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Patent Analysis of

Heat sink with integrated threaded lid

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10002819

Application Number

US15/076986

Application Date

22 March 2016

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION

Original Assignee (Applicant)

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION

International Classification

H05K7/20,B23P17/00,H01L23/367,B23P15/26,H01L21/48

Cooperative Classification

H01L23/4006,G06F1/20,H01L21/4882,H01L23/3675,H01L23/42

Inventor

ANDERL, WILLIAM J.,ELISON, BRET P.,MANN, PHILLIP V.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 1 US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 2 US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 3
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Abstract

A method affixes a heat sink to a module lid. A module lid is mounted to a substrate by use of a lid adhesive. The module lid has a threaded exterior portion. The module lid is thermally interfaced to a die by use of a thermal interface material. The heat sink is then screwed onto a module lid, where the heat sink includes a threaded heat sink base pocket that mates with the threaded exterior portion of the module lid, and wherein the heat sink is screwed down onto the module lid until 1) a solid mechanical and thermal contact is established between the heat sink and the module lid, and 2) an airflow from an air moving device flows unobstructed across vanes on the heat sink.

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Claims

1. A method of affixing a heat sink to a module lid, the method comprising: mounting the module lid to a substrate by use of a lid adhesive, wherein the module lid has a threaded exterior portion, wherein the module lid has a polygonal shape that has rounded corners, and wherein the threaded exterior portion of the module lid is only at the rounded corners of the module lid; thermally interfacing the module lid to a die by use of a thermal interface material; and screwing the heat sink onto the module lid, wherein the heat sink comprises a threaded heat sink base pocket that mates with the threaded exterior portion of the module lid, and wherein the heat sink is screwed down onto the module lid until 1) a solid mechanical and thermal contact is established between the heat sink and the module lid, and 2) an airflow from an air moving device flows unobstructed across vanes on the heat sink.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the airflow from the air moving device is parallel to vanes of the heat sink when a thread engagement between the heat sink and the module lid mechanically and thermally couples the heat sink to the module lid.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method of affixing a heat sink to a module lid, the method comprising: mounting the module lid to a substrate by use of a lid adhesive, wherein the module lid has a threaded exterior portion, wherein the module lid has a polygonal shape that has rounded corners, and wherein the threaded exterior portion of the module lid is only at the rounded corners of the module lid; thermally interfacing the module lid to a die by use of a thermal interface material; and screwing the heat sink onto the module lid, wherein the heat sink comprises a threaded heat sink base pocket that mates with the threaded exterior portion of the module lid, and wherein the heat sink is screwed down onto the module lid until
    • 1) a solid mechanical and thermal contact is established between the heat sink and the module lid, and
    • 2) an airflow from an air moving device flows unobstructed across vanes on the heat sink.
    • 2. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • the airflow from the air moving device is parallel to vanes of the heat sink when a thread engagement between the heat sink and the module lid mechanically and thermally couples the heat sink to the module lid.
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Description

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates to the field of electronic circuits, and specifically to cooling devices used in electronic circuits. Still more specifically, the present invention relates to heat sinks used as cooling devices in electronic circuits.

SUMMARY

A method affixes a heat sink to a module lid. A module lid is mounted to a substrate by use of a lid adhesive. The module lid has a threaded exterior portion. The module lid is thermally interfaced to a die by use of a thermal interface material. The heat sink is then screwed onto a module lid, where the heat sink includes a threaded heat sink base pocket that mates with the threaded exterior portion of the module lid, and wherein the heat sink is screwed down onto the module lid until 1) a solid mechanical and thermal contact is established between the heat sink and the module lid, and 2) an airflow from an air moving device flows unobstructed across vanes on the heat sink.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary computing device into which a novel heat sink structure is incorporated;

FIG. 2 illustrates a top view of the novel heat sink structure presented herein; and

FIG. 3 depicts a cross-sectional view of the heat sink structure shown in FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Electronics cooling for packaged modules often uses two methods of mounting/mating their cooling solution: mounting hardware and adhesive thermal interface material (TIM). In the prior art, mounting hardware used clips, screws, springs, etc. that provided tensions between the cooling solution (e.g., a heat sink) and the device being cooled (e.g., an integrated circuit (IC), also known as a “die”, which is a small block of semiconducting material on which a functional circuit is fabricated). The adhesive TIM provides thermal conduction between the heat sink and the die.

Mounting hardware poses several problems.

First, mounting hardware takes up high quality board space and is sometimes impossible to use on various modules. That is, springs, clips, etc. not only take up space in a system, they are also difficult to manipulate.

Second, mounting hardware is not adjustable. That is, a clip/spring simply holds the heat sink down at a certain pressure, which is fixed. This results in undue pressure on connectors (between the die and a circuit board) as well as on the die itself.

Third, mounting hardware such as ball grid array (BGA) spring clips (used on modules to provide actuation to small heat sinks and used in conjunction with high performance TIMs) have the drawbacks of reduction in heat sink performance (due to poor mating between the heat sink and the die); solder ball stress/integrity issues (due to undue pressure against the die by the BGA spring clips); the inability to support high loads (due to the limited strength of the springs in the BGA spring clips); and the inability to survive shock/vibe requirements (due to the limited resilience provided by BGA spring clips).

Furthermore, adhesive thermal interface materials (TIMs), when used alone to adhere a heat sink to a die are among the lowest performers for thermal conductivity since they are mainly composed of polymer adhesive. Furthermore, adhesive TIMs are also extremely difficult to rework or remove, since they are an adhesive (glue) that permanently bonds the heat sink to the die.

Other actuation hardware requires board space and sometimes holes in the board in order to have retention. This is the most undesirable option since board space near modules is at a premium and any hardware in these regions takes away from the capability and/or signal integrity of the whole system.

With reference now to the figures, and specifically to FIG. 1, an exemplary computing device 101 into which the presently-presented and novel heat sink structure 103 is incorporated is presented. Heat sink structure 103 includes a module lid 105, which is mounted atop a die 107 (e.g., an integrated circuit), which is mounted atop a substrate 109 (e.g., a glass epoxy that supports internal wires to external connectors), which is mounted on a circuit board 111 (e.g. a glass epoxy structure that supports various integrated circuits, power supplies, fans, input/output interfaces, etc.).

As shown in FIG. 1, in an embodiment of the present invention module lid 105 has a polygonal shape (e.g., a square) that has multiple threaded corners, such as threaded corner 113. When a heat sink (shown in FIGS. 2-3 but not FIG. 1) is fully engaged with the module lid 105, airflow 115 from an air moving device 117 (e.g., a cooling fan within a housing of computing device 101 and/or mounted on the circuit board 111 itself) flows parallel to (and thus unimpeded by) cooling vanes on the heat sink. Additional details of the heat sink structure 103 are shown below in FIGS. 2-3.

With reference now to FIG. 2, a top view of the novel heat sink structure 103 introduced in FIG. 1 is presented. As shown in FIG. 2, a heat sink 202 is mounted over the module lid 105. Heat sink 202 has a threaded heat sink base pocket 204, which is screwed onto the threaded corners (e.g., threaded corner 113) of module lid 105 to form multiple thread engagements (e.g., thread engagement 206). Thus, heat sink 202 is screwed down onto module lid 105 until 1) solid mechanical and thermal contact is established between heat sink 202 and module lid 105, and 2) the airflow 115 from air moving device 117 flows unobstructed across the vanes (e.g., vane 208) on heat sink 202.

With reference now to FIG. 3, a cross-sectional view of the heat sink structure 103 shown in FIG. 2 is presented.

As shown in FIG. 3, a package ball grid array (BGA) 301 provides electrical connections between a planar (i.e., a printed circuit board—not shown) and the die 107 using internal wiring, such as the depicted wire 303 that connects one of the solder balls from package BGA 301 to one or more of the solder balls in the chip BGA 305. The chip BGA 305 is connected to internal circuitry (not shown) within the die 107, which is thermally coupled by a die thermal interface material (TIM) 307 to the underside of the module lid 105. As depicted, module lid 105 is adhered to substrate 109 using a lid adhesive 311 (e.g., a heat resistant glue), thus providing a fixed combination of module lid 105, die 107, and substrate 109.

The present invention provides a novel and adjustable means for affixing the heat sink 202 to the module lid 105. That is, the heat sink 202 has a threaded heat sink base pocket 204, whose inner surfaces are threaded. These threaded inner surfaces from the threaded heat sink base pocket 204 screw onto the threaded corners (e.g., threaded corner 113) of the polygonal-shaped module lid 105 at areas such as the depicted thread engagement 206 area.

As a user screws the heat sink 202 down onto the module lid 105, the user is able to 1) selectively control the amount of pressure forced against the module lid 105; 2) evenly spread out the lid thermal interface material (TIM) 309 between the heat sink 202 and the module lid 105 by the rotational movement of the heat sink 202; and 3) align the orientation of the vanes (e.g., vane 208) such that airflow 115 from the air moving device 117 shown in FIGS. 1-2 flows between the vanes, thereby providing maximum heat removal.

Thus, as depicted and described herein, the corners of a lidded module are rounded and threaded such that a heat sink with a certain-depth threaded recess can be screwed on. Mounting a heat sink in this fashion prevents the need for board level mounting hardware and allows the use of a high quality thermal interface material. The threading is aligned such that at an optimal, nominal gap, the fins and heat sink orientation are properly aligned with the airflow direction. Given the planarity of lidded modules, this type of actuation has a beneficial effect on the thermal bond line directly over the hottest components, further improving thermal performance of the heat sink.

An additional benefit of the mounting scheme presented and described in the present disclosure and figures includes better electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection due to the intimate contact between the heat sink base and the module lid.

In an alternative embodiment of the present invention, a threaded ring is used on the previously described heat sink structure to provide a compliant surface for mounting a standard heat sink. This type of mounting allows a spring clip or other constant force mounting scheme without using board space or impacting signal integrity.

Having thus described embodiments of the present invention of the present application in detail and by reference to illustrative embodiments thereof, it will be apparent that modifications and variations are possible without departing from the scope of the present invention defined in the appended claims.

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Patent Valuation

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32.0/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

56.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

74.51/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

94.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

23.51/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Retaining heat sinks on printed circuit boards INTEL CORPORATION 19 March 2004 22 September 2005
Integral chip lid and heat sink HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, L.P. 13 August 2003 17 February 2005
VLSI Packaging system NCR CORPORATION 06 October 1980 02 August 1983
Heat sink assembly with fixing devices FOXCONN TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD. 25 April 2005 01 December 2005
Active device substrate connector having a heat sink AMP INCORPORATED 31 March 1980 17 August 1982
See full citation <>

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US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 1 US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 2 US10002819 Heat sink integrated threaded 3