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Patent Analysis of

Modular battery cover

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10003062

Application Number

US13/620433

Application Date

14 September 2012

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

LENOVO ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

BULUR, YAKUP,FISHBUNE, RICHARD J.,MARESH, MARK E.,SWENSON, NEIL C.,WHEELER, ADAM M.

International Classification

H01M2/20,H01M2/10

Cooperative Classification

H01M2/204,H01M2/1066,Y10T307/653

Inventor

BULUR, YAKUP,FISHBUNE, RICHARD J.,MARESH, MARK E.,SWENSON, NEIL C.,WHEELER, ADAM M.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10003062 Modular battery cover 1 US10003062 Modular battery cover 2 US10003062 Modular battery cover 3
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Abstract

A device may include an electronic component stack cover having an open end sized to receive a modular electronic component stack including a plurality of like modular electronic components, an at least partially closed end, and sides extending from the at least partially closed end toward the open end. The at least partially closed end and the at least one side may form a chamber. At least one electrically conductive probe may extend from the at least partially closed end into the chamber. The chamber may conform to an outer shape of at least a portion of the modular electronic component stack, and the electrically conductive probe may be configured to electrically interface with a first connector on the electronic component stack when the stack is within the chamber.

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Claims

1. A system comprising: a printed circuit board (PCB) having a first PCB circuit including a positive circuit terminal, a negative circuit terminal, a plurality of electrical interfaces, a plurality of selectively actuatable jumpers, and a plurality of conductors; the plurality of conductors connecting each one of the plurality of electrical interfaces through the jumpers to the positive and negative circuit terminals in a selectable one of a series connection and a parallel connection; a plurality of modular battery stacks, each battery stack including at least one battery module, each battery module including a first battery connector, a second battery connector, and a battery, the battery having a positive battery terminal connected to the first battery connector and a negative battery terminal connected to the second battery connector; and one of the first battery connectors of each battery stack being mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces and one of the second battery connectors of each battery stack being mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective second one of the plurality of electrical interfaces, wherein the first and second battery connectors of each first battery module are configured to receive a second battery module; a battery stack cover assembly including a cover configured to encase at least a portion of at least a first one of the plurality of battery stacks, the cover incorporating at least one return conductor; and at least one fastener mounted to the battery stack cover for selectively fastening the battery stack cover to the PCB, wherein the first battery connector is exposed and the fastener is electrically conductive and connected to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces, the battery stack cover assembly further including a return conductor operatively connecting the respective first battery connector to the fastener.

2. The system of claim 1, wherein the first battery connector is exposed, and the return conductor is operatively connecting the first battery connector of the first one of the battery stacks to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces.

3. The system of claim 1, each battery module in each of the plurality of battery stacks further including at least one secondary electrical connector configured to mechanically and electrically mate with a connector on another battery module; and the battery stack cover assembly further including a plurality of the return conductors and a plurality of the fasteners, each return conductor connecting the first battery connector or an exposed one of the at least one secondary electrical connector of the battery stack to a respective fastener when the battery stack cover is encasing at least a portion of the battery stack.

4. The system of claim 3, wherein each of the fasteners is configured to fasten the associated battery stack to a respective electrical interface on the PCB, the electrical interfaces associated with each battery stack being electrically interconnected.

5. The system of claim 1, wherein the battery stack cover being substantially rigid, and further comprising a chamber having a shape conforming to a shape of the battery stack.

6. The system of claim 5, wherein each battery module includes exposed receptacles and the battery stack cover assembly includes a cap portion having a plurality of protrusions extending into the chamber, the cover having a height appropriate to connect the protrusions with corresponding receptacles on an outermost battery module when the battery stack cover is operatively placed on the battery stack.

7. The system of claim 1, wherein the first and second battery connectors permit an offset interconnection with the second battery module.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A system comprising:
    • a printed circuit board (PCB) having a first PCB circuit including a positive circuit terminal, a negative circuit terminal, a plurality of electrical interfaces, a plurality of selectively actuatable jumpers, and a plurality of conductors
    • the plurality of conductors connecting each one of the plurality of electrical interfaces through the jumpers to the positive and negative circuit terminals in a selectable one of a series connection and a parallel connection
    • a plurality of modular battery stacks, each battery stack including at least one battery module, each battery module including a first battery connector, a second battery connector, and a battery, the battery having a positive battery terminal connected to the first battery connector and a negative battery terminal connected to the second battery connector
    • and one of the first battery connectors of each battery stack being mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces and one of the second battery connectors of each battery stack being mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective second one of the plurality of electrical interfaces, wherein the first and second battery connectors of each first battery module are configured to receive a second battery module
    • a battery stack cover assembly including a cover configured to encase at least a portion of at least a first one of the plurality of battery stacks, the cover incorporating at least one return conductor
    • and at least one fastener mounted to the battery stack cover for selectively fastening the battery stack cover to the PCB, wherein the first battery connector is exposed and the fastener is electrically conductive and connected to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces, the battery stack cover assembly further including a return conductor operatively connecting the respective first battery connector to the fastener.
    • 2. The system of claim 1, wherein
      • the first battery connector is exposed, and the return conductor is operatively connecting the first battery connector of the first one of the battery stacks to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces.
    • 3. The system of claim 1, each battery module in each of the plurality of battery stacks further including
      • at least one secondary electrical connector configured to mechanically and electrically mate with a connector on another battery module
      • and the battery stack cover assembly further including a plurality of the return conductors and a plurality of the fasteners, each return conductor connecting the first battery connector or an exposed one of the at least one secondary electrical connector of the battery stack to a respective fastener when the battery stack cover is encasing at least a portion of the battery stack.
    • 5. The system of claim 1, wherein
      • the battery stack cover being substantially rigid, and further comprising
    • 7. The system of claim 1, wherein
      • the first and second battery connectors permit an offset interconnection with the second battery module.
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Description

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to the field of electronics, and more specifically, to interconnecting modules for electronic components such as batteries.

As portable computers, cell phones, and other battery-powered electronic devices become smaller, thinner, and more powerful, battery technology has evolved toward thinner, solid-state battery cells. With device component space at a premium, batteries and other electronic components must be connected reliably and securely in compact yet easily manufacturable ways.

BRIEF SUMMARY

According to one embodiment of the invention, a system may include a printed circuit board (PCB) having a first PCB circuit including a positive circuit terminal, a negative circuit terminal, a plurality of electrical interfaces, a plurality of selectively actuatable jumpers, and a plurality of conductors. The plurality of conductors may connect each one of the plurality of electrical interfaces through the jumpers to the positive and negative circuit terminals in a selectable one of a series connection and a parallel connection. A plurality of modular battery stacks may be included. Each battery stack may have at least one battery module, each battery module including a first battery connector, a second battery connector, and a battery. The battery may have a positive battery terminal connected to the first battery connector and a negative battery terminal connected to the second battery connector. One of the first battery connectors of each battery stack may be mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces. One of the second battery connectors of each battery stack may be mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective second one of the plurality of electrical interfaces.

According to a second embodiment, a system may include a modular battery stack including one or more battery modules. The one or more battery modules may each include opposite major faces and a first battery connector and a second battery connector, a battery having positive and negative terminals connected respectively to the first and second battery connectors, and an additional connector. Each battery connector and additional connector may extend between the major faces and may be configured to mechanically and electrically mate with a connector on another battery module when a major face of one battery module is proximate to a major faces of the other battery module. A battery stack cover assembly may include a cover covering at least a portion of an outermost battery module of the one or more battery modules and an electrical conductor, the outermost battery module having an exposed major face and having connectors connected to connectors on an adjacent module on an unexposed major face of the outermost battery module, the electrical conductor connecting one of the battery connectors of the outermost battery module to the additional connector of the outermost battery module.

In another embodiment, a device may include an electronic component stack cover having an open end sized to receive a modular electronic component stack including a plurality of like modular electronic components. The cover may have an at least partially closed end, and sides extending from the at least partially closed end toward the open end, the at least partially closed end and the at least one side forming a chamber between the at least partially closed end and the open end. The device may also include at least one electrically conductive probe extending from the at least partially closed end into the chamber. The chamber may be shaped to conform to an outer shape of at least a portion of the modular electronic component stack, and the electrically conductive probe may be configured to electrically interface with a first connector on the electronic component stack when the stack is within the chamber.

Advantages of such systems and methods will be more readily understood after considering the drawings and the detailed description below.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

In order that the advantages of the invention will be readily understood, a more particular description of the invention briefly described above will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments that are illustrated in the appended drawings. Understanding that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope, the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of an illustrative electrical component module.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of an illustrative conductive coupler.

FIG. 3 shows a plan view of two illustrative electrical component modules connected in parallel and shown separated for clarity.

FIG. 4 shows a plan view of two illustrative electrical component modules connected in series and shown separated for clarity.

FIG. 5 shows an illustrative module including an illustrative set of conductive couplers.

FIG. 6 shows an illustrative module including three illustrative sets of conductive couplers.

FIG. 7 shows an illustrative module including multiple sets of conductive couplers as well as a battery cell connected to the module.

FIG. 8 shows an illustrative printed circuit board with illustrative module assemblies.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of another illustrative module having eight sides.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a stack of three illustrative modules such as the one shown in FIG. 9, separated to show the individual modules.

FIG. 11 shows an illustrative cap structure or cover for use with a module assembly.

FIG. 12 shows another illustrative cap or cover for use with a module assembly.

FIG. 13 shows another illustrative cap or cover for use with a module assembly.

FIG. 14 shows an illustrative keyed module assembly and cap or cover.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

An electrical component module may be configured to stackably interconnect with one or more other such modules. A module may include a planar dielectric board having a plurality of conductive couplers formed in the board. The couplers may mechanically mate with similar couplers on another such module, thereby interconnecting the modules electrically and physically to form an assembly. Electrical components may be mounted on the boards, and these electrical components may accordingly be interconnected as well. Forming the conductive couplers in specific geometrical arrangements may allow offsetting one module relative to another, while still connecting the modules. This offset interconnection may allow various interconnection schemes, such as parallel, series, a combination of the two, or intermodule connectivity within an assembly.

Referring now to FIG. 1, an illustrative electrical component module is generally shown at 10. In this example, electrical component module 10 may include a substantially planar dielectric substrate 12, a first conductive coupler 14, a second conductive coupler 16, a first aperture 18, a second aperture 20, and an electrical component 22. Substrate 12 may include any suitable structure configured to provide a rigid board having a first major surface 24 and a second major surface 26 spaced from and opposite the first major surface, suitable for mounting electrical components.

Conductive couplers 14 and 16 may be formed in substrate 12, passing from first major surface 24 to second major surface 26. Conductive couplers 14 and 16 may each be any suitable structure configured to mechanically and electrically engage directly with a second such structure. For example, a conductive coupler may include a two-part assembly having a female portion at first major surface 24 and male portion at second major surface 26. Other configurations are possible, as further described below regarding FIG. 2.

Apertures 18 and 20 may each be any suitable structure configured to provide an electrically non-conductive aperture, recess, opening, or hole in substrate 12 sized to accept at least a portion of a conductive coupler. For example, apertures 18 and 20 may be holes in substrate 12 sized to allow entry of a portion of a conductive coupler similar to conductive couplers 14 and 16.

In the example depicted in FIG. 1, conductive couplers 14 and 16, together with apertures 18 and 20, are arranged at positions on substrate 12 corresponding to the corners of a square. More generally, they may be said to be located at equally spaced points on a circle. This arrangement allows any given module 10 to be interconnected with a second such module in four possible ways, three of which provide electrical interconnectivity, as further described below regarding FIGS. 3 and 4.

Module 10 may also include electrical component 22, which may be any suitable electrical component that may be mounted on substrate 12 and electrically connected to first and second conductive couplers. In the example of FIG. 1, electrical component includes a solid-state battery. One skilled in the art will understand that electrical component 22 may also include a resistor, a capacitor, or one of many other standard components known in the art. Continuing with the example of FIG. 1, electrical component 22 may have a first terminal 28 electrically connected to first conductive coupler 14 and a second terminal 30 electrically connected to second conductive coupler 16. For example, a solid state battery may have a positive and a negative terminal, each wired to one of the conductive couplers.

Turning to FIG. 2, a more detailed view of an illustrative conductive coupler 36 is depicted in a substrate 38 of a module 40 which is an example of module 10. Conductive coupler 36 may be similar to conductive couplers 14 and 16, and may include a first connector element 42 disposed at a first major surface 46 of substrate 38 electrically connected to an associated second connector element 44 forming an extension extending normally from a second major surface 48 of the substrate. First connector element 42 may form a recess 50 in the first major surface. Conductive coupler 36 may also include an electrical via 52 extending through the substrate between recess 50 and the associated second connector element 44. Second connector element 44 may form a male connector such as a pin connector, and may be axially aligned with recess 50 of the associated first connector element. As shown in FIG. 2, a second connector element 44′ of a second conductive coupler 36′ of a second module 40′ may engage mechanically and electrically in a friction-fit engagement with first connector element 42 of conductive coupler 36. This mechanical and electrical engageability allows multiple examples of modules 10 to be manually connected or disconnected, greatly facilitating manufacturability and configurability of assemblies.

It should be appreciated that first and second connector elements may take various forms and may include various geometries. For example, second connector element 44 is shown as a hollow pin. However, second connector element may be solid, may be of a different length and/or width, and may include other structures. For example, second connector element 44 may include a flange or other structure (not shown) to limit the depth to which the male connector element may pass into a female connector element. In other examples, via 52 may pass only partially through the substrate. In yet another example, via 52 may be replaced by a conductor such as a wire that electrically connects recess 50 to second connector element 44.

FIGS. 3 and 4 each depict an assembly including two examples of module 10 in an illustrative interconnection scheme. FIG. 3 shows an assembly 56 with parallel connection and FIG. 4 shows an assembly 58 with one of two possible series connections. In each assembly, the two modules would be stacked in mechanical engagement, but the modules have been separated and shown side by side to better illustrate the connections. The dashed lines between connector elements indicate where electrical connection is made between the stacked modules.

FIG. 3 shows assembly 56 including two examples of module 10, generally indicated at 60 and 62. In the example shown in FIG. 3, module 60 is stacked on top of module 62. Module 60 has a solid-state battery 64 with a positive terminal 66 connected to a conductive coupler 68 and a negative terminal 70 connected to a conductive coupler 72. Similarly, module 62 has a solid-state battery 74 with a positive terminal 76 connected to a conductive coupler 78 and a negative terminal 80 connected to a conductive coupler 82. Module 60 also includes first and second apertures 84 and 86 formed in substrate 88, while module 62 includes first and second apertures 90 and 92 formed in substrate 94.

In the example depicted in FIG. 3, module 60 and module 62 have the same rotational orientation, meaning that module 60 is aligned exactly the same as module 62 when viewed from a position orthogonal to the planes of the respective substrates. Because the substrates in this example have four lateral edges or sides 96, four discrete rotational orientations are possible for each module. As shown in FIG. 3, placing the two modules 60 and 62 in identical discrete rotational orientations results in alignment of conductive coupler 68 with conductive coupler 78 and alignment of conductive coupler 72 with conductive coupler 82. Stacking the two modules, then, results in mating connector 68 with connector 78 and connector 72 with connector 82 in mechanical and electrical engagement. Because connectors 68 and 78 are connected to positive terminals of the respective batteries and connectors 72 and 82 are connected to negative terminals of the respective batteries, this engagement results in a parallel connection of the two batteries.

FIG. 4 shows assembly 58 including two examples of module 10, generally indicated at 100 and 102. In the example shown in FIG. 4, module 100 is stacked on top of module 102. Module 100 has a solid-state battery 104 with a positive terminal 106 connected to a conductive coupler 108 and a negative terminal 110 connected to a conductive coupler 112. Similarly, module 102 has a solid-state battery 114 with a positive terminal 116 connected to a conductive coupler 118 and a negative terminal 120 connected to a conductive coupler 122. Module 100 also includes first and second apertures 124 and 126 formed in substrate 128, while module 102 includes first and second apertures 130 and 132 formed in substrate 134.

Instead of modules having identical rotational orientations as in the example of FIG. 3, in the example of FIG. 4 the conductive couplers of the two modules may be offset by rotating the modules relative to each other. As shown in FIG. 4, module 100 may be in an orientation rotated 90 degrees from the orientation of module 102. Because conductive couplers 108 and 112 together with apertures 124 and 126 are disposed at the corners of an imaginary square, rotating module 100 by 90 degrees aligns conductive coupler 108 with conductive coupler 122, and also aligns aperture 124 with conductive coupler 118. Lateral edges 136 of the modules may also be aligned, indicating that the modules are in one of the discrete rotational alignments possible.

In the example of FIG. 4, stacking the two modules results in mating coupler 108 with coupler122 in mechanical and electrical engagement and mating coupler 118 with non-conductive aperture 124 in mechanical engagement. Because connectors 108 and 122 are connected to the positive terminal of battery 104 and the negative terminal of battery 114, respectively, this engagement results in a series connection of the two batteries.

It will be appreciated that a series connection may also be achieved by placing module 100 in an orientation 180 degrees from that shown, again resulting in a 90-degree difference between the two modules. Furthermore, it should be understood that the arrangements shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 may be combined in any number of ways to produce more than two modules in series, more than two modules in parallel, or to produce assemblies having a combination of series and parallel modules, simply by stacking the modules as desired.

Other methods may be used to offset modules. For example, two modules may have identical rotational orientation, but be offset laterally to align different conductive couplers, which may be arranged linearly.

Turning to FIG. 5, another illustrative module such as module 10 is generally indicated at 148. As shown in FIG. 5, a set of conductive couplers 150 may be provided in addition to conductive couplers 152 and 154 used to connect an electrical component 156. In the example of FIG. 5, module 148 includes a substrate 158 having four sides or lateral edges 160. In general, modules 10 may be regular polygons having more or fewer sides 160 than module 148.

In this example, a rotational offset of the conductive couplers may be used when interconnecting modules. Accordingly, conductive couplers belonging to a certain set, such as conductive couplers 150, may be arranged at equally-spaced points on at least a portion of a circle, and the circle may be centered on the center of the substrate. This arrangement allows conductive couplers from a given set to align with conductive couplers from the corresponding set on another module, in more than one rotational orientation. The number of conductive couplers in equally spaced positions on a circle may correspond to the number of edges 160 of the substrate. This arrangement allows alignment of respective edges of the modules to correspond to alignment of the conductive couplers. For example, a four-sided module 150 (i.e., a module having a four-sided substrate) may have a set of four conductive couplers 150. The four couplers 150 may align, in more than one rotational orientation, with corresponding couplers when the four sides 160 of module 148 are aligned with the four sides of another module.

In other examples, a module may itself be circular, with any number of rotational positions and corresponding couplers. In these and in previous examples, other indicators of rotational orientation may be utilized, such as markers on an outer perimeter of the module.

In some examples, the set of conductive couplers 150 may be configured as a circuit, with one or more electrical conductors 162 connected to the substrate and interconnecting the plurality of conductive couplers 150. In these examples, interconnection of the couplers on two or more stacked modules produces a multi-level circuit that may carry a signal or electrical current from the top module to the bottom module, regardless of rotational orientation of any of the modules. For example, a lead from a thermal sensor may be connected to one of the pin portions of one of the couplers 150, and the signal from that sensor may be carried down through the stack through the circuits formed by the couplers 150 on each module, all of which circuits are interconnected by way of mechanical and electrical engagement of the mated couplers from module to module. It should be understood that more than one such independent circuit formed of electrically connected conductive couplers may be provided on a module, and that each such independent circuit may have couplers located at equally spaced points on a circle, with multiple independent circuits possible on any given circle.

For example, FIG. 6 shows three examples of such circuits all formed on a substrate 164 of a module 166: circuit 168, circuit 170, and circuit 172. In this example, circuit 168 includes four conductive couplers 168A, 168B, 168C, and 168D arranged at equally spaced points on a circle A. Circuit 170 includes four conductive couplers 170A, 170B, 170C, and 170D arranged at equally spaced points on a circle B. Circuit 172 includes four conductive couplers 172A, 172B, 172C, and 172D arranged at equally spaced points on a circle C. For clarity, the conductors that connect the couplers of each circuit are not shown. In some examples, not shown, circuits may be formed by connecting on a module two or more circuits such as those just described to form a single circuit arranged on more than one circle.

FIG. 7 shows a module 180 similar to module 10 configured to be stackably interconnectable with other such modules to form an assembly. Module 180 may include a square-shaped substrate 182, a first conductive coupler 184, a second conductive coupler 186, a first circuit 188 including conductive couplers 188A, 188B, 188C, and 188D, a second circuit 190 including conductive couplers 190A, 190B, 190C, and 190D, a third circuit 192 including conductive couplers 192A, 192B, 192C, and 192D, a first aperture 194, and a second aperture 196. A battery cell 198 may be mounted on substrate 182, and may have a positive terminal connected to first conductive coupler 184 and a negative terminal connected to second conductive coupler 186.

Multiple modules 180 may be interconnected by engaging couplers in a stacked configuration. As described above, stacking any two adjacent modules in the same rotational orientation may create a parallel interconnection, while stacking any two adjacent modules in offset rotational orientations may result in a series connection. Combinations of modules may be created having all series, all parallel, or any combination of the two interconnection types.

Each circuit or set of couplers may be independent of any other couplers or circuits on the module. First circuit 188, second circuit 190, and third circuit 192 may each provide an independent electrical pathway for a signal to travel from module to module regardless of rotational orientation of any two adjacent modules in a stack. Third circuit 192 may also be arranged with at least one conductive coupler disposed near first conductive coupler 184 and/or second conductive coupler 186 in order to facilitate installation of a jumper 200 between one of the conductive couplers attached to battery cell 198 and one of the couplers of the third circuit. When modules are interconnected in parallel, a sufficient connection may be made, such as at a printed circuit board (PCB), to the first and second conductive couplers on the bottom-most module 180 in order to complete the battery circuit of all parallel-connected modules. However, this is not possible if modules 180 are connected in series, as the top-most module 180 will not have a return path for one of the first or second conductive couplers. To facilitate a connection of that coupler to the PCB through the intervening modules in this example, jumper 200 may be installed as described.

FIG. 8 shows a PCB 210 configured to interconnect multiple assemblies 212, each assembly including a stack of modules 214 similar to module 10 or module 180. More specifically, in this example, four assemblies 212 are depicted and referred to as assemblies 216, 218, 220, and 221. In this plan view of the PCB with assemblies, only a topmost module 214 may be seen in each assembly. More specifically, assembly 216 may include topmost module 222, assembly 218 may include topmost module 224, assembly 220 may include topmost module 226, and assembly 221 may include topmost module 227.

PCB 210 may include any suitable number of electrical interfaces. In this example four electrical interfaces 228, 230, 232, and 234 are included, each configured to provide a pluggable mechanical and electrical connection for a module 214 and thereby to provide a pluggable mechanical and electrical connection for an assembly 212. For example, each electrical interface may provide male connector pins (not shown) configured to mate with the first connector elements of all or selected ones of the conductive couplers on the first major surface of the bottom-most module 214 in the module stack of an assembly 212.

PCB 210 may also include a PCB circuit 236 including a positive terminal 238, a negative terminal 240, and a plurality of conductors 242 selectably connecting electrical interfaces 228, 230, 232, and 234 to positive terminal 238 and negative terminal 240. Conductors 242 may selectably connect the interfaces to the terminals by use of jumpers such as series jumpers 244 and parallel jumpers 246. Each jumper may be any suitable structure configured to electrically connect two conductors when in a first state and to electrically disconnect two conductors when in a second state. For example, each jumper may be a standard electrical jumper or electrical switch known in the art. Each series jumper 244 may complete a connection between two successive electrical interfaces such that an assembly on one electrical interface is placed in series connection with an assembly 212 on the other electrical interface. Each parallel jumper 246 may function in concert with another such jumper to connect an electrical interface to the PCB circuit in parallel. For example, parallel jumpers 246A and 246B may place electrical interface 232 and thereby assembly 220 in parallel connection with PCB circuit 236. All of jumpers 246 place all four assemblies in parallel in this example. Correspondingly, all of jumpers 244 place all four assemblies in series.

Various other combinations of jumpers are possible, for example, to create a combination of parallel and series connections with the PCB circuit. For example, two or more of the assemblies distal from terminals 238 and 240 may be connected in series with the series connected in parallel with one or more assemblies proximate to terminals 238 and 240. The configuration shown in FIG. 8 allows each assembly position to contain a single module or a stack of modules connected in series, parallel, or a combination of series and parallel. As described above, a module jumper 250 similar to jumper 200 may be necessary to connect a terminal of the battery of a topmost module such as topmost module 226 to PCB 210. Jumper 250 may connect the appropriate battery terminal conductive coupler of the top module to conductive coupler 192 in the upper left corner, as shown in FIG. 8.

In some embodiments, a module may be configured to eliminate the need for a separate top-of-stack jumper such as jumper 250, even if modules are connected in series. FIGS. 9 and 10, for example, show a multi-sided module 260 configured to allow a top module to be stacked in such a way as to connect a terminal of the topmost battery to an auxiliary circuit that will in turn provide an electrical connection down through all modules in the stack. Module 260 may include a first conductive coupler 262, a second conductive coupler 264 electrically isolated from coupler 262, and a third conductive coupler 266 electrically connected to coupler 264. Module 260 may also include an auxiliary circuit 268 formed of electrically interconnected conductive couplers 270 equidistantly spaced at points on an imaginary circle 272 centered on a major surface 274 of module 260. Accordingly, as with the previously described set of couplers 150, interconnection of the couplers on two or more stacked modules produces a multi-level circuit that may carry a signal or electrical current from the top module to the bottom module, regardless of the number of modules in the stack.

Couplers 262, 264, and 266 may be spaced from each other along the circumference of an imaginary circle 276 on major surface 274 of module 260. A circular arc between couplers 262 and 264 may have a length designated D1. Coupler 266 may be spaced along an arc from coupler 264 at a distance D2 that is approximately twice D1, and along an arc from coupler 262 at a distance D3 that is approximately three times D1. One or more apertures 278 may also be spaced on circle 276 to facilitate mechanical interconnection of multiple modules 260. Apertures 278 may be electrically nonconductive apertures similar to apertures 18 and 20 described above.

An electrical connector 280 may be spaced on circle 276 at a distance D3 from coupler 264, and may include an electrically conductive connector configured to electrically and mechanically connect to another module stacked on major surface 274. Connector 280 may not pass through the substrate of module 260 electrically, and accordingly may not create an electrical connection to another module on which module 260 is stacked, i.e., another module placed on a major surface other than surface 274. Connector 280 may be electrically connected to auxiliary circuit 268. Additional apertures 278 may be spaced at regular intervals having a distance D1 between the various couplers on circle 276, including between connector 280 and coupler 262.

A battery 282, or other electrical component, may have terminals connected to couplers 262 and 264. Because coupler 266 is electrically connected to coupler 264, connection to either coupler may be equivalent electrically.

FIG. 10 depicts an assembly of three stacked modules such as module 260. The three modules may be stacked in mechanical engagement, but as in FIGS. 3 and 4, the modules have been separated and shown side by side to better illustrate the connections. The dashed lines between connector elements indicate where electrical connections are made between the stacked modules.

From the drawings and the above description, it should be apparent that multiple copies of module 260 may be interconnected mechanically and electrically, similar to the interconnection of modules 10 and 180. For example, stacking multiple modules 260 on one another without changing the relative rotational orientation of the modules, such that couplers 262 and 264 of each module 260 connect to respective couplers 262 and 264 of another module 260 results in parallel connection of the batteries or other electronic components on each of the modules. Similarly, stacking multiple modules 260 such that coupler 262 of one module is connected to coupler 264 of another, as shown in FIG. 10, results in series connection of the batteries. Unlike the parallel connection method, it may be necessary to orient the modules at different relative rotations to facilitate series connection. As described above, combinations of these connection methods are possible, with batteries in series and/or parallel within the stack.

Modules such as module 260, however, may have additional options regarding interconnection of adjacent modules due to there being three couplers electrically connected to the battery terminals rather than two. As a first option, in the module stack shown in FIG. 10, module 260 may be stacked in series with module 260′ by rotating module 260′ by 45 degrees (corresponding to distance D1 relative to module 260) to connect coupler 262′ on module 260′ with coupler 264 on module 260.

To illustrate a second option for connecting modules such as module 260 in series, module 260″ may be stacked in series with module 260′ by rotating module 260″ by 135 degrees (corresponding to distance D3 relative to module 260′) to connect coupler 262″ on module 260″ to coupler 266′ on module 260′. This option also illustrates how modules such as module 260 may themselves electrically connect a topmost or outermost module through the stack to the lowermost or innermost module. Specifically, the illustrative 135-degree relative rotation also aligns coupler 266″ with connector 280′ thereby connecting battery 282″ of topmost module 260″ to auxiliary circuit 268′ of middle module 260′ and auxiliary circuit 268 of lowermost module 260, where a connection may be made to an underlying PCB. The connection down through the stack may thus be accomplished without use of a separate jumper on the top-most module.

Turning to FIGS. 11-14, other exemplary structures will now be described for connecting one or more circuits or components on an exposed module of a stack or assembly to an underlying structure such as a PCB. Specifically, FIG. 11 shows an illustrative modular battery stack cap or cover 290 that may be placed over an assembly 292 of stacked modules 294. Cover 290 is shown partially installed over assembly 292. Cover 290 may have an inner chamber 296 conforming to the shape of the assembly, and may incorporate one or more return-path conductors 298, each interconnecting a circuit of topmost module 300 to an underlying PCB, possibly using a conductive probe 302 extending from conductor 298 into the chamber and into a coupler 303 of module 300. Note that each return path conductor may connect to a respective different circuit, or multiple return path conductors may connect to the same circuit. Conductor 298 may connect module 300 to a conductive connector 304 on an underlying PCB 306 through a conductive fastener such as a foot 308 that may be configured to mate with conductive connector 304. Separate return-path conductors 298 may be used to extend any corresponding circuit, such as a power or other circuit, that is exposed on topmost module 300 of the PCB. Cover 290 may be made of any suitable material, such as rigid plastic. Cover 290 may also provide structural integrity, protection, and dust exclusion for the assembly.

FIG. 12 shows another illustrative cover 320 similar to cover 290. In this example, cover 320 may have only a single return path conductor 322 configured to connect a circuit of a topmost module (not shown) to an underlying PCB 324 using a conductive fastener such as a foot 326 that may plug into a corresponding connector 328 on PCB 324. Other fasteners such as fasteners 330 may be used to further secure cover 320 to PCB 324. Fasteners 330 may be electrically isolated or nonconductive.

FIG. 13 shows another illustrative cover 340 similar to covers 290 and 320. In this example, cover 340 may include a single return path conductor 342 electrically connected to a conductive extension such as probe 346 configured to connect a circuit of a topmost module of an assembly (not shown) to an underlying PCB 348. Additional extensions such as extension 350 and 352 may extend into the chamber of the cover. However, in this example, extensions 350 and 352 may be electrically isolated and/or nonconductive, and may be configured to interface with the topmost module for purposes of stabilization and securing the cover rather than to provide an electrical connection.

FIG. 14 shows yet another illustrative cap or cover 360. In this example, cover 360 may be configured to function as a jumper rather than directly connecting a module to a PCB. Cover 360 may have lateral sidewalls 362 extending normally from an end wall 364. Sidewalls 362 may be sized to partially cover lateral sides of an assembly 366, and may only cover a portion of the assembly, such as all or a portion of a topmost module 368 of the assembly. In this example, cover 360 has multiple members extending from end wall 364 into a chamber 370 formed by the end and sidewalls. For example, cover 360 may include electrically connected conductive members 372 and 374, which may be configured to mate with conductive couplers 376 and 378, respectively, on module 368. When members 372 and 374 are mated with couplers 376 and 378, electronic component 380 on module 368 may be electrically connected through coupler 378 to a circuit that connects component 380 back down through the assembly. Accordingly, cover 360 may function as a jumper such as jumper 250 described above.

Cover 360 may include additional extensions such as extensions 382 depicted in FIG. 14. Extensions 382 may mate with couplers on module 368, and may jumper additional circuits together on module 368. Alternatively, one or more extensions 382 may be electrically conductive and/or isolated, and may provide mechanical stability or security.

Cover 360 and module 368 may be keyed together using a mechanical key and keyway such as key 384 on cover 360 and keyway 386 on module 368. Key 384 and keyway 386 may be configured such that the key and keyway align and mate only when cover 360 is in a desired position, such as a position that aligns extensions 372 and 374 with couplers 376 and 378, respectively. In some examples, the key and keyway may be located on opposite components. In other words, the key may be disposed on a module and the keyway on the cover. Indicia (not shown) may be provided on an exposed surface of cover 360 to indicate a position of the key and keyway.

Accordingly, a system or device as described above for electrical component modules may include one or more of the following examples.

In a first example, a system may include a printed circuit board (PCB) having a first PCB circuit including a positive circuit terminal, a negative circuit terminal, a plurality of electrical interfaces, a plurality of selectively actuatable jumpers, and a plurality of conductors. The plurality of conductors may connect each one of the plurality of electrical interfaces through the jumpers to the positive and negative circuit terminals in a selectable one of a series connection and a parallel connection. Each one of the plurality of modular battery stacks may include at least one battery module, and each battery module may include a first battery connector, a second battery connector, and a battery. The battery may have a positive battery terminal connected to the first battery connector and a negative battery terminal connected to the second battery connector. One of the first battery connectors of each battery stack may be mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces and one of the second battery connectors of each battery stack may be mechanically and electrically non-destructively removably connected to a respective second one of the plurality of electrical interfaces.

The first battery connector may be exposed. A battery stack cover assembly may include a cover encasing at least a portion of at least a first one of the plurality of battery stacks and a return conductor operatively connecting the first battery connector of the first one of the battery stacks to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces.

A battery stack cover assembly may include a cover encasing at least a portion of at least a first one of the plurality of battery stacks and at least one fastener mounted to the battery stack cover for selectively fastening the battery stack cover to the PCB.

The first battery connector may be exposed and the fastener may be electrically conductive and connected to the respective first one of the plurality of electrical interfaces. The battery stack cover assembly may further include a return conductor operatively connecting the respective first battery connector to the fastener.

Each battery module in each of the plurality of battery stacks may include at least one secondary electrical connector configured to mechanically and electrically mate with a connector on another battery module. The battery stack cover assembly may include a plurality of the return conductors and a plurality of the fasteners, each return conductor connecting the first battery connector or an exposed one of the at least one secondary electrical connector of the battery stack to a respective fastener when the battery stack cover is encasing at least a portion of the battery stack.

Each of the fasteners may be configured to fasten the associated battery stack to a respective electrical interface on the PCB, the electrical interfaces associated with each battery stack being electrically interconnected.

A battery stack cover assembly may include a battery stack cover encasing at least a portion of at least a first one of the plurality of battery stacks, the battery stack cover being substantially rigid and including a chamber having a shape conforming to a shape of the battery stack.

Each battery module may include exposed receptacles and the battery stack cover assembly may include a cap portion having a plurality of protrusions extending into the chamber, the cover having a height appropriate to connect the protrusions with corresponding receptacles on an outermost battery module when the battery stack cover is operatively placed on the battery stack.

In a second example, a modular battery stack may include one or more battery modules. Each module may include opposite major faces and a first battery connector and a second battery connector, a battery having positive and negative terminals connected respectively to the first and second battery connectors, and an additional connector. Each battery connector and additional connector may extend between the major faces and may be configured to mechanically and electrically mate with a connector on another battery module when a major face of one battery module is proximate to a major faces of the other battery module. A battery stack cover assembly may include a cover covering at least a portion of an outermost battery module of the one or more battery modules and an electrical conductor. The outermost battery module may have an exposed major face and connectors connected to connectors on an adjacent module on an unexposed major face of the outermost battery module. The electrical conductor may connect one of the battery connectors of the outermost battery module to the additional connector of the outermost battery module.

A printed circuit board (PCB) may have a circuit conductor, and at least one of the connectors of one or more of the battery modules of the modular battery stack may be electrically connected to the circuit conductor of the PCB.

The battery stack cover and the outermost battery module may have in combination a key and corresponding keyway defining an orientation of the battery stack cover relative to the outermost battery module required for the battery stack cover to operatively seat against the outermost battery module.

The electrical conductor of the battery stack cover assembly may connect a preselected one of the battery connectors of the outermost battery module to the additional connector of the outermost battery module when the key and keyway are aligned.

The battery stack cover may further include indicia indicative of a position of the key or keyway in the battery stack cover.

The outermost battery module may include at least one lateral surface connecting respective edges of the associated opposite major faces, and the modular battery stack cover may encase at least a portion of both the exposed major face and the at least one lateral surface of the outermost battery module.

The battery stack cover may provide electrical isolation between the first and second battery connectors when the modular battery stack cover connects one of the battery connectors to the additional connector.

In a third example, a device may include an electronic component stack cover having an open end sized to receive a modular electronic component stack including a plurality of like modular electronic components. The cover may include an at least partially closed end, and sides extending from the at least partially closed end toward the open end, the at least partially closed end and the at least one side forming a chamber between the at least partially closed end and the open end. The device may further include at least one electrically conductive probe extending from the at least partially closed end into the chamber. The chamber may be shaped to conform to an outer shape of at least a portion of the modular electronic component stack and the electrically conductive probe may be configured to electrically interface with a first connector on the electronic component stack when the stack is within the chamber.

The modular electronic component stack may include an end electronic component module having a first terminal and a second terminal. The electrically conductive probe may be configured to electrically connect the first terminal to the second terminal when the electronic component stack cover is mounted onto the modular electronic component stack with the end electronic component module positioned proximate the at least partially closed end of the electronic component stack cover.

The device may include an electrically isolated probe extending into the chamber. The electronic component stack may include an end electronic component module having the first connector, a second connector, and a circuit with a terminal electrically connected to the first connector. The electrically isolated probe may be configured to mechanically attach to the second connector on the end electronic component module.

The device may include an electrical conductor supported by and extending along the cover from the open end to the at least partially closed end. The electrical conductor may be electrically connected to the conductive probe.

The device may include a fastener at the open end, the fastener being configured to attach the device to a printed circuit board.

The fastener may be electrically conductive, and the electrically conductive probe may be electrically connected to the fastener.

The cover and electronic component stack may include in combination a key and a keyway, the cover and modular electronic component stack being mechanically keyed with the key seating in the keyway when the electrically-conductive probe is aligned with an associated terminal of a circuit on the electronic component stack.

The cover may further include an outer surface that is exposed when the cover is operatively covering an electronic component stack, and indicia may be located on the outer surface of the cover indicative of a position of the key or keyway of the cover.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the invention. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises” and/or “comprising,” when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

The corresponding structures, materials, acts, and equivalents of all means or step plus function elements in the claims below are intended to include any structure, material, or act for performing the function in combination with other claimed elements as specifically claimed. The description of the various embodiments of the present invention has been presented for purposes of illustration, but is not intended to be exhaustive or limited to the embodiments disclosed. Many modifications and variations will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the described embodiments. The terminology used herein was chosen to best explain the principles of the embodiments, the practical application or technical improvement over technologies found in the marketplace, or to enable others of ordinary skill in the art to understand the embodiments disclosed herein.

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34.0/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

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48.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

69.89/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

79.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Elektrochemisches Festelektrolyt-Zellsystem FRAUNHOFER-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FOERDERUNG DER ANGEWANDTEN FORSCHUNG E.V. 80636 MUENCHEN DE 21 June 1996 02 January 1997
Battery protection circuits SONY CORPORATION 15 September 1993 23 March 1994
Fuel cell assembly ABB PATENT GMBH 12 April 1991 14 October 1992
可携式电子装置及其电性连接机构 宏达国际电子股份有限公司 10 December 2009 15 June 2011
具有位置可改变的连接端的电池组电路板及其改变方法 英华达股份有限公司 04 April 2001 06 November 2002
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