.

In some aspects, the activated coagulation factor is a Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, Factor IXa is present in the composition prior to drying within a range of 0.01 to 0.05 U/mL. In other aspects, the activated coagulation factor is a Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, Factor XIa is present in the composition prior to drying within a range of 0.01 to 0.05 U/mL. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 2 phospholipids. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 3 phospholipids. In other aspects, the phospholipids in the phospholipid mixture are selected from the group consisting of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and combinations thereof. In some aspects, the phospholipids are natural phospholipids, synthetic phospholipids, or combinations thereof. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture further comprises cholesterol. In some aspects, the cholesterol content in the phospholipid mixture is from about 1 to about 20 mole-% of cholesterol. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture is in lipid vesicle form. In some aspects, the lipid vesicles are small unilamellar vesicles. In some aspects, the activation mixture further comprises divalent cations. In other aspects, the divalent cations are calcium ions.

In some aspects, the activation mixture reacts with a coagulation factor selected from the group consisting of Factor VII, Factor VIII, and Factor IX. In other aspects, the Factor VIII coagulation factor is a Factor VIII protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some aspects, the Factor IX coagulation factor is a Factor IX protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In other aspects, the Factor VIII coagulation factor is a chimeric Factor VIII-Fc fusion protein. In some aspects, the Factor IX coagulation factor is a chimeric Factor IX-Fc fusion protein. In other aspects, the Fc portion of the chimeric Factor VIII or Factor IX protein comprises a human Fe domain. In some aspects, the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises a B-domain deleted Factor VIII. In specific aspects, the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises SEQ ID NO:6. In other aspects, the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises SEQ ID NO:2. In some aspects, the chimeric Factor IX protein comprises SEQ ID NO: 13.

In some aspects, the solid substrate is selected from the group consisting of paper, plastic, glass, ceramic material, metal, and combinations thereof. In other aspects, the solid substrate is a surface on a test strip, test stick, reaction chamber, cartridge, chip, well plate, or array used in an apparatus to measure coagulation factor activity or coagulation time. In some aspects, the patient has not yet been treated with a coagulation factor. In some aspects, the patient has received prior coagulation factor treatment, but the treatment has been discontinued for a time period sufficient to deplete the coagulation factor treatment from the patient's blood. In some aspects, the measurement is carried in a point of care test system. In another aspect, the measurement is carried out in a mechanical or optical analytical system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS/FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows a schematic representation of the coagulation cascade.

FIG. 2 shows an overview of one stage assay (aPTT).

FIG. 3 shows clotting time for hemophilia A donor plasma spiked with rFVIIIFc measured using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay. FIXa/phospholipid was used as activator mixture. Samples consisted of 12 μL of re-calcified plasma applied directly (without preincubation) to the test bed.

FIG. 4 shows clotting time for hemophilia B donor plasma spiked with rFIXIc measured using the Standard FMS Factor IX assay. FXIa/phospholipid was used as activator mixture. Samples consisted of 12 μL of re-calcified plasma applied directly (without preincubation) to the test bed.

FIG. 5A shows clotting time determined using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay using Phospholipid Blend 2 in the activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex. Samples BD1-003. BD1-002, BD1-001 and BD1-005 were collected from 4 hemophilia A subjects and each sample was spiked with 6 levels of rFVIIIFc (100%. 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.3% and 3.1%).

FIG. 5B shows clotting time determined using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay using Phospholipid Blend 8 in the activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex. Samples BD1-003, BD1-002, BD1-001 and BD1-005 were collected from 4 hemophilia A subjects and each sample was spiked with 6 levels of rFVIIIFc (100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.3% and 3.1%).

FIG. 6A shows a comparison of clotting time determined using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay (Standard Method) and Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay (Alternate Method 3). Samples contained 12 μL of re-calcified plasma mixed 1:3 with substrate plasma (Factor VIII deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFVIIIFc). Factor IXa/phospholipids complex was used as activator.

FIG. 6B shows clotting time measured using the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay (Alternate Method 9.8). Samples contained 12 μL of re-calcified plasma mixed 1:3 with substrate plasma (Factor IX deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFIXFc). Factor XIa/phospholipids complex was used as activator.

FIG. 7A shows the effect of a single plasma freeze-thaw cycle on Alternate FMS Factor IX assay performance. Samples contained 12 μL of re-calcified plasma mixed 1:3 with substrate plasma (Factor IX deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFIXFc).

FIG. 7B shows clotting times corresponding to fresh plasma samples, and plasma subjected to a single plasma freeze-thaw cycle as measured using the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay. Samples contained 12 μL of re-calcified plasma mixed 1:3 with substrate plasma (Factor VIII deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFVIIIFc).

FIG. 8A shows the correlation between spiked rFVIIIFc levels measured using the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay and rFVIIIFc levels measured by MLA. Citrated plasma samples from 14 hemophilia A donor were collected at 3 sites by 3 different methodologies, and spiked with varying levels of rFVIIIFc prior to being assayed using the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay or MLA.

FIG. 8B shows the correlation between spiked rFXFc levels measured using the Alternate FMS FIX assays and rFIXFc levels measured by MLA. Citrated plasma samples from 9 hemophilia B donor were collected at 3 sites using 3 different methodologies, and spiked with varying levels of rFIXFc prior to being assayed using Alternate FMS FIX assay or MLA.

FIG. 9A shows clotting time results obtained by applying the Standard FMS FVIII assay to pre-dose whole blood samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc (0 IU/dl to 200 IU/dL).

FIG. 9B shows clotting time results obtained by applying the Alternate FMS FVIII assay to pre-dose whole blood samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc (0 IU/dl to 200 IU/dL).

FIGS. 10A, 10B and 10C show clotting times obtained using MLA assay. Samples were frozen plasma retains prepared from the samples spiked with various concentration of rFVIIFc. FIG. 10A shows results corresponding to Factor VIII calibration plasma and rFVIIIFc samples. FIG. 10B shows results corresponding to pre-dose samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc. FIG. 10C shows results corresponding to post-dose samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc.

FIGS. 11A and 11B show, respectively, Standard FMS Factor VIII assay measurements conducted on frozen plasma retains of pre-dose (FIG. 11A) and post-dose (FIG. 11B) samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc.

FIGS. 12A and 12B show, respectively. Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay measurements conducted on frozen plasma retains of pre-dose (FIG. 11A) and post-dose (FIG. 11B) samples obtained from two hemophilia A subjects (samples designated BD1-003 and BD1-005, respectively) spiked with increasing concentration of rFVIIIFc.

FIG. 13 shows the correlation between whole blood clotting and plasma clotting time measurements performed using the Alternate FMS FVIII assay.

FIG. 14A compares Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay clotting times for plasma and whole blood samples obtained from two patients (BD1-002 and BD1-004). FIG. 14B shows the correlation between whole blood clotting time and plasma clotting time measurements performed using the Alternate FMS FVIII assay. Pre-dose blood samples were spiked with increasing concentrations of rFVIIIFc (0 IU/dL-200 IU/dL).

FIG. 15A compares Alternate FMS Factor IX assay clotting times for plasma and whole blood samples. FIG. 15B shows the correlation between whole blood clotting time and plasma clotting time using the Alternate FMS FIX assay. Pre-dose blood samples were spiked with increasing concentration of rFIXFc (0 IU/dL-200 IU/dL).

FIG. 16 shows the variability between meters assaying a single FVIII deficient plasma sample spiked to 100% (triangles) and 3% (circles) rFVIIIFc in duplicate on 16 research meters using the Alternate FMS FVIII assay.

FIG. 17 provides a diagram showing the correlation between coagulation factor concentration (% Factor) and clotting time (Ct) from FMS assays, and the application of such correlation to a point-of-care device.

FIG. 18 provides a diagram showing the calculation of terminal half-life from data obtained from FMS assays and its integration with pharmacokinetics data to calculate time to trough and determine patient-specific doses and interval between doses.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure provides methods and compositions for diagnosing and treating subject having a bleeding disorder. The disclosed methods comprise contacting a sample. e.g., a blood sample or a plasma sample obtained from the patient, with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. In some aspects, the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the blood sample and the onset of clotting, i.e., the clotting time (Ct), is used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters which in turn can be used to commence, modify, or cease treatment with coagulation factors. Certain FVIII and FIX polypeptides for use in the methods provided herein are described in International Application No. PCT/US2010/059136, filed Dec. 6, 2010, and in International Application No. PCT/US2011/043569, filed Jul. 11, 2011, each of which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety.

I. Definitions

It must be noted that, as used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. The terms “a” (or “an”), as well as the terms “one or more,” and “at least one” can be used interchangeably herein.

Furthermore, “and/or” where used herein is to be taken as specific disclosure of each of the two specified features or components with or without the other. Thus, the term “and/or” as used in a phrase such as “A and/or B” herein is intended to include “A and B,”“A or B,”“A” (alone), and “B” (alone). Likewise, the term “and/or” as used in a phrase such as “A. B, and/or C” is intended to encompass each of the following aspects: A, B, and C; A, B, or C; A or C; A or B; B or C; A and C; A and B; B and C; A (alone); B (alone); and C (alone).

It is understood that wherever aspects are described herein with the language “comprising,” otherwise analogous aspects described in terms of “consisting of” and/or “consisting essentially of” are also provided.

Unless defined otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this disclosure is related. For example, the Concise Dictionary of Biomedicine and Molecular Biology, Juo, Pei-Show, 2nd ed., 2002, CRC Press; The Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed., 1999, Academic Press; and the Oxford Dictionary Of Biochemistry And Molecular Biology. Revised, 2000, Oxford University Press, provide one of skill with a general dictionary of many of the terms used in this disclosure.

Units, prefixes, and symbols are denoted in their Système International de Unites (SI) accepted form. Numeric ranges are inclusive of the numbers defining the range. Unless otherwise indicated, amino acid sequences are written left to right in amino to carboxy orientation. The headings provided herein are not limitations of the various aspects of the disclosure, which can be had by reference to the specification as a whole. Accordingly, the terms defined immediately below are more fully defined by reference to the specification in its entirety.

“Administering.” as used herein, refers to giving a pharmaceutically acceptable amount of a therapeutic agent such as a coagulation factor, e.g., Factor VIII or Factor IX polypeptide, to a subject via a pharmaceutically acceptable route. Routes of administration include intravenous, e.g., intravenous injection and intravenous infusion, e.g., via central venous access. Additional routes of administration include subcutaneous, intramuscular, oral, nasal, and pulmonary administration. In some aspects, the administration is subcutaneous. Coagulation factors, e.g., Factor VIII and Factor IX, including fragments, variants, derivatives, chimeric polypeptides, or hybrid polypeptide can be administered as part of a pharmaceutical composition comprising at least one excipient. The term administering also refers to giving any other therapeutic agent or prophylactic agent (e.g., a small molecule) that can be given in a pharmaceutically acceptable amount to a subject having a coagulation-related disorder via a pharmaceutically acceptable route.

The term “sequence” as used to refer to a protein sequence, a peptide sequence, a polypeptide sequence, or an amino acid sequence means a linear representation of the amino acid constituents in the polypeptide in an amino-terminal to carboxyl-terminal direction in which residues that neighbor each other in the representation are contiguous in the primary structure of the polypeptide.

By a “protein” or “polypeptide” is meant any sequence of two or more amino acids linearly linked by amide bonds (peptide bonds) regardless of length, post-translation modification, or function. As used herein, the term “polypeptide” is intended to encompass a singular “polypeptide” as well as plural “polypeptides.”“Polypeptide,”“peptide,” and “protein” are used interchangeably herein. Thus, peptides, dipeptides, tripeptides, or oligopeptides are included within the definition of “polypeptide.” and the term “polypeptide” can be used instead of, or interchangeably with any of these terms. The term “polypeptide” is also intended to refer to the products of post-expression modifications of the polypeptide, including without limitation glycosylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, amidation, derivatization by known protecting/blocking groups, proteolytic cleavage, or modification by non-naturally occurring amino acids. A polypeptide can be derived from a natural biological source or produced by recombinant technology, but is not necessarily translated from a designated nucleic acid sequence. A polypeptide can be generated in any manner, including by chemical synthesis. Also included as polypeptides of the present disclosure are fragments, derivatives, analogs, or variants of the foregoing polypeptides, and any combination thereof.

The term “fragment” when referring to polypeptides and proteins, e.g., coagulation factors such as Factor VIII or Factor IX, include any polypeptides or proteins which retain at least some of the properties of the reference polypeptide or protein. E.g., in the case of procoagulant polypeptides such as coagulation factors and procoagulant peptides, the term fragment would refer to any polypeptides or proteins which retain at least some of the procoagulant activity of the reference polypeptide or protein. Fragments of polypeptides include proteolytic fragments, as well as deletion fragments.

The term “variant” as used herein refers to a polypeptide sequence that differs from that of a parent polypeptide sequence by virtue of at least one amino acid modification. Variants can occur naturally or be non-naturally occurring. Non-naturally occurring variants can be produced using art-known mutagenesis techniques. Variant polypeptides can comprise conservative or non-conservative amino acid substitutions, deletions, or additions.

“Derivatives” of polypeptides or proteins of the present disclosure are polypeptides or proteins which have been altered so as to exhibit additional features not found on the native polypeptide or protein. Also included as “derivatives” are those peptides that contain one or more naturally occurring amino acid derivatives of the twenty standard amino acids. A polypeptide or amino acid sequence “derived from” a designated polypeptide or protein refers to the origin of the polypeptide. Preferably, the polypeptide or amino acid sequence which is derived from a particular sequence has an amino acid sequence that is essentially identical to that sequence or a portion thereof, wherein the portion consists of at least 10-20 amino acids, preferably at least 20-30 amino acids, more preferably at least 30-50 amino acids, or which is otherwise identifiable to one of ordinary skill in the art as having its origin in the sequence.

Polypeptides derived from another peptide can have one or more mutations relative to the starting polypeptide, e.g., one or more amino acid residues which have been substituted with another amino acid residue or which has one or more amino acid residue insertions or deletions. Preferably, the polypeptide comprises an amino acid sequence which is not naturally occurring. Such variants necessarily have less than 100% sequence identity or similarity with the starting polypeptide. In one aspect, the variant will have an amino acid sequence from about 75% to less than 100% amino acid sequence identity or similarity with the amino acid sequence of the starting polypeptide, more preferably from about 80% to less than 100%, more preferably from about 85% to less than 100%, more preferably from about 90% to less than 100% (e.g., 91%, 92%, 93%, 94%, 95%, 96%, 97%, 98%, 99%) and most preferably from about 95% to less than 100%, e.g., over the length of the variant molecule. In one aspect, there is one amino acid difference between a starting polypeptide sequence and the sequence derived therefrom. Identity or similarity with respect to this sequence is defined herein as the percentage of amino acid residues in the candidate sequence that are identical (i.e. same residue) with the starting amino acid residues, after aligning the sequences and introducing gaps, if necessary, to achieve the maximum percent sequence identity.

A polypeptide which is “isolated” is a polypeptide which is in a form not found in nature. Isolated polypeptides include those which have been purified to a degree that they are no longer in a form in which they are found in nature. In some aspects, a polypeptide which is isolated is substantially pure.

A “recombinant” polypeptide or protein refers to a polypeptide or protein produced via recombinant DNA technology. Recombinantly produced polypeptides and proteins expressed in host cells are considered isolated for the purpose of the invention, as are native or recombinant polypeptides which have been separated, fractionated, or partially or substantially purified by any suitable technique. The polypeptides disclosed herein, e.g., clotting factors, can be recombinantly produced using methods known in the art. Alternatively, proteins and peptides disclosed herein can be chemically synthesized.

A “conservative amino acid substitution” is one in which the amino acid residue is replaced with an amino acid residue having a similar side chain. Families of amino acid residues having similar side chains have been defined in the art, including basic side chains (e.g., Lys, Arg, His), acidic side chains (e.g., Asp, Glu), uncharged polar side chains (e.g., Gly, Asn, Gnl, Ser, Thr, Tyr, Cys), nonpolar side chains (e.g., Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Pro, Phe, Met, Trp), beta-branched side chains (e.g., Thr, Val, Ile) and aromatic side chains (e.g., Tyr, Phe, Trp, His). Thus, if an amino acid in a polypeptide is replaced with another amino acid from the same side chain family, the substitution is considered to be conservative. In another aspect, a string of amino acids can be conservatively replaced with a structurally similar string that differs in order and/or composition of side chain family members.

Non-conservative substitutions include those in which (i) a residue having an electropositive side chain (e.g., Arg, His or Lys) is substituted for, or by, an electronegative residue (e.g., Glu or Asp), (ii) a hydrophilic residue (e.g., Ser or Thr) is substituted for, or by, a hydrophobic residue (e.g., Ala, Leu, He, Phe or Val), (iii) a cysteine or proline is substituted for, or by, any other residue, or (iv) a residue having a bulky hydrophobic or aromatic side chain (e.g., Val, He, Phe or Trp) is substituted for, or by, one having a smaller side chain (e.g., Ala, Ser) or no side chain (e.g., Gly).

The term “percent sequence identity” between two polynucleotide or polypeptide sequences refers to the number of identical matched positions shared by the sequences over a comparison window, taking into account additions or deletions (i.e., gaps) that must be introduced for optimal alignment of the two sequences. A matched position is any position where an identical nucleotide or amino acid is presented in both the target and reference sequence. Gaps presented in the target sequence are not counted since gaps are not nucleotides or amino acids. Likewise, gaps presented in the reference sequence are not counted since target sequence nucleotides or amino acids are counted, not nucleotides or amino acids from the reference sequence.

The percentage of sequence identity is calculated by determining the number of positions at which the identical amino-acid residue or nucleic acid base occurs in both sequences to yield the number of matched positions, dividing the number of matched positions by the total number of positions in the window of comparison and multiplying the result by 100 to yield the percentage of sequence identity. The comparison of sequences and determination of percent sequence identity between two sequences can be accomplished using readily available software both for online use and for download. Suitable software programs are available from various sources, and for alignment of both protein and nucleotide sequences. One suitable program to determine percent sequence identity is bl2seq, part of the BLAST suite of program available from the U.S. government's National Center for Biotechnology Information BLAST web site (blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Bl2seq performs a comparison between two sequences using either the BLASTN or BLASTP algorithm. BLASTN is used to compare nucleic acid sequences, while BLASTP is used to compare amino acid sequences. Other suitable programs are, e.g., Needle, Stretcher, Water, or Matcher, part of the EMBOSS suite of bioinformatics programs and also available from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) at www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/psa.

Different regions within a single polynucleotide or polypeptide target sequence that aligns with a polynucleotide or polypeptide reference sequence can each have their own percent sequence identity. It is noted that the percent sequence identity value is rounded to the nearest tenth. For example, 80.11, 80.12, 80.13, and 80.14 are rounded down to 80.1, while 80.15, 80.16, 80.17, 80.18, and 80.19 are rounded up to 80.2. It also is noted that the length value will always be an integer.

In certain aspects, the percentage identity “X” of a first amino acid sequence to a second sequence amino acid is calculated as 100×(Y/Z), where Y is the number of amino acid residues scored as identical matches in the alignment of the first and second sequences (as aligned by visual inspection or a particular sequence alignment program) and Z is the total number of residues in the second sequence. If the length of a first sequence is longer than the second sequence, the percent identity of the first sequence to the second sequence will be higher than the percent identity of the second sequence to the first sequence.

One skilled in the art will appreciate that the generation of a sequence alignment for the calculation of a percent sequence identity is not limited to binary sequence-sequence comparisons exclusively driven by primary sequence data. Sequence alignments can be derived from multiple sequence alignments. One suitable program to generate multiple sequence alignments is ClustalW2, available from www.clustal.org. Another suitable program is MUSCLE, available from www.drive5.com/muscle/. ClustalW2 and MUSCLE are alternatively available, e.g., from the EBI.

It will also be appreciated that sequence alignments can be generated by integrating sequence data with data from heterogeneous sources such as structural data (e.g., crystallographic protein structures), functional data (e.g., location of mutations), or phylogenetic data. A suitable program that integrates heterogeneous data to generate a multiple sequence alignment is T-Coffee, available at www.tcoffee.org, and alternatively available, e.g., from the EBI. It will also be appreciated that the final alignment used to calculate percent sequence identity can be curated either automatically or manually.

“Polynucleotide” and “nucleic acid” are used interchangeably and refer to a polymeric compound comprised of covalently linked nucleotide residues. Polynucleotides can be DNA, cDNA, RNA, single stranded, or double stranded, vectors, plasmids, phage, or viruses. Polynucleotides include those in Sequence Table 1, which encode the polypeptides of Sequence Table 2 (see Sequence Table 1). Polynucleotides also include fragments of the polynucleotides of Table 1, e.g., those that encode fragments of the polypeptides of Table 2, such as Factor VIII, Factor IX, Fc, signal sequence, propeptide, 6His and other fragments of the polypeptides of Sequence Table 2.

The terms “subject” and “patient” are used interchangeably and refer to a human or a non-human mammal, for whom diagnosis, prognosis, or therapy of a bleeding disorder is desired. Non-human mammals include mice, dogs, primates, bears, cats, horses, cows, pigs, and other domestic animals and small animals. Subjects also include pediatric humans. Pediatric human subjects are birth to 20 years, e.g., birth to 18 years, birth to 16 years, birth to 15 years, birth to 12 years, birth to 11 years, birth to 6 years, birth to 5 years, birth to 2 years, or 2 to 11 years of age. In some aspects of the present disclosure, a subject is a naïve subject. A naïve subject is a subject that has not been administered a treatment for a bleeding disorder. In some aspects, a naïve subject has not been treated with prior to being diagnosed with having a bleeding disorder.

The methods disclosed herein can be practiced on a subject in need of control or prevention of bleeding, bleeding episodes, or hemophilia disorders. Such subjects include those in need of control or prevention of bleeding in minor hemorrhage, hemarthroses, superficial muscle hemorrhage, soft tissue hemorrhage, moderate hemorrhage, intramuscle or soft tissue hemorrhage with dissection, mucous membrane hemorrhage, hematuria, major hemorrhage, hemorrhage of the pharynx, hemorrhage of the retropharynx, hemorrhage of the retroperitonium, hemorrhage of the central nervous system, bruises, cuts, scrapes, joint hemorrhage, nose bleed, mouth bleed, gum bleed, intracranial bleeding, intraperitoneal bleeding, minor spontaneous hemorrhage, bleeding after major trauma, moderate skin bruising, or spontaneous hemorrhage into joints, muscles, internal organs or the brain. Such subjects also include those need of peri-operative management, such as management of bleeding associated with surgery or dental extraction.

The term “bleeding disease or disorder.” as used herein, means a genetically inherited or acquired condition characterized by a tendency to hemorrhage, either spontaneously or as a result of trauma, due to an impaired ability or inability to form a fibrin clot. Examples of such disorders include hemophilias. The three main forms are hemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency), hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency or “Christmas disease”) and hemophilia C (factor XI deficiency, mild bleeding tendency). Other hemostatic disorders include, e.g., von Willebrand disease, Factor XI deficiency (PTA deficiency). Factor XII deficiency, deficiencies or structural abnormalities in fibrinogen, prothrombin, Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X or factor XIII, Bernard-Soulier syndrome, which is a defect or deficiency in GPIb. GPIb, the receptor for vWF, can be defective and lead to lack of primary clot formation (primary hemostasis) and increased bleeding tendency), and thrombasthenia of Glanzman and Naegeli (Glanzmann thrombasthenia). In liver failure (acute and chronic forms), there is insufficient production of coagulation factors by the liver; this can increase bleeding risk.

Bleeding disease or disorder can require on-demand treatment or prophylactic treatment. “On-demand treatment,” as used herein, means treatment that is intended to take place over a short course of time and is in response to an existing condition, such as a bleeding episode, or a perceived short term need such as planned surgery. Conditions that can require on-demand treatment include a bleeding episode, hemarthrosis, muscle bleed, oral bleed, hemorrhage, hemorrhage into muscles, oral hemorrhage, trauma, trauma capitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, intra-abdominal hemorrhage, intrathoracic hemorrhage, bone fracture, central nervous system bleeding, bleeding in the retropharyngeal space, bleeding in the retroperitoneal space, or bleeding in the illiopsoas sheath. Bleeding episodes other than these are also included. The subject can be in need of surgical prophylaxis, peri-operative management, or treatment for surgery. Such surgeries include minor surgery, major surgery, tooth extraction, tonsillectomy, other dental/thoraco-facial surgeries, inguinal herniotomy, synovectomy, total knee replacement, other joint replacement, craniotomy, osteosynthesis, trauma surgery, intracranial surgery, intra-abdominal surgery, intrathoracic surgery. Surgeries other than these are also included.

Additional conditions that can require on-demand treatment include minor hemorrhage, hemarthroses, superficial muscle hemorrhage, soft tissue hemorrhage, moderate hemorrhage, intramuscle or soft tissue hemorrhage with dissection, mucous membrane hemorrhage, hematuria, major hemorrhage, hemorrhage of the pharynx, hemorrhage of the retropharynx, hemorrhage of the retroperitonium, hemorrhage of the central nervous system, bruises, cuts, scrapes, joint hemorrhage, nose bleed, mouth bleed, gum bleed, intracranial bleeding, intraperitoneal bleeding, minor spontaneous hemorrhage, bleeding after major trauma, moderate skin bruising, or spontaneous hemorrhage into joints, muscles, internal organs or the brain. Additional reasons for on-demand treatment include the need for peri-operative management for surgery or dental extraction, major surgery, extensive oral surgery, urologic surgery, hernia surgery, orthopedic surgery such as replacement of knee, hip, or other major joint.

The terms “prophylactic treatment” or “prophylaxis” as used herein, mean administering a procoagulant compound, e.g., a clotting factor, fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric peptide, or hybrid peptide thereof, to a subject over a course of time to increase the level of activity in a subject's plasma. Preferably, the increased level is sufficient to decrease the incidence of spontaneous bleeding or to prevent bleeding, e.g., in the event of an unforeseen injury. Preferably, during prophylactic treatment, the plasma protein level in the subject does not fall below the baseline level for that subject, or below the level that characterizes severe hemophilia.

The term “about” is used herein to mean approximately, roughly, around, or in the regions of. When the term “about” is used in conjunction with a numerical range, it modifies that range by extending the boundaries above and below the numerical values set forth. Thus, “about 10-20” means “about 10 to about 20.” In general, the term “about” is used herein to modify a numerical value above and below the stated value by a variance of 10 percent, up or down (higher or lower).

The term “pharmacokinetic parameters” or “PK parameters” as used herein refers to those constant and variable terms that are related to the disposition of a pharmacologically active agent. e.g., a coagulation factor, within a subject and includes for example volume of distribution, total clearance, metabolic clearance, bioavailability, intrinsic clearance, mean residence time, partitioning coefficients between tissues and blood, elimination rates, half-life, terminal half-life, time to trough, as well as other parameters known in the art. PK parameters can be based, e.g., on protein level or activity level. In addition, certain PK parameters can be based on model predicted data, on observed data, or on combinations of model and observed data.

As used herein, the term “clotting factor.” refers to molecules, fragment, derivatives, or analogs thereof, naturally occurring or recombinantly produced, which prevent or decrease the duration of a bleeding episode in a subject. In other words, it means molecules having pro-clotting or pro-coagulant activity, i.e., are responsible for the conversion of fibrinogen into a mesh of insoluble fibrin causing the blood to coagulate or clot. The term “clotting factor” as used herein also encompasses synthetic peptides with procoagulant activity.

The term “clotting time” as used herein, refers to the time period elapsed from the time when the sample is contacted with the activating mixture until the time when the sample clots.

“Half-Life” as used herein, refers to a biological half-life of a particular therapeutic agent in vivo. Terminal half-life can be represented by the time required for half the quantity administered to a subject to be cleared from the circulation and/or other tissues in the subject. When a clearance curve of a given polypeptide is constructed as a function of time, the curve is usually biphasic with a rapid α-phase and longer β-phase. The α-phase typically represents an equilibration of the administered chimeric polypeptide between the intra- and extra-vascular space and is, in part, determined by the size of the polypeptide. The β-phase typically represents the catabolism of the polypeptide in the intravascular space.

The term “terminal plasma half-life” or “terminal half-life” refers to the time required to divide the plasma concentration by two after reaching pseudo-equilibrium. The terminal half-life is especially relevant to multiple dosing regimens, because it controls the degree of therapeutic agent accumulation, concentration fluctuations, and the time taken to reach equilibrium.

“Trough,” as used herein, is the lowest plasma activity level reached after administering a dose of a pharmacologically active agent, e.g., a clotting factor such as Factor VIII or Factor IX, a fragment, a derivative or an analog thereof, before the next dose is administered, if any. Accordingly. “time to trough” (T) is the time at which the lowest plasma activity level is reached after administering a pharmacologically active agent before the next dose is administered.

The term “sample” as used herein includes any biological fluid or issue, such as whole blood or serum, obtained from a subject which contains or is suspected to contain a blood coagulation factor. In some specific aspects, that sample is blood or a fraction thereof, muscle, skin, or a combination thereof. Samples can be obtained by any means known in the art.

In order to apply the methods and systems of the disclosure, samples from a patient can be obtained before or after the administration of a therapy to treat a bleeding disorder. In some cases, successive samples can be obtained from the patient after therapy has commenced or after therapy has ceased. Samples can, for example, be requested by a healthcare provider (e.g., a doctor) or healthcare benefits provider, obtained and/or processed by the same or a different healthcare provider (e.g., a nurse, a hospital) or a clinical laboratory, and after processing, the results can be forwarded to yet another healthcare provider, healthcare benefits provider or the patient. Similarly, the measuring/determination of clotting times and/or PK parameters derived from clotting times, comparisons between clotting times and/or PK parameters derived from clotting times, evaluation of the clotting times and/or PK parameters derived from clotting time, and treatment decisions can be performed by one or more healthcare providers, healthcare benefits providers, and/or clinical laboratories.

As used herein, the term “healthcare provider” refers to individuals or institutions which directly interact and administer to living subjects. e.g., human patients. Non-limiting examples of healthcare providers include doctors, nurses, technicians, therapist, pharmacists, counselors, alternative medicine practitioners, medical facilities, doctor's offices, hospitals, emergency rooms, clinics, urgent care centers, alternative medicine clinics/facilities, and any other entity providing general and/or specialized treatment, assessment, maintenance, therapy, medication, and/or advice relating to all, or any portion of, a patient's state of health, including but not limited to general medical, specialized medical, surgical, and/or any other type of treatment, assessment, maintenance, therapy, medication and/or advice.

As used herein, the term “clinical laboratory” refers to a facility for the examination or processing of materials derived from a living subject, e.g., a human being. Non-limiting examples of processing include biological, biochemical, serological, chemical, immunohematological, hematological, biophysical, cytological, pathological, genetic, or other examination of materials derived from the human body for the purpose of providing information, e.g., for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of any disease or impairment of, or the assessment of the health of living subjects, e.g., human beings. These examinations can also include procedures to collect or otherwise obtain a sample, prepare, determine, measure, or otherwise describe the presence or absence of various substances in the body of a living subject, e.g., a human being, or a sample obtained from the body of a living subject. e.g., a human being.

As used herein, the term “healthcare benefits provider” encompasses individual parties, organizations, or groups providing, presenting, offering, paying for in whole or in part, or being otherwise associated with giving a patient access to one or more healthcare benefits, benefit plans, health insurance, and/or healthcare expense account programs.

In some aspects, a healthcare provider can administer or instruct another healthcare provider to administer a therapy to treat a bleeding disease or disorder. A healthcare provider can implement or instruct another healthcare provider or patient to perform the following actions: obtain a sample, process a sample, submit a sample, receive a sample, transfer a sample, analyze or measure a sample, quantify a sample, provide the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, receive the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, compare/score the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying one or more samples, provide the comparison/score from one or more samples, obtain the comparison/score from one or more samples, administer a therapy or therapeutic agent (e.g., a clotting factor such as a Factor VIII or Factor IX polypeptide), commence the administration of a therapy, cease the administration of a therapy, continue the administration of a therapy, temporarily interrupt the administration of a therapy, increase the amount of an administered therapeutic agent, decrease the amount of an administered therapeutic agent, continue the administration of an amount of a therapeutic agent, increase the frequency of administration of a therapeutic agent, decrease the frequency of administration of a therapeutic agent, maintain the same dosing frequency on a therapeutic agent, replace a therapy or therapeutic agent by at least another therapy or therapeutic agent, combine a therapy or therapeutic agent with at least another therapy or additional therapeutic agent.

In some aspects, a healthcare benefits provider can authorize or deny, for example, collection of a sample, processing of a sample, submission of a sample, receipt of a sample, transfer of a sample, analysis or measurement a sample, quantification a sample, provision of results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, transfer of results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, comparison/scoring of results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying one or more samples, transfer of the comparison/score from one or more samples, administration of a therapy or therapeutic agent, commencement of the administration of a therapy or therapeutic agent, cessation of the administration of a therapy or therapeutic agent, continuation of the administration of a therapy or therapeutic agent, temporary interruption of the administration of a therapy or therapeutic agent, increase of the amount of administered therapeutic agent, decrease of the amount of administered therapeutic agent, continuation of the administration of an amount of a therapeutic agent, increase in the frequency of administration of a therapeutic agent, decrease in the frequency of administration of a therapeutic agent, maintain the same dosing frequency on a therapeutic agent, replace a therapy or therapeutic agent by at least another therapy or therapeutic agent, or combine a therapy or therapeutic agent with at least another therapy or additional therapeutic agent.

In addition a healthcare benefits providers can, e.g., authorize or deny the prescription of a therapy, authorize or deny coverage for therapy, authorize or deny reimbursement for the cost of therapy, determine or deny eligibility for therapy, etc.

In some aspects, a clinical laboratory can, for example, collect or obtain a sample, process a sample, submit a sample, receive a sample, transfer a sample, analyze or measure a sample, quantify a sample, provide the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, receive the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying a sample, compare/score the results obtained after analyzing/measuring/quantifying one or more samples, provide the comparison/score from one or more samples, obtain the comparison/score from one or more samples.

The above enumerated actions can be performed by a healthcare provider, healthcare benefits provider, or patient automatically using a computer-implemented method (e.g., via a web service or stand-alone computer system).

II. Methods and Compositions for Coagulation Activity Testing

The standard methodology for determining coagulation factor levels in use today is the one stage coagulation factor clotting assay (FIG. 2). A major drawback of this assay is that one cannot use whole blood samples. A typical one stage coagulation factor clotting assay requires, for example (i) venous blood drawn into sodium citrate anticoagulant, (ii) centrifugation to obtain a plasma sample, (iii) laboratory bench top coagulation analyzers and specifically trained laboratory personnel, (iv) liquid reagent preparation and standard curve construction, (v) multiple step assay procedures, (vi) dilution of patient plasma, (vii) mix with factor deficient plasma to mask inter-individual phenotypic variation, (viii) pre-incubation with non-physiological contact phase activators to generate an activated factor, e.g., Factor XIa, (ix) addition of Ca+2 to initiate clotting, (x) optical (most common) or mechanical clot detection, (xi) derivation of factor level from Log-Linear (most common) plot of coagulation factor concentration versus clot time (reliable range for standard instrument systems using log-linear fits is ˜3%-120% of normal; high end instruments have incorporated sophisticated software packages that can return accurate values below 1%).

To address the drawbacks of conventional one stage coagulation factor clotting assays, the present disclosure provides a modified coagulation assay which, in contrast with a standard coagulation assay, can operate using a whole blood sample, for example, fingerstick blood. Instead of pre-incubating the sample with a non-physiological contact phase activators. e.g., kaolin, typically used in laboratory-based assays, the assays disclosed herein use an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex. This activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate, e.g., a test strip.

Accordingly, the disclosed assays can be performed in point of care analyzers that do not require specially trained laboratory personnel. This general assay format, in which a patient sample (plasma or whole blood) can be applied directly to the solid substrate containing dried assay chemistry, is referred to as the Standard Factor Monitoring System (“Standard FMS”) assay throughout the present disclosure.

In specific aspects of the present disclosure, the Standard FMS assays can be applied to determining coagulation activity of Factor VIII, e.g., measured as clotting time. For the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay, the activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex can comprise, for example, a mixture of purified activated Factor IX (Factor IXa; abbreviated as FIXa) and phospholipid vesicles, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. In other specific aspects of the present disclosure, the Standard FMS assay can be applied to determining coagulation activity of Factor IX. e.g., measured as clotting time. For the Standard FMS Factor IX assay, the activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex can comprise, for example, a mixture of purified activated Factor XI (Factor XIa; abbreviated as FXIa) and phospholipid vesicles, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. In some aspects, the assays disclosed herein require no preincubation of the samples with the activators mixture.

In order to address the observed phenotypic variability between samples from the same donor or between donors, the Standard FMS assay can be modified. In some aspects of the present disclosure, less sensitive phospholipid blends in the activator mixture can be used to reduce phenotypic variability. In other aspects, adding a variety of purified coagulation factors to the sample. e.g., Factor II, Factor VII. Factor VIII. Factor IX. Factor X. Factor XI. Factor XII. Factor XIII, fibrinogen, vWF, or Tissue Factor can also reduce phenotypic variability. In other aspects, adding inhibitors to the sample. e.g., CTI, aprotinin, ϵ-aminocaproic acid (EACA). D-Phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1-arginine chloromethyl ketone-Factor VIIa (FPRCK-FVIIa), or anti-FVIII monoclonal antibodies can also reduce phenotypic variability. Accordingly, the present disclosure provides also a variant of the Standard FMS assay, referred to as the “Alternate FMS” assay throughout the instant disclosure. This Alternate FMS assay is essentially a hybrid between the Standard FMS assay and a one stage factor assay (e.g., an aPTT assay) which is less susceptible to phenotypic variability. The Alternate FMS assay also utilizes an activation mixture comprising a coagulation factor (e.g., FIXa or FXIa) and a phospholipid vesicle preparation dried on the solid substrate (e.g. a disposable test strip). In the plasma based Alternate FMS assay, one part of sample (e.g., hemophilia plasma or fingerstick whole blood) can be mixed with a volume of a corresponding sample that has been depleted of the assay target factor (referred to as “substrate sample” throughout the instant disclosure). In this manner, the variability of non-target sample components can be normalized by addition of the substrate sample. This combination of sample (e.g., hemophilia plasma or fingerstick whole blood) and substrate sample can be done in an all-liquid system, resulting in a dilution of the sample, thus increasing the lower level of detection of the assay. In some aspects, the sample is diluted with substrate sample at about a 1:2 ratio, at about 1:3 ratio, at about a 1:4 ratio, or at about a 1:5 ratio. Dilution ratios can be adjusted above or below the disclosed ratios using routine experimentation.

As disclosed above, both the Standard FMS assay and the Alternate FMS assays use an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the composition is dried onto a solid substrate. The activation mixture can contain all the substances necessary for the determination of coagulation factor activity, e.g., via measurement of clotting time. These necessary substances are usually an activated coagulation factor functioning as coagulation activator component, phospholipids, and optionally divalent cations.

The activation mixtures disclosed herein generally do not contain stabilizers, however, in some aspects of the present disclosure, the activation mixture can contain one or more stabilizers known in the art, such as amino acids (e.g., D-alanine, L-alanine, beta-alanine, etc.). Suitable concentrations of stabilizers are known in the art or can be routinely determined. In some specific aspects, the activation mixture disclosed herein consists of or substantially consists of an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, i.e., the activation mixture it does not contain, e.g., divalent cations, stabilizers such as albumin o amino acids, or additional coagulation factor activators or inhibitors.

In some aspects, the solid substrate can be, e.g., paper, plastic, glass, ceramic material, metal, and combinations thereof. The solid substrate can be, for example, the surface on a test strip, test stick, reaction chamber, cartridge, chip, well plate, or array used in an apparatus to measure coagulation factor activity or coagulation time. In some aspects, the solid substrate can be a membrane, which can be single layered or multilayered. In some aspects, the solid substrate is the surface of a disposable test strip. In other aspects, the solid substrate is the wall in a well in a plastic cartridge. In other aspects, the solid substrate is the wall of a well in a multiwell plate (e.g., a 96-well place). In some aspects, the solid substrate is the wall of a capillary. In other aspects, the solid substrate is the wall of a vial. In other aspects, the solid substrate is a surface in a mechanical mixing component of a measurement apparatus.

The solid substrate can be made of any suitable material which preferably has good thermal conductivity, clarity for optical transmission, mechanical properties for easy construction, surface properties that allow for uniform drying and stability of the activation mixture, and neutrality to the liquid medium in the sample to prevent interference with the coagulation assay. For this purpose, plastic are especially well suited. Suitable plastics include, for example, those with high free surface energies and low water sorption, including PETG, polyester (MYLAR®), polycarbonate (LEXAN®), polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene. SAN, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) (e.g., CYCOLAC®), etc. In some aspects, plastics and other materials used as solid substrates can be hydrophobic, which would make it difficult to uniformly coat the surface with the activation mixtures disclosed here. Therefore, in some aspects, the substrate can be coated with another reagent (e.g., chemicals such as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxy-hexanoate) (PHBHHx), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV), or polylactic acid (PLA); or proteins such as collagen or fibronectin) that would render the surface of the substrate hydrophilic and permit attachment of the activation mixture to the surface. In other aspects, the substrate can be physically modified by plasma etching or corona treating to render its surface hydrophilic.

The activation mixture can be provided, for example, (i) already dried onto a solid substrate, (ii) in a liquid to be dried in situ, or (iii) in a dry form (e.g., lyophilized form) to be reconstituted and dried onto the solid substrate. Dry components can be provided separately or in a premixed form. The activation mixture can be dried onto the solid substrate by using methods known in the art. For example, the drying of the activation mixture can be accomplished by air drying (e.g., at room temperature), drying under an inert gas stream (e.g., nitrogen or argon), vacuum drying, lyophilizing, dessicant drying, convective drying, etc. The term drying “onto” a solid substrate also encompasses drying the activation mixture “into” a porous substrate. In this respect, the dry activation mixture can be, for example, located into porous matrices such as sponges, porous paper filters, fleece or felt material, or can be microencapsulated.

The activation mixture can be applied to the substrate using methods known in the art, e.g., spray painting or lyophilization. In some aspects, the activation mixture can be chemically conjugated to the substrate. Chemical conjugation methods to covalently attach lipids, e.g., phospholipids and/or proteins, e.g., coagulation factors, are known in the art.

In some aspects, the activation mixture disclosed herein can be used to measure clotting time in samples containing or suspected to contain a coagulation factor, for example. Factor VIII or Factor IX. In some aspects, the coagulation factor is a Factor VIII protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof as disclosed below. In other aspects, the coagulation factor is a Factor IX protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some specific aspects, the Factor VIII or Factor IX proteins are chimeric proteins (e.g., rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc) or hybrid proteins.

In some aspects, the Factor VIII chimeric protein is a single chain (SC) rFVIIIFc. SC rFVIIIFc are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/668,889, and U.S. Pat. No. 7,041,635, both of which are herein incorporated by reference in their entireties.

The activation mixture disclosed herein can contain an activated coagulation factor, or alternatively a hematologically equivalent, such, as a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof.

In some aspects, for example to apply the methods disclosed herein to measure the coagulation activity of a Factor VIII protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein or hybrid protein thereof), the activated coagulation factor is a Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some specific aspects, a Factor IXa protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein or hybrid protein thereof) is present in the activation mixture composition prior to drying within a range of about 0.01 U/mL to about 0.05 U/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is about 0.01 U/mL about 0.02 U/mL, about 0.03 U/mL, about 0.04 U/mL, about 0.05 U/mL, about 0.06 U/mL, about 0.07 U/mL, about 0.08 U/mL, about 0.09 U/mL, or about 0.1 U/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is at least about 0.1 U/mL.

In other aspects, for example to apply the methods disclosed herein to measure the coagulation activity of a Factor IX protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof, the activated coagulation factor is a Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof. In some specific aspects, the Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is present in the activation mixture composition prior to drying within a range of about 0.01 U/mL to about 0.05 U/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is about 0.01 U/mL, about 0.02 U/mL, about 0.03 U/mL, about 0.04 U/mL, about 0.05 U/mL, about 0.06 U/mL, about 0.07 U/mL, about 0.08 U/mL, about 0.09 U/mL, or about 0.1 U/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is at least 0.1 U/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is about 0.01 mg/mL, about 0.02 mg/mL, about 0.03 mg/mL, about 0.04 mg/mL, about 0.05 mg/mL, about 0.06.g/mL, about 0.07 mg/mL, about 0.08 mg/mL, about 0.09 mg/mL, or about 0.1 mg/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is about 0.1 mg/mL. In some aspects, the concentration of Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof is about 0.10 mg/mL, about 0.15 mg/mL, about 0.20 mg/mL, about 0.25 mg/mL, about 0.30 mg/mL, about 0.35.g/mL, about 0.40 mg/mL, about 0.45 mg/mL, or about 0.50 mg/mL.

One skilled in the art would understand that other activated coagulation factors and cofactors can be used instead of Factor IXa and FXIa depending on the coagulation factor tested in the coagulation assay.

The activation mixture contains a phospholipid mixture comprising at least one phospholipid. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 2 phospholipids. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 3 phospholipids. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises more than three phospholipids. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises at least one phospholipid in combination with at least another lipid, e.g., a fatty acid or cholesterol.

In some specific aspects, the composition of the phospholipid mixture is defined. i.e., phospholipid(s) and other lipid components (if present) are combined according to predetermined ratios. In other aspects, the composition of phospholipid mixture is not defined. e.g., the phospholipid mixture is obtained from an animal and/or vegetal tissue extract (e.g., egg, soy, etc). Chloroform extracts from rabbit brain are an example of suitable phospholipid mixture obtained from a tissue extract known in the art. In some aspects, the phospholipids can be natural. In other aspects, the phospholipids can be synthetic. In some aspects, the phospholipids are a mixture of natural and synthetic phospholipids. The phospholipids in the phospholipid mixture can be, for example, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine, and any combinations thereof.

Synthetic phospholipics that can be present in the phospholipid mixture include, for example, synthetic phosphatidic acid (e.g., DMPA, DPPA, DSPA), synthetic phosphatidylcholine (e.g., DDPC, DLPC, DMPC. DPPC. DSPC, DOPC, POPC, DEPC), synthetic phosphatidylglycerol (e.g., DMPG, DPPG, DSPG, POPG), synthetic phosphatidylethanoamine (e.g., DMPE, DPPE, DSPE, DOPE), synthetic phosphatidylserine (e.g., DOPS), and combinations thereof.

In some specific examples, the phospholipid mixture comprises 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In other specific examples, the phospholipid mixture comprises 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In yet other specific examples, the phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol.

In some specific examples, the phospholipid mixture consists or consists essentially of 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In other specific examples, the phospholipid mixture consists or consists essentially of 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In yet other specific examples, the phospholipid mixture consists or consists essentially of 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises at least about 5 mole-%, at least about 10 mole-%, at least about 15 mole-%, at least about 20 mole-%, at least about 25 mole-%, at least about 30 mole-%, at least about 35 mole-%, at least about 40 mole-%, at least about 45 mole-%, at least about 50 mole-%, at least about 55 mole-%, at least about 60 mole-%, at least about 65 mole-%, at least about 70 mole-%, at least about 75 mole-%, at least about 80 mole-%, at least about 85 mole-%, at least about 90 mole-%, or at least about 95 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises at least about 5 mole-%, at least about 10 mole-%, at least about 15 mole-%, at least about 20 mole-%, at least about 25 mole-%, at least about 30 mole-%, at least about 35 mole-%, at least about 40 mole-%, at least about 45 mole-%, at least about 50 mole-%, at least about 55 mole-%, at least about 60 mole-%, at least about 65 mole-%, at least about 70 mole-%, at least about 75 mole-%, at least about 80 mole-%, at least about 85 mole-%, at least about 90 mole-%, or at least about 95 mole-% of phosphatidylserine.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises at least about 5 mole-%, at least about 10 mole-%, at least about 15 mole-%, at least about 20 mole-%, at least about 25 mole-%, at least about 30 mole-%, at least about 35 mole-%, at least about 40 mole-%, at least about 45 mole-%, at least about 50 mole-%, at least about 55 mole-%, at least about 60 mole-%, at least about 65 mole-%, at least about 70 mole-%, at least about 75 mole-%, at least about 80 mole-%, at least about 85 mole-%, at least about 90 mole-%, or at least about 95 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture further comprises cholesterol. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises at least about 1 mole-%, at least about 2 mole-%, at least about 3 mole-%, at least about 4 mole-%, at least about 5 mole-%, at least about 6 mole-%, at least about 7 mole-%, at least about 8 mole-%, at least about 9 mole-%, at least about 10 mole-%, at least about 11 mole-%, at least about 12 mole-%, at least about 13 mole-%, at least about 14 mole-%, at least about 15 mole-%, at least about 16 mole-%, at least about 17 mole-%, at least about 18 mole-%, at least about 19 mole-%, or at least about 20 mole-% of cholesterol.

In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture is combined with the activated coagulation factor prior to drying onto a solid substrate. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture is in vesicle form (e.g., a liposome or other artificial lipid vesicle). In some aspects, the vesicles are unilamellar vesicles, e.g., small unilamellar vesicles. Unilamellar vesicles can be produced using methods known in the arts. e.g., extrusion or sonication. Typically, small unilamellar vesicles are formed by sonication (e.g., tip or bath sonication) from large multilamellar vesicles. Large unilamelar vesicles can be formed, for example, by extrusion or by allowing small unilamellar vesicles to coalesce.

Divalent cations are optionally present in the activation mixture. In some aspects, divalent cations are present in the sample (e.g., a recalcified sample) and in the activation mixture. In other aspects, divalent cations can be added after the sample has contacted the activation mixture.

In some aspects, the divalent cations are calcium ions. Any chemical source of calcium cations can be used, e.g., CaCl2, Ca(NO2)2, CaSO4, or other inorganic or organic calcium cation-containing compounds.

The methods disclosed herein can be applied to any sample containing a coagulation factor or suspected of containing a coagulation factor. In some aspects, the sample can be whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, or other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor. In some aspects, the sample is decalcified, e.g., decalcified plasma. Plasma can be decalcified, for example, by adding chelators such as EDTA. In other aspects, the sample is recalcified, e.g., recalcified plasma. Methods to decalcify blood samples, e.g., plasma, and specific conditions and calcium concentrations for recalcification are well known in the art.

Measurements of coagulation, e.g., clotting time (Ct) measurements, using the activation mixtures disclosed herein, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate, can be carried out manually by visual observation of clot formation. However, measurement of coagulation, e.g., clotting time (Ct) measurement, can also be performed using optical or mechanical measurement instruments such as those marketed, e.g., by the Amelung, Baxter, Labor, Medtronic, CoaguSense, Roche Diagnostics (e.g., CoaguChek® I, II, XS; Coumatrak®), CardioVascular Diagnostics (e.g., TAS®), Organon Teknica (Coag-A-Mate®), Haemoscope (TEG), Pentapharm (ROTEM). Medirox, Siemens, Hemotek, Helena Laboratories, and Behring companies. Measurements can also be performed using point-of-care devised discussed infra.

The activation mixtures disclosed herein, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate, can be applied to a variety of methods for measuring coagulation, and/or the concentration of coagulation factors in biological samples, e.g., blood or plasma, and/or to determine the effect or concentration of direct or indirect inhibitors of coagulation. Such methods include both chromogenic assays and so-called “clotting methods” such as the aPTT assay. In general, these “clotting methods” are characterized by the fact that coagulation is activated and the time from coagulation activation until detection of clotting in the sample is measured, and in turn clotting time can be converted into direct concentration units by establishing a calibration curve with appropriate calibration reagents.

In specific aspects of the present disclosure, the activation mixture can be used as a reagent for the measurement of the Factor VIII activity of a Factor VIII protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein, or hybrid protein thereof) in a sample. In one specific aspect, such activation mixture comprises 80% of 0.1 mg/mL Factor IXa and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. In another specific aspect, such activation mixture consist or substantially consists of 80% of 0.1 mg/mL Factor IXa and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate.

In specific aspects of the present disclosure, the activation mixture can be used as a reagent for the measurement of the Factor IX activity of a Factor IX protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein, or hybrid protein thereof) in a sample. In one specific aspect, such activation mixture comprises 80% of Factor XIa suspension and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprising 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. In another specific aspect, such activation mixture consists or substantially consists of 80% of Factor XIa suspension and 20% of a phospholipid mixture comprising 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol, wherein said activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. The exact amount of FXIa suspension needed varies depending on the specific activity of this reagent and is titrated for optimal amount and may include approximately 0.1 mg/mL to approximately 0.5 mg/mL.

Also provided in the present disclosure is a kit for performing a measurement of coagulation factor activity or coagulation time in a sample, wherein said kit comprises the components to prepare any of the activation mixtures disclosed herein in one or more vials, as well as instructions to dry the components to prepare any of the activation mixtures disclosed herein onto a solid substrate. Such kit can comprise, for example, (i) a solution comprising both an activated coagulation factor and phospholipid vesicles in a single vial, or (ii) separate vials, one of them containing a solution of activated coagulation factor and a second vial containing a solution of phospholipid vesicles, or (ii) a vial containing a solution of activated coagulation factor and a second vial containing a dried phospholipid mixture to be reconstituted to produce phospholipid vesicles, etc. Thus, in some aspects, the kit comprises one or more components in a dry form or non-dry form in one or more vials, instructions for reconstituting or mixing the components in the kit, and instruction for drying the activation mixture onto a solid substrate.

Also provided in the present disclosure is a sample holder for performing a blood coagulation assay, comprising a surface coated with any one of the activation mixtures disclosed herein, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate. For example, the sample holder can be a test strip, a test stick, a reaction chamber, a cup, a cuvette, a cartridge, a chip, a well plate, an array, a membrane, a capillary, etc. A particular advantage of using a dried activation mixture coating a surface (as opposed to using a fluid reagent) in a sample holder is that it extends the shelf life of the sample holder. A second advantage is that using a dried activation mixture applied to coat the inner walls of a sample holder (e.g., a cartridge, a well or a cuvette) is that the operator does not need to mix, pour, or otherwise deal with liquid reactants.

In performing the assays disclosed herein (e.g., the Standard FMS assay or the Alternate FMS assay), a great variation in protein concentrations, incubation times, reagent concentrations, and temperatures can be employed. The selection of particular assay parameters will depend on the coagulation factor to be assayed as well as the source, type and size of the sample to be assayed, the anticipated levels of coagulation factor contained therein, and the threshold of sensitivity desired. Taking these circumstances into consideration, selection of assay parameters will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

The assays disclosed herein (e.g., the Standard FMS assay or the Alternate FMS assay) can be used in methods for determining clotting time in a patient having a bleeding disorder. Accordingly, the present disclosure provides a method for determining clotting time in a patient having bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; and, (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the blood sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct).

The present disclosure also provides a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient will benefit from administration of a treatment; and, (c) administering the treatment to the patient if Ct indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment. Also provided is a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient will benefit from administration of a treatment; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to administer the treatment to the patient if Ct indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment.

The disclosure also provides a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (c) administering an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted. Also provided is a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to optimize the treatment administered, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted.

The instant disclosure also provides a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (c) providing a treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof. Also provided is a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct), wherein Ct indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (c) instructing a healthcare provider to provide treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof.

Also provided in the present disclosure is a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) comparing the measured Ct with the Ct obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (d) maintaining or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard. Also provided is a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) comparing the measured Ct with the Ct obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to maintain or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard.

The present disclosure also provides a method for determining a coagulation factor level in a bleeding disorder patient, comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) correlating the Ct value with the level of coagulation factor in the sample. The correlation between Ct and coagulation factor level (% Factor) can be calculated, for example, according to the formula:

Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B

wherein, for each coagulation factor, A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and B is patient-specific off-set value.

For a given coagulation factor, the A values for dose response curves plotting concentration of coagulation factor (% Factor) versus Ct are similar for all patients, whereas the B off-set values are different due to patient-specific global coagulation differences. The variability in B values can be addressed, for example, by optimizing the chemistry of the activation mixture so that there is no difference in B values among patients. The resulting correlation between concentration of factor and Ct can be used in a “Ready to Use Factor Monitoring Device” that does not require patient-specific calibration. Such device can be, for example, a point-of-care device.

Alternatively, the variability in B values can be addressed by customizing the device for each patient. For example, Ct can be measured during an initial (training) visit using the Standard FMS assay or Alternate FMS assay disclosed herein, and venous sample for standard laboratory analysis can be obtained at the same time. The BI value, offset between Ct value from FMS assay(s) and the laboratory assays, could be provided to the patient (e.g., as an ID value). The ID value could be used to program the device, thus providing a “Customized Factor Monitoring Device” specifically customized for a single patient. Multiple patient IDs would be possible per device. Such device can be, for example, a point-of-care device.

The instant disclosure also provides a method for determining a pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter in a bleeding disorder patient, comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) correlating a PK with the calculated Ct value, thereby determining the value of the PK parameter.

Also provided in the present disclosure is a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment; and, (d) administering the treatment to the patient if the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment. Also provided in the present disclosure is a method of treating a patient having a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to administer the treatment to the patient if the PK parameter indicates that the patient will benefit from administration of the treatment.

The present disclosure also provides is a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (d) administering an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the treatment is maintained or adjusted. The present disclosure also provides a method of optimizing a bleeding disorder treatment in a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter correlates with a therapeutically efficacious treatment; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to administer an optimized treatment to the patient, wherein the therapy is maintained or adjusted.

The instant disclosure also provides a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (d) providing treatment for the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof.

Also provided in the instant disclosure is a method of diagnosing whether a patient is in need of treatment for a bleeding disorder comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct, wherein the PK parameter indicates whether the patient has a bleeding disorder; and, (d) instructing a healthcare provider to provide therapy to treat the bleeding disorder if the patient is in need thereof.

The present disclosure also provides a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); and, (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct; (d) comparing the PK parameter with the PK obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (e) maintaining or adjusting the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard. Also provided is a method of monitoring the efficacy of a bleeding disorder treatment administered to a patient comprising (a) contacting a sample obtained from the patient with an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, wherein the activation mixture is dried onto a solid substrate; (b) measuring the time between the contacting of the activation mixture with the sample and the onset of clotting, thereby calculating the clotting time (Ct); (c) determining a PK parameter based on Ct; (d) comparing the PK parameter with the PK obtained from a corresponding standard, wherein the standard is representative of a therapeutically efficacious treatment, and wherein a similarity between the patient's results and the standard is indicative of efficacy of the patient's current treatment; and, (e) instructing a healthcare provider to maintain or adjust the patient's treatment based on the relative difference between the patient's results and the corresponding standard.

In some aspects, the PK is terminal half-life (“HL”). In other aspects, the PK is time to through (“T”). The PK parameters disclosed herein as well as other PK parameters known in the art can be calculated from Ct and additional parameters that can be determined experimentally and/or from pharmacodynamic simulation and/or pharmacokinetic simulations. For example, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics parameters can be calculated for a certain coagulation factor, for a certain population, or for a certain administration route, dosage, or other condition based on simulations conducts on data obtained from a single patient or from multiple patients (e.g., patients in a clinical trial).

In some aspects, HL can be calculated according to the formula:

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2)

wherein, for each coagulation factor. A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, T1 and T2 are times at which Ct is measured, and Ct1 and Ct2 are Ct values measured at T1 and T2, respectively. In this calculation, the offset value B becomes irrelevant. i.e., interpatient differences in global coagulation do not affect terminal half-life. The possibility of repeating Ct measures on a point-of-care device on multiple days applying the method and compositions disclosed herein (for example, one measurement per day for 5 to 8 days) means that the likely result would be far more accurate than terminal half-life values obtained using one or two traditional laboratory-based measurements.

In some aspects, the patient-specific terminal half-life calculated according to the method disclosed above can be combined with pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamics data. For example, product-specific in vivo recovery and distribution phase (α-phase) half-life data can be obtained via population modeling using data obtained from clinical trials. “In vivo recovery” (“IVR”) is generally represented by the incremental recovery (K-value), which is the observed peak activity minus predose level and then divided by the dose. IVR can also be calculated on a percentage basis. The mean IVR can be determined in a patient population, or the individual IVR can be determined in a single subject. Product-specific in vivo recovery and distribution phase (α-phase) half-life data can be combined to patient-specific terminal half-life data to calculate time to trough (T) according to the formula:

T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough)

wherein for each coagulation factor A is a constant value corresponding to the slope of a Ct versus coagulation factor concentration dose-response, and HL is the terminal half-life, Ctmeasured is Ct measured at certain time point, and Cttrough is patient-specific clot time at trough. In some aspects, the patient is administered a new dose of coagulation factor every T interval.

In some aspects, the sample used in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, comprises, e.g., whole blood, citrated or equivalently stabilized blood, plasma, or other fluid sample containing or suspected of containing a coagulation factor. In some aspects, the sample is whole blood, for example venous blood obtained via phlebotomy, whereas in other aspects the blood is fingerstick blood. In some specific aspects, a single drop of fingerstick blood is required to practice the disclosed methods.

In other aspects, the sample is plasma. Samples, e.g., plasma or blood, can be refrigerated or used at room temperature. In some aspects, samples, e.g., plasma or blood, can be frozen and thawed prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture. In other cases, the sample has not been frozen and thawed prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture. In some aspects, the sample is decalcified, e.g., by adding a chelator such as EDTA to the sample. In other aspects, the decalcified sample is recalcified prior to contacting the sample with the activation mixture by adding a solution containing divalent ions, e.g., calcium ions. In certain aspects, the decalcified sample is recalcified after contacting the sample with the activation mixture.

In certain aspects, variability between samples can be reduced by adding, for example, a purified coagulation factor or an inhibitor of coagulation to the sample. Purified coagulation factor that can be added to the sample include, for example, Factors II, Factor VII, Factor VIII, Factor IX, Factor X, Factor XI, Factor XII, Factor XIII, Fibrinogen, vWF, Tissue Factor, and combinations thereof. Coagulation inhibitors that can be added to the sample include, for example, CTI, aprotinin, ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA). D-Phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1-arginine chloromethyl ketone-Factor VIIa (FPRCK-FVIIa), anti-coagulation factor monoclonal antibodies, and combinations thereof. In some aspects, the one purified coagulation factor can be added to the sample. In other cases, more than one purified coagulation factor can be added to the sample. In some cases, one coagulation inhibitor can be added to the sample. In other cases, more than one coagulation inhibitor can be added to the sample. In some cases, a combination comprising at least one purified coagulation factor and at least one coagulation inhibitor can be added to the sample.

In some cases, the sample can be diluted, for example, with substrate sample (i.e., sample that has been depleted of the assay target factor). This dilution can consist, for example, of one part of sample diluted with three parts of substrate sample. In some aspects, the sample is diluted with substrate sample at about a 1:2 ratio, at about 1:3 ratio, at about a 1:4 ratio, or at about a 1:5 ratio. Dilution ratios can be adjusted above or below the disclosed ratios using routine experimentation.

In some aspects, the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, use an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor wherein the factor is a Factor IXa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof.

In some aspects, the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, use an activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor wherein the factor is a Factor XIa protein or a fragment, variant, or derivative thereof.

In some aspects, the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, use an activation mixture comprising a phospholipid mixture. This phospholipid mixture can comprise, for example, 1 phospholipid, 2 phospholipids, 3 phospholipids, or more than 3 phospholipids. These phospholipids can be, for example, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, or phosphatidylglycerol. The phospholipids in the phospholipid mixture can be, for example, natural phospholipids, synthetic phospholipids, or combinations thereof.

In some specific aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In certain specific aspects, the phospholipid mixture consists or essentially consists of 70 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine and 30 mole-% of phosphatidylserine. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In yet other aspects, the phospholipid mixture consists or essentially consists of 80 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 10 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 10 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In some aspects, the phospholipid mixture comprises 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In other aspects, the phospholipid mixture consists or essentially consists of 75 mole-% of phosphatidylcholine, 20 mole-% of phosphatidylserine, and 5 mole-% of phosphatidylglycerol. In certain aspects, the phospholipid mixture further comprises cholesterol, for example at a concentration from about 1 to about 20 mole-% of cholesterol.

In some aspects, the activation mixture used in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, comprises a phospholipid mixture in lipid vesicle form. In some aspects, the lipid vesicles are small unilamellar vesicles.

In some aspects, the activation mixture used in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, further comprises divalent cations. e.g., calcium ions.

In some aspects, the activation mixture used in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, can react with a coagulation factor, e.g., Factor VII. Factor VIII, or Factor IX. In some aspects, the Factor VIII coagulation factor is a Factor VIII protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein, or hybrid protein thereof). In some aspects, the Factor VIII coagulation factor is a chimeric Factor VIII-Fc fusion protein. In some aspects, the Fc portion of the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises a human Fc domain. In some aspects, the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises a B-domain deleted Factor VIII. In specific aspects, the chimeric Factor VIII protein comprises SEQ ID NO:6, or SEQ ID NO:2.

In other aspects, the Factor IX coagulation factor is a Factor IX protein (or a fragment, variant, derivative, chimeric protein, or hybrid protein thereof). In some aspects, the Factor IX coagulation factor is a chimeric Factor IX-Fc fusion protein. In some aspects, the Fc portion of the chimeric Factor IX protein comprises a human Fc domain. In certain specific aspects, the chimeric Factor IX protein comprises SEQ ID NO: 13.

In some aspects, the activation mixture used in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, is dried onto a the solid substrate. This solid substrate can be, for example, paper, plastic, glass, ceramic material, metal, and combinations thereof. In some aspects, the solid substrate is a surface on a test strip, test stick, reaction chamber, cartridge, chip, well plate, or array used in an apparatus to measure coagulation factor activity or coagulation time.

In some aspects, the patient in the methods of treating, optimizing a treatment, diagnosing whether a patient needs a treatment, monitoring the efficacy of the treatment, or in the methods for determining clotting times, coagulation factor levels, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters disclosed herein, has not yet been treated with a coagulation factor. However, in other cases, the patient has received prior coagulation factor treatment, but the treatment has been discontinued for a time period sufficient to deplete the coagulation factor treatment from the patient's blood.

The methods, compositions, and systems of the present disclosure can be applied to treating a patient or evaluating or determining whether a patient will benefit from administration of a therapeutically effective dose of a therapeutic agent that is capable of treating a bleeding disorder, for example, hemophilia A or hemophilia B. The methods of systems disclosed herein can be used to apply more precise coagulation factor dosing to patients. In a further aspect, the methods and systems disclosed herein can be used to increase the power and effectiveness of clinical trials. Thus, individuals in a study can be monitored and dosages adjusted individually. When the methods of the present disclosure are used for the treatment of bleeding disorders by administration of a coagulation factor. e.g., a Factor VIII or Factor IX protein (or fragment, variants, derivative, chimeric proteins, or hybrid protein thereof), individualized treatment using the methods provided herein can result in fewer disease flare-ups, and thus provide a higher quality of life for the patient. In order to treat a patient, samples from the patient can be obtained before or after the administration of a FVIII or FIX polypeptide. In some cases, successive samples can be obtained from the patient after clotting factor treatment has commenced or after treatment has ceased.

Samples can, e.g., be requested by a healthcare provider (e.g., a doctor) or healthcare benefits provider, obtained and/or processed by the same or a different healthcare provider (e.g., a nurse, a hospital) or a clinical laboratory, and after processing, the results can be forwarded to yet another healthcare provider, healthcare benefits provider or the patient. Similarly, the measuring/determination of clotting times, the comparisons between time points, and treatment decisions can be performed by one or more healthcare providers, healthcare benefits providers, and/or clinical laboratories. In some cases, the methods, compositions, and systems disclosed herein can be applied in a point-of-care test system.

The methods described herein can be used for variety of evaluations, including without limitation, analysis of a patient's blood prior to treatment (or after complete washout of prior therapeutic treatment, to evaluate ‘baseline’ clot formation (which can correlate with severity of the disease) and adding various therapeutic composition(s) such as recombinant FVIII or FIX ex vivo to such blood in order to predict the individual's response to therapy. The methods disclosed herein can be applied, for example, to measure clotting time in samples from a patient suffering from a bleeding disorder, samples from a patient suffering from a clotting disorder, or samples from a healthy patient (e.g., prior to surgery). The methods disclosed herein can also be applied, for example, to determine the effect on coagulation of a natural, recombinant, or chimeric clotting factor, a biological (e.g., an antibody or fusion protein), an anticoagulant, or a small molecule drug added to a plasma or blood sample, or present or suspected to be present in a blood or plasma sample from a patient. Thus, the methods disclosed herein are generally applicable to the measurement of coagulation (e.g., by measuring clotting time) in samples from patients suffering or at risk of suffering conditions other bleeding disorders other than hemophilias. For example, in some conditions such as lupus, coagulation can be altered by the presence of lupus anticoagulant, a prothrombotic agent that precipitates the formation of thrombi in vivo. Patients with lupus and other conditions causing thrombosis can be treated with anticoagulants. Coagulation can also be altered by substances from animal origin, e.g., hirudin or proteins from snake venoms. Certain drug therapies, for example, warfarin treatment, are known to influence coagulation factor levels. Also patients suffering from consumptive coagulapathies such as thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) can present anomalies in coagulation factor levels which require careful clinical management. Successful treatment of these conditions similarly requires accurate determination of serum coagulation factor levels. In managing any of the aforementioned medical conditions, one mode of treatment involves administration of exogenous coagulation factors (e.g., Factor VIII or FIX proteins, fragments, variants or derivatives, for example rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc). It is essential that the precise concentration of such therapeutic doses be measured, and the quantity of coagulation factor be monitored.

Accordingly, the methods for diagnosing, treating, optimizing treatment, monitoring treatment, etc. disclosed herein can generally be applied to any diseases, conditions, or any situations in which blood coagulation is compromised or is suspected to be compromised, and also for prophylactic or preventive purposes (for example, to detect the onset of a disease or condition in a patient at risk or with a family history of such disease).

III. Point-of-Care Applications

In many situations, blood coagulation tests can be performed directly at the point of care without transport of the sample to an separate facility. e.g., a laboratory. The advantages of point-of-care analysis include (i) short turn-around time, as there is no time or only little time needed for transport of the sample, which allows fast monitoring-directed decisions, (ii) transport of the sample to an emergency laboratory can be very expensive, especially at night and when only few samples are to be analyzed, and (iii) self-testing of the patient is possible.

Available point-of-care methods methods for analysis of coagulation time have the same limitations as the determination of aPTT in the laboratory, e.g., non-linear dose response, low sensitivity, or high variation between samples and/or patients.

The methods and compositions of the present disclosure can be used in improved assays for point-of-care analysis of samples. e.g., blood samples such as whole blood samples. Thus, the present disclosure also includes a point-of-care hematological assay wherein the activation mixture disclosed herein is positioned in one or more reaction locations in a test apparatus and a sample of body fluid to be assayed (e.g., whole blood, citrated blood, or plasma) is contacted by the activation mixture.

As a specific aspect, the present disclosure provides a point-of-care device designed to rapidly test for coagulation levels, e.g., levels of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) levels in hemophilia patients, from a finger stick blood sample by using raw clotting times, wherein said point of care device uses a disposable sample holder (e.g., a disposable strip) coated with a activation mixture comprising an activated coagulation factor and a phospholipid mixture, and wherein said activation mixture is dried onto said disposable sample holder.

The Standard FMS and Alternate FMS assays disclosed herein can be implemented in point-of-care devices and used as a global hemostasis tests by using raw clotting times (Ct) to determine individual pharmacokinetic parameters which in term can be used to decide treatment. Accordingly, the methods and composition disclosed herein can be applied to measure coagulation activity by implementing them in commercially available point-of-care self-monitoring devices, for example, i-STAT 1 (Abbott Point of Care); INRatio or INRatio2 PT INR Monitors (Alere); RapidPoint (Bayer); Coag-Sense PT/INR Monitoring System (CoaguSense); Actalyke Mini II, Actalyke XL, or Cascade POC (Helena Point of Care); Gem PCL Plus (Instrumentation Laboratory); Hemochrom Response, Hemochron Signature Elite, Hemochron Signature+, or ProTime Microcoagulation System (ITC); ACT Plus, or HMS Plus (Medtronic Cardiac Surgery); CoaguCheck XS Pro PT, CoaguCheck XS PT, CoaguCheck Plus PT (Roche Diagnostics); etc.

IV. Factor VIII and Factor IX Polypeptides

The methods and compositions provided in the present disclosure can be used in assays to determine the activity of clotting factors, such as Factor VIII and Factor IX polypeptides (including fragments, variants, derivatives, chimeric, and hybrid polypeptides). A detailed description of Factor VIII and Factor IX polypeptides (including fragments, variants, derivatives, chimeric and hybrid polypeptides) whose coagulating activity can be assessed by using the methods and compositions of the present disclosure is provided below.

A. Factor VIII Polypeptides

“Factor VIII.” as used herein, means functional Factor VIII polypeptide in its normal role in coagulation, unless otherwise specified. Thus, the term Factor VIII includes variant polypeptides that are functional. Factor VII proteins include the human, porcine, canine, and murine Factor VIII proteins. The full length polypeptide and polynucleotide sequences are known, as are many functional fragments, mutants and modified versions. Examples of human Factor VIII sequences are shown as subsequences in SEQ ID NOs: 2, 6, 8, 10, and 12 (Sequence Table 2). Factor VIII polypeptides include, e.g., full-length Factor VIII, full-length Factor VIII minus Met at the N-terminus, mature Factor VIII (minus the signal sequence), mature Factor VIII with an additional Met at the N-terminus, and/or Factor VIII with a full or partial deletion of the B domain. Factor VIII polypeptides include B domain deletions, whether partial or full deletions or single chain FVIII. Factor VIII can be made by recombinant means (“recombinant Factor VIII” or “rFVIII”), i.e., it is not naturally occurring or derived from plasma.

“B domain” of Factor VIII, as used herein, is the same as the B domain known in the art that is defined by internal amino acid sequence identity and sites of proteolytic cleavage by thrombin, e.g., residues Ser741-Arg1648 of full length human Factor VIII. The other human Factor VIII domains are defined by the following amino acid residues: A1, residues Ala1-Arg372; A2, residues Ser373-Arg740; A3, residues Ser1690-Ile2032; C1, residues Arg2033-Asn2172; C2, residues Ser2173-Tyr2332. The A3-C1-C2 sequence includes residues Ser1690-Tyr2332. The remaining sequence, residues Glu1649-Arg1689, is usually referred to as the Factor VIII light chain activation peptide. The locations of the boundaries for all of the domains, including the B domains, for porcine, mouse and canine Factor VIII are also known in the art. In certain aspects, the B domain of Factor VIII is deleted (“B domain deleted Factor VIII” or “BDD FVIII”). An example of a BDD FVIII is REFACTO (recombinant BDD FVIII), which has the same sequence as the Factor VIII portion of the sequence in Sequence Table 2A(i) (amino acids −19 to 1438 or 1 to 1438 of SEQ ID NO:2).

A “B domain deleted Factor VIII” can have the full or partial deletions disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,316,226, 6,346,513, 7,041,635, 5,789,203, 6,060,447, 5,595,886, 6,228,620, 5,972,885, 6,048,720, 5,543,502, 5,610,278, 5,171,844, 5,112,950, 4,868,112, and 6,458,563, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In some aspects, a B domain deleted Factor VIII sequence of the present disclosure comprises any one of the deletions disclosed at col. 4, line 4 to col. 5, line 28 and examples 1-5 of U.S. Pat. No. 6,316,226 (also in U.S. Pat. No. 6,346,513). In some aspects, a B domain deleted Factor VIII of the present disclosure has a deletion disclosed at col. 2, lines 26-51 and examples 5-8 of U.S. Pat. No. 5,789,203 (also U.S. Pat. No. 6,060,447, U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,886, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,228,620). In some aspects, a B domain deleted Factor VIII has a deletion described in col. 1, lines 25 to col. 2, line 40 of U.S. Pat. No. 5,972,885; col. 6, lines 1-22 and example 1 of U.S. Pat. No. 6,048,720; col. 2, lines 17-46 of U.S. Pat. No. 5,543,502; col. 4, line 22 to col. 5, line 36 of U.S. Pat. No. 5,171,844; col. 2, lines 55-68, FIG. 2, and example 1 of U.S. Pat. No. 5,112,950; col. 2, line 2 to col. 19, line 21 and table 2 of U.S. Pat. No. 4,868,112; col. 2, line 1 to col. 3, line 19, col. 3, line 40 to col. 4, line 67, col. 7, line 43 to col. 8, line 26, and col. 11, line 5 to col. 13, line 39 of U.S. Pat. No. 7,041,635; or col. 4, lines 25-53, of U.S. Pat. No. 6,458,563. In some aspects, a B domain deleted Factor VIII has a deletion of most of the B domain, but still contains amino-terminal sequences of the B domain that are essential for in vivo proteolytic processing of the primary translation product into two polypeptide chain, as disclosed in WO 91/09122, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In some aspects, a B domain deleted factor VIII is constructed with a deletion of amino acids 747-1638. e.g., virtually a complete deletion of the B domain. Hoeben R. C., et al. J. Biol. Chem. 265 (13): 7318-7323 (1990), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. A B domain deleted Factor VIII can also contain a deletion of amino acids 771-1666 or amino acids 868-1562 of factor VIII. Meulien P., et al. Protein Eng. 2(4): 301-6 (1988), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Additional B domain deletions include, e.g.: deletion of amino acids 982 through 1562 or 760 through 1639 (Toole et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (1986) 83, 5939-5942)), 797 through 1562 (Eaton, et al. Biochemistry (1986) 25:8343-8347)), 741 through 1646 (Kaufman (PCT published application No. WO 87/04187)), 747-1560 (Sarver, et al., DNA (1987) 6:553-564)), 741 through 1648 (Pasek (PCT application No. 88/00831)), 816 through 1598 or 741 through 1689 (Lagner (Behring Inst. Mitt. (1988) No 82:16-25, EP 295597)), each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

In other aspects, BDD FVIII includes a FVIII polypeptide containing fragments of the B-domain that retain one or more N-linked glycosylation sites, e.g., residues 757, 784, 828, 900, 963, or optimally 943, which correspond to the amino acid sequence of the full-length FVIII sequence. Examples of the B-domain fragments include 226 amino acids or 163 amino acids of the B-domain as disclosed in Miao, H. Z., et al., Blood 103(a): 3412-3419 (2004). Kasuda, A, et al., J. Thromb. Haemost. 6: 1352-1359 (2008), and Pipe, S. W., et al., J. Thromb. Haemost. 9: 2235-2242 (2011) (e.g., the first 226 amino acids or 163 amino acids of the B domain are retained). In still other aspects, BDD FVIII further comprises a point mutation at residue 309 (from Phe to Ser) to improve expression of the BDD FVIII protein. See Miao. H. Z., et al., Blood 103(a): 3412-3419 (2004). In still other aspects, the BDD FVIII includes a FVIII polypeptide containing a portion of the B-domain, but not containing one or more furin cleavage sites (e.g., Arg1313 and Arg 1648). See Pipe, S. W., et al., J. Thromb. Haemost. 9: 2235-2242 (2011). The references are incorporated herein by reference, and each of the foregoing deletions can be made in any Factor VIII sequence.

In certain aspects, FVIII includes a single chain FVIII polypeptide. In one embodiment, a single chain FVIII polypeptide can include one or more mutations or substitutions at R1645 or R1648 corresponding to full-length Factor VIII sequence or both. Additional examples of single chain FVIII polypeptides can be found at U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/668,889, filed Jul. 6, 2012, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In another embodiment, a single chain FVIII polypeptide contains a FVIII polypeptide having a deletion of R1645 and/or R1648 corresponding to full-length FVIII sequence or a sequence containing R1645 and/or R1648 corresponding to full-length FVIII. For example, a single chain FVIII can contain a deletion of amino acid positions 746 to 1649, 746 to 1652, 746 to 1655, 758 to 1649, 758 to 1652, 758 to 1655, 765 to 1649, 765 to 1652, 765 to 1655, 748 to 1658, 755 to 1658, 762 to 1658, 769 to 1658, 776 to 1658, or 783 to 1658 corresponding to full-length FVIII sequence. Additional examples can be found at U.S. Pat. No. 7,041,635, filed Jan. 3, 2003, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

A great many functional Factor VIII variants are known, as is discussed above and below. In addition, hundreds of nonfunctional mutations in Factor VIII have been identified in hemophilia patients, and it has been determined that the effect of these mutations on Factor VIII function is due more to where they lie within the 3-dimensional structure of Factor VIII than on the nature of the substitution (Cutler et al., Hum. Mutat. 19:274-8 (2002), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). In addition, comparisons between Factor VIII from humans and other species have identified conserved residues that are likely to be required for function (Cameron et al., Thromb. Haemost. 79:317-22 (1998); U.S. Pat. No. 6,251,632), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

The human Factor VIII gene was isolated and expressed in mammalian cells (Toole, J. J., et al. Nature 312:342-347 (1984); Gitschier. J., et al., Nature 312:326-330 (1984); Wood, W. I., et al., Nature 312:330-337 (1984); Vehar. G. A., et al., Nature 312:337-342 (1984); WO 87/04187; WO 88/08035; WO 88/03558; U.S. Pat. No. 4,757,006), each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, and the amino acid sequence was deduced from cDNA. Capon et al., U.S. Pat. No. 4,965,199, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, discloses a recombinant DNA method for producing Factor VIII in mammalian host cells and purification of human Factor VIII. Human Factor VIII expression in CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells and BHKC (baby hamster kidney cells) has been reported. Human Factor VIII has been modified to delete part or all of the B domain (U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,994,371 and 4,868,112, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety), and replacement of the human Factor VIII B domain with the human Factor V B domain has been performed (U.S. Pat. No. 5,004,803, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). The cDNA sequence encoding human Factor VIII and predicted amino acid sequence are shown in SEQ ID NOs:1 and 2, respectively, of US Application Publ. No. 2005/0100990, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,859,204. Lollar. J. S., incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, reports functional mutants of Factor VIII having reduced antigenicity and reduced immunoreactivity. U.S. Pat. No. 6,376,463, Lollar. J. S., incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, also reports mutants of Factor VIII having reduced immunoreactivity. US Application Publ. No. 2005/0100990, Saenko et al., incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, reports functional mutations in the A2 domain of Factor VIII.

A number of functional Factor VIII molecules, including B-domain deletions, are disclosed in the following patents U.S. Pat. No. 6,316,226 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,346,513, both assigned to Baxter; U.S. Pat. No. 7,041,635 assigned to In2Gen; U.S. Pat. No. 5,789,203, U.S. Pat. No. 6,060,447, U.S. Pat. No. 5,595,886, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,228,620 assigned to Chiron; U.S. Pat. No. 5,972,885 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,048,720 assigned to Biovitrum, U.S. Pat. No. 5,543,502 and U.S. Pat. No. 5,610,278 assigned to Novo Nordisk; U.S. Pat. No. 5,171,844 assigned to Immuno Ag; U.S. Pat. No. 5,112,950 assigned to Transgene S.A.; U.S. Pat. No. 4,868,112 assigned to Genetics Institute, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

The porcine Factor VIII sequence is published, (Toole, J. J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5939-5942 (1986)), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, and the complete porcine cDNA sequence obtained from PCR amplification of factor VIII sequences from a pig spleen cDNA library has been reported (Healey, J. F., et al., Blood 88:4209-4214 (1996), incorporated herein by reference in its entirety). Hybrid human/porcine Factor VIII having substitutions of all domains, all subunits, and specific amino acid sequences were disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,364,771 by Lollar and Runge, and in WO 93/20093, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. More recently, the nucleotide and corresponding amino acid sequences of the A1 and A2 domains of porcine factor VIII and a chimeric Factor VIII with porcine A1 and/or A2 domains substituted for the corresponding human domains were reported in WO 94/11503, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. U.S. Pat. No. 5,859,204, Lollar, J. S., also discloses the porcine cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences. 6,458,563, incorporated herein by reference in its entirety assigned to Emory discloses a B-domain deleted porcine Factor VIII.

The Factor VIII (or Factor VIII portion of a chimeric polypeptide) can be at least 90% or 95% identical to a Factor VIII amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 without a signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 1438 of SEQ ID NO:2; amino acids 1 to 2332 of SEQ ID NO:6; amino acids 1 to 740 of SEQ ID NO:8; amino acids 1 to 745 of SEQ ID NO:10; or amino acids 1 to 684 of SEQ ID NO:12). The Factor VIII (or Factor VIII portion of a chimeric polypeptide) can be identical to a Factor VIII amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 without a signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 1438 of SEQ ID NO:2; amino acids 1 to 2332 of SEQ ID NO:6; amino acids 1 to 740 of SEQ ID NO:8; amino acids 1 to 745 of SEQ ID NO:10; or amino acids 1 to 684 of SEQ ID NO: 12).

The Factor VIII (or Factor VIII portion of a chimeric polypeptide) can be at least 90% or 95% identical to a Factor VIII amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 with a signal sequence (amino acids −19 to 1438 of SEQ ID NO:2; amino acids −19 to 2332 of SEQ ID NO:6; amino acids −19 to 740 of SEQ ID NO:8; amino acids −19 to 745 of SEQ ID NO:10; or amino acids −20 to 684 of SEQ ID NO:12). The Factor VIII (or Factor VIII portion of a chimeric polypeptide) can be identical to a Factor VIII amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 with a signal sequence (amino acids −19 to 1438 of SEQ ID NO:2; amino acids −19 to 2332 of SEQ ID NO:6; amino acids −19 to 740 of SEQ ID NO:8; amino acids −19 to 745 of SEQ ID NO:10; or amino acids −20 to 684 of SEQ ID NO:12).

B. Factor IX Polypeptides

“Factor IX”, “FIX”, “protein having FIX activity”, “FIX protein”, or “FIX polypeptide” as used herein, means functional Factor IX polypeptide in its normal role in coagulation, unless otherwise specified. Thus, the term Factor IX includes variant polypeptides that are functional and the polynucleotides that encode such functional variant polypeptides. Factor IX polypeptides include the human, bovine, porcine, canine, feline, and murine Factor IX polypeptides. The full length polypeptide and polynucleotide sequences of Factor IX are known, as are many functional variants, e.g., fragments, mutants and modified versions. Factor IX polypeptides include full-length Factor IX, full-length Factor IX minus Met at the N-terminus, full-length Factor IX minus the signal sequence, mature Factor IX (minus the signal sequence and propeptide), and mature Factor IX with an additional Met at the N-terminus. Factor IX can be made by recombinant means (“recombinant Factor IX” or “rFIX”), i.e., it is not naturally occurring or derived from plasma.

great many functional Factor IX variants are known. International publication number WO 02/040544 A3, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses mutants that exhibit increased resistance to inhibition by heparin at page 4, lines 9-30 and page 15, lines 6-31. International publication number WO 03/020764 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses Factor IX mutants with reduced T cell immunogenicity in Tables 2 and 3 (on pages 14-24), and at page 12, lines 1-27. International publication number WO 2007/149406 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses functional mutant Factor IX molecules that exhibit increased protein stability, increased in vivo and in vitro half-life, and increased resistance to proteases at page 4, line 1 to page 19, line 11. WO 2007/149406 A2 also discloses chimeric and other variant Factor IX molecules at page 19, line 12 to page 20, line 9.

International publication number WO 08/118507 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses Factor IX mutants that exhibit increased clotting activity at page 5, line 14 to page 6, line 5. International publication number WO 09/051717 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses Factor IX mutants having an increased number of N-linked and/or O-linked glycosylation sites, which results in an increased half-life and/or recovery at page 9, line 11 to page 20, line 2. International publication number WO 09/137254 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, also discloses Factor IX mutants with increased numbers of glycosylation sites at page 2, paragraph [006] to page 5, paragraph [011] and page 16, paragraph [044] to page 24, paragraph [057]. International publication number WO 09/130198 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses functional mutant Factor IX molecules that have an increased number of glycosylation sites, which result in an increased half-life, at page 4, line 26 to page 12, line 6. International publication number WO 09/140015 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety, discloses functional Factor IX mutants that an increased number of Cys residues, which can be used for polymer (e.g., PEG) conjugation, at page 11, paragraph [0043] to page 13, paragraph [0053].

In addition, hundreds of non-functional mutations in Factor IX have been identified in hemophilia patients, many of which are disclosed in Table 1, at pages 11-14 of International publication number WO 09/137254 A2, which is herein incorporated by reference in its entirety. Such non-functional mutations are not included in the invention, but provide additional guidance for which mutations are more or less likely to result in a functional Factor IX polypeptide.

The Factor IX (or Factor IX portion of a chimeric polypeptide) can be at least 90% or at least 95% or 100% identical to a Factor IX amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 without a signal sequence and propeptide sequence (amino acids 1 to 415 of SEQ ID NO:14), or alternatively, with a propeptide sequence, or with a propeptide and signal sequence (full length Factor IX).

Factor IX coagulant activity is expressed as International Unit(s) (IU). One IU of Factor IX activity corresponds approximately to the quantity of Factor IX in one milliliter of normal human plasma. Several assays are available for measuring Factor IX activity, including the one stage clotting assay (activated partial thromboplastin time; aPTT), thrombin generation time (TGA) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®).

“Protein having FIX activity which is in its activated form,” or “activated FIX protein” means the activated form of a corresponding FIX protein/polypeptide. The term “activated” in connection with an activated FIX protein/polypeptide is used according to its common meaning. For example, in vivo. Factor IX is produced as a zymogen, an inactive precursor. It is processed to remove a signal peptide, glycosylated and then cleaved. e.g., by factor XIa or factor VIIa to produce activated FIX (FIXa), a two-chain form where the two chains are linked by a disulfide bridge. For example, activated FIX protein can be formed during the production and/or purification of a recombinant FIX protein. In one example, in a pharmaceutical FIX polypeptide compositions, the activated form of the FIX polypeptide can be considered an impurity.

C. Factor VIII and Factor IX Chimeric Polypeptides

“Chimeric polypeptide,” as used herein, means a polypeptide that includes within it at least two moieties (or portions thereof such as subsequences or peptides) from different sources. Chimeric polypeptides can include two, three, four, five, six, seven, or more polypeptides or portions thereof from different sources, such as different genes, different cDNAs, or different animal or other species. Chimeric polypeptides can include one or more linkers joining the different polypeptides or portions thereof. Thus, the polypeptides or portions thereof can be joined directly or they can be joined indirectly, via linkers, or both, within a single chimeric polypeptide. Chimeric polypeptides can include additional peptides such as signal sequences and sequences such as 6His and FLAG that aid in protein purification or detection. In addition, chimeric polypeptides can have amino acid or peptide additions to the N- and/or C-termini.

In certain aspects, a chimeric polypeptide is a long-acting clotting factor. “Long-acting clotting factor” such as long-acting FVIII or long-acting FIX is a Factor VIII or Factor IX having an increased half-life (also referred to herein as t½, t½ beta, elimination half-life and HL) over a reference Factor VIII or a reference Factor IX, respectively. The increased half-life of a long-acting Factor VIII or a long-acting Factor IX may be due to fusion to one or more non-Factor VIII or non-Factor IX polypeptides such as, e.g., Fc, XTEN, albumin, a PAS sequence, transferrin, CTP (28 amino acid C-terminal peptide (CTP) of hCG with its 4 O-glycans), polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), albumin binding polypeptide, albumin-binding small molecules, or two or more combinations thereof. The increased half-life may be due to one or more modification, such as, e.g., pegylation. Exemplary long-acting clotting factor polypeptides include. e.g., chimeric Factor VIII polypeptides comprising Fc, chimeric Factor VIII polypeptides comprising XTEN, chimeric Factor VIII polypeptides comprising albumin, chimeric Factor IX polypeptides comprising Fc, chimeric FIX polypeptide comprising XTEN, or chimeric Factor IX polypeptide comprising albumin. Additional exemplary long-acting Factor VIII polypeptides include, e.g., pegylated Factor VIII or pegylated Factor IX.

The “reference” polypeptide, in the case of a long-acting chimeric Factor VIII polypeptide, is a polypeptide consisting essentially of the Factor VIII portion of the chimeric polypeptide, e.g., the same Factor VIII portion without the Fc portion, without the XTEN portion, or without the albumin portion. The “reference” polypeptide, in the case of a long-acting chimeric Factor IX polypeptide, is a polypeptide consisting essentially of the Factor IX portion of the chimeric polypeptide, e.g., the same Factor IX portion without the Fc portion, without the XTEN portion, or without the albumin portion. Likewise, the reference polypeptide in the case of a modified Factor VIII or Factor IX is the same Factor VIII or Factor IX without the modification, respectively. e.g., a Factor VIII without the pegylation or a Factor IX without the pegylation.

In some aspects, the chimeric polypeptide comprises a Factor VIII portion and a non-Factor VIII portion. In some aspects, the chimeric polypeptide comprises a Factor IX portion and a non-Factor IX portion. Exemplary non-Factor VIII or non-Factor IX portions include, e.g., Fc, and albumin. Exemplary chimeric polypeptides include, e.g., chimeric Factor VIII-Fc polypeptides, chimeric Factor IX-Fc polypeptides, chimeric Factor VIII-albumin polypeptides, and chimeric Factor IX-albumin polypeptides.

In some aspects, a chimeric polypeptide comprising a Factor VIII or Factor IX portion of a chimeric protein has an increased half-life (t1/2) over a polypeptide consisting of the same Factor VIII or Factor IX portion without the non Factor VIII or Factor IX portion. A chimeric Factor VIII or Factor IX polypeptide with an increased t1/2 can be referred to herein as a long-acting Factor VIII or Factor IX. Long-acting chimeric Factor VIII or Factor IX polypeptides include. e.g., Factor VIII or Factor IX fused to Fc (including. e.g., chimeric Factor VIII or Factor IX polypeptides in the form of a hybrid such as a FVIIIFc monomer dimer hybrid; see e.g. FIGS. 1 and 2, and Table 2; and U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,404,956 and 7,348,004).

Exemplary chimeric Factor VIII polypeptides include, e.g., chimeric Factor VIII-Fc polypeptides. Exemplary chimeric Factor VIII-Fc polypeptides include. e.g., SEQ ID NOs:2, 6, 8, 10, and 12 (Sequence Table 2), with or without their signal sequences and the chimeric Fc polypeptide of SEQ ID NO:4 (Sequence Table 2). The chimeric polypeptide can comprise a sequence at least 90% or 95% identical to the Factor VIII and Fc amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2A(i) without a signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 1665 of SEQ ID NO:2) or at least 90% or 95% identical to the Factor VIII and Fc amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2A(i) with a signal sequence (amino acids −19 to 1665 of SEQ ID NO:2). The chimeric polypeptide can comprise a sequence identical to the Factor VIII and Fc amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2A(i) without a signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 1665 of SEQ ID NO:2) or identical to the Factor VIII and Fc amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2A(i) with a signal sequence (amino acids −19 to 1665 of SEQ ID NO:2).

Exemplary chimeric Factor IX polypeptides are Factor IX-FcRn BP chimeric polypeptides, e.g., Factor IX-Fc chimeric polypeptides such as the FIXFc in SEQ ID NO:2 (Sequence Table 2), with or without its signal sequence and propeptide. Other exemplary chimeric polypeptides include, but are not limited to, Factor IX-XTEN chimeric polypeptides. Factor IX can be fused to either N-terminus or C-terminus of XTEN. The chimeric polypeptide can comprise a sequence at least 90% or at least 95% or 100% identical to the Factor IX and FcRn BP, e.g., the Fc amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2A without a signal sequence and propeptide sequence (amino acids 1 to 642 of SEQ ID NO:14), or alternatively, with a propeptide sequence, or alternatively with a signal sequence and a propeptide sequence.

D. Factor VIII and Factor IX Hybrid Polypeptides

“Hybrid” polypeptides and proteins, as used herein, means a combination of a chimeric polypeptide with a second polypeptide. The chimeric polypeptide and the second polypeptide in a hybrid can be associated with each other via non-covalent protein-protein interactions, such as charge-charge or hydrophobic interactions. The chimeric polypeptide and the second polypeptide in a hybrid can be associated with each other via covalent bond(s) such as disulfide bonds. The chimeric peptide and the second peptide can be associated with each other via more than one type of bond, such as non-covalent and disulfide bonds. Hybrids are described in WO 2004/101740, WO2005/001025, U.S. Pat. No. 7,404,956, U.S. Pat. No. 7,348,004, and WO 2006/074199, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. The second polypeptide can be a second copy of the same chimeric polypeptide or it can be a non-identical chimeric polypeptide.

In some aspects, the second polypeptide is a polypeptide comprising an Fc. In some aspects, the chimeric polypeptide is a chimeric Factor VIII-Fc polypeptide and the second polypeptide consists essentially of Fc, e.g, a rFVIIIFc recombinant fusion protein consisting of a single molecule of recombinant B-domain deleted human FVIII (BDD-rFVIII) fused to the dimeric Fc domain of the human IgG1, with no intervening linker sequence. This hybrid polypeptide is referred to herein as FVIIIFc monomeric Fe fusion protein, FVIIIFc monomer hybrid, monomeric FVIIIIFc hybrid, and FVIIIFc monomer-dimer. In some aspects, the chimeric polypeptide is a Factor IX-FcRn BP, e.g., Factor IX-Fc chimeric polypeptide, and the second polypeptide consists essentially of Fc. See. e.g., Sequence Table 2 (SEQ ID NOs:14 and 4). See, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 7,404,956, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

The second polypeptide in a hybrid can comprise or consist essentially of a sequence at least 90% or at least 95%, or 100% identical to the amino acid sequence shown in Sequence Table 2 without a signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 227 of SEQ ID NO:4), or alternatively, at least 90%, or at least 95%, or 100% identical to the amino acid sequence shown in Table 2 with a signal sequence (amino acids −20 to 227 of SEQ ID NO:4).

Having now described the present invention in detail, the same will be more clearly understood by reference to the following examples, which are included herewith for purposes of illustration only and are not intended to be limiting of the invention. All patents and publications referred to herein are expressly incorporated by reference in their entireties.

EXAMPLES

Materials and Methods

Preparation of Test Strips (FVIII)

Disposable strips were the same type as currently used in Coag-Sense™ PT/INR Monitoring System (CoaguSense, Inc, Fremont, Calif.) without the Prothrombin Time reagents added to the strip. Strips were coated with 1.25 μL of 80% of 0.1 mg/mL purified Factor IXa (obtained from Haematologic Technologies, Essex Junction, Vt.) plus 20% phospholipid vesicles prepared as described below. Strips were air dried in a dry 37° C. incubator and individually sealed in plastic pouches containing a desiccant.

Preparation of Phospholipids

The strip for the Standard FMS Factor VII assay used an equal mix of Phospholipid Blend 2 and Phospholipid Blend 8. Phospholipid Blend 2 consisted of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS) mixture at a 70:30 molar ratio (mol-%). Phospholipid Blend 8 consisted of a PC. PS and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) mixture at a 80:10:10 molar ratio. Thus, the optimized ratio of PL on the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay strip (“standard strip”) was 75:20:5 (PC:PS:PG).

To prepare phospholipid blends, a total of 2.6 μmoles of phospholipids dissolved in chloroform was dispensed into a glass tube, where individual phospholipids were mixed at the defined molar ratio (synthetic phospholipids can be obtained from Avanti Polar Lipids, Alabaster, Ala.). The phospholipid mixture was dried in a fume hood under a gentle stream of nitrogen or argon. When dry, phospholipid mixtures were dried in a speed-vac for an additional 1 hour to overnight under high vacuum to remove any residual chloroform. 2.6 mL Hepes Buffered Saline (10 mM HEPES pH 7.4 and 140 mM NaCl) at room temperature were added to the dried-down phospholipid mixture until all the dried lipid suspension was re-hydrated. The tube was incubated at 37° C. and vortexed intermittently. The result was a milky, uniform suspension. Small unilamellar vesicles were prepared by sonication for 7-10 minutes on ice with one-minute gap intervals between the shocks. The residual large vesicles were removed by filtering using 45-micron filters.

Test Procedure

The test strip containing the dried activator mixture (FIXa/PL mixture) was pre-warmed automatically after insertion into the measuring device. When the device was ready to receive a sample, patient plasma or whole blood was recalcified with 0.3 volumes of 60 mM CaCl2 and 12 μL of the recalcified sample were immediately added to the well of the pre-warmed test strip. Clot formation was initiated as the blood/plasma dissolved the dried activator on the test strip. The device measured the time from initiation to formation of a clot with defined characteristics. This time interval was referred to as clotting time (Ct). See, e.g., FIG. 3 for an example of the application of the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay.

Further optimization of the FMS FVIII assay included the addition of trace amounts of Factor VIII (approx. 1% of normal) to the dried activator mixture, which resulted in a base clot time, rather than “timing out” in the absence any clot formation in severely hemophilic patient samples. Further optimization of the FMS FVIII assays will include adding CaCl2 on the dried test strip rather than off-strip recalcification of the sample.

Optimized FMS FVIII assay chemistry during the clot reaction can contain the following reactants (i) 9.2 μL patient blood; (ii) 2.8 μL buffer; (iii) 14 mM CaCl2; (iv) 21 μM phospholipid mix (PC:PS:PG at 75:20:5); (v) 8.3 μg Factor IXa; and (vi) 24 pg Factor VIII.

FMS Factor IX Assay

The FMS Factor IX assay (see. e.g., FIG. 4 for an example of the application of the Standard FMS Factor IX assay) followed the same procedure as for Factor VIII, except that (i) the activator mixture included on the test strip contains Factor XIa instead of Factor IXa (the exact amount of Factor XIa needed varied depending on the specific activity of this reagent and is titrated for optimal amount); and, (ii) trace amounts of Factor IX could optionally be added to the strip to achieve a base clotting time to improve responsiveness to small amounts of Factor IX in the patient sample.

Example 1: Standard Factor Monitoring System (FMS) Assay

Both Standard FMS assays (Standard FMS Factor VIII assay and Standard FMS Factor IX assay) were initiated by the application of 12 μL of recalcified patient plasma directly to the test bed, a disposable test strip containing activated coagulation factor-phospholipid complex. On this test bed, utilizing linear log-log curve fitting of concentration versus clotting time, both Standard FMS assays performed well when an individual Hemophilia A or Hemophilia B donor plasma was spiked with either rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc, respectively (TABLE 1).


TABLE 1
Application of Standard FMS Factor VIII and Factor IX assays to
Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B Samples spiked with either rFVIIIFc
or rFIXFc, respectively.
Standard FMS
Standard FMS
Factor VIII Assay
Factor IX Assay
Assay Range (IU/dL)
0.8-100
0.2-100
Accuracy (% Spike Recovery)
+/−10%
+/−10.1
Precision (% CV)
3.8
1.9

Example 2: Sensitivity of the Standard FMS Assay to Individual Phenotypic Variability

The disclosed “Standard FMS” assay system utilized undiluted patient plasma, thus, it was more analogous to an aPTT assay than to the one-stage factor assay. In the laboratory aPTT assay, one part undiluted patient plasma is generally combined with equal parts of liquid aPTT reagent and of CaCl2 solution. In contrast, in the one-stage assay, one part diluted (1:5) patient plasma is generally combined with one part factor deficient plasma, one part aPTT reagent, and one part CaCl2. Because of this dilution of patient plasma with factor deficient plasma, the one stage factor assay largely masks inter-subject variability that can occur as a result of variable levels of non-target coagulation factors (TABLE 2).


TABLE 2
Hemophilia Donor Phenotypic Variability
VIII Deficient Plasma Samples
Sample
PT (sec)
APTT (sec)
Fib. (mg/dL)
% II
% V
% VII
% VIII
% IX
% X
% XI
% XII
HRF 11P2F8
11.1
104.8
293
85
86
80
<1
86
107
79
85
HRF 11P3F8
11.2
>400
353
82
76
95
<1
98
95
82
87
GK 892-2086
11.6
103.0
248
78
67
81
<1
76
93
80
126
HRF 10-389
11.2
117.2
276
78
94
72
<1
74
93
62
80
HRF 10-1081
10.8
>400
334
89
116
80
<1
113
122
100
92
BD-001
11.0
70.2
293
In89
92
75
2.2
90
97
90
121
BD1-002
11.3
111.3
345
92
90
55
<1
120
125
99
120
BD1-005
10.4
91.4
342
99
98
84
<1
128
132
115
105
BD-00X
10.7
76.3
236
94
75
91
<1
102
101
83
85
IX Deficient Plasma Samples
Sample
PT (sec)
APTT (sec)
Fib. (mg/dL)
% II
% V
% VII
% VIII
% IX
% X
% XI
% XII
HRF 11P1F9
12.0
105.6
383
85
111
57
91
2
114
94
110
HRF 09-860
12.9
82.6
226
89
88
43
63
2
115
80
77
HRF 11-019
11.7
106.8
387
82
111
60
101
2
114
105
113
GK 929-2074
11.8
113.1
357
85
113
58
94
2
117
97
105
K 939-2054
12.1
97.8
257
89
96
53
72
2
130
79
89

Chromogenic based Factor VIII and Factor IX assays are also insensitive to non-target coagulation factors because of the large sample dilutions and physiologically irrelevant concentrations of added coagulation factors and inhibitors.

To assess the sensitivity of the Standard FMS assay to individual phenotypic variability, four plasma samples collected from individual hemophilia A (HemA) donors after 5 day washout period (essentially 0% Factor VIII, confirmed by in-house assays) were spiked at 6 levels of rFVIIIFc (100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.3%, 3.1%) and the clotting time was determined using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay. The Standard FMS assay was applied using no equilibrating factors, and activation mixture comprising FIXa and Phospholipid Blend 2 (FIG. 5A) or Phospholipid Blend 8 (FIG. 5B). Although log-linear plots of rFVIIIFc concentration versus clot time for the 4 individuals displayed the same assay range and sensitivity, each of the individuals displayed a unique dose response to added rFVIIIFc.

Example 3: Alternate FMS Assay

To eliminate the observed phenotypic variability, several modifications to the Standard FMS methodology were investigated. Substitution of less sensitive phospholipid blends was able to reduce phenotypic variability. Adding a variety of purified coagulation factors, e.g., Factors II, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XII, fibrinogen, vWF and Tissue Factor, and inhibitors, e.g., CTI, aprotinin. ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA), D-Phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1-arginine chloromethyl ketone-Factor VIIa (FPRCK-FVIIa), or anti-FVIII monoclonal antibodies, also was able to reduce phenotypic variability.

A variant of the Standard FMS was developed. This variant, referred to as the “Alternate FMS” assay throughout the instant disclosure was essentially designed as a hybrid between the “Standard FMS” assay and a one stage coagulation factor assay. The Alternate FMS assay also utilized an activation mixture comprising activated coagulation factor (FIXa or FXIa) combined with a phospholipid vesicle preparation and dried on the solid substrate (e.g., a disposable test strip). In the plasma based Alternate FMS assay (see FIGS. 6A and 6B), one part hemophilia plasma spiked with either rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc was mixed with three parts of a substrate plasma that had been depleted of the assay target factor. In this manner, the variability of non-target plasma components was normalized by addition of the substrate plasma.

This combination of hemophilia plasma and substrate plasma was done in an all-liquid system resulting in a four-fold dilution of the hemophilia test plasma, thus increasing the lower level of detection.


TABLE 3
Range, average precision and accuracy data for Alternate FMS Factor
VIII and Factor IX Assays
Alternate FMS
Alternate FMS
Factor VIII Assay
Factor IX Assay
Range (IU/dL)
1.5-100
0.4-100
Average Precision (% CV)
1.8%
1.0%
Accuracy (% Spike Recovery)
+/−10.2
+/−11.3

It is anticipated that preparing a dry substrate plasma format will significantly improve the lower level of detection, since the target analyte will be four-fold higher than in the current format.

Example 4: Evaluation of Inter-Subject Variability Using the Alternate FMS Assay

To evaluate the ability of the Alternate FMS assay format to decrease inter-subject variability, 14 hemophilia A and 9 hemophilia B plasma samples were procured to conduct spike recovery studies. Plasma samples were obtained from 4 different vendors, collected by 3 different methodologies on 3 different anticoagulants. Plasma samples included immunodepleted as well as congenital hemophilia plasma. Plasma samples were also subjected to different storage conditions as well as freeze thaw cycles. The effect of a single plasma freeze thaw cycle on Alternate FMS assay performance is shown in FIGS. 7A (Alternate FMS Factor IX assay) and 7B (Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay).

In each case, samples contained 12 μL of re-calcified plasma mixed 1:3 with substrate plasma (Factor IX deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFIXFc in the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay; and Factor VIII deficient plasma supplemented with defined levels of rFVIIIFc in the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay). The results of the spike recovery studies are summarized in FIGS. 8A and 8B.

The samples presented in FIG. 8A were citrated plasma samples collected from 14 hemophilia A donors (assumed <1% Factor VIII). Plasma samples were collected at 3 sites, using 3 different methodologies and spiked with varying levels of rFVIIIFc. Each of these samples was also assayed on a laboratory reference system (MLA-1000 Coagulation Analyzer) utilizing the manufacturer's suggested reagents and calibration standard plasma traceable to the appropriate WHO standard. For hemophilia A plasmas spiked with rFVIIIFc, the theoretical values (assuming Factor VIII plasma levels supplied by vendors) were not in good agreement with values determined on the MLA. This could be related to sample quality issues, errors in the MLA assay, or errors in stock Factor VIII concentrations. For this reason, spike recovery assays for Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay in FIG. 8A were plotted as MLA value vs. Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay value (FIG. 8A). The dashed lines on the graph represented +/−20% of the MLA determined Factor VIII level. The average CV for all the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assays performed on the 14 hemophilia A donors was 3.1.

The samples presented in FIG. 8B were citrated plasma samples collected from 9 hemophilia B donors (8 donors were <1% Factor IX; 1 donor was ˜34% Factor IX). Plasma samples were collected at 3 sites, using 3 different methodologies and spiked with varying levels of rFIXFc. Each of these samples was also assayed on a laboratory reference system (MLA-1000 Coagulation Analyzer) utilizing the manufacturer's suggested reagents and calibration standard plasma traceable to the appropriate WHO standard. Factor IX values and MLA values were in good agreement. Assuming the MLA value was the “true value.” a plot was constructed of MLA factor concentration versus Alternate FMS Factor IX assay concentrations (FIG. 83). The dashed lines on the graph represented +/−20% of the MI. A determined Factor IX level. The average CV for the 64 determinations on 8 different instruments was 3.1% (range 0-10.2%). There was no apparent bias over the range of Factor IX concentrations (1.5-12.5 IU/dL) tested.

Assuming that the concentration determined by the MLA assay was the true value, then 61% of the Alternate FMS Factor VIII determinations and 75% of the Alternate FMS Factor IX determinations were within a +/−20% accuracy range. The average spike recovery for the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay was +/−21% (Range 0.8-51%) and for the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay it was +/−23% (Range 0.3-98%). Assay performance was remarkable considering the non-ideal nature of the frozen plasma samples, uncertainties surrounding stock concentrations of rFVIII and rFIX products, not yet optimized test bed parameters, manual solid substrate production, and non-standardized “off the shelf” critical raw materials.

Example 5: Adaptation of Alternate FMS Assay to Whole Blood Samples

The feasibility of adapting these Alternate FMS assays to whole blood was examined in normal donors and in hemophilia A (n=4) (results shown in Example 5.1) and hemophilia B (n=1) subjects (results shown in Example 5.2).

The experimental protocol was similar for each round of testing using Alternate FMS Factor VIII and Factor IX assays. In both cases, subjects were asked to suspend factor replacement therapy for a minimum of 4 days prior to the test date. Citrated venous whole blood and fingerstick whole blood samples were collected prior to patient self-administration of their individual routine replacement therapy. A second set of citrated venous whole blood and fingerstick whole blood samples were collected and tested 20-40 minutes post infusion. Fingerstick samples, pre and post infusion were applied directly to the FMS test bed (solid substrate containing activation mixture). Aliquots of pre-infusion citrated venous blood samples were spiked with varying levels of the appropriate drug product (either rFVIIIFc or rFIXFc) and then assayed using the Alternate FMS assay. Samples were also tested on the MLA system.

Example 5.1: Adaptation of Alternate FMS Factor VIII Assay to Whole Blood Samples

The Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay was applied to six hemophilia A subjects. The results of the last 2 test events are summarized in FIGS. 9-14 and TABLES 4 and 5. A direct comparison of the data in FIGS. 9-12 and FIG. 14 test data cannot be made owing to reagent lot changes. The major goal of the testing was to determine the feasibility of the Alternate FMS assay to mute the inter-subject variability inherent in the Standard FMS assay in whole blood samples from hemophilia A donors as it did in frozen plasma samples.

FIGS. 9A and 9B summarize an experiment in which citrated venous and fingerstick whole blood samples were collected from 2 hemophilia A subjects 5 days pre and post infusion treatment with factor replacement therapy. Samples were spiked with increasing concentrations (0 IU/dl to 200 IU/dL) of rFVIIIFc and tested utilizing the Standard FMS standard and Alternate FMS assays. Assuming both subjects' baseline FVIII values were 0 IU/dL, then the 2 hemophilia A subjects displayed disparate dose response in the Standard FMS assay. This was likely due to inter-subject variability in coagulation factors other than FVIII or to cellular components. When these same samples were run using the Alternate FMS assay, both subjects displayed similar concentration dependent clot times over the range of 1.5-200 IU/dL rFVIIIFc.

Each of the venous whole blood samples from the spike experiments described above was centrifuged to prepare plasma samples. The frozen plasma retentions were subsequently assayed on the MLA system (FIGS. 10A, 10B and 10C), using the Standard FMS Factor VIII assay (FIGS. 11A and 11B), and using the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay (FIGS. 12A and 12B) to ascertain the relationship between FMS whole blood clot times versus plasma clot times. The trends in dose response for plasma samples mirrored those of venous whole blood samples (see FIG. 13) indicating a correlation that can be exploited for calibration purposes.

Example 5.2: Application of the Alternate FMS Factor VIII Assay to Citrated and Non-Citrated Whole Blood Samples

Since the ultimate goal for the FMS assays was to use fingerstick whole blood that was not citrate anticoagulated, a comparison between citrated venous blood, citrated plasma and non-citrated fingerstick blood was performed in parallel to the previously described experiment. The results of this comparison are summarized in TABLE 4. Fingerstick whole blood samples displayed concentration-dependent clotting analogous to venous blood and plasma samples in both the Standard and the Alternate FMS methods.


TABLE 4
FMS FVIII Assays - Plasma/Venous/Fingerstick Blood Sampling
Correlation
Standard FMS
Alternate FMS
Factor VIII Assay
Factor VIII Assay
DONOR ID
003
005
003
005
Pre-Dose (<1% FVIII)
Clot Time (seconds)
Venous
>300
>300
116.5
112.6
Fingerstick
>300
>300
ND
ND
Plasma
>300
>300
102.6
104.9
Venous + 100% rFVIII-Fc
61.5
55.2
77.8
76.3
Spike
Plasma + 100% rFVIII-Fc
45.8
46.5
64.4
64
Spike
Post-Dose (assume 100%
FVIII)
Venous
65
56.1
89.1
83.6
Fingerstick
54.7
48.6
71.1
ND
Plasma
52.9
47
72.2
70.4
ND = Not determined

Two additional Hemophilia A donors were tested using essentially the same protocol with the following changes: (i) testing focused mainly on the Alternate FMS assay, (ii) new lots of strips and raw materials, including substrate plasma, were used in this testing, and (iii) a modified fingerstick protocol using a high flow pediatric lancet was employed. Also, plasma samples separated from the citrated venous blood were assayed prior to freezing and retesting. Samples were spiked with increasing levels (0.8-200 IU/dL) rFVIIIFc prior to assay.

The results of this second round of testing are displayed in FIGS. 14A and 14B, and TABLE 5. General assay performance was improved in these tests compared with the results from the previous round of testing shown in TABLE 4.


TABLE 5
Alternate FMS Factor VIII Assay - Plasma/Venous/Fingerstick Blood
Sampling Correlation
Alternate Method
DONOR ID
BD1-002
BD1-004
Pre-Dose Samples
CLOT TIME (seconds)
Venous Blood
>300
>300
Fingerstick Blood
>300
>300
Plasma
>300
>300
Venous + 100% rFVII-Fc Spike
56.7
57.4
Plasma + 100% rFVIII-Fc Spike
60.0
57.9
Post Dose Samples
Venous Blood
54.9
59.9
Fingerstick Blood
Drop 1
53.6
55.1
Drop 2
57.7
61.7
Plasma, Neat
58.5
ND

Results indicated that, in the current format, the useful range for the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay in venous blood is 1.5 IU/dL-200 IU/dL. The average CV for all of these determinations (n=17) was 2.1% (range 0.3-4.8) with no trend in CV with level of FVIII. As it was designed to do, the Alternate FMS Factor VIII assay displayed minimized intersubject variability thought to result from natural variations in non-Factor VIII effectors.

It is anticipated that optimization of instrument parameters to improve clot detection at the lower (<1%) range will expand the useful range of the assay to <0.5 IU/dL. Limited data on fingerstick whole blood indicated a good correlation to citrated whole blood and plasma. Experiments that follow temporal FMS fingerstick assays on post factor replacement therapy will be used to explore useful range for this format.

Example 5.3: Adaptation of Alternate FMS Factor IX Assay to Whole Blood Samples

The utility of the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay in whole blood samples was demonstrated by performing experiments analogous to those described for Factor VIII on a Hem B subject. The Hem B subject suspended Factor IX replacement therapy for 4 days prior to the test date. Citrated venous whole blood, citrated plasma, and fingerstick whole blood samples were collected pre- and post-self administration of the subject's routine Factor IX replacement therapy.

Aliquots of pre-infusion venous blood were spiked with increasing levels of rFIXFc (0-200 IU/dL) for use in constructing dose-response curves using the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay. Plasma samples separated from these samples were assayed fresh using the Alternate FMS IX assay. Frozen retentions were subsequently assayed using the Alternate FMS Factor IX assay and the MLA reference system. The results from these experiments are summarized in FIGS. 15A and 15B, and TABLE 6. The average CV for the 44 determinations performed on 8 random instruments was 1.7%. The range of CV values (0-5.8%) did not appear correlated to Factor IX levels.

The potential range in whole blood as demonstrated by the venous blood dose-response curves was 0.4 IU/dL-100 IU/dL with an average CV of 1.8%. Again, CVs were not significantly different over the entire range of the assay.


TABLE 6
Alternate FMS Factor IX Assay - Plasma/Venous/Fingerstick Blood
Sampling Correlation
Alternate Method
Factor IX Assay
DONOR ID
BD2-002
Pre-Dose Samples
Clot Time (seconds)
Venous Blood
90.4
Fingerstick Blood
103.5
Plasma
107.6
Venous + 100% rFVIII-Fc Spike
52.2
Plasma + 100% rFVIII-Fc Spike
53.8
Post Dose Samples
Venous Blood
54.1
Fingerstick Blood
62.8
Plasma, Neat
63.4

Example 6: Evaluation of Instrument-to-Instrument Variability

This experiment used 8 instruments in random order for 64 determinations using the Hem A samples used in Example 4. Instrument to instrument variability was evaluated by assaying a single Factor VIII deficient plasma sample spiked to 100% and 3% rFVIIIFc in duplicate on 16 research instruments (FIG. 16). The observed CV values for the 100% spike (1.7%) and the observed CV value for the 3% spike (3.8%) were exceptional in light of the fact that no tuning was done on those instruments and the results included inter-instrument results.

Example 7: Factor Monitoring Vs. PK Determination Vs. Global Hemostasis Test

Accurate clotting factor level determination in patients is a technical challenge. Several approaches can be use, e.g., factor monitoring, pharmacokinetics (PK) determination, or using a global hemostasis test.

Factor monitoring can be accomplished by routine measurement of Factor VIII or Factor IX levels by finger stick at treatment center and/or at the patient's home. This approach has some advantages, e.g., it can be used for determining “traditional” PK (recovery, clearance, terminal t½, etc.), it allows long-term use by the patient or caregiver to evaluate coverage at any given time, patients and health care providers are familiar with the concept of using factor levels for dosing (or the concept is easy to adopt), and it can be used for any current Factor VIII or Factor IX products anywhere (“lab access” in developing countries, diagnostic tool). The main drawback of this approach is that it requires high accuracy and precision, which makes it the most technically challenging approach. This is due, among other factor, to high inter-patient variability of coagulation time at equivalent factor levels, which needs to be “equilibrated” or alternatively can require one-time patient-specific calibration (e.g., single lab measurement during training visit).

If using PK determination, the readout is clot time only; thus, it does not provide actual clotting factor levels. The main advantages of this approach are that it requires precision only, since accuracy for factor levels is not needed, and no patient-specific calibration needed. In general, home-use with 5-8 measurements is likely to provide more accurate PK than 1-2 laboratory tests. This approach is also less technically challenging than factor monitoring because inter-patient variability in coagulation is not relevant for calculation of terminal t½, high precision and linearity of dose response have been shown for plasma, and proof of Concept for device chemistry has been achieved. The main drawbacks of this approach are (i) lack of transparency for dose determination based on clot time, and (ii) long-term use by subject requires adoption of “global hemostasis” concepts, e.g., “Minimal clot time needed for individual hemostasis” (however, these concepts can be intuitive: “If your blood does not clot in 90 sec. you need more factor”).

Determining Factor Level from Clot Time (Ct)

FIG. 17 exemplifies the use of clotting time measurements from FMS assays to determine factor levels. FMS assay results showed a linear relationship between Ct and factor levels, which can be represented according to Equation 1:

Ct=A×Ln(% Factor)+B  [Equation 1]

where the slope A was similar for all patients, at the offset B was due to patient-specific global coagulation differences.

It is possible to optimize the chemistry of the FMS assay (e.g., test strip design) to eliminate B, so there is no patient-specific offset. This approach can be used to design “ready to use” factor monitoring devices that do not require patient-specific calibration. Alternatively, the factor monitoring device can be customized for each patient by calculating B for each patient and configuring the monitoring device accordingly.

Determining Dosing Regimen Based on Clot Time (Ct)

FIG. 18 exemplifies how dosage regimens can be determined based on clotting time (Ct) determined using an FMS assay and data from population modeling, e.g., based on the A-LONG rFVIIIFc clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01181128) or the B-LONG rFIXFc clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01027364).

Half-life (HL) in terminal phase of PK can be determined according to the following set of equations:

Ct1=A×Ln(% F1)+B  [from Equation 1]

Ct2=A×Ln(% F2)+B  [from Equation 1]

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1)/Ln(% F1/% F2)  [Equation 3]

hence:

HL=−0.693×(T2−T1A/(Ct1−Ct2)  [Equation 4]

where A is the slope, a device-specific parameter which would be the same for all patients. Note that the “offset” (B) becomes irrelevant, i.e., inter-patient differences in global coagulation do not affect terminal half-life.

Population modeling based on clinical trials can be used to calculate product-specific in vivo recovery and α-phase half-life (distribution phase half-life), which in turn can be used to calculate “time to trough.” FMS assay derived patient-specific half-life values and “time to trough” values can in turn be used to calculate patient-specific dose and dose interval.

Global Hemostasis Test Based on FMS Assay

The FMS assays described above have been used to develop a global hemostasis test. The FMS assays disclosed herein measure an individual's overall clotting potential at any given level of coagulation factor. Proof of concept, sensitivity and range of the FMS assays have been established as shown in the examples above. Furthermore, no external dilution is performed as there is no need to equilibrate patient-specific differences.

As shown above in Equation 3, an increase in Ct as clotting factor is cleared over time correlates with terminal half-life (HL). Individual clot time at trough (Cttrough) is a critical parameter to establish in each patient. With known patient-specific HL and Cttrough, the “time to trough” (T) after any measured Ct is then predictable and can be calculated according to the following formula:

T=−1.44×HL/(A×(Ctmeasured−Cttrough)  [Equation 5]

The time to trough (T) would correspond to the time to the next dose.

CONCLUSIONS

If the primary purpose of the application of the FMS assay is to define the initial dosing regimen, a precise readout of clot time is sufficient. There is no need for accuracy or patient-specific calibration for terminal t½. To determine other PK parameters (e.g., recovery and clearance) in individual patients, accurate factor levels are required, however.

“Minimal clot time needed for hemostasis” can be an important biomarker for the individual patient. Once the FMS assay has been applied to measure (i) individual Ct at trough and (ii) change in Ct over time (i.e., individual terminal PK), estimating the “time to trough” (time to next dose) based on a single Ct measurement is expected to be very accurate.

It is to be appreciated that the Detailed Description section, and not the Summary and Abstract sections, is intended to be used to interpret the claims. The Summary and Abstract sections can set forth one or more but not all exemplary aspects of the present invention as contemplated by the inventor(s), and thus, are not intended to limit the present invention and the appended claims in any way.

The present invention has been described above with the aid of functional building blocks illustrating the implementation of specified functions and relationships thereof. The boundaries of these functional building blocks have been arbitrarily defined herein for the convenience of the description. Alternate boundaries can be defined so long as the specified functions and relationships thereof are appropriately performed.

The foregoing description of the specific aspects will so fully reveal the general nature of the invention that others can, by applying knowledge within the skill of the art, readily modify and/or adapt for various applications such specific aspects, without undue experimentation, without departing from the general concept of the present invention. Therefore, such adaptations and modifications are intended to be within the meaning and range of equivalents of the disclosed aspects, based on the teaching and guidance presented herein. It is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation, such that the terminology or phraseology of the present specification is to be interpreted by the skilled artisan in light of the teachings and guidance.

The breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary aspects, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and their equivalents.


SEQUENCE TABLE 1
Polynucleotide Sequences: FIX-Fc
A. B-Domain Deleted FVIIIFc
A(i). B-Domain Deleted FVIIIFc Chain DNA Sequence (FVIII signal peptide underlined, Fc
region in bold) (SEQ ID NO: 1, which encodes SEQ ID NO: 2)
ggtgcagtggaactgtcatgggactatatgcaaagtgatctcggtgagctgcctgtggacgcaagatttcctcctaga
gtgccaaaatcttttccattcaacacctcagtcgtgtacaaaaagactctgtttgtagaattcacggatcaccttttc
aacatcgctaagccaaggccaccctggatgggtctgctaggtcctaccatccaggctgaggtttatgatacagtggtc
attacacttaagaacatggcttcccatcctgtcagtcttcatgctgttggtgtatcctactggaaagcttctgaggga
gctgaatatgatgatcagaccagtcaaagggagaaagaagatgataaagtcttccctggtggaagccatacatatgtc
tggcaggtcctgaaagagaatggtccaatggcctctgacccactgtgccttacctactcatatctttctcatgtggac
ctggtaaaagacttgaattcaggcctcattggagccctactagtatgtagagaagggagtctggccaaggaaaagaca
cagaccttgcacaaatttatactactttttgctgtatttgatgaagggaaaagttggcactcagaaacaaagaactcc
ttgatgcaggatagggatgctgcatctgctcgggcctggcctaaaatgcacacagtcaatggttatgtaaacaggtct
ctgccaggtctgattggatgccacaggaaatcagtctattggcatgtgattggaatgggcaccactcctgaagtgcac
tcaatattcctcgaaggtcacacatttcttgtgaggaaccatcgccaggcgtccttggaaatctcgccaataactttc
cttactgctcaaacactcttgatggaccttggacagtttctactgttttgtcatatctcttcccaccaacatgatggc
atggaagcttatgtcaaagtagacagctgtccagaggaaccccaactacgaatgaaaaataatgaagaagcggaagac
tatgatgatgatcttactgattctgaaatggatgtggtcaggtttgatgatgacaactctccttcctttatccaaatt
cgctcagttgccaagaagcatcctaaaacttgggtacattacattgctgctgaagaggaggactgggactatgctccc
ttagtcctcgcccccgatgacagaagttataaaagtcaatatttgaacaatggccctcagcggattggtaggaagtac
aaaaaagtccgatttatggcatacacagatgaaacctttaagactcgtgaagctattcagcatgaatcaggaatcttg
ggacctttactttatggggaagttggagacacactgttgattatatttaagaatcaagcaagcagaccatataacatc
taccctcacggaatcactgatgtccgtcctttgtattcaaggagattaccaaaaggtgtaaaacatttgaaggatttt
ccaattctgccaggagaaatattcaaatataaatggacagtgactgtagaagatgggccaactaaatcagatcctcgg
tgcctgacccgctattactctagtttcgttaatatggagagagatctagcttcaggactcattggccctctcctcatc
tgctacaaagaatctgtagatcaaagaggaaaccagataatgtcagacaagaggaatgtcatcctgttttctgtattt
gatgagaaccgaagctggtacctcacagagaatatacaacgctttctccccaatccagctggagtgcagcttgaggat
ccagagttccaagcctccaacatcatgcacagcatcaatggctatgtttttgatagtttgcagttgtcagtttgtttg
catgaggtggcatactggtacattctaagcattggagcacagactgacttcctttctgtcttcttctctggatatacc
ttcaaacacaaaatggtctatgaagacacactcaccctattcccattctcaggagaaactgtcttcatgtcgatggaa
aacccaggtctatggattctggggtgccacaactcagactttcggaacagaggcatgaccgccttactgaaggtttct
agttgtgacaagaacactggtgattattacgaggacagttatgaagatatttcagcatacttgctgagtaaaaacaat
gccattgaaccaagaagcttctctcaaaacccaccagtcttgaaacgccatcaacgggaaataactcgtactactctt
cagtcagatcaagaggaaattgactatgatgataccatatcagttgaaatgaagaaggaagattttgacatttatgat
gaggatgaaaatcagagcccccgcagctttcaaaagaaaacacgacactattttattgctgcagtggagaggctctgg
gattatgggatgagtagctccccacatgttctaagaaacagggctcagagtggcagtgtccctcagttcaagaaagtt
gttttccaggaatttactgatggctcctttactcagcccttataccgtggagaactaaatgaacatttgggactcctg
gggccatatataagagcagaagttgaagataatatcatggtaactttcagaaatcaggcctctcgtccctattccttc
tattctagccttatttcttatgaggaagatcagaggcaaggagcagaacctagaaaaaactttgtcaagcctaatgaa
accaaaacttacttttggaaagtgcaacatcatatggcacccactaaagatgagtttgactgcaaagcctgggcttat
ttctctgatgttgacctggaaaaagatgtgcactcaggcctgattggaccccttctggtctgccacactaacacactg
aaccctgctcatgggagacaagtgacagtacaggaatttgctctgtttttcaccatctttgatgagaccaaaagctgg
tacttcactgaaaatatggaaagaaactgcagggctccctgcaatatccagatggaagatcccacttttaaagagaat
tatcgcttccatgcaatcaatggctacataatggatacactacctggcttagtaatggctcaggatcaaaggattcga
tggtatctgctcagcatgggcagcaatgaaaacatccattctattcatttcagtggacatgtgttcactgtacgaaaa
aaagaggagtataaaatggcactgtacaatctctatccaggtgtttttgagacagtggaaatgttaccatccaaagct
ggaatttggcgggtggaatgccttattggcgagcatctacatgctgggatgagcacactttttctggtgtacagcaat
aagtgtcagactcccctgggaatggcttctggacacattagagattttcagattacagcttcaggacaatatggacag
tgggccccaaagctggccagacttcattattccggatcaatcaatgcctggagcaccaaggagcccttttettggatc
aaggtggatctgttggcaccaatgattattcacggcatcaagacccagggtgcccgtcagaagttctccagcctctac
atctctcagtttatcatcatgtatagtcttgatgggaagaagtggcagacttatcgaggaaattccactggaacctta
atggtcttctttggcaatgtggattcatctgggataaaacacaatatttttaaccctccaattattgctcgatacatc
cgtttgcacccaactcattatagcattcgcagcactcttcgcatggagttgatgggctgtgatttaaatagttgcagc
atgccattgggaatggagagtaaagcaatatcagatgcacagattactgcttcatcctactttaccaatatgtttgcc
acctggtctccttcaaaagctcgacttcacctccaagggaggagtaatgcctggagacctcaggtgaataatccaaaa
gagtggctgcaagtggacttccagaagacaatgaaagtcacaggagtaactactcagggagtaaaatctctgcttacc
agcatgtatgtgaaggagttcctcatctccagcagtcaagatggccatcagtggactctcttttttcagaatggcaaa
gtaaaggtttttcagggaaatcaagactccttcacacctgtggtgaactctctagacccaccgttactgactcgctac
cttcgaattcacccccagagttgggtgcaccagattgccctgaggatggaggttctgggctgcgaggcacaggacctc
tacgacaaaactcacacatgcccaccgtgcccagctccagaactcctgggcggaccgtcagtcttcctcttcccccca
A(ii). Fc DNA sequence (mouse Igκ signal peptide underlined) (SEQ ID NO: 3, which encodes
SEQ ID NO: 4)
ccaccgtgcccagcacctgaactcctgggaggaccgtcagtcttcctcttccccccaaaacccaaggacaccctcatg
atctcccggacccctgaggtcacatgcgtggtggtggacgtgagccacgaagaccctgaggtcaagttcaactggtac
gtggacggcgtggaggtgcataatgccaagacaaagccgcgggaggagcagtacaacagcacgtaccgtgtggtcagc
gtcctcaccgtcctgcaccaggactggctgaatggcaaggagtacaagtgcaaggtctccaacaaagccctcccagcc
cccatcgagaaaaccatctccaaagccaaagggcagccccgagaaccacaggtgtacaccctgcccccatcccgcgat
gagctgaccaagaaccaggtcagcctgacctgcctggtcaaaggcttctatcccagcgacatcgccgtggagtgggag
agcaatgggcagccggagaacaactacaagaccacgcctcccgtgttggactccgacggctccttcttcctctacagc
aagctcaccgtggacaagagcaggtggcagcaggggaacgtcttctcatgctccgtgatgcatgaggctctgcacaac
cactacacgcagaagagcctctccctgtctccgggtaaa
B. Full Length FVIIIFc
B(i). Full Length FVIIIFc DNA Sequence (FVIII signal peptide underlined, Fc region in bold)
(SEQ ID NO: 5, which encodes SEQ ID NO: 6)
ggtgcagtggaactgtcatgggactatatgcaaagtgatctcggtgagctgcctgtggacgcaagatttcctcctaga
gtgccaaaatcttttccattcaacacctcagtcgtgtacaaaaagactctgtttgtagaattcacggatcaccttttc
aacatcgctaagccaaggccaccctggatgggtctgctaggtcctaccatccaggctgaggtttatgatacagtggtc
attacacttaagaacatggcttcccatcctgtcagtcttcatgctgttggtgtatcctactggaaagcttctgaggga
gctgaatatgatgatcagaccagtcaaagggagaaagaagatgataaagtcttccctggtggaagccatacatatgtc
tggcaggtcctgaaagagaatggtccaatggcctctgacccactgtgccttacctactcatatctttctcatgtggac
ctggtaaaagacttgaattcaggcctcattggagccctactagtatgtagagaagggagtctggccaaggaaaagaca
cagaccttgcacaaatttatactactttttgctgtatttgatgaagggaaaagttggcactcagaaacaaagaactcc
ttgatgcaggatagggatgctgcatctgctcgggcctggcctaaaatgcacacagtcaatggttatgtaaacaggtct
ctgccaggtctgattggatgccacaggaaatcagtctattggcatgtgattgaaatgggcaccactcctgaagtgcac
tcaatattcctcgaaggtcacacatttcttgtgaggaaccatcgccaggcgtccttggaaatctcgccaataactttc
cttactgctcaaacactcttgatggaccttggacagtttctactgttttgtcatatctcttcccaccaacatgatggc
atggaagcttatgtcaaagtagacagctgtccagaggaaccccaactacgaatgaaaaataatgaagaagcggaagac
tatgatgatgatcttactgattctgaaatggatgtggtcaggtttgatgatgacaactctccttcctttatccaaatt
cgctcagttgccaagaagcatcctaaaacttgggtacattacattgctgctgaagaggaggactgggactatgctccc
ttagtcctcgcccccgatgacagaagttataaaagtcaatatttgaacaatggccctcagcggattggtaggaagtac
aaaaaagtccgatttatggcatacacagatgaaacctttaagactcgtgaagctattcagcatgaatcaggaatcttg
ggacctttactttatggggaagttggagacacactgttgattatatttaagaatcaagcaagcagaccatataacatc
taccctcacggaatcactgatgtccgtcctttgtattcaaggagattaccaaaaggtgtaaaacatttgaaggatttt
ccaattctgccaggagaaatattcaaatataaatggacagtgactgtagaagatgggccaactaaatcagatcctcgg
gatgggaagaagtggcagacttatcgaggaaattccactggaaccttaatggtcttctttggcaatgtggattcatct
gggataaaacacaatatttttaaccctccaattattgctcgatacatccgtttgcacccaactcattatagcattcgc
agcactcttcgcatggagttgatgggctgtgatttaaatagttgcagcatgccattgggaatggagagtaaagcaata
tcagatgcacagattactgcttcatcctactttaccaatatgtttgccacctggtctccttcaaaagctcgacttcac
ctccaagggaggagtaatgcctggagacctcaggtgaataatccaaaagagtggctgcaagtggacttccagaagaca
atgaaagtcacaggagtaactactcagggagtaaaatctctgcttaccagcatgtatgtgaaggagttcctcatctcc
agcagtcaagatggccatcagtggactctcttttttcagaatggcaaagtaaaggtttttcagggaaatcaagactcc
ttcacacctgtggtgaactctctagacccaccgttactgactcgctaccttcgaattcacccccagagttgggtgcac
cagattgccctgaggatggaggttctgggctgcgaggcacaggacctctacgacaaaactcacacatgcccaccgtgc
C(i). Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc DNA sequence (no linker between HC and Fe) (signal peptide
underlined, Fc region in bold) (SEQ ID NO: 7, which encodes SEQ ID NO: 8)
aacatcgctaagccaaggccaccctggatgggtctgctaggtcctaccatccaggctgaggtttatgatacagtggtc
C(ii). Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc DNA sequence (5 amino acid linker between HC and Fc) (signal
peptide underlined, Fc region in bold, 5 amino acid linker is double-underlined) (SEQ ID NO: 9,
which encodes SEQ ID NO: 10)
attacacttaagaacatggcttcccatcctgtcagtcttcatgctgttggtgtatcctactggaaagcttctgaggga
cgatggtatctgctcagcatgggcagcaatgaaaacatccattctattcatttcagtggacatgtgttcactgtacga
D. FIX-Fc Chain DNA Sequence (SEQ ID NO: 13, which encodes SEQ ID NO: 14)
pSYN-FIX-030 Nucleotide sequence (nt 1 to 7583):
FIX exon 1 (signal peptide, 1st amino acid propeptide): nt 690-777
FIX mini intron: nt 778-1076
FIX propeptide sequence: nt 1077-1126
Mature FIX sequence: nt 1127-2371
Fc: nt 2372-3052
gcgcgcgttgacattgattattgactagttattaatagtaatcaattacggggtcattagttcatagcccatatatgg
agttccgcgttacataacttacggtaaatggcccgcctggctgaccgcccaacgacccccgcccattgacgtcaataa
tgacgtatgttcccatagtaacgccaatagggactttccattgacgtcaatgggtggagtatttacggtaaactgccc
acttggcagtacatcaagtgtatcatatgccaagtacgccccctattgacgtcaatgacggtaaatggcccgcctggc
attatgcccagtacatgaccttatgggactttcctacttggcagtacatctacgtattagtcatcgctattaccatgg
tgatgcggttttggcagtacatcaatgggcgtggatagcggtttgactcacggggatttccaagtctccaccccattg
acgtcaatgggagtttgttttggcaccaaaatcaacgggactttccaaaatgtcgtaacaactccgccccattgacgc
aaatgggcggtaggcgtgtacggtgggaggtctatataagcagagctctctggctaactagagaacccactgcttact
ggcttatcgaaattaatacgactcactatagggagacccaagcttcgcgacgtacggccgccaccatgcagcgcgtga
acatgatcatggcagaatcaccaggcctcatcaccatctgccttttaggatatctactcagtgctgaatgtacaggtt
tgtttccttttttaaaatacattgagtatgcttgccttttagatatagaaatatctgatgctgtcttcttcactaaat
tttgattacatgatttgacagcaatattgaagagtctaacagccagcacgcaggttggtaagtactgtgggaacatca
cagattttggctccatgccctaaagagaaattggctttcagattatttggattaaaaacaaagactttcttaagagat
gtaaaattttcatgatgttttcttttttgctaaaactaaagaattattcttttacatttcagtttttcttgatcatga
aaacgccaacaaaattctgaatcggccaaagaggtataattcaggtaaattggaagagtttgttcaagggaatctaga
gagagaatgtatggaagaaaagtgtagttttgaagaagcacgagaagtttttgaaaacactgaaagaacaactgaatt
ttggaagcagtatgttgatggagatcagtgtgagtccaatccatgtttaaatggcggcagttgcaaggatgacattaa
ttcctatgaatgttggtgtccctttggatttgaaggaaagaactgtgaattagatgtaacatgtaacattaagaatgg
cagatgcgagcagttttgtaaaaatagtgctgataacaaggtggtttgctcctgtactgagggatatcgacttgcaga
aaaccagaagtcctgtgaaccagcagtgccatttccatgtggaagagtttctgtttcacaaacttctaagctcacccg
tgctgagactgtttttcctgatgtggactatgtaaattctactgaagctgaaaccattttggataacatcactcaaag
cacccaatcatttaatgacttcactcgggttgttggtggagaagatgccaaaccaggtcaattcccttggcaggttgt
tttgaatggtaaagttgatgcattctgtggaggctctatcgttaatgaaaaatggattgtaactgctgcccactgtgt
tgaaactggtgttaaaattacagttgtcgcaggtgaacataatattgaggagacagaacatacagagcaaaagcgaaa
tgtgattcgaattattcctcaccacaactacaatgcagctattaataagtacaaccatgacattgcccttctggaact
ggacgaacccttagtgctaaacagctacgttacacctatttgcattgctgacaaggaatacacgaacatcttcctcaa
atttggatctggctatgtaagtggctggggaagagtcttccacaaagggagatcagctttagttcttcagtaccttag
agttccacttgttgaccgagccacatgtcttcgatctacaaagttcaccatctataacaacatgttctgtgctggctt
ccatgaaggaggtagagattcatgtcaaggagatagtgggggaccccatgttactgaagtggaagggaccagtttctt
aactggaattattagctggggtgaagagtgtgcaatgaaaggcaaatatggaatatataccaaggtgtcccggtatgt
caactggattaaggaaaaaacaaagctcactgacaaaactcacacatgcccaccgtgcccagctccggaactcctggg
cggaccgtcagtcttcctcttccccccaaaacccaaggacaccctcatgatctcccggacccctgaggtcacatgcgt
ggtggtggacgtgagccacgaagaccctgaggtcaagttcaactggtacgtggacggcgtggaggtgcataatgccaa
gacaaagccgcgggaggagcagtacaacagcacgtaccgtgtggtcagcgtcctcaccgtcctgcaccaggactggct
gaatggcaaggagtacaagtgcaaggtctccaacaaagccctcccagcccccatcgagaaaaccatctccaaagccaa
agggcagccccgagaaccacaggtgtacaccctgcccccatcccggatgagctgaccaagaaccaggtcagcctgac
ctgcctggtcaaaggcttctatcccagcgacatcgccgtggagtgggagagcaatgggcagccggagaacaactacaa
gaccacgcctcccgtgttggactccgacggctccttcttcctctacagcaagctcaccgtggacaagagcaggtggca
gcaggggaacgtcttctcatgctccgtgatgcatgaggctctgcacaaccactacacgcagaagagcctctccctgtc
tccgggtaaatgagaattcagacatgataagatacattgatgagtttggacaaaccacaactagaatgcagtgaaaaa
aatgctttatttgtgaaatttgtgatgctattgctttatttgtaaccattataagctgcaataaacaagttggggtgg
gcgaagaactccagcatgagatccccgcgctggaggatcatccagccggcgtcccggaaaacgattccgaagcccaac
ctttcatagaaggcggcggtggaatcgaaatctcgtagcacgtgtcagtcctgctcctcggccacgaagtgcacgcag
ttgccggccgggtcgcgcagggcgaactcccgcccccacggctgctcgccgatctcggtcatggccggcccggaggcg
tcccggaagttcgtggacacgacctccgaccactcggcgtacagctcgtccaggccgcgcacccacacccaggccagg
gtgttgtccggcaccacctggtcctggaccgcgctgatgaacagggtcacgtcgtcccggaccacaccggcgaagtcg
tcctccacgaagtcccgggagaacccgagccggtcggtccagaactcgaccgctccggcgacgtcgcgcgcggtgagc
accggaacggcactggtcaacttggccatggtttagttcctcaccttgtcgtattatactatgccgatatactatgcc
gatgattaattgtcaacacgtgctgatcagatccgaaaatggatatacaagctcccgggagctttttgcaaaagccta
ggcctccaaaaaagcctcctcactacttctggaatagctcagaggcagaggcggcctcggcctctgcataaataaaaa
aaattagtcagccatggggcggagaatgggcggaactgggcggagttaggggcgggatgggcggagttaggggcggga
ctatggttgctgactaattgagatgcatgctttgcatacttctgcctgctggggagcctggggactttccacacctgg
ttgctgactaattgagatgcatgctttgcatacttctgcctgctggggagcctggggactttccacaccctcgtcgag
ctagcttcgtgaggctccggtgcccgtcagtgggcagagcgcacatcgcccacagtccccgagaagttggggggaggg
gtcggcaattgaaccggtgcctagagaaggtggcgcggggtaaactgggaaagtgatgtcgtgtactggctccgcctt
tttcccgagggtgggggagaaccgtatataagtgcagtagtcgccgtgaacgttctttttcgcaacgggtttgccgcc
agaacacaggtaagtgccgtgtgtggttcccgcgggcctggcctctttacgggttatggcccttgcgtgccttgaatt
acttccacctggctccagtacgtgattcttgatcccgagctggagccaggggcgggccttgcgctttaggagcccctt
cgcctcgtgcttgagttgaggcctggcctgggcgctggggccgccgcgtgcgaatctggtggcaccttcgcgcctgtc
tcgctgctttcgataagtctctagccatttaaaatttttgatgacctgctgcgacgctttttttctggcaagatagtc
ttgtaaatgcgggccaggatctgcacactggtatttcggtttttggggccgcgggcggcgacggggcccgtgcgtccc
agcgcacatgttcggcgaggcggggcctgcgagcgcggccaccgagaatcggacgggggtagtctcaagctggccggc
ctgctctggtgcctggcctcgcgccgccgtgtatcgccccgccctgggcggcaaggctggcccggtcggcaccagttg
cgtgagcggaaagatggccgcttcccggccctgctccagggggctcaaaatggaggacgcggcgctcgggagagcggg
cgggtgagtcacccacacaaaggaaaggggcctttccgtcctcagccgtcgcttcatgtgactccacggagtaccggg
cgccgtccaggcacctcgattagttctggagcttttggagtacgtcgtctttaggttggggggaggggttttatgcga
tggagtttccccacactgagtgggtggagactgaagttaggccagcttggcacttgatgtaattctccttggaatttg
ccctttttgagtttggatcttggttcattctcaagcctcagacagtggttcaaagtttttttcttccatttcaggtgt
cgtgaacacgtggtcgcggccgcgccgccaccatggagacagacacactcctgctatgggtactgctgctctgggttc
caggttccactggtgacaaaactcacacatgcccaccgtgcccagcacctgaactcctgggaggaccgtcagtcttcc
tcttccccccaaaacccaaggacaccctcatgatctcccggacccctgaggtcacatgcgtggtggtggacgtgagcc
acgaagaccctgaggtcaagttcaactggtacgtggacggcgtggaggtgcataatgccaagacaaagccgcgggagg
agcagtacaacagcacgtaccgtgtggtcagcgtcctcaccgtcctgcaccaggactggctgaatggcaaggagtaca
agtgcaaggtctccaacaaagccctcccagcccccatcgagaaaaccatctccaaagccaaagggcagccccgagaac
cacaggtgtacaccctgcccccatcccgcgatgagctgaccaagaaccaggtcagcctgacctgcctggtcaaaggct
tctatcccagcgacatcgccgtggagtgggagagcaatgggcagccggagaacaactacaagaccacgcctcccgtgt
tggactccgacggctccttcttcctctacagcaagctcaccgtggacaagagcaggtggcagcaggggaacgtcttct
catgctccgtgatgcatgaggctctgcacaaccactacacgcagaagagcctctccctgtctccgggtaaatgactcg
agagatctggccggctgggcccgtttcgaaggtaagcctatccctaaccctctcctcggtctcgattctacgcgtacc
ggtcatcatcaccatcaccattgagtttaaacccgctgatcagcctcgactgtgccttctagttgccagccatctgtt
gtttgcccctcccccgtgccttccttgaccctggaaggtgccactcccactgtcctttcctaataaaatgaggaaatt
gcatcgcattgtctgagtaggtgtcattctattctggggggtggggtggggcaggacagcaagggggaggattgggaa
gacaatagcaggcatgctggggatgcggtgggctctatggcttctgaggcggaaagaaccagtggcggtaatacggtt
atccacagaatcaggggataacgcaggaaagaacatgtgagcaaaaggccagcaaaaggccaggaaccgtaaaaaggc
cgcgttgctggcgtttttccataggctccgcccccctgacgagcatcacaaaaatcgacgctcaagtcagaggtggcg
aaacccgacaggactataaagataccaggcgtttccccctagaagctccctcgtgcgctctcctgttccgaccctgcc
gcttaccggatacctgtccgcctttctcccttcgggaagcgtggcgctttctcatagctcacgctgtaggtatctcag
ttcggtgtaggtcgttcgctccaagctgggctgtgtgcacgaaccccccgttcagcccgaccgctgcgccttatccgg
taactatcgtcttgagtccaacccggtaagacacgacttatcgccactggcagcagccactggtaacaggattagcag
agcgaggtatgtaggcggtgctacagagttcttgaagtggtggcctaactacggctacactagaagaacagtatttgg
tatctgcgctctgctgaagccagttaccttcggaaaaagagttggtagctcttgatccggcaaacaaaccaccgctgg
tagcggtggtttttttgtttgcaagcagcagattacgcgcagaaaaaaaggatctcaagaagatcctttgatcttttc
tacggggtctgacgctcagtggaacgaaaactcacgttaagggattttggtcatgacattaacctataaaaataggcg
tatcacgaggccctttcgtctcgcgcgtttcggtgatgacggtgaaaacctctgacacatgcagctcccggagacggt
cacagcttgtctgtaagcggatgccgggagcagacaagcccgtcagggcgcgtcagcgggtgttggcgggtgtcgggg
ctggcttaactatgcggcatcagagcagattgtactgagagtgcaccatatatgcggtgtgaaataccgcacagatgc
gtaaggagaaaataccgcatcaggcgccattcgccattcaggctgcgcaactgttgggaagggcgatcggtgcgggcc
tcttcgctattacgcca
E. Fc DNA sequence (mouse Igκ signal peptide underlined) (SEQ ID NO: 3, which encodes SEQ
ID NO: 4) This is the Fc cassette from pSYN-FIX-030. In addition, there is a separate Fc
expression cassette that was transfected into the cell line in plasmid pSYN-Fc-015 that encodes
the same amino acid sequence, but contains a few noncoding changes. The second copy of Fc
encoding sequence enables a better monomer: dimer ratio.
ccaccgtgcccagcacctgaactcctgggaggaccgtcagtcttcctcttccccccaaaacccaaggacaccctcatg
atctcccggacccctgaggtcacatgcgtggtggtggacgtgagccacgaagaccctgaggtcaagttcaactggtac
gtggacggcgtggaggtgcataatgccaagacaaagccgcgggaggagcagtacaacagcacgtaccgtgtggtcagc
gtcctcaccgtcctgcaccaggactggctgaatggcaaggagtacaagtgcaaggtctccaacaaagccctcccagcc
cccatcgagaaaaccatctccaaagccaaagggcagccccgagaaccacaggtgtacaccctgcccccatcccgcgat
gagctgaccaagaaccaggtcagcctgacctgcctggtcaaaggcttctatcccagcgacatcgccgtggagtgggag
agcaatgggcagccggagaacaactacaagaccacgcctcccgtgttggactccgacggctccttcttcctctacagc
aagctcaccgtggacaagagcaggtggcagcaggggaacgtcttctcatgctccgtgatgcatgaggctctgcacaac
                   cactacacgcagaagagcctctccctgtctccgggtaaa


SEQUENCE TABLE 2
Polypeptide Sequences
A(i). B domain deleted FVIII-Fc chain (19 amino acid signal sequence underlined) (SEQ ID
NO: 2)
QSDQEEIDYDDTISVEMKKEDFDIYDEDENQSPRSFQKKTRHYFIAAVERLWDYGMSSSPHVLRNRAQSGSVPQFKKV
VFQEFTDGSFTQPLYRGELNEHLGLLGPYIRAEVEDNIMVTFRNQASRPYSFYSSLISYEEDQRQGAEPRKNFVKPNE
TKTYFWKVQHHMAPTKDEFDCKAWAYFSDVDLEKDVHSGLIGPLLVCHTNTLNPAHGRQVTVQEFALFFTIFDETKSW
YFTENMERNCRAPCNIQMEDPTFKENYRFHAINGYIMDTLPGLVMAQDQRIRWYLLSMGSNENIHSIHFSGHVFTVRK
KEEYKMALYNLYPGVFETVEMLPSKAGIWRVECLIGEHLHAGMSTLFLVYSNKCQTPLGMASGHIRDFQITASGQYGQ
WAPKLARLHYSGSINAWSTKEPFSWIKVDLLAPMIIHGIKTQGARQKFSSLYISQFIIMYSLDGKKWQTYRGNSTGTL
MVFFGNVDSSGIKHNIFNPPIIARYIRLHPTHYSIRSTLRMELMGCDLNSCSMPLGMESKAISDAQITASSYFTNMFA
TWSPSKARLHLQGRSNAWRPQVNNPKEWLQVDFQKTMKVTGVTTQGVKSLLTSMYVKEFLISSSQDGHQWTLFFQNGK
VKVFQGNQDSFTPVVNSLDPPLLTRYLRIHPQSWVHQIALRMEVLGCEAQDLYDKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSVFLFPP
A(ii). Fc chain (20 amino acid heterologous signal peptide from mouse Igκ chain underlined)
(SEQ ID NO: 4)
VDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRD
ELTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDKSRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHN
HYTQKSLSLSPGK
B. Full length FVIIIFc monomer hybrid (Full length FVIIIFc monomer dimer): created by
coexpressing FVIIIFc and Fc chains.
Construct = HC-B-LC-Fc fusion. An Fc expression cassette is cotransfected with full length
FVIII-Fc to generate the full length FVIIIFe monomer. For the FVIIIFc chain, the Fc sequence is
shown in bold; HC sequence is shown in double underline; B domain sequence is shown in
italics Signal peptides are underlined.
PEIEVTWAKQGRTERLCSQNPPVLKRHQREITRTTLQSDQEEIDYDDTISVEMKKEDFDIYDEDENQSPRSFQKKTRH
YFIAAVERLWDYGMSSSPHVLRNRAQSGSVPQFKKVVFQEFTDGSFTQPLYRGELNEHLGLLGPYIRAEVEDNIMVTF
RNQASRPYSFYSSLISYEEDQRQGAEPRKNFVKPNETKTYFWKVQHHMAPTKDEFDCKAWAYFSDVDLEKDVESGLIG
PLLVCHTNTLNPAHGRQVTVQEFALFFTIFDETKSWYFTENMERNCRAPCNIQMEDPTFKENYRFHAINGYIMDTLPG
LVMAQDQRIRWYLLSMGSNEAIHSIHFSGHVFTVRKKEEYKMALYNLYPGVFETVEMLPSKAGIWRVECLIGEHLHAG
MSTLFLVYSNKCQTPLGMASGHIRDFQITASGQYGQWAPKLARLHYSGSINAWSTKEPFSWIKVDLLAPMIIHGIKTQ
GARQKFSSLYISQFIIMYSLDGKKWQTYRGNSTGTLMVFFGNVDSSGIKHNIFNPPIIARYIRLHPTHYSIRSTLRME
LMGCDLNSCSMPLGMESKAISDAQITASSYFTNMFATWSPSKARLHLQGRSNAWRPQVNNPKEWLQVDFQKTMKVTGV
TTQGVKSLLTSMYVKEFLISSSQDGHQWTLFFQNGKVKVFQGNQDSFTPVVNSLDPPLLTRYLRIHPQSWVEQIALRM
EVLGCEAQDLYDKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDPEVKFNWYVDGVEVHNA
B(ii). Fc chain (20 amino acid heterologous signal peptide from mouse Igκ chain underlined)
(SEQ ID NO: 4)
VDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRD
ELTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDKSRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHN
HYTQKSLSLSPGK
C. FVIII-Fc Heterodimer Hybrid
This is made by cotransfecting HC-Fc and LC-Fc constructs. Two HC-Fc constructs have been
made. One has no linker between HC and Fc (HC-Fc) while the other has a 5 amino acid linker
between HC and Fc (HC+5-Fc). The FVIII signal peptide was used for the HC-Fc constructs,
while the mouse Igκ signal sequence was used for the LC-Fc construct.
NIAKPRPPWMGLLGPTIQAEVYDTVVITLKNMASHPVSLHAVGVSYWKASEGAEYDDQTSQREKEDDKVFPGGSHTYV
WQVLKENGPMASDPLCLTYSYLSHVDLVKDLNSGLIGALLVCREGSLAKEKTQTLHKFILLFAVFDEGKSWHSETKNS
LMQDRDAASARAWPKMHTVNGYVNRSLPGLIGCHRKSVFWHVIGMGTTPEVHSIFLEGHTFLVRNHRQASLEISPITF
LTAQTLLMDLGQFLLFCHISSHQHDGMEAYVKVDSCPEEPQLRMKNNEEAEDYDDDLTDSEMDVVRFDDDNSPSFIQI
RSVAKKHPKTWVHYIAAEEEDWDYAPLVLAPDDRSYKSQYLNNGPQRIGRKYKKVRFMAYTDETFKTREAIQHESGIL
GPLLYGEVGDTLLIIFKNQASRPYNIYPHGITDVRPLYSRRLPKGVKHLKDFPILPGEIFKYKWTVTVEDGPTKSDPR
CLTRYYSSFVNMERDLASGLIGPLLICYKESVDQRGNQIMSDKRNVILFSVFDENRSWYLTENIQRFLPNPAGVQLED
PEFQASNIMHSINGYVFDSLQLSVCLHEVAYWYILSIGAQTDFLSVFFSGYTFKHKMVYEDTLTLFPFSGETVFMSME
NPGLWILGCHNSDFRNRGMTALLKVSSCDKNTGDYYEDSYEDISAYLLSKNNAIEPRDKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSVF
NIAKPRPPWMGLLGPTIQAEVYDTVVITLKNMASHPVSLHAVGVSYWKASEGAEYDDQTSQREKEDDKVFPGGSHTYV
WQVLKENGPMASDPLCLTYSYLSHVDLVKDLNSGLIGALLVCREGSLAKEKTQTLHKFILLFAVFDEGKSWHSETKNS
LMQDRDAASARAWPKMHTVNGYVNRSLPGLIGCHRKSVYWHVIGMGTTPEVHSIFLEGHTFLVRNHRQASLEISPITF
LTAQTLLMDLGQFLLFCHISSHQHDGMEAYVKVDSCPEEPQLRMKNNEEAEDYDDDKTDSEMDVVRFDDDNSPSFIQI
RSVAKKHPKTWVHYIAAEEEDWDYAPLVLAPDDRSYKSQYLNNGPQRIGRKYKKVRFMAYTDETFKTREAIQHESGIL
GPLLYGEVGDTLLIIFKNQASRPYNIYPHGITDVRPLYSRRLPKGVKHLKDFPILPGEIFKYKWTVTVEDGPTKSDPR
CLTRYYSSFVNMERDLASGLIGPLLICYKESVDQRGNQIMSDKRNVILFSVFDENRSWYLTENIQRFLPNPAGVQLED
PEFQASNIMHSINGYVFDSLQLSVCLHEVAYWYILSIGAQTDFLSVFFSGYTFKHKMVYEDTLTLFPFSGETVFMSME
NGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRDELTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYK
C(iii). LC-Fc6His (Fc sequence is shown in bold, signal peptide underlined.) (SEQ ID NO: 12)
WDYGMSSSPHVLRNRAQSGSVPQFKKVVFQEFTDGSFTQPLYRGELNEHLGLLGPYIRAEVEDNIMVTFRNQASRPYS
FYSSLISYEEDQRQGAEPRKNFVKPNETKTYFWKVQHHMAPTKDEFDCKAWAYFSDVDLEKDVHSGLIGPLLVCHTNT
LNPAHGRQVTVQEFALFFTIFDETKSWYFTENMERNCRAPCNIQMEDPTFKENYRFHAINGYIMDTLPGLVMAQDQRI
RWYLLSMGSNENIHSIHFSGHVFTVRKKEEYKNALYNLYPGVFETVEMLPSKAGIWRVECLIGEHLHAGMSTLFLVYS
NKCQTPLGMASGHIRDFQITASGQYGQWAPKLARLHYSGSINAWSTKEPFSWIKVDLLAPMIIHGIKTQGARQKFSSL
YISQFIIMYSLDGKKWQTYRGNSTGTLMVFFGNVDSSGIKHNIFNPPIIARYIRLHPTHYSIRSTLRMELMGCDLNSC
SMPLGMESKAISDAQITASSYFTNMFATWSPSKARLHLQGRSNAWRPQVNNPKEWLQVDFQKTMKVTGVTTQGVKSLL
TSMYVKEFLISSSQDGHQWTLFFQNGKVKVFQGNQDSFTPVVNSLDPPLLTRYLRIHPQSWVHQIALRMEVLGCEAQD
D. FIX-Fc chain (SEQ ID NO: 14):
(28 amino acid signal sequence underlined, 18 amino acid propeptide double underlined, Fc
portion in italics.) The C-terminal lysine is not present in either subunit; this processing is often
observed in recombinant proteins produced in mammalian cell culture, as well as with plasma
derived proteins.
E. FIXFc-SC subunit:
FIX Signal Peptide:
-46 MQRVNMIMAESPGLITICLLGYLLSAEC
FIX Propeptide: -18 TVFLDHENAN KILNRPKR
YNSGKLEEFVQGNLERECMEEKCSFEEAREVFENTERTTEFWKQYVDGDQCESNPCLNGGSCKDDINSYECWCPFGFE
GKNCELDVTCNIKNGRCEQFCKNSADNKVVCSCTEGYRLAENQKSCEPAVPFPCGRVSVSQTSKLTRAETVFPDVDYV
NSTEAETILDNITQSTQSFNDFTRVVGGEDAKPGQFPWQVVLNGKVDAFCGGSIVNEKWIVTAAHCVETGVKITVVAG
EHNIEETEHTEQKRNVIRIIPHHNYNAAINKYNHDIALLELDEPLVLNSYVTPICIADKEYTNIFLKFGSGYVSGWGR
VFHKGRSALVLQYLRVPLVDRATCLRSTKFTIYNNMFCAGFHEGGRDSCQGDSGGPHVTEVEGTSFLTGIISWGEECA
MKGKYGIYTKVSRYVNWIKEKTKLTDKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDPEV
Mature Fc sequence (corresponding to human IgG1 amino acids 221 to 447, EU numbering)
DKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSVFLFPPKPICDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDPEVKFNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNS
TYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRDELTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSD
IAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDKSRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSPGK

<160> NUMBER OF SEQ ID NOS: 14

<210> SEQ ID NO: 1

<211> LENGTH: 5052

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: B-Domain Deleted FVIIIFc Chain

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(57)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (4371)..(5052)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc region

<400> SEQENCE: 1

atgcaaatag agctctccac ctgcttcttt ctgtgccttt tgcgattctg ctttagtgcc 60

accagaagat actacctggg tgcagtggaa ctgtcatggg actatatgca aagtgatctc 120

ggtgagctgc ctgtggacgc aagatttcct cctagagtgc caaaatcttt tccattcaac 180

acctcagtcg tgtacaaaaa gactctgttt gtagaattca cggatcacct tttcaacatc 240

gctaagccaa ggccaccctg gatgggtctg ctaggtccta ccatccaggc tgaggtttat 300

gatacagtgg tcattacact taagaacatg gcttcccatc ctgtcagtct tcatgctgtt 360

ggtgtatcct actggaaagc ttctgaggga gctgaatatg atgatcagac cagtcaaagg 420

gagaaagaag atgataaagt cttccctggt ggaagccata catatgtctg gcaggtcctg 480

aaagagaatg gtccaatggc ctctgaccca ctgtgcctta cctactcata tctttctcat 540

gtggacctgg taaaagactt gaattcaggc ctcattggag ccctactagt atgtagagaa 600

gggagtctgg ccaaggaaaa gacacagacc ttgcacaaat ttatactact ttttgctgta 660

tttgatgaag ggaaaagttg gcactcagaa acaaagaact ccttgatgca ggatagggat 720

gctgcatctg ctcgggcctg gcctaaaatg cacacagtca atggttatgt aaacaggtct 780

ctgccaggtc tgattggatg ccacaggaaa tcagtctatt ggcatgtgat tggaatgggc 840

accactcctg aagtgcactc aatattcctc gaaggtcaca catttcttgt gaggaaccat 900

cgccaggcgt ccttggaaat ctcgccaata actttcctta ctgctcaaac actcttgatg 960

gaccttggac agtttctact gttttgtcat atctcttccc accaacatga tggcatggaa 1020

gcttatgtca aagtagacag ctgtccagag gaaccccaac tacgaatgaa aaataatgaa 1080

gaagcggaag actatgatga tgatcttact gattctgaaa tggatgtggt caggtttgat 1140

gatgacaact ctccttcctt tatccaaatt cgctcagttg ccaagaagca tcctaaaact 1200

tgggtacatt acattgctgc tgaagaggag gactgggact atgctccctt agtcctcgcc 1260

cccgatgaca gaagttataa aagtcaatat ttgaacaatg gccctcagcg gattggtagg 1320

aagtacaaaa aagtccgatt tatggcatac acagatgaaa cctttaagac tcgtgaagct 1380

attcagcatg aatcaggaat cttgggacct ttactttatg gggaagttgg agacacactg 1440

ttgattatat ttaagaatca agcaagcaga ccatataaca tctaccctca cggaatcact 1500

gatgtccgtc ctttgtattc aaggagatta ccaaaaggtg taaaacattt gaaggatttt 1560

ccaattctgc caggagaaat attcaaatat aaatggacag tgactgtaga agatgggcca 1620

actaaatcag atcctcggtg cctgacccgc tattactcta gtttcgttaa tatggagaga 1680

gatctagctt caggactcat tggccctctc ctcatctgct acaaagaatc tgtagatcaa 1740

agaggaaacc agataatgtc agacaagagg aatgtcatcc tgttttctgt atttgatgag 1800

aaccgaagct ggtacctcac agagaatata caacgctttc tccccaatcc agctggagtg 1860

cagcttgagg atccagagtt ccaagcctcc aacatcatgc acagcatcaa tggctatgtt 1920

tttgatagtt tgcagttgtc agtttgtttg catgaggtgg catactggta cattctaagc 1980

attggagcac agactgactt cctttctgtc ttcttctctg gatatacctt caaacacaaa 2040

atggtctatg aagacacact caccctattc ccattctcag gagaaactgt cttcatgtcg 2100

atggaaaacc caggtctatg gattctgggg tgccacaact cagactttcg gaacagaggc 2160

atgaccgcct tactgaaggt ttctagttgt gacaagaaca ctggtgatta ttacgaggac 2220

agttatgaag atatttcagc atacttgctg agtaaaaaca atgccattga accaagaagc 2280

ttctctcaaa acccaccagt cttgaaacgc catcaacggg aaataactcg tactactctt 2340

cagtcagatc aagaggaaat tgactatgat gataccatat cagttgaaat gaagaaggaa 2400

gattttgaca tttatgatga ggatgaaaat cagagccccc gcagctttca aaagaaaaca 2460

cgacactatt ttattgctgc agtggagagg ctctgggatt atgggatgag tagctcccca 2520

catgttctaa gaaacagggc tcagagtggc agtgtccctc agttcaagaa agttgttttc 2580

caggaattta ctgatggctc ctttactcag cccttatacc gtggagaact aaatgaacat 2640

ttgggactcc tggggccata tataagagca gaagttgaag ataatatcat ggtaactttc 2700

agaaatcagg cctctcgtcc ctattccttc tattctagcc ttatttctta tgaggaagat 2760

cagaggcaag gagcagaacc tagaaaaaac tttgtcaagc ctaatgaaac caaaacttac 2820

ttttggaaag tgcaacatca tatggcaccc actaaagatg agtttgactg caaagcctgg 2880

gcttatttct ctgatgttga cctggaaaaa gatgtgcact caggcctgat tggacccctt 2940

ctggtctgcc acactaacac actgaaccct gctcatggga gacaagtgac agtacaggaa 3000

tttgctctgt ttttcaccat ctttgatgag accaaaagct ggtacttcac tgaaaatatg 3060

gaaagaaact gcagggctcc ctgcaatatc cagatggaag atcccacttt taaagagaat 3120

tatcgcttcc atgcaatcaa tggctacata atggatacac tacctggctt agtaatggct 3180

caggatcaaa ggattcgatg gtatctgctc agcatgggca gcaatgaaaa catccattct 3240

attcatttca gtggacatgt gttcactgta cgaaaaaaag aggagtataa aatggcactg 3300

tacaatctct atccaggtgt ttttgagaca gtggaaatgt taccatccaa agctggaatt 3360

tggcgggtgg aatgccttat tggcgagcat ctacatgctg ggatgagcac actttttctg 3420

gtgtacagca ataagtgtca gactcccctg ggaatggctt ctggacacat tagagatttt 3480

cagattacag cttcaggaca atatggacag tgggccccaa agctggccag acttcattat 3540

tccggatcaa tcaatgcctg gagcaccaag gagccctttt cttggatcaa ggtggatctg 3600

ttggcaccaa tgattattca cggcatcaag acccagggtg cccgtcagaa gttctccagc 3660

ctctacatct ctcagtttat catcatgtat agtcttgatg ggaagaagtg gcagacttat 3720

cgaggaaatt ccactggaac cttaatggtc ttctttggca atgtggattc atctgggata 3780

aaacacaata tttttaaccc tccaattatt gctcgataca tccgtttgca cccaactcat 3840

tatagcattc gcagcactct tcgcatggag ttgatgggct gtgatttaaa tagttgcagc 3900

atgccattgg gaatggagag taaagcaata tcagatgcac agattactgc ttcatcctac 3960

tttaccaata tgtttgccac ctggtctcct tcaaaagctc gacttcacct ccaagggagg 4020

agtaatgcct ggagacctca ggtgaataat ccaaaagagt ggctgcaagt ggacttccag 4080

aagacaatga aagtcacagg agtaactact cagggagtaa aatctctgct taccagcatg 4140

tatgtgaagg agttcctcat ctccagcagt caagatggcc atcagtggac tctctttttt 4200

cagaatggca aagtaaaggt ttttcaggga aatcaagact ccttcacacc tgtggtgaac 4260

tctctagacc caccgttact gactcgctac cttcgaattc acccccagag ttgggtgcac 4320

cagattgccc tgaggatgga ggttctgggc tgcgaggcac aggacctcta cgacaaaact 4380

cacacatgcc caccgtgccc agctccagaa ctcctgggcg gaccgtcagt cttcctcttc 4440

cccccaaaac ccaaggacac cctcatgatc tcccggaccc ctgaggtcac atgcgtggtg 4500

gtggacgtga gccacgaaga ccctgaggtc aagttcaact ggtacgtgga cggcgtggag 4560

gtgcataatg ccaagacaaa gccgcgggag gagcagtaca acagcacgta ccgtgtggtc 4620

agcgtcctca ccgtcctgca ccaggactgg ctgaatggca aggagtacaa gtgcaaggtc 4680

tccaacaaag ccctcccagc ccccatcgag aaaaccatct ccaaagccaa agggcagccc 4740

cgagaaccac aggtgtacac cctgccccca tcccgggatg agctgaccaa gaaccaggtc 4800

agcctgacct gcctggtcaa aggcttctat cccagcgaca tcgccgtgga gtgggagagc 4860

aatgggcagc cggagaacaa ctacaagacc acgcctcccg tgttggactc cgacggctcc 4920

ttcttcctct acagcaagct caccgtggac aagagcaggt ggcagcaggg gaacgtcttc 4980

tcatgctccg tgatgcatga ggctctgcac aaccactaca cgcagaagag cctctccctg 5040

tctccgggta aa 5052

<210> SEQ ID NO: 2

<211> LENGTH: 1684

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: B-Domain Deleted FVIIIFc Chain

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(19)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: MISC_FEATURE

<222> LOCATION: (1457)..(1684)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc region

<400> SEQENCE: 2

Met Gln Ile Glu Leu Ser Thr Cys Phe Phe Leu Cys Leu Leu Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

Cys Phe Ser Ala Thr Arg Arg Tyr Tyr Leu Gly Ala Val Glu Leu Ser

20 25 30

Trp Asp Tyr Met Gln Ser Asp Leu Gly Glu Leu Pro Val Asp Ala Arg

35 40 45

Phe Pro Pro Arg Val Pro Lys Ser Phe Pro Phe Asn Thr Ser Val Val

50 55 60

Tyr Lys Lys Thr Leu Phe Val Glu Phe Thr Asp His Leu Phe Asn Ile

65 70 75 80

Ala Lys Pro Arg Pro Pro Trp Met Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Thr Ile Gln

85 90 95

Ala Glu Val Tyr Asp Thr Val Val Ile Thr Leu Lys Asn Met Ala Ser

100 105 110

His Pro Val Ser Leu His Ala Val Gly Val Ser Tyr Trp Lys Ala Ser

115 120 125

Glu Gly Ala Glu Tyr Asp Asp Gln Thr Ser Gln Arg Glu Lys Glu Asp

130 135 140

Asp Lys Val Phe Pro Gly Gly Ser His Thr Tyr Val Trp Gln Val Leu

145 150 155 160

Lys Glu Asn Gly Pro Met Ala Ser Asp Pro Leu Cys Leu Thr Tyr Ser

165 170 175

Tyr Leu Ser His Val Asp Leu Val Lys Asp Leu Asn Ser Gly Leu Ile

180 185 190

Gly Ala Leu Leu Val Cys Arg Glu Gly Ser Leu Ala Lys Glu Lys Thr

195 200 205

Gln Thr Leu His Lys Phe Ile Leu Leu Phe Ala Val Phe Asp Glu Gly

210 215 220

Lys Ser Trp His Ser Glu Thr Lys Asn Ser Leu Met Gln Asp Arg Asp

225 230 235 240

Ala Ala Ser Ala Arg Ala Trp Pro Lys Met His Thr Val Asn Gly Tyr

245 250 255

Val Asn Arg Ser Leu Pro Gly Leu Ile Gly Cys His Arg Lys Ser Val

260 265 270

Tyr Trp His Val Ile Gly Met Gly Thr Thr Pro Glu Val His Ser Ile

275 280 285

Phe Leu Glu Gly His Thr Phe Leu Val Arg Asn His Arg Gln Ala Ser

290 295 300

Leu Glu Ile Ser Pro Ile Thr Phe Leu Thr Ala Gln Thr Leu Leu Met

305 310 315 320

Asp Leu Gly Gln Phe Leu Leu Phe Cys His Ile Ser Ser His Gln His

325 330 335

Asp Gly Met Glu Ala Tyr Val Lys Val Asp Ser Cys Pro Glu Glu Pro

340 345 350

Gln Leu Arg Met Lys Asn Asn Glu Glu Ala Glu Asp Tyr Asp Asp Asp

355 360 365

Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu Met Asp Val Val Arg Phe Asp Asp Asp Asn Ser

370 375 380

Pro Ser Phe Ile Gln Ile Arg Ser Val Ala Lys Lys His Pro Lys Thr

385 390 395 400

Trp Val His Tyr Ile Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Asp Trp Asp Tyr Ala Pro

405 410 415

Leu Val Leu Ala Pro Asp Asp Arg Ser Tyr Lys Ser Gln Tyr Leu Asn

420 425 430

Asn Gly Pro Gln Arg Ile Gly Arg Lys Tyr Lys Lys Val Arg Phe Met

435 440 445

Ala Tyr Thr Asp Glu Thr Phe Lys Thr Arg Glu Ala Ile Gln His Glu

450 455 460

Ser Gly Ile Leu Gly Pro Leu Leu Tyr Gly Glu Val Gly Asp Thr Leu

465 470 475 480

Leu Ile Ile Phe Lys Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Asn Ile Tyr Pro

485 490 495

His Gly Ile Thr Asp Val Arg Pro Leu Tyr Ser Arg Arg Leu Pro Lys

500 505 510

Gly Val Lys His Leu Lys Asp Phe Pro Ile Leu Pro Gly Glu Ile Phe

515 520 525

Lys Tyr Lys Trp Thr Val Thr Val Glu Asp Gly Pro Thr Lys Ser Asp

530 535 540

Pro Arg Cys Leu Thr Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Ser Phe Val Asn Met Glu Arg

545 550 555 560

Asp Leu Ala Ser Gly Leu Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Ile Cys Tyr Lys Glu

565 570 575

Ser Val Asp Gln Arg Gly Asn Gln Ile Met Ser Asp Lys Arg Asn Val

580 585 590

Ile Leu Phe Ser Val Phe Asp Glu Asn Arg Ser Trp Tyr Leu Thr Glu

595 600 605

Asn Ile Gln Arg Phe Leu Pro Asn Pro Ala Gly Val Gln Leu Glu Asp

610 615 620

Pro Glu Phe Gln Ala Ser Asn Ile Met His Ser Ile Asn Gly Tyr Val

625 630 635 640

Phe Asp Ser Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Cys Leu His Glu Val Ala Tyr Trp

645 650 655

Tyr Ile Leu Ser Ile Gly Ala Gln Thr Asp Phe Leu Ser Val Phe Phe

660 665 670

Ser Gly Tyr Thr Phe Lys His Lys Met Val Tyr Glu Asp Thr Leu Thr

675 680 685

Leu Phe Pro Phe Ser Gly Glu Thr Val Phe Met Ser Met Glu Asn Pro

690 695 700

Gly Leu Trp Ile Leu Gly Cys His Asn Ser Asp Phe Arg Asn Arg Gly

705 710 715 720

Met Thr Ala Leu Leu Lys Val Ser Ser Cys Asp Lys Asn Thr Gly Asp

725 730 735

Tyr Tyr Glu Asp Ser Tyr Glu Asp Ile Ser Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Lys

740 745 750

Asn Asn Ala Ile Glu Pro Arg Ser Phe Ser Gln Asn Pro Pro Val Leu

755 760 765

Lys Arg His Gln Arg Glu Ile Thr Arg Thr Thr Leu Gln Ser Asp Gln

770 775 780

Glu Glu Ile Asp Tyr Asp Asp Thr Ile Ser Val Glu Met Lys Lys Glu

785 790 795 800

Asp Phe Asp Ile Tyr Asp Glu Asp Glu Asn Gln Ser Pro Arg Ser Phe

805 810 815

Gln Lys Lys Thr Arg His Tyr Phe Ile Ala Ala Val Glu Arg Leu Trp

820 825 830

Asp Tyr Gly Met Ser Ser Ser Pro His Val Leu Arg Asn Arg Ala Gln

835 840 845

Ser Gly Ser Val Pro Gln Phe Lys Lys Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Thr

850 855 860

Asp Gly Ser Phe Thr Gln Pro Leu Tyr Arg Gly Glu Leu Asn Glu His

865 870 875 880

Leu Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Tyr Ile Arg Ala Glu Val Glu Asp Asn Ile

885 890 895

Met Val Thr Phe Arg Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser

900 905 910

Ser Leu Ile Ser Tyr Glu Glu Asp Gln Arg Gln Gly Ala Glu Pro Arg

915 920 925

Lys Asn Phe Val Lys Pro Asn Glu Thr Lys Thr Tyr Phe Trp Lys Val

930 935 940

Gln His His Met Ala Pro Thr Lys Asp Glu Phe Asp Cys Lys Ala Trp

945 950 955 960

Ala Tyr Phe Ser Asp Val Asp Leu Glu Lys Asp Val His Ser Gly Leu

965 970 975

Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Val Cys His Thr Asn Thr Leu Asn Pro Ala His

980 985 990

Gly Arg Gln Val Thr Val Gln Glu Phe Ala Leu Phe Phe Thr Ile Phe

995 1000 1005

Asp Glu Thr Lys Ser Trp Tyr Phe Thr Glu Asn Met Glu Arg Asn

1010 1015 1020

Cys Arg Ala Pro Cys Asn Ile Gln Met Glu Asp Pro Thr Phe Lys

1025 1030 1035

Glu Asn Tyr Arg Phe His Ala Ile Asn Gly Tyr Ile Met Asp Thr

1040 1045 1050

Leu Pro Gly Leu Val Met Ala Gln Asp Gln Arg Ile Arg Trp Tyr

1055 1060 1065

Leu Leu Ser Met Gly Ser Asn Glu Asn Ile His Ser Ile His Phe

1070 1075 1080

Ser Gly His Val Phe Thr Val Arg Lys Lys Glu Glu Tyr Lys Met

1085 1090 1095

Ala Leu Tyr Asn Leu Tyr Pro Gly Val Phe Glu Thr Val Glu Met

1100 1105 1110

Leu Pro Ser Lys Ala Gly Ile Trp Arg Val Glu Cys Leu Ile Gly

1115 1120 1125

Glu His Leu His Ala Gly Met Ser Thr Leu Phe Leu Val Tyr Ser

1130 1135 1140

Asn Lys Cys Gln Thr Pro Leu Gly Met Ala Ser Gly His Ile Arg

1145 1150 1155

Asp Phe Gln Ile Thr Ala Ser Gly Gln Tyr Gly Gln Trp Ala Pro

1160 1165 1170

Lys Leu Ala Arg Leu His Tyr Ser Gly Ser Ile Asn Ala Trp Ser

1175 1180 1185

Thr Lys Glu Pro Phe Ser Trp Ile Lys Val Asp Leu Leu Ala Pro

1190 1195 1200

Met Ile Ile His Gly Ile Lys Thr Gln Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Phe

1205 1210 1215

Ser Ser Leu Tyr Ile Ser Gln Phe Ile Ile Met Tyr Ser Leu Asp

1220 1225 1230

Gly Lys Lys Trp Gln Thr Tyr Arg Gly Asn Ser Thr Gly Thr Leu

1235 1240 1245

Met Val Phe Phe Gly Asn Val Asp Ser Ser Gly Ile Lys His Asn

1250 1255 1260

Ile Phe Asn Pro Pro Ile Ile Ala Arg Tyr Ile Arg Leu His Pro

1265 1270 1275

Thr His Tyr Ser Ile Arg Ser Thr Leu Arg Met Glu Leu Met Gly

1280 1285 1290

Cys Asp Leu Asn Ser Cys Ser Met Pro Leu Gly Met Glu Ser Lys

1295 1300 1305

Ala Ile Ser Asp Ala Gln Ile Thr Ala Ser Ser Tyr Phe Thr Asn

1310 1315 1320

Met Phe Ala Thr Trp Ser Pro Ser Lys Ala Arg Leu His Leu Gln

1325 1330 1335

Gly Arg Ser Asn Ala Trp Arg Pro Gln Val Asn Asn Pro Lys Glu

1340 1345 1350

Trp Leu Gln Val Asp Phe Gln Lys Thr Met Lys Val Thr Gly Val

1355 1360 1365

Thr Thr Gln Gly Val Lys Ser Leu Leu Thr Ser Met Tyr Val Lys

1370 1375 1380

Glu Phe Leu Ile Ser Ser Ser Gln Asp Gly His Gln Trp Thr Leu

1385 1390 1395

Phe Phe Gln Asn Gly Lys Val Lys Val Phe Gln Gly Asn Gln Asp

1400 1405 1410

Ser Phe Thr Pro Val Val Asn Ser Leu Asp Pro Pro Leu Leu Thr

1415 1420 1425

Arg Tyr Leu Arg Ile His Pro Gln Ser Trp Val His Gln Ile Ala

1430 1435 1440

Leu Arg Met Glu Val Leu Gly Cys Glu Ala Gln Asp Leu Tyr Asp

1445 1450 1455

Lys Thr His Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly

1460 1465 1470

Gly Pro Ser Val Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu

1475 1480 1485

Met Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val Asp Val

1490 1495 1500

Ser His Glu Asp Pro Glu Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp Gly

1505 1510 1515

Val Glu Val His Asn Ala Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr

1520 1525 1530

Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val Val Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln

1535 1540 1545

Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys Glu Tyr Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys

1550 1555 1560

Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly

1565 1570 1575

Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln Val Tyr Thr Leu Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp

1580 1585 1590

Glu Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln Val Ser Leu Thr Cys Leu Val Lys Gly

1595 1600 1605

Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp Ile Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser Asn Gly Gln

1610 1615 1620

Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp Ser Asp

1625 1630 1635

Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr Ser Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser Arg

1640 1645 1650

Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala

1655 1660 1665

Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly

1670 1675 1680

Lys

<210> SEQ ID NO: 3

<211> LENGTH: 762

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(30)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Ig-Kappa signal peptide

<400> SEQENCE: 3

atggagacag acacactcct gctatgggta ctgctgctct gggttccagg ttccactggt 60

gacaaaactc acacatgccc accgtgccca gcacctgaac tcctgggagg accgtcagtc 120

ttcctcttcc ccccaaaacc caaggacacc ctcatgatct cccggacccc tgaggtcaca 180

tgcgtggtgg tggacgtgag ccacgaagac cctgaggtca agttcaactg gtacgtggac 240

ggcgtggagg tgcataatgc caagacaaag ccgcgggagg agcagtacaa cagcacgtac 300

cgtgtggtca gcgtcctcac cgtcctgcac caggactggc tgaatggcaa ggagtacaag 360

tgcaaggtct ccaacaaagc cctcccagcc cccatcgaga aaaccatctc caaagccaaa 420

gggcagcccc gagaaccaca ggtgtacacc ctgcccccat cccgcgatga gctgaccaag 480

aaccaggtca gcctgacctg cctggtcaaa ggcttctatc ccagcgacat cgccgtggag 540

tgggagagca atgggcagcc ggagaacaac tacaagacca cgcctcccgt gttggactcc 600

gacggctcct tcttcctcta cagcaagctc accgtggaca agagcaggtg gcagcagggg 660

aacgtcttct catgctccgt gatgcatgag gctctgcaca accactacac gcagaagagc 720

ctctccctgt ctccgggtaa actctccctg tctccgggta aa 762

<210> SEQ ID NO: 4

<211> LENGTH: 247

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(10)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Ig-Kappa signal peptide

<400> SEQENCE: 4

Met Glu Thr Asp Thr Leu Leu Leu Trp Val Leu Leu Leu Trp Val Pro

1 5 10 15

Gly Ser Thr Gly Asp Lys Thr His Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro

20 25 30

Glu Leu Leu Gly Gly Pro Ser Val Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys

35 40 45

Asp Thr Leu Met Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val

50 55 60

Asp Val Ser His Glu Asp Pro Glu Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp

65 70 75 80

Gly Val Glu Val His Asn Ala Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr

85 90 95

Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val Val Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln Asp

100 105 110

Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys Glu Tyr Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys Ala Leu

115 120 125

Pro Ala Pro Ile Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly Gln Pro Arg

130 135 140

Glu Pro Gln Val Tyr Thr Leu Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu Leu Thr Lys

145 150 155 160

Asn Gln Val Ser Leu Thr Cys Leu Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp

165 170 175

Ile Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser Asn Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys

180 185 190

Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp Ser Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr Ser

195 200 205

Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser Arg Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val Phe Ser

210 215 220

Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr Gln Lys Ser

225 230 235 240

Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly Lys

245

<210> SEQ ID NO: 5

<211> LENGTH: 7674

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Full Length FVIIIFc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(57)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (6993)..(7674)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc Region

<400> SEQENCE: 5

atgcaaatag agctctccac ctgcttcttt ctgtgccttt tgcgattctg ctttagtgcc 60

accagaagat actacctggg tgcagtggaa ctgtcatggg actatatgca aagtgatctc 120

ggtgagctgc ctgtggacgc aagatttcct cctagagtgc caaaatcttt tccattcaac 180

acctcagtcg tgtacaaaaa gactctgttt gtagaattca cggatcacct tttcaacatc 240

gctaagccaa ggccaccctg gatgggtctg ctaggtccta ccatccaggc tgaggtttat 300

gatacagtgg tcattacact taagaacatg gcttcccatc ctgtcagtct tcatgctgtt 360

ggtgtatcct actggaaagc ttctgaggga gctgaatatg atgatcagac cagtcaaagg 420

gagaaagaag atgataaagt cttccctggt ggaagccata catatgtctg gcaggtcctg 480

aaagagaatg gtccaatggc ctctgaccca ctgtgcctta cctactcata tctttctcat 540

gtggacctgg taaaagactt gaattcaggc ctcattggag ccctactagt atgtagagaa 600

gggagtctgg ccaaggaaaa gacacagacc ttgcacaaat ttatactact ttttgctgta 660

tttgatgaag ggaaaagttg gcactcagaa acaaagaact ccttgatgca ggatagggat 720

gctgcatctg ctcgggcctg gcctaaaatg cacacagtca atggttatgt aaacaggtct 780

ctgccaggtc tgattggatg ccacaggaaa tcagtctatt ggcatgtgat tggaatgggc 840

accactcctg aagtgcactc aatattcctc gaaggtcaca catttcttgt gaggaaccat 900

cgccaggcgt ccttggaaat ctcgccaata actttcctta ctgctcaaac actcttgatg 960

gaccttggac agtttctact gttttgtcat atctcttccc accaacatga tggcatggaa 1020

gcttatgtca aagtagacag ctgtccagag gaaccccaac tacgaatgaa aaataatgaa 1080

gaagcggaag actatgatga tgatcttact gattctgaaa tggatgtggt caggtttgat 1140

gatgacaact ctccttcctt tatccaaatt cgctcagttg ccaagaagca tcctaaaact 1200

tgggtacatt acattgctgc tgaagaggag gactgggact atgctccctt agtcctcgcc 1260

cccgatgaca gaagttataa aagtcaatat ttgaacaatg gccctcagcg gattggtagg 1320

aagtacaaaa aagtccgatt tatggcatac acagatgaaa cctttaagac tcgtgaagct 1380

attcagcatg aatcaggaat cttgggacct ttactttatg gggaagttgg agacacactg 1440

ttgattatat ttaagaatca agcaagcaga ccatataaca tctaccctca cggaatcact 1500

gatgtccgtc ctttgtattc aaggagatta ccaaaaggtg taaaacattt gaaggatttt 1560

ccaattctgc caggagaaat attcaaatat aaatggacag tgactgtaga agatgggcca 1620

actaaatcag atcctcggtg cctgacccgc tattactcta gtttcgttaa tatggagaga 1680

gatctagctt caggactcat tggccctctc ctcatctgct acaaagaatc tgtagatcaa 1740

agaggaaacc agataatgtc agacaagagg aatgtcatcc tgttttctgt atttgatgag 1800

aaccgaagct ggtacctcac agagaatata caacgctttc tccccaatcc agctggagtg 1860

cagcttgagg atccagagtt ccattgtttg catgaggtgg catactggta cattctaagc 1920

attggagcac agactgactt cctttctgtc ttcttctctg gatatacctt caaacacaaa 1980

atggtctatg aagacacact caccctattc ccattctcag gagaaactgt cttcatgtcg 2040

atggaaaacc caggtctatg gattctgggg tgccacaact cagactttcg gaacagaggc 2100

atgaccgcct tactgaaggt ttctagttgt gacaagaaca ctggtgatta ttacgaggac 2160

agttatgaag atatttcagc atacttgctg agtaaaaaca atgccattga accaagaagc 2220

ttctcccaga attcaagaca ccctagcact aggcaaaagc aatttaatgc caccacaatt 2280

ccagaaaatg acatagagaa gactgaccct tggtttgcac acagaacacc tatgcctaaa 2340

atacaaaatg tctcctctag tgatttgttg atgctcttgc gacagagtcc tactccacat 2400

gggctatcct tatctgatct ccaagaagcc aaatatgaga ctttttctga tgatccatca 2460

cctggagcaa tagacagtaa taacagcctg tctgaaatga cacacttcag gccacagctc 2520

catcacagtg gggacatggt atttacccct gagtcaggcc tccaattaag attaaatgag 2580

aaactgggga caactgcagc aacagagttg aagaaacttg atttcaaagt ttctagtaca 2640

tcaaataatc tgatttcaac aattccatca gacaatttgg cagcaggtac tgataataca 2700

agttccttag gacccccaag tatgccagtt cattatgata gtcaattaga taccactcta 2760

tttggcaaaa agtcatctcc ccttactgag tctggtggac ctctgagctt gagtgaagaa 2820

aataatgatt caaagttgtt agaatcaggt ttaatgaata gccaagaaag ttcatgggga 2880

aaaaatgtat cgtcaacaga gagtggtagg ttatttaaag ggaaaagagc tcatggacct 2940

gctttgttga ctaaagataa tgccttattc aaagttagca tctctttgtt aaagacaaac 3000

aaaacttcca ataattcagc aactaataga aagactcaca ttgatggccc atcattatta 3060

attgagaata gtccatcagt ctggcaaaat atattagaaa gtgacactga gtttaaaaaa 3120

gtgacacctt tgattcatga cagaatgctt atggacaaaa atgctacagc tttgaggcta 3180

aatcatatgt caaataaaac tacttcatca aaaaacatgg aaatggtcca acagaaaaaa 3240

gagggcccca ttccaccaga tgcacaaaat ccagatatgt cgttctttaa gatgctattc 3300

ttgccagaat cagcaaggtg gatacaaagg actcatggaa agaactctct gaactctggg 3360

caaggcccca gtccaaagca attagtatcc ttaggaccag aaaaatctgt ggaaggtcag 3420

aatttcttgt ctgagaaaaa caaagtggta gtaggaaagg gtgaatttac aaaggacgta 3480

ggactcaaag agatggtttt tccaagcagc agaaacctat ttcttactaa cttggataat 3540

ttacatgaaa ataatacaca caatcaagaa aaaaaaattc aggaagaaat agaaaagaag 3600

gaaacattaa tccaagagaa tgtagttttg cctcagatac atacagtgac tggcactaag 3660

aatttcatga agaacctttt cttactgagc actaggcaaa atgtagaagg ttcatatgac 3720

ggggcatatg ctccagtact tcaagatttt aggtcattaa atgattcaac aaatagaaca 3780

aagaaacaca cagctcattt ctcaaaaaaa ggggaggaag aaaacttgga aggcttggga 3840

aatcaaacca agcaaattgt agagaaatat gcatgcacca caaggatatc tcctaataca 3900

agccagcaga attttgtcac gcaacgtagt aagagagctt tgaaacaatt cagactccca 3960

ctagaagaaa cagaacttga aaaaaggata attgtggatg acacctcaac ccagtggtcc 4020

aaaaacatga aacatttgac cccgagcacc ctcacacaga tagactacaa tgagaaggag 4080

aaaggggcca ttactcagtc tcccttatca gattgcctta cgaggagtca tagcatccct 4140

caagcaaata gatctccatt acccattgca aaggtatcat catttccatc tattagacct 4200

atatatctga ccagggtcct attccaagac aactcttctc atcttccagc agcatcttat 4260

agaaagaaag attctggggt ccaagaaagc agtcatttct tacaaggagc caaaaaaaat 4320

aacctttctt tagccattct aaccttggag atgactggtg atcaaagaga ggttggctcc 4380

ctggggacaa gtgccacaaa ttcagtcaca tacaagaaag ttgagaacac tgttctcccg 4440

aaaccagact tgcccaaaac atctggcaaa gttgaattgc ttccaaaagt tcacatttat 4500

cagaaggacc tattccctac ggaaactagc aatgggtctc ctggccatct ggatctcgtg 4560

gaagggagcc ttcttcaggg aacagaggga gcgattaagt ggaatgaagc aaacagacct 4620

ggaaaagttc cctttctgag agtagcaaca gaaagctctg caaagactcc ctccaagcta 4680

ttggatcctc ttgcttggga taaccactat ggtactcaga taccaaaaga agagtggaaa 4740

tcccaagaga agtcaccaga aaaaacagct tttaagaaaa aggataccat tttgtccctg 4800

aacgcttgtg aaagcaatca tgcaatagca gcaataaatg agggacaaaa taagcccgaa 4860

atagaagtca cctgggcaaa gcaaggtagg actgaaaggc tgtgctctca aaacccacca 4920

gtcttgaaac gccatcaacg ggaaataact cgtactactc ttcagtcaga tcaagaggaa 4980

attgactatg atgataccat atcagttgaa atgaagaagg aagattttga catttatgat 5040

gaggatgaaa atcagagccc ccgcagcttt caaaagaaaa cacgacacta ttttattgct 5100

gcagtggaga ggctctggga ttatgggatg agtagctccc cacatgttct aagaaacagg 5160

gctcagagtg gcagtgtccc tcagttcaag aaagttgttt tccaggaatt tactgatggc 5220

tcctttactc agcccttata ccgtggagaa ctaaatgaac atttgggact cctggggcca 5280

tatataagag cagaagttga agataatatc atggtaactt tcagaaatca ggcctctcgt 5340

ccctattcct tctattctag ccttatttct tatgaggaag atcagaggca aggagcagaa 5400

cctagaaaaa actttgtcaa gcctaatgaa accaaaactt acttttggaa agtgcaacat 5460

catatggcac ccactaaaga tgagtttgac tgcaaagcct gggcttattt ctctgatgtt 5520

gacctggaaa aagatgtgca ctcaggcctg attggacccc ttctggtctg ccacactaac 5580

acactgaacc ctgctcatgg gagacaagtg acagtacagg aatttgctct gtttttcacc 5640

atctttgatg agaccaaaag ctggtacttc actgaaaata tggaaagaaa ctgcagggct 5700

ccctgcaata tccagatgga agatcccact tttaaagaga attatcgctt ccatgcaatc 5760

aatggctaca taatggatac actacctggc ttagtaatgg ctcaggatca aaggattcga 5820

tggtatctgc tcagcatggg cagcaatgaa aacatccatt ctattcattt cagtggacat 5880

gtgttcactg tacgaaaaaa agaggagtat aaaatggcac tgtacaatct ctatccaggt 5940

gtttttgaga cagtggaaat gttaccatcc aaagctggaa tttggcgggt ggaatgcctt 6000

attggcgagc atctacatgc tgggatgagc acactttttc tggtgtacag caataagtgt 6060

cagactcccc tgggaatggc ttctggacac attagagatt ttcagattac agcttcagga 6120

caatatggac agtgggcccc aaagctggcc agacttcatt attccggatc aatcaatgcc 6180

tggagcacca aggagccctt ttcttggatc aaggtggatc tgttggcacc aatgattatt 6240

cacggcatca agacccaggg tgcccgtcag aagttctcca gcctctacat ctctcagttt 6300

atcatcatgt atagtcttga tgggaagaag tggcagactt atcgaggaaa ttccactgga 6360

accttaatgg tcttctttgg caatgtggat tcatctggga taaaacacaa tatttttaac 6420

cctccaatta ttgctcgata catccgtttg cacccaactc attatagcat tcgcagcact 6480

cttcgcatgg agttgatggg ctgtgattta aatagttgca gcatgccatt gggaatggag 6540

agtaaagcaa tatcagatgc acagattact gcttcatcct actttaccaa tatgtttgcc 6600

acctggtctc cttcaaaagc tcgacttcac ctccaaggga ggagtaatgc ctggagacct 6660

caggtgaata atccaaaaga gtggctgcaa gtggacttcc agaagacaat gaaagtcaca 6720

ggagtaacta ctcagggagt aaaatctctg cttaccagca tgtatgtgaa ggagttcctc 6780

atctccagca gtcaagatgg ccatcagtgg actctctttt ttcagaatgg caaagtaaag 6840

gtttttcagg gaaatcaaga ctccttcaca cctgtggtga actctctaga cccaccgtta 6900

ctgactcgct accttcgaat tcacccccag agttgggtgc accagattgc cctgaggatg 6960

gaggttctgg gctgcgaggc acaggacctc tacgacaaaa ctcacacatg cccaccgtgc 7020

ccagctccag aactcctggg cggaccgtca gtcttcctct tccccccaaa acccaaggac 7080

accctcatga tctcccggac ccctgaggtc acatgcgtgg tggtggacgt gagccacgaa 7140

gaccctgagg tcaagttcaa ctggtacgtg gacggcgtgg aggtgcataa tgccaagaca 7200

aagccgcggg aggagcagta caacagcacg taccgtgtgg tcagcgtcct caccgtcctg 7260

caccaggact ggctgaatgg caaggagtac aagtgcaagg tctccaacaa agccctccca 7320

gcccccatcg agaaaaccat ctccaaagcc aaagggcagc cccgagaacc acaggtgtac 7380

accctgcccc catcccggga tgagctgacc aagaaccagg tcagcctgac ctgcctggtc 7440

aaaggcttct atcccagcga catcgccgtg gagtgggaga gcaatgggca gccggagaac 7500

aactacaaga ccacgcctcc cgtgttggac tccgacggct ccttcttcct ctacagcaag 7560

ctcaccgtgg acaagagcag gtggcagcag gggaacgtct tctcatgctc cgtgatgcat 7620

gaggctctgc acaaccacta cacgcagaag agcctctccc tgtctccggg taaa 7674

<210> SEQ ID NO: 6

<211> LENGTH: 2578

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Full Length FVIIIFc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(19)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: MISC_FEATURE

<222> LOCATION: (2331)..(2578)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc region

<400> SEQENCE: 6

Met Gln Ile Glu Leu Ser Thr Cys Phe Phe Leu Cys Leu Leu Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

Cys Phe Ser Ala Thr Arg Arg Tyr Tyr Leu Gly Ala Val Glu Leu Ser

20 25 30

Trp Asp Tyr Met Gln Ser Asp Leu Gly Glu Leu Pro Val Asp Ala Arg

35 40 45

Phe Pro Pro Arg Val Pro Lys Ser Phe Pro Phe Asn Thr Ser Val Val

50 55 60

Tyr Lys Lys Thr Leu Phe Val Glu Phe Thr Asp His Leu Phe Asn Ile

65 70 75 80

Ala Lys Pro Arg Pro Pro Trp Met Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Thr Ile Gln

85 90 95

Ala Glu Val Tyr Asp Thr Val Val Ile Thr Leu Lys Asn Met Ala Ser

100 105 110

His Pro Val Ser Leu His Ala Val Gly Val Ser Tyr Trp Lys Ala Ser

115 120 125

Glu Gly Ala Glu Tyr Asp Asp Gln Thr Ser Gln Arg Glu Lys Glu Asp

130 135 140

Asp Lys Val Phe Pro Gly Gly Ser His Thr Tyr Val Trp Gln Val Leu

145 150 155 160

Lys Glu Asn Gly Pro Met Ala Ser Asp Pro Leu Cys Leu Thr Tyr Ser

165 170 175

Tyr Leu Ser His Val Asp Leu Val Lys Asp Leu Asn Ser Gly Leu Ile

180 185 190

Gly Ala Leu Leu Val Cys Arg Glu Gly Ser Leu Ala Lys Glu Lys Thr

195 200 205

Gln Thr Leu His Lys Phe Ile Leu Leu Phe Ala Val Phe Asp Glu Gly

210 215 220

Lys Ser Trp His Ser Glu Thr Lys Asn Ser Leu Met Gln Asp Arg Asp

225 230 235 240

Ala Ala Ser Ala Arg Ala Trp Pro Lys Met His Thr Val Asn Gly Tyr

245 250 255

Val Asn Arg Ser Leu Pro Gly Leu Ile Gly Cys His Arg Lys Ser Val

260 265 270

Tyr Trp His Val Ile Gly Met Gly Thr Thr Pro Glu Val His Ser Ile

275 280 285

Phe Leu Glu Gly His Thr Phe Leu Val Arg Asn His Arg Gln Ala Ser

290 295 300

Leu Glu Ile Ser Pro Ile Thr Phe Leu Thr Ala Gln Thr Leu Leu Met

305 310 315 320

Asp Leu Gly Gln Phe Leu Leu Phe Cys His Ile Ser Ser His Gln His

325 330 335

Asp Gly Met Glu Ala Tyr Val Lys Val Asp Ser Cys Pro Glu Glu Pro

340 345 350

Gln Leu Arg Met Lys Asn Asn Glu Glu Ala Glu Asp Tyr Asp Asp Asp

355 360 365

Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu Met Asp Val Val Arg Phe Asp Asp Asp Asn Ser

370 375 380

Pro Ser Phe Ile Gln Ile Arg Ser Val Ala Lys Lys His Pro Lys Thr

385 390 395 400

Trp Val His Tyr Ile Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Asp Trp Asp Tyr Ala Pro

405 410 415

Leu Val Leu Ala Pro Asp Asp Arg Ser Tyr Lys Ser Gln Tyr Leu Asn

420 425 430

Asn Gly Pro Gln Arg Ile Gly Arg Lys Tyr Lys Lys Val Arg Phe Met

435 440 445

Ala Tyr Thr Asp Glu Thr Phe Lys Thr Arg Glu Ala Ile Gln His Glu

450 455 460

Ser Gly Ile Leu Gly Pro Leu Leu Tyr Gly Glu Val Gly Asp Thr Leu

465 470 475 480

Leu Ile Ile Phe Lys Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Asn Ile Tyr Pro

485 490 495

His Gly Ile Thr Asp Val Arg Pro Leu Tyr Ser Arg Arg Leu Pro Lys

500 505 510

Gly Val Lys His Leu Lys Asp Phe Pro Ile Leu Pro Gly Glu Ile Phe

515 520 525

Lys Tyr Lys Trp Thr Val Thr Val Glu Asp Gly Pro Thr Lys Ser Asp

530 535 540

Pro Arg Cys Leu Thr Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Ser Phe Val Asn Met Glu Arg

545 550 555 560

Asp Leu Ala Ser Gly Leu Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Ile Cys Tyr Lys Glu

565 570 575

Ser Val Asp Gln Arg Gly Asn Gln Ile Met Ser Asp Lys Arg Asn Val

580 585 590

Ile Leu Phe Ser Val Phe Asp Glu Asn Arg Ser Trp Tyr Leu Thr Glu

595 600 605

Asn Ile Gln Arg Phe Leu Pro Asn Pro Ala Gly Val Gln Leu Glu Asp

610 615 620

Pro Glu Phe Gln Ala Ser Asn Ile Met His Ser Ile Asn Gly Tyr Val

625 630 635 640

Phe Asp Ser Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Cys Leu His Glu Val Ala Tyr Trp

645 650 655

Tyr Ile Leu Ser Ile Gly Ala Gln Thr Asp Phe Leu Ser Val Phe Phe

660 665 670

Ser Gly Tyr Thr Phe Lys His Lys Met Val Tyr Glu Asp Thr Leu Thr

675 680 685

Leu Phe Pro Phe Ser Gly Glu Thr Val Phe Met Ser Met Glu Asn Pro

690 695 700

Gly Leu Trp Ile Leu Gly Cys His Asn Ser Asp Phe Arg Asn Arg Gly

705 710 715 720

Met Thr Ala Leu Leu Lys Val Ser Ser Cys Asp Lys Asn Thr Gly Asp

725 730 735

Tyr Tyr Glu Asp Ser Tyr Glu Asp Ile Ser Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Lys

740 745 750

Asn Asn Ala Ile Glu Pro Arg Ser Phe Ser Gln Asn Ser Arg His Pro

755 760 765

Ser Thr Arg Gln Lys Gln Phe Asn Ala Thr Thr Ile Pro Glu Asn Asp

770 775 780

Ile Glu Lys Thr Asp Pro Trp Phe Ala His Arg Thr Pro Met Pro Lys

785 790 795 800

Ile Gln Asn Val Ser Ser Ser Asp Leu Leu Met Leu Leu Arg Gln Ser

805 810 815

Pro Thr Pro His Gly Leu Ser Leu Ser Asp Leu Gln Glu Ala Lys Tyr

820 825 830

Glu Thr Phe Ser Asp Asp Pro Ser Pro Gly Ala Ile Asp Ser Asn Asn

835 840 845

Ser Leu Ser Glu Met Thr His Phe Arg Pro Gln Leu His His Ser Gly

850 855 860

Asp Met Val Phe Thr Pro Glu Ser Gly Leu Gln Leu Arg Leu Asn Glu

865 870 875 880

Lys Leu Gly Thr Thr Ala Ala Thr Glu Leu Lys Lys Leu Asp Phe Lys

885 890 895

Val Ser Ser Thr Ser Asn Asn Leu Ile Ser Thr Ile Pro Ser Asp Asn

900 905 910

Leu Ala Ala Gly Thr Asp Asn Thr Ser Ser Leu Gly Pro Pro Ser Met

915 920 925

Pro Val His Tyr Asp Ser Gln Leu Asp Thr Thr Leu Phe Gly Lys Lys

930 935 940

Ser Ser Pro Leu Thr Glu Ser Gly Gly Pro Leu Ser Leu Ser Glu Glu

945 950 955 960

Asn Asn Asp Ser Lys Leu Leu Glu Ser Gly Leu Met Asn Ser Gln Glu

965 970 975

Ser Ser Trp Gly Lys Asn Val Ser Ser Thr Glu Ser Gly Arg Leu Phe

980 985 990

Lys Gly Lys Arg Ala His Gly Pro Ala Leu Leu Thr Lys Asp Asn Ala

995 1000 1005

Leu Phe Lys Val Ser Ile Ser Leu Leu Lys Thr Asn Lys Thr Ser

1010 1015 1020

Asn Asn Ser Ala Thr Asn Arg Lys Thr His Ile Asp Gly Pro Ser

1025 1030 1035

Leu Leu Ile Glu Asn Ser Pro Ser Val Trp Gln Asn Ile Leu Glu

1040 1045 1050

Ser Asp Thr Glu Phe Lys Lys Val Thr Pro Leu Ile His Asp Arg

1055 1060 1065

Met Leu Met Asp Lys Asn Ala Thr Ala Leu Arg Leu Asn His Met

1070 1075 1080

Ser Asn Lys Thr Thr Ser Ser Lys Asn Met Glu Met Val Gln Gln

1085 1090 1095

Lys Lys Glu Gly Pro Ile Pro Pro Asp Ala Gln Asn Pro Asp Met

1100 1105 1110

Ser Phe Phe Lys Met Leu Phe Leu Pro Glu Ser Ala Arg Trp Ile

1115 1120 1125

Gln Arg Thr His Gly Lys Asn Ser Leu Asn Ser Gly Gln Gly Pro

1130 1135 1140

Ser Pro Lys Gln Leu Val Ser Leu Gly Pro Glu Lys Ser Val Glu

1145 1150 1155

Gly Gln Asn Phe Leu Ser Glu Lys Asn Lys Val Val Val Gly Lys

1160 1165 1170

Gly Glu Phe Thr Lys Asp Val Gly Leu Lys Glu Met Val Phe Pro

1175 1180 1185

Ser Ser Arg Asn Leu Phe Leu Thr Asn Leu Asp Asn Leu His Glu

1190 1195 1200

Asn Asn Thr His Asn Gln Glu Lys Lys Ile Gln Glu Glu Ile Glu

1205 1210 1215

Lys Lys Glu Thr Leu Ile Gln Glu Asn Val Val Leu Pro Gln Ile

1220 1225 1230

His Thr Val Thr Gly Thr Lys Asn Phe Met Lys Asn Leu Phe Leu

1235 1240 1245

Leu Ser Thr Arg Gln Asn Val Glu Gly Ser Tyr Asp Gly Ala Tyr

1250 1255 1260

Ala Pro Val Leu Gln Asp Phe Arg Ser Leu Asn Asp Ser Thr Asn

1265 1270 1275

Arg Thr Lys Lys His Thr Ala His Phe Ser Lys Lys Gly Glu Glu

1280 1285 1290

Glu Asn Leu Glu Gly Leu Gly Asn Gln Thr Lys Gln Ile Val Glu

1295 1300 1305

Lys Tyr Ala Cys Thr Thr Arg Ile Ser Pro Asn Thr Ser Gln Gln

1310 1315 1320

Asn Phe Val Thr Gln Arg Ser Lys Arg Ala Leu Lys Gln Phe Arg

1325 1330 1335

Leu Pro Leu Glu Glu Thr Glu Leu Glu Lys Arg Ile Ile Val Asp

1340 1345 1350

Asp Thr Ser Thr Gln Trp Ser Lys Asn Met Lys His Leu Thr Pro

1355 1360 1365

Ser Thr Leu Thr Gln Ile Asp Tyr Asn Glu Lys Glu Lys Gly Ala

1370 1375 1380

Ile Thr Gln Ser Pro Leu Ser Asp Cys Leu Thr Arg Ser His Ser

1385 1390 1395

Ile Pro Gln Ala Asn Arg Ser Pro Leu Pro Ile Ala Lys Val Ser

1400 1405 1410

Ser Phe Pro Ser Ile Arg Pro Ile Tyr Leu Thr Arg Val Leu Phe

1415 1420 1425

Gln Asp Asn Ser Ser His Leu Pro Ala Ala Ser Tyr Arg Lys Lys

1430 1435 1440

Asp Ser Gly Val Gln Glu Ser Ser His Phe Leu Gln Gly Ala Lys

1445 1450 1455

Lys Asn Asn Leu Ser Leu Ala Ile Leu Thr Leu Glu Met Thr Gly

1460 1465 1470

Asp Gln Arg Glu Val Gly Ser Leu Gly Thr Ser Ala Thr Asn Ser

1475 1480 1485

Val Thr Tyr Lys Lys Val Glu Asn Thr Val Leu Pro Lys Pro Asp

1490 1495 1500

Leu Pro Lys Thr Ser Gly Lys Val Glu Leu Leu Pro Lys Val His

1505 1510 1515

Ile Tyr Gln Lys Asp Leu Phe Pro Thr Glu Thr Ser Asn Gly Ser

1520 1525 1530

Pro Gly His Leu Asp Leu Val Glu Gly Ser Leu Leu Gln Gly Thr

1535 1540 1545

Glu Gly Ala Ile Lys Trp Asn Glu Ala Asn Arg Pro Gly Lys Val

1550 1555 1560

Pro Phe Leu Arg Val Ala Thr Glu Ser Ser Ala Lys Thr Pro Ser

1565 1570 1575

Lys Leu Leu Asp Pro Leu Ala Trp Asp Asn His Tyr Gly Thr Gln

1580 1585 1590

Ile Pro Lys Glu Glu Trp Lys Ser Gln Glu Lys Ser Pro Glu Lys

1595 1600 1605

Thr Ala Phe Lys Lys Lys Asp Thr Ile Leu Ser Leu Asn Ala Cys

1610 1615 1620

Glu Ser Asn His Ala Ile Ala Ala Ile Asn Glu Gly Gln Asn Lys

1625 1630 1635

Pro Glu Ile Glu Val Thr Trp Ala Lys Gln Gly Arg Thr Glu Arg

1640 1645 1650

Leu Cys Ser Gln Asn Pro Pro Val Leu Lys Arg His Gln Arg Glu

1655 1660 1665

Ile Thr Arg Thr Thr Leu Gln Ser Asp Gln Glu Glu Ile Asp Tyr

1670 1675 1680

Asp Asp Thr Ile Ser Val Glu Met Lys Lys Glu Asp Phe Asp Ile

1685 1690 1695

Tyr Asp Glu Asp Glu Asn Gln Ser Pro Arg Ser Phe Gln Lys Lys

1700 1705 1710

Thr Arg His Tyr Phe Ile Ala Ala Val Glu Arg Leu Trp Asp Tyr

1715 1720 1725

Gly Met Ser Ser Ser Pro His Val Leu Arg Asn Arg Ala Gln Ser

1730 1735 1740

Gly Ser Val Pro Gln Phe Lys Lys Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Thr

1745 1750 1755

Asp Gly Ser Phe Thr Gln Pro Leu Tyr Arg Gly Glu Leu Asn Glu

1760 1765 1770

His Leu Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Tyr Ile Arg Ala Glu Val Glu Asp

1775 1780 1785

Asn Ile Met Val Thr Phe Arg Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Ser

1790 1795 1800

Phe Tyr Ser Ser Leu Ile Ser Tyr Glu Glu Asp Gln Arg Gln Gly

1805 1810 1815

Ala Glu Pro Arg Lys Asn Phe Val Lys Pro Asn Glu Thr Lys Thr

1820 1825 1830

Tyr Phe Trp Lys Val Gln His His Met Ala Pro Thr Lys Asp Glu

1835 1840 1845

Phe Asp Cys Lys Ala Trp Ala Tyr Phe Ser Asp Val Asp Leu Glu

1850 1855 1860

Lys Asp Val His Ser Gly Leu Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Val Cys His

1865 1870 1875

Thr Asn Thr Leu Asn Pro Ala His Gly Arg Gln Val Thr Val Gln

1880 1885 1890

Glu Phe Ala Leu Phe Phe Thr Ile Phe Asp Glu Thr Lys Ser Trp

1895 1900 1905

Tyr Phe Thr Glu Asn Met Glu Arg Asn Cys Arg Ala Pro Cys Asn

1910 1915 1920

Ile Gln Met Glu Asp Pro Thr Phe Lys Glu Asn Tyr Arg Phe His

1925 1930 1935

Ala Ile Asn Gly Tyr Ile Met Asp Thr Leu Pro Gly Leu Val Met

1940 1945 1950

Ala Gln Asp Gln Arg Ile Arg Trp Tyr Leu Leu Ser Met Gly Ser

1955 1960 1965

Asn Glu Asn Ile His Ser Ile His Phe Ser Gly His Val Phe Thr

1970 1975 1980

Val Arg Lys Lys Glu Glu Tyr Lys Met Ala Leu Tyr Asn Leu Tyr

1985 1990 1995

Pro Gly Val Phe Glu Thr Val Glu Met Leu Pro Ser Lys Ala Gly

2000 2005 2010

Ile Trp Arg Val Glu Cys Leu Ile Gly Glu His Leu His Ala Gly

2015 2020 2025

Met Ser Thr Leu Phe Leu Val Tyr Ser Asn Lys Cys Gln Thr Pro

2030 2035 2040

Leu Gly Met Ala Ser Gly His Ile Arg Asp Phe Gln Ile Thr Ala

2045 2050 2055

Ser Gly Gln Tyr Gly Gln Trp Ala Pro Lys Leu Ala Arg Leu His

2060 2065 2070

Tyr Ser Gly Ser Ile Asn Ala Trp Ser Thr Lys Glu Pro Phe Ser

2075 2080 2085

Trp Ile Lys Val Asp Leu Leu Ala Pro Met Ile Ile His Gly Ile

2090 2095 2100

Lys Thr Gln Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys Phe Ser Ser Leu Tyr Ile Ser

2105 2110 2115

Gln Phe Ile Ile Met Tyr Ser Leu Asp Gly Lys Lys Trp Gln Thr

2120 2125 2130

Tyr Arg Gly Asn Ser Thr Gly Thr Leu Met Val Phe Phe Gly Asn

2135 2140 2145

Val Asp Ser Ser Gly Ile Lys His Asn Ile Phe Asn Pro Pro Ile

2150 2155 2160

Ile Ala Arg Tyr Ile Arg Leu His Pro Thr His Tyr Ser Ile Arg

2165 2170 2175

Ser Thr Leu Arg Met Glu Leu Met Gly Cys Asp Leu Asn Ser Cys

2180 2185 2190

Ser Met Pro Leu Gly Met Glu Ser Lys Ala Ile Ser Asp Ala Gln

2195 2200 2205

Ile Thr Ala Ser Ser Tyr Phe Thr Asn Met Phe Ala Thr Trp Ser

2210 2215 2220

Pro Ser Lys Ala Arg Leu His Leu Gln Gly Arg Ser Asn Ala Trp

2225 2230 2235

Arg Pro Gln Val Asn Asn Pro Lys Glu Trp Leu Gln Val Asp Phe

2240 2245 2250

Gln Lys Thr Met Lys Val Thr Gly Val Thr Thr Gln Gly Val Lys

2255 2260 2265

Ser Leu Leu Thr Ser Met Tyr Val Lys Glu Phe Leu Ile Ser Ser

2270 2275 2280

Ser Gln Asp Gly His Gln Trp Thr Leu Phe Phe Gln Asn Gly Lys

2285 2290 2295

Val Lys Val Phe Gln Gly Asn Gln Asp Ser Phe Thr Pro Val Val

2300 2305 2310

Asn Ser Leu Asp Pro Pro Leu Leu Thr Arg Tyr Leu Arg Ile His

2315 2320 2325

Pro Gln Ser Trp Val His Gln Ile Ala Leu Arg Met Glu Val Leu

2330 2335 2340

Gly Cys Glu Ala Gln Asp Leu Tyr Asp Lys Thr His Thr Cys Pro

2345 2350 2355

Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly Gly Pro Ser Val Phe Leu

2360 2365 2370

Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu Met Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro

2375 2380 2385

Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val Asp Val Ser His Glu Asp Pro Glu

2390 2395 2400

Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp Gly Val Glu Val His Asn Ala

2405 2410 2415

Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val

2420 2425 2430

Val Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys

2435 2440 2445

Glu Tyr Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile

2450 2455 2460

Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln

2465 2470 2475

Val Tyr Thr Leu Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln

2480 2485 2490

Val Ser Leu Thr Cys Leu Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp Ile

2495 2500 2505

Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser Asn Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys

2510 2515 2520

Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp Ser Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr

2525 2530 2535

Ser Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser Arg Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val

2540 2545 2550

Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr

2555 2560 2565

Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly Lys

2570 2575

<210> SEQ ID NO: 7

<211> LENGTH: 2957

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(57)

<400> SEQENCE: 7

atgcaaatag agctctccac ctgcttcttt ctgtgccttt tgcgattctg ctttagtgcc 60

accagaagat actacctggg tgcagtggaa ctgtcatggg actatatgca aagtgatctc 120

ggtgagctgc ctgtggacgc aagatttcct cctagagtgc caaaatcttt tccattcaac 180

acctcagtcg tgtacaaaaa gactctgttt gtagaattca cggatcacct tttcaacatc 240

gctaagccaa ggccaccctg gatgggtctg ctaggtccta ccatccaggc tgaggtttat 300

gatacagtgg tcattacact taagaacatg gcttcccatc ctgtcagtct tcatgctgtt 360

ggtgtatcct actggaaagc ttctgaggga gctgaatatg atgatcagac cagtcaaagg 420

gagaaagaag atgataaagt cttccctggt ggaagccata catatgtctg gcaggtcctg 480

aaagagaatg gtccaatggc ctctgaccca ctgtgcctta cctactcata tctttctcat 540

gtggacctgg taaaagactt gaattcaggc ctcattggag ccctactagt atgtagagag 600

ggagtctggc caaggaaaag acacagacct tgcacaaatt tatactactt tttgctgtat 660

ttgatgaagg gaaaagttgg cactcagaaa caaagaactc cttgatgcag gatagggatg 720

ctgcatctgc tcgggcctgg cctaaaatgc acacagtcaa tggttatgta aacaggtctc 780

tgccaggtct gattggatgc cacaggaaat cagtctattg gcatgtgatt ggaatgggca 840

ccactcctga agtgcactca atattcctcg aaggtcacac atttcttgtg aggaaccatc 900

gccaggcgtc cttggaaatc tcgccaataa ctttccttac tgctcaaaca ctcttgatgg 960

accttggaca gtttctactg ttttgtcata tctcttccca ccaacatgat ggcatggaag 1020

cttatgtcaa agtagacagc tgtccagagg aaccccaact acgaatgaaa aataatgaag 1080

aagcggaaga ctatgatgat gatcttactg attctgaaat ggatgtggtc aggtttgatg 1140

atgacaactc tccttccttt atccaaattc gctcagttgc caagaagcat cctaaaactt 1200

gggtacatta cattgctgct gaagaggagg actgggacta tgctccctta gtcctcgccc 1260

ccgatgacag aagttataaa agtcaatatt tgaacaatgg ccctcagcgg attggtagga 1320

agtacaaaaa agtccgattt atggcataca cagatgaaac ctttaagact cgtgaagcta 1380

ttcagcatga atcaggaatc ttgggacctt tactttatgg ggaagttgga gacacactgt 1440

tgattatatt taagaatcaa gcaagcagac catataacat ctaccctcac ggaatcactg 1500

atgtccgtcc tttgtattca aggagattac caaaaggtgt aaaacatttg aaggattttc 1560

caattctgcc aggagaaata ttcaaatata aatggacagt gactgtagaa gatgggccaa 1620

ctaaatcaga tcctcggtgc ctgacccgct attactctag tttcgttaat atggagagag 1680

atctagcttc aggactcatt ggccctctcc tcatctgcta caaagaatct gtagatcaaa 1740

gaggaaacca gataatgtca gacaagagga atgtcatcct gttttctgta tttgatgaga 1800

accgaagctg gtacctcaca gagaatatac aacgctttct ccccaatcca gctggagtgc 1860

agcttgagga tccagagttc caagcctcca acatcatgca cagcatcaat ggctatgttt 1920

ttgatagttt gcagttgtca gtttgtttgc atgaggtggc atactggtac attctaagca 1980

ttggagcaca gactgacttc ctttctgtct tcttctctgg atataccttc aaacacaaaa 2040

tggtctatga agacacactc accctattcc cattctcagg agaaactgtc ttcatgtcga 2100

tggaaaaccc aggtctatgg attctggggt gccacaactc agactttcgg aacagaggca 2160

tgaccgcctt actgaaggtt tctagttgtg acaagaacac tggtgattat tacgaggaca 2220

gttatgaaga tatttcagca tacttgctga gtaaaaacaa tgccattgaa ccaagagaca 2280

aaactcacac atgcccaccg tgcccagctc cagaactcct gggcggaccg tcagtcttcc 2340

tcttcccccc aaaacccaag gacaccctca tgatctcccg gacccctgag gtcacatgcg 2400

tggtggtgga cgtgagccac gaagaccctg aggtcaagtt caactggtac gtggacggcg 2460

tggaggtgca taatgccaag acaaagccgc gggaggagca gtacaacagc acgtaccgtg 2520

tggtcagcgt cctcaccgtc ctgcaccagg actggctgaa tggcaaggag tacaagtgca 2580

aggtctccaa caaagccctc ccagccccca tcgagaaaac catctccaaa gccaaagggc 2640

agccccgaga accacaggtg tacaccctgc ccccatcccg ggatgagctg accaagaacc 2700

aggtcagcct gacctgcctg gtcaaaggct tctatcccag cgacatcgcc gtggagtggg 2760

agagcaatgg gcagccggag aacaactaca agaccacgcc tcccgtgttg gactccgacg 2820

gctccttctt cctctacagc aagctcaccg tggacaagag caggtggcag caggggaacg 2880

tcttctcatg ctccgtgatg catgaggctc tgcacaacca ctacacgcag aagagcctct 2940

ccctgtctcc gggtaaa 2957

<210> SEQ ID NO: 8

<211> LENGTH: 986

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(19)

<400> SEQENCE: 8

Met Gln Ile Glu Leu Ser Thr Cys Phe Phe Leu Cys Leu Leu Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

Cys Phe Ser Ala Thr Arg Arg Tyr Tyr Leu Gly Ala Val Glu Leu Ser

20 25 30

Trp Asp Tyr Met Gln Ser Asp Leu Gly Glu Leu Pro Val Asp Ala Arg

35 40 45

Phe Pro Pro Arg Val Pro Lys Ser Phe Pro Phe Asn Thr Ser Val Val

50 55 60

Tyr Lys Lys Thr Leu Phe Val Glu Phe Thr Asp His Leu Phe Asn Ile

65 70 75 80

Ala Lys Pro Arg Pro Pro Trp Met Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Thr Ile Gln

85 90 95

Ala Glu Val Tyr Asp Thr Val Val Ile Thr Leu Lys Asn Met Ala Ser

100 105 110

His Pro Val Ser Leu His Ala Val Gly Val Ser Tyr Trp Lys Ala Ser

115 120 125

Glu Gly Ala Glu Tyr Asp Asp Gln Thr Ser Gln Arg Glu Lys Glu Asp

130 135 140

Asp Lys Val Phe Pro Gly Gly Ser His Thr Tyr Val Trp Gln Val Leu

145 150 155 160

Lys Glu Asn Gly Pro Met Ala Ser Asp Pro Leu Cys Leu Thr Tyr Ser

165 170 175

Tyr Leu Ser His Val Asp Leu Val Lys Asp Leu Asn Ser Gly Leu Ile

180 185 190

Gly Ala Leu Leu Val Cys Arg Glu Gly Ser Leu Ala Lys Glu Lys Thr

195 200 205

Gln Thr Leu His Lys Phe Ile Leu Leu Phe Ala Val Phe Asp Glu Gly

210 215 220

Lys Ser Trp His Ser Glu Thr Lys Asn Ser Leu Met Gln Asp Arg Asp

225 230 235 240

Ala Ala Ser Ala Arg Ala Trp Pro Lys Met His Thr Val Asn Gly Tyr

245 250 255

Val Asn Arg Ser Leu Pro Gly Leu Ile Gly Cys His Arg Lys Ser Val

260 265 270

Tyr Trp His Val Ile Gly Met Gly Thr Thr Pro Glu Val His Ser Ile

275 280 285

Phe Leu Glu Gly His Thr Phe Leu Val Arg Asn His Arg Gln Ala Ser

290 295 300

Leu Glu Ile Ser Pro Ile Thr Phe Leu Thr Ala Gln Thr Leu Leu Met

305 310 315 320

Asp Leu Gly Gln Phe Leu Leu Phe Cys His Ile Ser Ser His Gln His

325 330 335

Asp Gly Met Glu Ala Tyr Val Lys Val Asp Ser Cys Pro Glu Glu Pro

340 345 350

Gln Leu Arg Met Lys Asn Asn Glu Glu Ala Glu Asp Tyr Asp Asp Asp

355 360 365

Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu Met Asp Val Val Arg Phe Asp Asp Asp Asn Ser

370 375 380

Pro Ser Phe Ile Gln Ile Arg Ser Val Ala Lys Lys His Pro Lys Thr

385 390 395 400

Trp Val His Tyr Ile Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Asp Trp Asp Tyr Ala Pro

405 410 415

Leu Val Leu Ala Pro Asp Asp Arg Ser Tyr Lys Ser Gln Tyr Leu Asn

420 425 430

Asn Gly Pro Gln Arg Ile Gly Arg Lys Tyr Lys Lys Val Arg Phe Met

435 440 445

Ala Tyr Thr Asp Glu Thr Phe Lys Thr Arg Glu Ala Ile Gln His Glu

450 455 460

Ser Gly Ile Leu Gly Pro Leu Leu Tyr Gly Glu Val Gly Asp Thr Leu

465 470 475 480

Leu Ile Ile Phe Lys Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Asn Ile Tyr Pro

485 490 495

His Gly Ile Thr Asp Val Arg Pro Leu Tyr Ser Arg Arg Leu Pro Lys

500 505 510

Gly Val Lys His Leu Lys Asp Phe Pro Ile Leu Pro Gly Glu Ile Phe

515 520 525

Lys Tyr Lys Trp Thr Val Thr Val Glu Asp Gly Pro Thr Lys Ser Asp

530 535 540

Pro Arg Cys Leu Thr Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Ser Phe Val Asn Met Glu Arg

545 550 555 560

Asp Leu Ala Ser Gly Leu Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Ile Cys Tyr Lys Glu

565 570 575

Ser Val Asp Gln Arg Gly Asn Gln Ile Met Ser Asp Lys Arg Asn Val

580 585 590

Ile Leu Phe Ser Val Phe Asp Glu Asn Arg Ser Trp Tyr Leu Thr Glu

595 600 605

Asn Ile Gln Arg Phe Leu Pro Asn Pro Ala Gly Val Gln Leu Glu Asp

610 615 620

Pro Glu Phe Gln Ala Ser Asn Ile Met His Ser Ile Asn Gly Tyr Val

625 630 635 640

Phe Asp Ser Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Cys Leu His Glu Val Ala Tyr Trp

645 650 655

Tyr Ile Leu Ser Ile Gly Ala Gln Thr Asp Phe Leu Ser Val Phe Phe

660 665 670

Ser Gly Tyr Thr Phe Lys His Lys Met Val Tyr Glu Asp Thr Leu Thr

675 680 685

Leu Phe Pro Phe Ser Gly Glu Thr Val Phe Met Ser Met Glu Asn Pro

690 695 700

Gly Leu Trp Ile Leu Gly Cys His Asn Ser Asp Phe Arg Asn Arg Gly

705 710 715 720

Met Thr Ala Leu Leu Lys Val Ser Ser Cys Asp Lys Asn Thr Gly Asp

725 730 735

Tyr Tyr Glu Asp Ser Tyr Glu Asp Ile Ser Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Lys

740 745 750

Asn Asn Ala Ile Glu Pro Arg Asp Lys Thr His Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys

755 760 765

Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly Gly Pro Ser Val Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro

770 775 780

Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu Met Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro Glu Val Thr Cys

785 790 795 800

Val Val Val Asp Val Ser His Glu Asp Pro Glu Val Lys Phe Asn Trp

805 810 815

Tyr Val Asp Gly Val Glu Val His Asn Ala Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu

820 825 830

Glu Gln Tyr Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val Val Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu

835 840 845

His Gln Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys Glu Tyr Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn

850 855 860

Lys Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly

865 870 875 880

Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln Val Tyr Thr Leu Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu

885 890 895

Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln Val Ser Leu Thr Cys Leu Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr

900 905 910

Pro Ser Asp Ile Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser Asn Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn

915 920 925

Asn Tyr Lys Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp Ser Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe

930 935 940

Leu Tyr Ser Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser Arg Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn

945 950 955 960

Val Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr

965 970 975

Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly Lys

980 985

<210> SEQ ID NO: 9

<211> LENGTH: 2973

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(57)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (2277)..(2292)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: amino acid linker

<400> SEQENCE: 9

atgcaaatag agctctccac ctgcttcttt ctgtgccttt tgcgattctg ctttagtgcc 60

accagaagat actacctggg tgcagtggaa ctgtcatggg actatatgca aagtgatctc 120

ggtgagctgc ctgtggacgc aagatttcct cctagagtgc caaaatcttt tccattcaac 180

acctcagtcg tgtacaaaaa gactctgttt gtagaattca cggatcacct tttcaacatc 240

gctaagccaa ggccaccctg gatgggtctg ctaggtccta ccatccaggc tgaggtttat 300

gatacagtgg tcattacact taagaacatg gcttcccatc ctgtcagtct tcatgctgtt 360

ggtgtatcct actggaaagc ttctgaggga gctgaatatg atgatcagac cagtcaaagg 420

gagaaagaag atgataaagt cttccctggt ggaagccata catatgtctg gcaggtcctg 480

aaagagaatg gtccaatggc ctctgaccca ctgtgcctta cctactcata tctttctcat 540

gtggacctgg taaaagactt gaattcaggc ctcattggag ccctactagt atgtagagaa 600

gggagtctgg ccaaggaaaa gacacagacc ttgcacaaat ttatactact ttttgctgta 660

tttgatgaag ggaaaagttg gcactcagaa acaaagaact ccttgatgca ggatagggat 720

gctgcatctg ctcgggcctg gcctaaaatg cacacagtca atggttatgt aaacaggtct 780

ctgccaggtc tgattggatg ccacaggaaa tcagtctatt ggcatgtgat tggaatgggc 840

accactcctg aagtgcactc aatattcctc gaaggtcaca catttcttgt gaggaaccat 900

cgccaggcgt ccttggaaat ctcgccaata actttcctta ctgctcaaac actcttgatg 960

gaccttggac agtttctact gttttgtcat atctcttccc accaacatga tggcatggaa 1020

gcttatgtca aagtagacag ctgtccagag gaaccccaac tacgaatgaa aaataatgaa 1080

gaagcggaag actatgatga tgatcttact gattctgaaa tggatgtggt caggtttgat 1140

gatgacaact ctccttcctt tatccaaatt cgctcagttg ccaagaagca tcctaaaact 1200

tgggtacatt acattgctgc tgaagaggag gactgggact atgctccctt agtcctcgcc 1260

cccgatgaca gaagttataa aagtcaatat ttgaacaatg gccctcagcg gattggtagg 1320

aagtacaaaa aagtccgatt tatggcatac acagatgaaa cctttaagac tcgtgaagct 1380

attcagcatg aatcaggaat cttgggacct ttactttatg gggaagttgg agacacactg 1440

ttgattatat ttaagaatca agcaagcaga ccatataaca tctaccctca cggaatcact 1500

gatgtccgtc ctttgtattc aaggagatta ccaaaaggtg taaaacattt gaaggatttt 1560

ccaattctgc caggagaaat attcaaatat aaatggacag tgactgtaga agatgggcca 1620

actaaatcag atcctcggtg cctgacccgc tattactcta gtttcgttaa tatggagaga 1680

gatctagctt caggactcat tggccctctc ctcatctgct acaaagaatc tgtagatcaa 1740

agaggaaacc agataatgtc agacaagagg aatgtcatcc tgttttctgt atttgatgag 1800

aaccgaagct ggtacctcac agagaatata caacgctttc tccccaatcc agctggagtg 1860

cagcttgagg atccagagtt ccaagcctcc aacatcatgc acagcatcaa tggctatgtt 1920

tttgatagtt tgcagttgtc agtttgtttg catgaggtgg catactggta cattctaagc 1980

attggagcac agactgactt cctttctgtc ttcttctctg gatatacctt caaacacaaa 2040

atggtctatg aagacacact caccctattc ccattctcag gagaaactgt cttcatgtcg 2100

atggaaaacc caggtctatg gattctgggg tgccacaact cagactttcg gaacagaggc 2160

atgaccgcct tactgaaggt ttctagttgt gacaagaaca ctggtgatta ttacgaggac 2220

agttatgaag atatttcagc atacttgctg agtaaaaaca atgccattga accaagaagc 2280

ttctcccaga atgacaaaac tcacacatgc ccaccgtgcc cagctccaga actcctgggc 2340

ggaccgtcag tcttcctctt ccccccaaaa cccaaggaca ccctcatgat ctcccggacc 2400

cctgaggtca catgcgtggt ggtggacgtg agccacgaag accctgaggt caagttcaac 2460

tggtacgtgg acggcgtgga ggtgcataat gccaagacaa agccgcggga ggagcagtac 2520

aacagcacgt accgtgtggt cagcgtcctc accgtcctgc accaggactg gctgaatggc 2580

aaggagtaca agtgcaaggt ctccaacaaa gccctcccag cccccatcga gaaaaccatc 2640

tccaaagcca aagggcagcc ccgagaacca caggtgtaca ccctgccccc atcccgggat 2700

gagctgacca agaaccaggt cagcctgacc tgcctggtca aaggcttcta tcccagcgac 2760

atcgccgtgg agtgggagag caatgggcag ccggagaaca actacaagac cacgcctccc 2820

gtgttggact ccgacggctc cttcttcctc tacagcaagc tcaccgtgga caagagcagg 2880

tggcagcagg ggaacgtctt ctcatgctcc gtgatgcatg aggctctgca caaccactac 2940

acgcagaaga gcctctccct gtctccgggt aaa 2973

<210> SEQ ID NO: 10

<211> LENGTH: 991

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Heavy Chain (HC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(19)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: MISC_FEATURE

<222> LOCATION: (759)..(764)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Linker

<400> SEQENCE: 10

Met Gln Ile Glu Leu Ser Thr Cys Phe Phe Leu Cys Leu Leu Arg Phe

1 5 10 15

Cys Phe Ser Ala Thr Arg Arg Tyr Tyr Leu Gly Ala Val Glu Leu Ser

20 25 30

Trp Asp Tyr Met Gln Ser Asp Leu Gly Glu Leu Pro Val Asp Ala Arg

35 40 45

Phe Pro Pro Arg Val Pro Lys Ser Phe Pro Phe Asn Thr Ser Val Val

50 55 60

Tyr Lys Lys Thr Leu Phe Val Glu Phe Thr Asp His Leu Phe Asn Ile

65 70 75 80

Ala Lys Pro Arg Pro Pro Trp Met Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Thr Ile Gln

85 90 95

Ala Glu Val Tyr Asp Thr Val Val Ile Thr Leu Lys Asn Met Ala Ser

100 105 110

His Pro Val Ser Leu His Ala Val Gly Val Ser Tyr Trp Lys Ala Ser

115 120 125

Glu Gly Ala Glu Tyr Asp Asp Gln Thr Ser Gln Arg Glu Lys Glu Asp

130 135 140

Asp Lys Val Phe Pro Gly Gly Ser His Thr Tyr Val Trp Gln Val Leu

145 150 155 160

Lys Glu Asn Gly Pro Met Ala Ser Asp Pro Leu Cys Leu Thr Tyr Ser

165 170 175

Tyr Leu Ser His Val Asp Leu Val Lys Asp Leu Asn Ser Gly Leu Ile

180 185 190

Gly Ala Leu Leu Val Cys Arg Glu Gly Ser Leu Ala Lys Glu Lys Thr

195 200 205

Gln Thr Leu His Lys Phe Ile Leu Leu Phe Ala Val Phe Asp Glu Gly

210 215 220

Lys Ser Trp His Ser Glu Thr Lys Asn Ser Leu Met Gln Asp Arg Asp

225 230 235 240

Ala Ala Ser Ala Arg Ala Trp Pro Lys Met His Thr Val Asn Gly Tyr

245 250 255

Val Asn Arg Ser Leu Pro Gly Leu Ile Gly Cys His Arg Lys Ser Val

260 265 270

Tyr Trp His Val Ile Gly Met Gly Thr Thr Pro Glu Val His Ser Ile

275 280 285

Phe Leu Glu Gly His Thr Phe Leu Val Arg Asn His Arg Gln Ala Ser

290 295 300

Leu Glu Ile Ser Pro Ile Thr Phe Leu Thr Ala Gln Thr Leu Leu Met

305 310 315 320

Asp Leu Gly Gln Phe Leu Leu Phe Cys His Ile Ser Ser His Gln His

325 330 335

Asp Gly Met Glu Ala Tyr Val Lys Val Asp Ser Cys Pro Glu Glu Pro

340 345 350

Gln Leu Arg Met Lys Asn Asn Glu Glu Ala Glu Asp Tyr Asp Asp Asp

355 360 365

Leu Thr Asp Ser Glu Met Asp Val Val Arg Phe Asp Asp Asp Asn Ser

370 375 380

Pro Ser Phe Ile Gln Ile Arg Ser Val Ala Lys Lys His Pro Lys Thr

385 390 395 400

Trp Val His Tyr Ile Ala Ala Glu Glu Glu Asp Trp Asp Tyr Ala Pro

405 410 415

Leu Val Leu Ala Pro Asp Asp Arg Ser Tyr Lys Ser Gln Tyr Leu Asn

420 425 430

Asn Gly Pro Gln Arg Ile Gly Arg Lys Tyr Lys Lys Val Arg Phe Met

435 440 445

Ala Tyr Thr Asp Glu Thr Phe Lys Thr Arg Glu Ala Ile Gln His Glu

450 455 460

Ser Gly Ile Leu Gly Pro Leu Leu Tyr Gly Glu Val Gly Asp Thr Leu

465 470 475 480

Leu Ile Ile Phe Lys Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Asn Ile Tyr Pro

485 490 495

His Gly Ile Thr Asp Val Arg Pro Leu Tyr Ser Arg Arg Leu Pro Lys

500 505 510

Gly Val Lys His Leu Lys Asp Phe Pro Ile Leu Pro Gly Glu Ile Phe

515 520 525

Lys Tyr Lys Trp Thr Val Thr Val Glu Asp Gly Pro Thr Lys Ser Asp

530 535 540

Pro Arg Cys Leu Thr Arg Tyr Tyr Ser Ser Phe Val Asn Met Glu Arg

545 550 555 560

Asp Leu Ala Ser Gly Leu Ile Gly Pro Leu Leu Ile Cys Tyr Lys Glu

565 570 575

Ser Val Asp Gln Arg Gly Asn Gln Ile Met Ser Asp Lys Arg Asn Val

580 585 590

Ile Leu Phe Ser Val Phe Asp Glu Asn Arg Ser Trp Tyr Leu Thr Glu

595 600 605

Asn Ile Gln Arg Phe Leu Pro Asn Pro Ala Gly Val Gln Leu Glu Asp

610 615 620

Pro Glu Phe Gln Ala Ser Asn Ile Met His Ser Ile Asn Gly Tyr Val

625 630 635 640

Phe Asp Ser Leu Gln Leu Ser Val Cys Leu His Glu Val Ala Tyr Trp

645 650 655

Tyr Ile Leu Ser Ile Gly Ala Gln Thr Asp Phe Leu Ser Val Phe Phe

660 665 670

Ser Gly Tyr Thr Phe Lys His Lys Met Val Tyr Glu Asp Thr Leu Thr

675 680 685

Leu Phe Pro Phe Ser Gly Glu Thr Val Phe Met Ser Met Glu Asn Pro

690 695 700

Gly Leu Trp Ile Leu Gly Cys His Asn Ser Asp Phe Arg Asn Arg Gly

705 710 715 720

Met Thr Ala Leu Leu Lys Val Ser Ser Cys Asp Lys Asn Thr Gly Asp

725 730 735

Tyr Tyr Glu Asp Ser Tyr Glu Asp Ile Ser Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Lys

740 745 750

Asn Asn Ala Ile Glu Pro Arg Ser Phe Ser Gln Asn Asp Lys Thr His

755 760 765

Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly Gly Pro Ser Val

770 775 780

Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu Met Ile Ser Arg Thr

785 790 795 800

Pro Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val Asp Val Ser His Glu Asp Pro Glu

805 810 815

Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp Gly Val Glu Val His Asn Ala Lys

820 825 830

Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val Val Ser

835 840 845

Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys Glu Tyr Lys

850 855 860

Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile Glu Lys Thr Ile

865 870 875 880

Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln Val Tyr Thr Leu Pro

885 890 895

Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln Val Ser Leu Thr Cys Leu

900 905 910

Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp Ile Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser Asn

915 920 925

Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp Ser

930 935 940

Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr Ser Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser Arg

945 950 955 960

Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala Leu

965 970 975

His Asn His Tyr Thr Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly Lys

980 985 990

<210> SEQ ID NO: 11

<211> LENGTH: 2793

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Light Chain (LC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: sig_peptide

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(60)

<400> SEQENCE: 11

atggagacag acacactcct gctatgggta ctgctgctct gggttccagg ttccactggt 60

gaaataactc gtactactct tcagtcagat caagaggaaa ttgactatga tgataccata 120

tcagttgaaa tgaagaagga agattttgac atttatgatg aggatgaaaa tcagagcccc 180

cgcagctttc aaaagaaaac acgacactat tttattgctg cagtggagag gctctgggat 240

tatgggatga gtagctcccc acatgttcta agaaacaggg ctcagagtgg cagtgtccct 300

cagttcaaga aagttgtttt ccaggaattt actgatggct cctttactca gcccttatac 360

cgtggagaac taaatgaaca tttgggactc ctggggccat atataagagc agaagttgaa 420

gataatatca tggtaacttt cagaaatcag gcctctcgtc cctattcctt ctattctagc 480

cttatttctt atgaggaaga tcagaggcaa ggagcagaac ctagaaaaaa ctttgtcaag 540

cctaatgaaa ccaaaactta cttttggaaa gtgcaacatc atatggcacc cactaaagat 600

gagtttgact gcaaagcctg ggcttatttc tctgatgttg acctggaaaa agatgtgcac 660

tcaggcctga ttggacccct tctggtctgc cacactaaca cactgaaccc tgctcatggg 720

agacaagtga cagtacagga atttgctctg tttttcacca tctttgatga gaccaaaagc 780

tggtacttca ctgaaaatat ggaaagaaac tgcagggctc cctgcaatat ccagatggaa 840

gatcccactt ttaaagagaa ttatcgcttc catgcaatca atggctacat aatggataca 900

ctacctggct tagtaatggc tcaggatcaa aggattcgat ggtatctgct cagcatgggc 960

agcaatgaaa acatccattc tattcatttc agtggacatg tgttcactgt acgaaaaaaa 1020

gaggagtata aaatggcact gtacaatctc tatccaggtg tttttgagac agtggaaatg 1080

ttaccatcca aagctggaat ttggcgggtg gaatgcctta ttggcgagca tctacatgct 1140

gggatgagca cactttttct ggtgtacagc aataagtgtc agactcccct gggaatggct 1200

tctggacaca ttagagattt tcagattaca gcttcaggac aatatggaca gtgggcccca 1260

aagctggcca gacttcatta ttccggatca atcaatgcct ggagcaccaa ggagcccttt 1320

tcttggatca aggtggatct gttggcacca atgattattc acggcatcaa gacccagggt 1380

gcccgtcaga agttctccag cctctacatc tctcagttta tcatcatgta tagtcttgat 1440

gggaagaagt ggcagactta tcgaggaaat tccactggaa ccttaatggt cttctttggc 1500

aatgtggatt catctgggat aaaacacaat atttttaacc ctccaattat tgctcgatac 1560

atccgtttgc acccaactca ttatagcatt cgcagcactc ttcgcatgga gttgatgggc 1620

tgtgatttaa atagttgcag catgccattg ggaatggaga gtaaagcaat atcagatgca 1680

cagattactg cttcatccta ctttaccaat atgtttgcca cctggtctcc ttcaaaagct 1740

cgacttcacc tccaagggag gagtaatgcc tggagacctc aggtgaataa tccaaaagag 1800

tggctgcaag tggacttcca gaagacaatg aaagtcacag gagtaactac tcagggagta 1860

aaatctctgc ttaccagcat gtatgtgaag gagttcctca tctccagcag tcaagatggc 1920

catcagtgga ctctcttttt tcagaatggc aaagtaaagg tttttcaggg aaatcaagac 1980

tccttcacac ctgtggtgaa ctctctagac ccaccgttac tgactcgcta ccttcgaatt 2040

cacccccaga gttgggtgca ccagattgcc ctgaggatgg aggttctggg ctgcgaggca 2100

caggacctct acgacaaaac tcacacatgc ccaccgtgcc cagctccaga actcctgggc 2160

ggaccgtcag tcttcctctt ccccccaaaa cccaaggaca ccctcatgat ctcccggacc 2220

cctgaggtca catgcgtggt ggtggacgtg agccacgaag accctgaggt caagttcaac 2280

tggtacgtgg acggcgtgga ggtgcataat gccaagacaa agccgcggga ggagcagtac 2340

aacagcacgt accgtgtggt cagcgtcctc accgtcctgc accaggactg gctgaatggc 2400

aaggagtaca agtgcaaggt ctccaacaaa gccctcccag cccccatcga gaaaaccatc 2460

tccaaagcca aagggcagcc ccgagaacca caggtgtaca ccctgccccc atcccgggat 2520

gagctgacca agaaccaggt cagcctgacc tgcctggtca aaggcttcta tcccagcgac 2580

atcgccgtgg agtgggagag caatgggcag ccggagaaca actacaagac cacgcctccc 2640

gtgttggact ccgacggctc cttcttcctc tacagcaagc tcaccgtgga caagagcagg 2700

tggcagcagg ggaacgtctt ctcatgctcc gtgatgcatg aggctctgca caaccactac 2760

acgcagaaga gcctctccct gtctccgggt aaa 2793

<210> SEQ ID NO: 12

<211> LENGTH: 931

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Light Chain (LC)-Fc

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(20)

<400> SEQENCE: 12

Met Glu Thr Asp Thr Leu Leu Leu Trp Val Leu Leu Leu Trp Val Pro

1 5 10 15

Gly Ser Thr Gly Glu Ile Thr Arg Thr Thr Leu Gln Ser Asp Gln Glu

20 25 30

Glu Ile Asp Tyr Asp Asp Thr Ile Ser Val Glu Met Lys Lys Glu Asp

35 40 45

Phe Asp Ile Tyr Asp Glu Asp Glu Asn Gln Ser Pro Arg Ser Phe Gln

50 55 60

Lys Lys Thr Arg His Tyr Phe Ile Ala Ala Val Glu Arg Leu Trp Asp

65 70 75 80

Tyr Gly Met Ser Ser Ser Pro His Val Leu Arg Asn Arg Ala Gln Ser

85 90 95

Gly Ser Val Pro Gln Phe Lys Lys Val Val Phe Gln Glu Phe Thr Asp

100 105 110

Gly Ser Phe Thr Gln Pro Leu Tyr Arg Gly Glu Leu Asn Glu His Leu

115 120 125

Gly Leu Leu Gly Pro Tyr Ile Arg Ala Glu Val Glu Asp Asn Ile Met

130 135 140

Val Thr Phe Arg Asn Gln Ala Ser Arg Pro Tyr Ser Phe Tyr Ser Ser

145 150 155 160

Leu Ile Ser Tyr Glu Glu Asp Gln Arg Gln Gly Ala Glu Pro Arg Lys

165 170 175

Asn Phe Val Lys Pro Asn Glu Thr Lys Thr Tyr Phe Trp Lys Val Gln

180 185 190

His His Met Ala Pro Thr Lys Asp Glu Phe Asp Cys Lys Ala Trp Ala

195 200 205

Tyr Phe Ser Asp Val Asp Leu Glu Lys Asp Val His Ser Gly Leu Ile

210 215 220

Gly Pro Leu Leu Val Cys His Thr Asn Thr Leu Asn Pro Ala His Gly

225 230 235 240

Arg Gln Val Thr Val Gln Glu Phe Ala Leu Phe Phe Thr Ile Phe Asp

245 250 255

Glu Thr Lys Ser Trp Tyr Phe Thr Glu Asn Met Glu Arg Asn Cys Arg

260 265 270

Ala Pro Cys Asn Ile Gln Met Glu Asp Pro Thr Phe Lys Glu Asn Tyr

275 280 285

Arg Phe His Ala Ile Asn Gly Tyr Ile Met Asp Thr Leu Pro Gly Leu

290 295 300

Val Met Ala Gln Asp Gln Arg Ile Arg Trp Tyr Leu Leu Ser Met Gly

305 310 315 320

Ser Asn Glu Asn Ile His Ser Ile His Phe Ser Gly His Val Phe Thr

325 330 335

Val Arg Lys Lys Glu Glu Tyr Lys Met Ala Leu Tyr Asn Leu Tyr Pro

340 345 350

Gly Val Phe Glu Thr Val Glu Met Leu Pro Ser Lys Ala Gly Ile Trp

355 360 365

Arg Val Glu Cys Leu Ile Gly Glu His Leu His Ala Gly Met Ser Thr

370 375 380

Leu Phe Leu Val Tyr Ser Asn Lys Cys Gln Thr Pro Leu Gly Met Ala

385 390 395 400

Ser Gly His Ile Arg Asp Phe Gln Ile Thr Ala Ser Gly Gln Tyr Gly

405 410 415

Gln Trp Ala Pro Lys Leu Ala Arg Leu His Tyr Ser Gly Ser Ile Asn

420 425 430

Ala Trp Ser Thr Lys Glu Pro Phe Ser Trp Ile Lys Val Asp Leu Leu

435 440 445

Ala Pro Met Ile Ile His Gly Ile Lys Thr Gln Gly Ala Arg Gln Lys

450 455 460

Phe Ser Ser Leu Tyr Ile Ser Gln Phe Ile Ile Met Tyr Ser Leu Asp

465 470 475 480

Gly Lys Lys Trp Gln Thr Tyr Arg Gly Asn Ser Thr Gly Thr Leu Met

485 490 495

Val Phe Phe Gly Asn Val Asp Ser Ser Gly Ile Lys His Asn Ile Phe

500 505 510

Asn Pro Pro Ile Ile Ala Arg Tyr Ile Arg Leu His Pro Thr His Tyr

515 520 525

Ser Ile Arg Ser Thr Leu Arg Met Glu Leu Met Gly Cys Asp Leu Asn

530 535 540

Ser Cys Ser Met Pro Leu Gly Met Glu Ser Lys Ala Ile Ser Asp Ala

545 550 555 560

Gln Ile Thr Ala Ser Ser Tyr Phe Thr Asn Met Phe Ala Thr Trp Ser

565 570 575

Pro Ser Lys Ala Arg Leu His Leu Gln Gly Arg Ser Asn Ala Trp Arg

580 585 590

Pro Gln Val Asn Asn Pro Lys Glu Trp Leu Gln Val Asp Phe Gln Lys

595 600 605

Thr Met Lys Val Thr Gly Val Thr Thr Gln Gly Val Lys Ser Leu Leu

610 615 620

Thr Ser Met Tyr Val Lys Glu Phe Leu Ile Ser Ser Ser Gln Asp Gly

625 630 635 640

His Gln Trp Thr Leu Phe Phe Gln Asn Gly Lys Val Lys Val Phe Gln

645 650 655

Gly Asn Gln Asp Ser Phe Thr Pro Val Val Asn Ser Leu Asp Pro Pro

660 665 670

Leu Leu Thr Arg Tyr Leu Arg Ile His Pro Gln Ser Trp Val His Gln

675 680 685

Ile Ala Leu Arg Met Glu Val Leu Gly Cys Glu Ala Gln Asp Leu Tyr

690 695 700

Asp Lys Thr His Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly

705 710 715 720

Gly Pro Ser Val Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu Met

725 730 735

Ile Ser Arg Thr Pro Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val Asp Val Ser His

740 745 750

Glu Asp Pro Glu Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp Gly Val Glu Val

755 760 765

His Asn Ala Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr Asn Ser Thr Tyr

770 775 780

Arg Val Val Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly

785 790 795 800

Lys Glu Tyr Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile

805 810 815

Glu Lys Thr Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln Val

820 825 830

Tyr Thr Leu Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln Val Ser

835 840 845

Leu Thr Cys Leu Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp Ile Ala Val Glu

850 855 860

Trp Glu Ser Asn Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys Thr Thr Pro Pro

865 870 875 880

Val Leu Asp Ser Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr Ser Lys Leu Thr Val

885 890 895

Asp Lys Ser Arg Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met

900 905 910

His Glu Ala Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser

915 920 925

Pro Gly Lys

930

<210> SEQ ID NO: 13

<211> LENGTH: 7583

<212> TYPE: DNA

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX-Fc Chain

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: exon

<222> LOCATION: (690)..(777)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX exon 1

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: Intron

<222> LOCATION: (778)..(1076)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX mini intron

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1077)..(1126)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX propeptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (1127)..(2371)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Mature FIX

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: misc_feature

<222> LOCATION: (2372)..(3052)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Fc region

<400> SEQENCE: 13

gcgcgcgttg acattgatta ttgactagtt attaatagta atcaattacg gggtcattag 60

ttcatagccc atatatggag ttccgcgtta cataacttac ggtaaatggc ccgcctggct 120

gaccgcccaa cgacccccgc ccattgacgt caataatgac gtatgttccc atagtaacgc 180

caatagggac tttccattga cgtcaatggg tggagtattt acggtaaact gcccacttgg 240

cagtacatca agtgtatcat atgccaagta cgccccctat tgacgtcaat gacggtaaat 300

ggcccgcctg gcattatgcc cagtacatga ccttatggga ctttcctact tggcagtaca 360

tctacgtatt agtcatcgct attaccatgg tgatgcggtt ttggcagtac atcaatgggc 420

gtggatagcg gtttgactca cggggatttc caagtctcca ccccattgac gtcaatggga 480

gtttgttttg gcaccaaaat caacgggact ttccaaaatg tcgtaacaac tccgccccat 540

tgacgcaaat gggcggtagg cgtgtacggt gggaggtcta tataagcaga gctctctggc 600

taactagaga acccactgct tactggctta tcgaaattaa tacgactcac tatagggaga 660

cccaagcttc gcgacgtacg gccgccacc atg cag cgc gtg aac atg atc atg 713

Met Gln Arg Val Asn Met Ile Met

1 5

gca gaa tca cca ggc ctc atc acc atc tgc ctt tta gga tat cta ctc 761

Ala Glu Ser Pro Gly Leu Ile Thr Ile Cys Leu Leu Gly Tyr Leu Leu

10 15 20

agt gct gaa tgt aca g gtttgtttcc ttttttaaaa tacattgagt atgcttgcct 817

Ser Ala Glu Cys Thr

25

tttagatata gaaatatctg atgctgtctt cttcactaaa ttttgattac atgatttgac 877

agcaatattg aagagtctaa cagccagcac gcaggttggt aagtactgtg ggaacatcac 937

agattttggc tccatgccct aaagagaaat tggctttcag attatttgga ttaaaaacaa 997

agactttctt aagagatgta aaattttcat gatgttttct tttttgctaa aactaaagaa 1057

ttattctttt acatttcagt ttttcttgat catgaaaacg ccaacaaaat tctgaatcgg 1117

ccaaagaggt ataattcagg taaattggaa gagtttgttc aagggaatct agagagagaa 1177

tgtatggaag aaaagtgtag ttttgaagaa gcacgagaag tttttgaaaa cactgaaaga 1237

acaactgaat tttggaagca gtatgttgat ggagatcagt gtgagtccaa tccatgttta 1297

aatggcggca gttgcaagga tgacattaat tcctatgaat gttggtgtcc ctttggattt 1357

gaaggaaaga actgtgaatt agatgtaaca tgtaacatta agaatggcag atgcgagcag 1417

ttttgtaaaa atagtgctga taacaaggtg gtttgctcct gtactgaggg atatcgactt 1477

gcagaaaacc agaagtcctg tgaaccagca gtgccatttc catgtggaag agtttctgtt 1537

tcacaaactt ctaagctcac ccgtgctgag actgtttttc ctgatgtgga ctatgtaaat 1597

tctactgaag ctgaaaccat tttggataac atcactcaaa gcacccaatc atttaatgac 1657

ttcactcggg ttgttggtgg agaagatgcc aaaccaggtc aattcccttg gcaggttgtt 1717

ttgaatggta aagttgatgc attctgtgga ggctctatcg ttaatgaaaa atggattgta 1777

actgctgccc actgtgttga aactggtgtt aaaattacag ttgtcgcagg tgaacataat 1837

attgaggaga cagaacatac agagcaaaag cgaaatgtga ttcgaattat tcctcaccac 1897

aactacaatg cagctattaa taagtacaac catgacattg cccttctgga actggacgaa 1957

cccttagtgc taaacagcta cgttacacct atttgcattg ctgacaagga atacacgaac 2017

atcttcctca aatttggatc tggctatgta agtggctggg gaagagtctt ccacaaaggg 2077

agatcagctt tagttcttca gtaccttaga gttccacttg ttgaccgagc cacatgtctt 2137

cgatctacaa agttcaccat ctataacaac atgttctgtg ctggcttcca tgaaggaggt 2197

agagattcat gtcaaggaga tagtggggga ccccatgtta ctgaagtgga agggaccagt 2257

ttcttaactg gaattattag ctggggtgaa gagtgtgcaa tgaaaggcaa atatggaata 2317

tataccaagg tgtcccggta tgtcaactgg attaaggaaa aaacaaagct cactgacaaa 2377

actcacacat gcccaccgtg cccagctccg gaactcctgg gcggaccgtc agtcttcctc 2437

ttccccccaa aacccaagga caccctcatg atctcccgga cccctgaggt cacatgcgtg 2497

gtggtggacg tgagccacga agaccctgag gtcaagttca actggtacgt ggacggcgtg 2557

gaggtgcata atgccaagac aaagccgcgg gaggagcagt acaacagcac gtaccgtgtg 2617

gtcagcgtcc tcaccgtcct gcaccaggac tggctgaatg gcaaggagta caagtgcaag 2677

gtctccaaca aagccctccc agcccccatc gagaaaacca tctccaaagc caaagggcag 2737

ccccgagaac cacaggtgta caccctgccc ccatcccggg atgagctgac caagaaccag 2797

gtcagcctga cctgcctggt caaaggcttc tatcccagcg acatcgccgt ggagtgggag 2857

agcaatgggc agccggagaa caactacaag accacgcctc ccgtgttgga ctccgacggc 2917

tccttcttcc tctacagcaa gctcaccgtg gacaagagca ggtggcagca ggggaacgtc 2977

ttctcatgct ccgtgatgca tgaggctctg cacaaccact acacgcagaa gagcctctcc 3037

ctgtctccgg gtaaatgaga attcagacat gataagatac attgatgagt ttggacaaac 3097

cacaactaga atgcagtgaa aaaaatgctt tatttgtgaa atttgtgatg ctattgcttt 3157

atttgtaacc attataagct gcaataaaca agttggggtg ggcgaagaac tccagcatga 3217

gatccccgcg ctggaggatc atccagccgg cgtcccggaa aacgattccg aagcccaacc 3277

tttcatagaa ggcggcggtg gaatcgaaat ctcgtagcac gtgtcagtcc tgctcctcgg 3337

ccacgaagtg cacgcagttg ccggccgggt cgcgcagggc gaactcccgc ccccacggct 3397

gctcgccgat ctcggtcatg gccggcccgg aggcgtcccg gaagttcgtg gacacgacct 3457

ccgaccactc ggcgtacagc tcgtccaggc cgcgcaccca cacccaggcc agggtgttgt 3517

ccggcaccac ctggtcctgg accgcgctga tgaacagggt cacgtcgtcc cggaccacac 3577

cggcgaagtc gtcctccacg aagtcccggg agaacccgag ccggtcggtc cagaactcga 3637

ccgctccggc gacgtcgcgc gcggtgagca ccggaacggc actggtcaac ttggccatgg 3697

tttagttcct caccttgtcg tattatacta tgccgatata ctatgccgat gattaattgt 3757

caacacgtgc tgatcagatc cgaaaatgga tatacaagct cccgggagct ttttgcaaaa 3817

gcctaggcct ccaaaaaagc ctcctcacta cttctggaat agctcagagg cagaggcggc 3877

ctcggcctct gcataaataa aaaaaattag tcagccatgg ggcggagaat gggcggaact 3937

gggcggagtt aggggcggga tgggcggagt taggggcggg actatggttg ctgactaatt 3997

gagatgcatg ctttgcatac ttctgcctgc tggggagcct ggggactttc cacacctggt 4057

tgctgactaa ttgagatgca tgctttgcat acttctgcct gctggggagc ctggggactt 4117

tccacaccct cgtcgagcta gcttcgtgag gctccggtgc ccgtcagtgg gcagagcgca 4177

catcgcccac agtccccgag aagttggggg gaggggtcgg caattgaacc ggtgcctaga 4237

gaaggtggcg cggggtaaac tgggaaagtg atgtcgtgta ctggctccgc ctttttcccg 4297

agggtggggg agaaccgtat ataagtgcag tagtcgccgt gaacgttctt tttcgcaacg 4357

ggtttgccgc cagaacacag gtaagtgccg tgtgtggttc ccgcgggcct ggcctcttta 4417

cgggttatgg cccttgcgtg ccttgaatta cttccacctg gctccagtac gtgattcttg 4477

atcccgagct ggagccaggg gcgggccttg cgctttagga gccccttcgc ctcgtgcttg 4537

agttgaggcc tggcctgggc gctggggccg ccgcgtgcga atctggtggc accttcgcgc 4597

ctgtctcgct gctttcgata agtctctagc catttaaaat ttttgatgac ctgctgcgac 4657

gctttttttc tggcaagata gtcttgtaaa tgcgggccag gatctgcaca ctggtatttc 4717

ggtttttggg gccgcgggcg gcgacggggc ccgtgcgtcc cagcgcacat gttcggcgag 4777

gcggggcctg cgagcgcggc caccgagaat cggacggggg tagtctcaag ctggccggcc 4837

tgctctggtg cctggcctcg cgccgccgtg tatcgccccg ccctgggcgg caaggctggc 4897

ccggtcggca ccagttgcgt gagcggaaag atggccgctt cccggccctg ctccaggggg 4957

ctcaaaatgg aggacgcggc gctcgggaga gcgggcgggt gagtcaccca cacaaaggaa 5017

aggggccttt ccgtcctcag ccgtcgcttc atgtgactcc acggagtacc gggcgccgtc 5077

caggcacctc gattagttct ggagcttttg gagtacgtcg tctttaggtt ggggggaggg 5137

gttttatgcg atggagtttc cccacactga gtgggtggag actgaagtta ggccagcttg 5197

gcacttgatg taattctcct tggaatttgc cctttttgag tttggatctt ggttcattct 5257

caagcctcag acagtggttc aaagtttttt tcttccattt caggtgtcgt gaacacgtgg 5317

tcgcggccgc gccgccacca tggagacaga cacactcctg ctatgggtac tgctgctctg 5377

ggttccaggt tccactggtg acaaaactca cacatgccca ccgtgcccag cacctgaact 5437

cctgggagga ccgtcagtct tcctcttccc cccaaaaccc aaggacaccc tcatgatctc 5497

ccggacccct gaggtcacat gcgtggtggt ggacgtgagc cacgaagacc ctgaggtcaa 5557

gttcaactgg tacgtggacg gcgtggaggt gcataatgcc aagacaaagc cgcgggagga 5617

gcagtacaac agcacgtacc gtgtggtcag cgtcctcacc gtcctgcacc aggactggct 5677

gaatggcaag gagtacaagt gcaaggtctc caacaaagcc ctcccagccc ccatcgagaa 5737

aaccatctcc aaagccaaag ggcagccccg agaaccacag gtgtacaccc tgcccccatc 5797

ccgcgatgag ctgaccaaga accaggtcag cctgacctgc ctggtcaaag gcttctatcc 5857

cagcgacatc gccgtggagt gggagagcaa tgggcagccg gagaacaact acaagaccac 5917

gcctcccgtg ttggactccg acggctcctt cttcctctac agcaagctca ccgtggacaa 5977

gagcaggtgg cagcagggga acgtcttctc atgctccgtg atgcatgagg ctctgcacaa 6037

ccactacacg cagaagagcc tctccctgtc tccgggtaaa tgactcgaga gatctggccg 6097

gctgggcccg tttcgaaggt aagcctatcc ctaaccctct cctcggtctc gattctacgc 6157

gtaccggtca tcatcaccat caccattgag tttaaacccg ctgatcagcc tcgactgtgc 6217

cttctagttg ccagccatct gttgtttgcc cctcccccgt gccttccttg accctggaag 6277

gtgccactcc cactgtcctt tcctaataaa atgaggaaat tgcatcgcat tgtctgagta 6337

ggtgtcattc tattctgggg ggtggggtgg ggcaggacag caagggggag gattgggaag 6397

acaatagcag gcatgctggg gatgcggtgg gctctatggc ttctgaggcg gaaagaacca 6457

gtggcggtaa tacggttatc cacagaatca ggggataacg caggaaagaa catgtgagca 6517

aaaggccagc aaaaggccag gaaccgtaaa aaggccgcgt tgctggcgtt tttccatagg 6577

ctccgccccc ctgacgagca tcacaaaaat cgacgctcaa gtcagaggtg gcgaaacccg 6637

acaggactat aaagatacca ggcgtttccc cctagaagct ccctcgtgcg ctctcctgtt 6697

ccgaccctgc cgcttaccgg atacctgtcc gcctttctcc cttcgggaag cgtggcgctt 6757

tctcatagct cacgctgtag gtatctcagt tcggtgtagg tcgttcgctc caagctgggc 6817

tgtgtgcacg aaccccccgt tcagcccgac cgctgcgcct tatccggtaa ctatcgtctt 6877

gagtccaacc cggtaagaca cgacttatcg ccactggcag cagccactgg taacaggatt 6937

agcagagcga ggtatgtagg cggtgctaca gagttcttga agtggtggcc taactacggc 6997

tacactagaa gaacagtatt tggtatctgc gctctgctga agccagttac cttcggaaaa 7057

agagttggta gctcttgatc cggcaaacaa accaccgctg gtagcggtgg tttttttgtt 7117

tgcaagcagc agattacgcg cagaaaaaaa ggatctcaag aagatccttt gatcttttct 7177

acggggtctg acgctcagtg gaacgaaaac tcacgttaag ggattttggt catgacatta 7237

acctataaaa ataggcgtat cacgaggccc tttcgtctcg cgcgtttcgg tgatgacggt 7297

gaaaacctct gacacatgca gctcccggag acggtcacag cttgtctgta agcggatgcc 7357

gggagcagac aagcccgtca gggcgcgtca gcgggtgttg gcgggtgtcg gggctggctt 7417

aactatgcgg catcagagca gattgtactg agagtgcacc atatatgcgg tgtgaaatac 7477

cgcacagatg cgtaaggaga aaataccgca tcaggcgcca ttcgccattc aggctgcgca 7537

actgttggga agggcgatcg gtgcgggcct cttcgctatt acgcca 7583

<210> SEQ ID NO: 14

<211> LENGTH: 688

<212> TYPE: PRT

<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence

<220> FEATURE:

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX-Fc Chain

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: SIGNAL

<222> LOCATION: (1)..(28)

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: MISC_FEATURE

<222> LOCATION: (29)..(48)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: FIX Propeptide

<220> FEATURE:

<221> NAME/KEY: MISC_FEATURE

<222> LOCATION: (402)..(688)

<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Mature Fc

<400> SEQENCE: 14

Met Gln Arg Val Asn Met Ile Met Ala Glu Ser Pro Gly Leu Ile Thr

1 5 10 15

Ile Cys Leu Leu Gly Tyr Leu Leu Ser Ala Glu Cys Thr Val Phe Leu

20 25 30

Asp His Glu Asn Ala Asn Lys Ile Leu Asn Arg Pro Lys Arg Tyr Asn

35 40 45

Ser Gly Lys Leu Glu Glu Phe Val Gln Gly Asn Leu Glu Arg Glu Cys

50 55 60

Met Glu Glu Lys Cys Ser Phe Glu Glu Ala Arg Glu Val Phe Glu Asn

65 70 75 80

Thr Glu Arg Thr Thr Glu Phe Trp Lys Gln Tyr Val Asp Gly Asp Gln

85 90 95

Cys Glu Ser Asn Pro Cys Leu Asn Gly Gly Ser Cys Lys Asp Asp Ile

100 105 110

Asn Ser Tyr Glu Cys Trp Cys Pro Phe Gly Phe Glu Gly Lys Asn Cys

115 120 125

Glu Leu Asp Val Thr Cys Asn Ile Lys Asn Gly Arg Cys Glu Gln Phe

130 135 140

Cys Lys Asn Ser Ala Asp Asn Lys Val Val Cys Ser Cys Thr Glu Gly

145 150 155 160

Tyr Arg Leu Ala Glu Asn Gln Lys Ser Cys Glu Pro Ala Val Pro Phe

165 170 175

Pro Cys Gly Arg Val Ser Val Ser Gln Thr Ser Lys Leu Thr Arg Ala

180 185 190

Glu Thr Val Phe Pro Asp Val Asp Tyr Val Asn Ser Thr Glu Ala Glu

195 200 205

Thr Ile Leu Asp Asn Ile Thr Gln Ser Thr Gln Ser Phe Asn Asp Phe

210 215 220

Thr Arg Val Val Gly Gly Glu Asp Ala Lys Pro Gly Gln Phe Pro Trp

225 230 235 240

Gln Val Val Leu Asn Gly Lys Val Asp Ala Phe Cys Gly Gly Ser Ile

245 250 255

Val Asn Glu Lys Trp Ile Val Thr Ala Ala His Cys Val Glu Thr Gly

260 265 270

Val Lys Ile Thr Val Val Ala Gly Glu His Asn Ile Glu Glu Thr Glu

275 280 285

His Thr Glu Gln Lys Arg Asn Val Ile Arg Ile Ile Pro His His Asn

290 295 300

Tyr Asn Ala Ala Ile Asn Lys Tyr Asn His Asp Ile Ala Leu Leu Glu

305 310 315 320

Leu Asp Glu Pro Leu Val Leu Asn Ser Tyr Val Thr Pro Ile Cys Ile

325 330 335

Ala Asp Lys Glu Tyr Thr Asn Ile Phe Leu Lys Phe Gly Ser Gly Tyr

340 345 350

Val Ser Gly Trp Gly Arg Val Phe His Lys Gly Arg Ser Ala Leu Val

355 360 365

Leu Gln Tyr Leu Arg Val Pro Leu Val Asp Arg Ala Thr Cys Leu Arg

370 375 380

Ser Thr Lys Phe Thr Ile Tyr Asn Asn Met Phe Cys Ala Gly Phe His

385 390 395 400

Glu Gly Gly Arg Asp Ser Cys Gln Gly Asp Ser Gly Gly Pro His Val

405 410 415

Thr Glu Val Glu Gly Thr Ser Phe Leu Thr Gly Ile Ile Ser Trp Gly

420 425 430

Glu Glu Cys Ala Met Lys Gly Lys Tyr Gly Ile Tyr Thr Lys Val Ser

435 440 445

Arg Tyr Val Asn Trp Ile Lys Glu Lys Thr Lys Leu Thr Asp Lys Thr

450 455 460

His Thr Cys Pro Pro Cys Pro Ala Pro Glu Leu Leu Gly Gly Pro Ser

465 470 475 480

Val Phe Leu Phe Pro Pro Lys Pro Lys Asp Thr Leu Met Ile Ser Arg

485 490 495

Thr Pro Glu Val Thr Cys Val Val Val Asp Val Ser His Glu Asp Pro

500 505 510

Glu Val Lys Phe Asn Trp Tyr Val Asp Gly Val Glu Val His Asn Ala

515 520 525

Lys Thr Lys Pro Arg Glu Glu Gln Tyr Asn Ser Thr Tyr Arg Val Val

530 535 540

Ser Val Leu Thr Val Leu His Gln Asp Trp Leu Asn Gly Lys Glu Tyr

545 550 555 560

Lys Cys Lys Val Ser Asn Lys Ala Leu Pro Ala Pro Ile Glu Lys Thr

565 570 575

Ile Ser Lys Ala Lys Gly Gln Pro Arg Glu Pro Gln Val Tyr Thr Leu

580 585 590

Pro Pro Ser Arg Asp Glu Leu Thr Lys Asn Gln Val Ser Leu Thr Cys

595 600 605

Leu Val Lys Gly Phe Tyr Pro Ser Asp Ile Ala Val Glu Trp Glu Ser

610 615 620

Asn Gly Gln Pro Glu Asn Asn Tyr Lys Thr Thr Pro Pro Val Leu Asp

625 630 635 640

Ser Asp Gly Ser Phe Phe Leu Tyr Ser Lys Leu Thr Val Asp Lys Ser

645 650 655

Arg Trp Gln Gln Gly Asn Val Phe Ser Cys Ser Val Met His Glu Ala

660 665 670

Leu His Asn His Tyr Thr Gln Lys Ser Leu Ser Leu Ser Pro Gly Lys

675 680 685

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Patent Valuation

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Reveal the value <>

34.9/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

40.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

64.55/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

42.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

20.61/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Compositions and methods for less immunogenic protein-lipid complexes THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK 28 July 2008 26 February 2009
System for timing the coagulation of blood INTERNATIONAL TECHNIDYNE CORPORATION 29 September 1972 17 September 1974
Method and system for analyzing a liquid INTERN. TECHNIDYNE CORP. 12 March 1970 03 October 1972
Machine for the determination of protrombin time and p.t.t. MORENO; ENRIQUE 16 November 1973 17 June 1975
Blood analyzing method and apparatus GREINER ELECTRONIC AG. 08 September 1967 30 December 1969
See full citation <>

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