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Patent Analysis of

Dual-accumulator electrical generation apparatus

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10003222

Application Number

US15/347538

Application Date

09 November 2016

Publication Date

19 June 2018

Current Assignee

MAROSZ, MARION J.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

MAROSZ, MARION J.

International Classification

H02K16/04,H02K1/14,H02K7/18,H02K1/08

Cooperative Classification

H02K1/143,H02K1/08,H02K7/1807,H02K16/04,H02K19/22

Inventor

MAROSZ, MARION J.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 1 US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 2 US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 3
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Abstract

An apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy includes a rotor having a first end portion and a second end portion, a first stator including a plurality of magnet poles, and a second stator including a plurality of magnet poles. The rotor is located about a shaft along a rotational axis. The rotor includes a plurality of north and south poles alternating along a circumference of the rotor. The plurality of magnet poles of the first stator are rotated 180 electrical degrees with respect to the plurality of magnet poles of the second stator.

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Claims

1. An apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, comprising: a rotor with an even number of electromagnetic poles of alternating polarity along a circumference of the rotor, each of the electromagnetic poles extending an entire axial length of the rotor and having a single polarity; a first stator ring defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles grouped into a plurality of sets circularly spaced apart from each other; and a second stator ring defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles grouped into a plurality of sets circularly spaced apart from each other and parallel to the first stator ring; wherein the rotor is positioned within the first stator ring and the second stator ring, the second stator ring being spaced axially apart from the first stator ring with flux leakage being reduced based upon an axial spatial separation of the first stator ring and the second stator ring, and the first stator ring being rotationally offset from the second stator ring with the magnet poles of the first stator ring radially facing a first set of alternating electromagnet poles of the rotor, the magnet poles of the second stator ring radially facing a different second set of alternating electromagnet poles of the rotor, and each of sets of radially inward magnet poles for both the first stator ring and the second stator ring corresponding to a specific phase of an electrical energy wave.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the magnet poles of the first stator ring face the north magnet poles of the rotor and the magnet poles of the second stator ring face the south magnet poles of the rotor.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the north magnet poles of the rotor generate a north polarity flux to the first stator ring and the south magnet poles of the rotor generate a south polarity flux to the second stator ring, the respective polarity flux to the accumulator rings being reversed as the rotor advances.

4. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the north polarity flux and the south polarity flux oscillate as a function of a number of magnet poles of the rotor and a speed of rotation.

5. The apparatus of claim 3, further comprising: a ferromagnetic connector between the first stator ring and the second stator ring; and a coil wrapped around the ferromagnetic connector; wherein the oscillating flux from the first stator ring and the second stator ring generate a voltage at an output of the coil.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein each of the electromagnetic poles of the rotor include a winding.

7. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein a number of revolutions per minute of turning the rotor is reduced as a function of a number increasing the electromagnetic poles of the rotor for a given rotor diameter, total flux, and torque remaining the same and the power output remaining the same.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the rotor is defined by a first axial end and an opposed second axial end.

9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein the magnet poles of the first stator ring face the electromagnetic poles of the rotor proximal to the first axial end thereof, and the magnet poles of the second stator ring face the electromagnetic poles of the rotor proximal to the second axial end thereof.

10. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein the voltage at the output of the coil corresponds to a level of electrical current through the winding of the electromagnetic poles of the rotor.

11. A magnetic alternating current generator comprising: a rotor with a predefined number of electromagnetic poles of alternating polarity along a circumference of the rotor, each of the electromagnetic poles extending an entire axial length of the rotor; one or more first stator ring segments each defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles; and one or more second stator ring segments each defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles and parallel to the first stator ring; ferromagnetic connectors between each of the respective first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments; and coils wrapped around each of the ferromagnetic connectors, an oscillating flux from a given one of the first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments generate a phase of a voltage signal at an output of the respective coils; wherein the rotor is positioned within a circular arrangement of the one or more first stator ring segments and a circular arrangement of the one or more second stator ring segments, each of the first stator ring segments being spaced axially apart from corresponding one of the second stator ring segments with flux leakage being reduced based upon an axial spatial separation of each of the respective first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments, and each of the first stator ring segments being rotationally offset from the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. An apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, comprising:
    • a rotor with an even number of electromagnetic poles of alternating polarity along a circumference of the rotor, each of the electromagnetic poles extending an entire axial length of the rotor and having a single polarity
    • a first stator ring defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles grouped into a plurality of sets circularly spaced apart from each other
    • and a second stator ring defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles grouped into a plurality of sets circularly spaced apart from each other and parallel to the first stator ring
    • wherein the rotor is positioned within the first stator ring and the second stator ring, the second stator ring being spaced axially apart from the first stator ring with flux leakage being reduced based upon an axial spatial separation of the first stator ring and the second stator ring, and the first stator ring being rotationally offset from the second stator ring with the magnet poles of the first stator ring radially facing a first set of alternating electromagnet poles of the rotor, the magnet poles of the second stator ring radially facing a different second set of alternating electromagnet poles of the rotor, and each of sets of radially inward magnet poles for both the first stator ring and the second stator ring corresponding to a specific phase of an electrical energy wave.
    • 2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein
      • the magnet poles of the first stator ring face the north magnet poles of the rotor and the magnet poles of the second stator ring face the south magnet poles of the rotor.
    • 7. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein
      • a number of revolutions per minute of turning the rotor is reduced as a function of a number increasing the electromagnetic poles of the rotor for a given rotor diameter, total flux, and torque remaining the same and the power output remaining the same.
    • 8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein
      • the rotor is defined by a first axial end and an opposed second axial end.
  • 11
    11. A magnetic alternating current generator comprising:
    • a rotor with a predefined number of electromagnetic poles of alternating polarity along a circumference of the rotor, each of the electromagnetic poles extending an entire axial length of the rotor
    • one or more first stator ring segments each defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles
    • and one or more second stator ring segments each defined by a plurality of radially inward magnet poles and parallel to the first stator ring
    • ferromagnetic connectors between each of the respective first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments
    • and coils wrapped around each of the ferromagnetic connectors, an oscillating flux from a given one of the first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments generate a phase of a voltage signal at an output of the respective coils
    • wherein the rotor is positioned within a circular arrangement of the one or more first stator ring segments and a circular arrangement of the one or more second stator ring segments, each of the first stator ring segments being spaced axially apart from corresponding one of the second stator ring segments with flux leakage being reduced based upon an axial spatial separation of each of the respective first stator ring segments and the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments, and each of the first stator ring segments being rotationally offset from the corresponding one of the second stator ring segments.
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Description

STATEMENT RE: FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH/DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

Technical Field

The present disclosure relates to the field of electrical power generation. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus and methods for constructing the same.

Discussion of Related Art

An alternator is an electrical generator that converts mechanical energy to electrical energy in the form of alternating current. The source of mechanical energy, the prime mover, may be an internal-combustion engine, a steam turbine, a water turbine, a wind turbine or other source of mechanical energy. In a typical alternator, the direct current (DC) magnetic flux is swept by an armature conductor which generates a voltage. This occurs over many conductors wound on the armature. The sum of the voltages is the output of the alternator.

In general, an alternator consists of a field, comprising a series of alternate north and south magnetic poles spaced around a circular periphery, and a concentric armature fabricated out of laminated steel and carrying a system of electrical conductors at its surface, together with a mechanical structure that permits the field to be revolved, with respect to the armature, by the prime mover. A typical alternator includes a wound stator associated with a field structure that is energized with DC current and rotated relative to the stator. One way of providing the direct current for energization of the rotor field winding is to obtain alternating current (AC) energy from the generator stator windings by means of a stationary transformer, rectify the output current of the transformer and apply the resulting DC voltage to the field winding through a slip-ring and brush connections.

In alternators, the armature may be either the rotor or stator. According to the arrangement of the field and armature windings, synchronous generators may be classified as rotating-armature type or rotating-field type. A rotating armature requires slip rings and brushes to conduct the current from the armature. The armature, brushes, and slip rings are difficult to insulate, and arc-overs and short circuits can result at high voltages. For this reason, high-voltage alternators are usually of the rotating-field type. Since the voltage applied to the rotating field is low voltage DC, the problem of high voltage arc-over at the slip rings does not exist.

The rotor's magnetic field may be produced by a field coil electromagnet or by permanent magnets. Permanent magnet machines generally raise the induced voltage compared to the coil field magnet type having the same physical size, and avoid the loss due to magnetizing current in the rotor, but are restricted in size, due to the cost of the magnet material.

Alternating current synchronous generators are normally constructed with the armature windings on the stator and the field winding on the rotor. In general, the stator comprises all of the non-rotating electrical parts of the generator, and the rotor includes all of the rotating electrical parts. FIG. 1 shows a simple two-pole alternator 100 including a rotor 101 having two slots 105 for field windings, a stator 102, and an output coil 110. The rotor 101 is mounted for rotation (as indicated by the curved arrows in FIG. 1) on a shaft 108. The rotor 101 is wound with wire (not shown) in the slots 105 to form the field winding and supplied with DC current via slip rings (not shown) on the shaft. A prime mover is provided, which provides the necessary mechanical energy in the form of rotational energy. Rotation of the shaft 108 by the prime mover rotates the rotor field winding relative to the stator 102. When current is applied, the rotor 101 becomes a magnet with both a north and a south pole. Alternatively, the rotor 101 could be a permanent magnet. When the rotor 101 is spinning, the alternating magnetic field induces an AC voltage in the output coil 110.

Large 50 Hz or 60 Hz three-phase alternators provide most of the world's electric power, which is distributed by electric power grids. A three-phase alternator has three completely separate windings in which current is produced, but a single rotating magnetic field. Within the alternator, there is no electrical connection between the windings. The rotating magnetic field is the rotor and the windings in which current is produced are in the fixed stator.

In prior art alternators, the stator pole magnets are inactive much of each cycle and generate a high degree of eddy current losses and sound due to magnetostriction losses. An eddy current creates a magnetic field that opposes the magnetic field that created it, and thus eddy currents are a cause of energy loss in alternators. To suppress eddy current, it is known to construct the stator from thin sheets of magnetic material, known as laminations. The laminations must be held in precise alignment with each other, e.g., to provide a uniform air gap between the stator and rotor poles. A method of interconnecting the laminations to form a rigid, unitary structure is known wherein a varnish or other suitable insulating material is interposed between laminations. After curing, the material binds the laminations rigidly together, thus preventing relative movement.

Since electrical power generation depends largely on an alternator's efficiency, there is a need for electrical alternators having higher efficiency. There is a need for a design for an electrical alternator that minimizes eddy current losses for high-efficiency operation, and which is designed in such a way that the audible noise is reduced. A need thus exists to improve the efficiency of electrical alternators.

BRIEF SUMMARY

According to an aspect of the present disclosure, an apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy includes two stator armatures (also referred to herein as first and second stators) located about a rotor having a plurality of laminated poles. Associated with each rotor pole is a coil of wire wound around the pole to allow an electric current flowing in the wire to polarize each pole, such that each pole magnetically becomes alternately a north pole and then a south pole. Each stator armature is formed of a stack of magnetic steel laminations in a ring shape and includes a plurality of magnetic poles disposed on the inner circumference of the stator armature. The poles of the first and second stators, respectively, are located to match the position of every other pole of the rotor.

According to another aspect of the present disclosure, an apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy includes a rotor having a first end portion and a second end portion, a first stator including a plurality of magnet poles, and a second stator including a plurality of magnet poles. The rotor is located about a shaft along a rotational axis. The rotor includes a plurality of north and south poles alternating along a circumference of the rotor. The plurality of magnet poles of the first stator are rotated 180 electrical degrees with respect to the plurality of magnet poles of the second stator.

The plurality of magnetic poles of the first stator may be disposed at angular intervals on an inner circumference of the first stator. The plurality of magnetic poles of the second stator may be disposed at angular intervals on an inner circumference of the second stator. The plurality of magnet poles of the first stator may be interleafed with the plurality of magnet poles of the second stator.

According to another aspect of the present disclosure, an apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy includes a rotor located about a shaft along a rotational axis, an output coil bridge, and a dual stator. The rotor has a plurality of poles. The dual stator includes a first stator having a plurality of magnet poles and a second stator having a plurality of magnet poles. The dual stator is magnetically coupled to the output coil bridge. The plurality of magnet poles of the first stator and the plurality of magnet poles of the second stator are proximal to the plurality of poles of the rotor, such that when a magnetic field is generated on the plurality of poles of the rotor, the first stator receives magnetic flux of all a first magnetic polarity and the second stator receives magnetic flux of all a second magnetic polarity.

According to another aspect of the present disclosure, an apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy includes a first dual stator, a second dual stator, a third dual stator, and a rotor. The rotor has a plurality of poles along a circumference of the rotor. When the rotor rotates, the first dual stator is magnetically coupled to a first output coil bridge, the second dual stator is magnetically coupled to a second output coil bridge, and the third dual stator is magnetically coupled to a third output coil bridge.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features and advantages of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus embodiments disclosed herein will be better understood with respect to the following description and drawings, in which like reference numerals may refer to similar or identical elements throughout the description of the figures, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a two-pole alternator;

FIG. 2A is a schematic view of a rotor and first and second stators of a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus, shown in a first configuration, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2B is a schematic view of the rotor and first and second stators of FIG. 2A, shown in a second configuration, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2C is a schematic view of an alternative embodiment of the first and second stators of FIG. 2A in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 2D is a schematic view of an alternative embodiment of the first and second stators of FIG. 2A in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2A in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 4 is a schematic view of a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4 in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 4 in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the first and second stators of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus of FIG. 4, partially cut away to illustrate parts of the rotor, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the rotor and first and second stators of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus of FIG. 4, shown separated, and partially cut away to illustrate parts of the first stator, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure;

FIG. 9 is a schematic view of a rotor and first and second stators of a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus in accordance with another embodiment the present disclosure;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 9 in accordance with an embodiment the present disclosure;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the first and second stators of FIG. 10, shown with parts separated, in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure; and

FIG. 12 is a schematic view of a three-phase dual-stator electrical generation apparatus in accordance with an embodiment of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Hereinafter, embodiments of a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus and methods for constructing the same are described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

This description may use the phrases “in an embodiment,”“in embodiments,”“in some embodiments,” or “in other embodiments,” which may each refer to one or more of the same or different embodiments in accordance with the present disclosure. Various features of the embodiments disclosed herein can be used alone, or in varying combinations with each other and are not intended to be limited to the specific combinations described herein.

As used herein, the term “electrical alternator” or simply “alternator” generally refers to alternating current (AC) electrical generators. As used herein, “eddy currents” generally refers to loops of electrical current induced within structure by a changing magnetic field. As used herein, the term “electrical steel” generally refers to steel with silicon added to it. As used herein, the term “hysteresis” generally refers to the residual magnetic field when magnetic excitation is removed or decreased. As it is used in this description, “transmission line” generally refers to any transmission medium that can be used for the propagation of signals from one point to another. It is to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only, and is not intended to be limiting.

In the presently-disclosed electrical generation apparatus embodiments, the armature is the stator, which comprises two or more parts. Various embodiments of the present disclosure provide a dual-stator electrical generation apparatus for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy including a rotor and dual stators. During operation of the presently-disclosed dual-stator electrical generation apparatus, as the rotor rotates, one armature ring (e.g., the first stator) will receive the magnetic flux of all the first magnetic polarity, e.g., north (N) polarity, poles of the rotor, and the other armature ring (e.g., the second stator) will receive all of the magnetic flux of the second magnetic polarity, e.g., south (S) polarity, poles of the rotor. The presently-disclosed dual-stator electrical generation apparatus may be simpler than the construction of the typical electrical alternator and/or provide significantly higher efficiency than prior art alternators.

When compared to a two-pole alternator (e.g., alternator 100 shown in FIG. 1) of equal size, e.g., equal rotor diameter and total rotor flux, the presently-disclosed dual-stator electrical generation apparatus is capable of producing the same output as the two-pole alternator with the same amount of torque but at a significantly lower rpm.

Although the present disclosure provides methods for constructing single-phase electrical power generation apparatus (e.g., single-phase, dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400 shown in FIG. 4) and three-phase electrical power generation apparatus (e.g., three-phase, dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200 shown in FIG. 12), those skilled in the art will recognize that various polyphase electrical power generation apparatus can be constructed using the presently-disclosed concepts and principles.

FIGS. 2A, 2B and 3-8 show an embodiment of a single-phase, dual-stator electrical generation apparatus, or components thereof. In the illustrated embodiment, the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus (shown generally as 400 in FIG. 4) includes a dual stator 9 comprising a first stator 1 and a second stator 2, in which a rotor 8 is concentrically disposed. In FIGS. 2C and 2D, two alternative embodiments of the dual stator 9 are shown.

In some embodiments, the magnetic field on the rotor 8 is generated by current delivered through slip rings 41 and 42. In other embodiments, the magnetic field on the rotor 8 may be generated by permanent magnets. Various parts of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400 may be formed of any of a variety of materials, including metallic and/or non-metallic materials. One or more parts of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400 may be constructed from thin lamination sheets stacked together, e.g., to reduce eddy current losses. The rotor 8 and the dual stator 9, or portions thereof, may be fabricated out of electrical steel, e.g., to improve the magnetic flux strength and reduce hysteresis loss.

Referring to FIGS. 2A, 2B and 3, the rotor 8 includes a plurality of pole pieces 4 circumferentially located about a central portion 3 of the rotor 8. In FIGS. 2A, 2B and 3, the rotor field winding is omitted for simplicity. In an embodiment, the central portion 3 of the rotor 8 has a cylindrical shape. As depicted in FIGS. 2A and 2B, alternate pole pieces 4 of the rotor 8 are of a first magnetic polarity, e.g., north (N) polarity, while the other pole pieces 4 are of a second magnetic polarity, e.g., south (S) polarity, as the rotor 8 rotates.

The rotor 8 has a first end 31 and a second end 32. The first end 31 and the second end 32 may be spaced apart by any suitable length L4. The rotor 8 has a longitudinal axis A-A between the first end 31 and the second end 32. The rotor 8 rotates (as indicated by the curved arrow in FIG. 3) about a shaft 70 along an axis of rotation, e.g., longitudinal axis A-A. The shaft 70 may be connected to or include a turbine shaft. In embodiments, the rotor pole pieces 4 are located at a fixed distance from the rotational axis. It is to be understood that the size, shape, and number of rotor pole pieces 4, and the relative spacing between pole pieces 4, may be varied from the configuration depicted in FIGS. 2A and 2B. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the size and shape of the rotor 8 will vary according to the number of poles on the dual stator 9.

In the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400, the dual stator 9 surrounds the circumference of the rotor 8. In embodiments, a first end portion of the rotor 8 (e.g., portion R1 shown in FIG. 8) is concentrically disposed within the first stator 1, and a second end portion of the rotor 8 (e.g., portion R2 shown in FIG. 8) is concentrically disposed within the second stator 2. During operation of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400, the rotor 8 is rotated by a prime mover (not shown) via the shaft 70 so that a magnetic flux is induced in the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 of the dual stator 9, as described in more detail later in this description.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the first stator 1 has a first side 11 and a second side 12. The first side 11 and the second side 12 of the first stator 1 may be spaced apart by any suitable length L1. The second stator 2 has a first side 21 and a second side 22. The first side 21 and the second side 22 of the second stator 2 may be spaced apart by any suitable length L2. In an embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3, the second side 12 of the first stator 1 is disposed in opposing relation with the first side 21 of the second stator 2. Alternatively, the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 may be arranged such that the first side 11 of the first stator 1 is disposed in opposing relation with the second side 22 of the second stator 2.

In some embodiments, as shown for example in FIG. 3, the second side 12 of the first stator 1 are spaced apart from the second side of the second stator 2 by a gap 7 to prevent flux leakage. The gap 7 may have any suitable length L3. In other embodiments, as shown for example in FIG. 10, the magnet poles of the first and second stators are at least partially interleafed with one another.

In an embodiment, as shown for example in FIGS. 3 and 7, the first side 11 of the first stator 1 is aligned with the first end 31 of the rotor 8. The second side 22 of the second stator 2 may additionally, or alternatively, be aligned with the second end 32 of the rotor 8. In an embodiment, the length L4 of the rotor 8 is defined by the sum of the length L1 of the first stator 1, the length L2 of the second stator 2 and the length L3 of the gap 7. In the preferred embodiment, the length L3 of the gap 7 is minimal so that the length L4 of the rotor 8 is minimized, e.g., to reduce fabrication cost, to reduce weight of the rotor, which helps to reduce the size of the shaft and bearings, to reduce the cost of ownership, and/or to facilitate easier transport and installation.

The first stator 1 and the second stator 2 each include a plurality of poles circumferentially located about the longitudinal axis A-A and proximal to the plurality of pole pieces 4. In more detail, the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 each consists of a ring-shaped portion with a plurality of poles protruding from the inner periphery of the ring, such that the poles of the first stator 1 and the second stator 2, respectively, match every other pole piece 4 on the rotor 8. In some embodiments, the stator poles may have rectangular or square geometries. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the stator poles may have other geometries, e.g., a trapezoidal geometry. The plurality of magnetic poles of the first stator 1 may be disposed at angular intervals on an inner circumference of the first stator 1. The plurality of magnetic poles of the second stator 2 may be disposed at angular intervals on an inner circumference of the second stator 2. In embodiments, the plurality of magnet poles of the first stator 1 are rotated 180 electrical degrees with respect to the plurality of magnet poles of the second stator 2.

In an embodiment, as shown for example in FIG. 2, the dual stator 9 includes twelve poles, of which the first stator 1 includes six poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 and the second stator 2 includes six poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11. The first stator 1 and the second stator 2 require no windings, making for lower cost of fabrication. It is to be understood that the dual stator 9 may be segmented into any suitable number of poles and should not be construed to be limited to only twelve poles.

In FIG. 2A, the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 of the first stator 1 are aligned with the south (S) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8, and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 2 are aligned with the north (N) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8. In FIG. 2B, the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 of the first stator 1 are aligned with the north (N) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8, and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 2 are aligned with the south (S) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8.

Referring to FIGS. 4-8, the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400 includes an output coil bridge 6 associated with the dual stator 9. Referring, in particular, to FIGS. 5 and 6, the output coil bridge 6 includes a first portion 61 associated with the first stator 1, a second portion 62 associated with the second stator 2, and a third portion 63 disposed between and magnetically coupling the first portion 61 and the second portion 62. The third portion 63 of the output coil collects flux from the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 as the rotor 8 rotates, supplying the output coil with AC flux. FIG. 6 shows an output coil 10 is wound onto the third portion 63 of the output coil bridge 6. The output coil 10 is omitted on the cross-sectional view in FIG. 5.

In an alternative embodiment shown in FIG. 2C, the first stator 1 has an edge portion 51 to allow for attachment of the first stator 1 to the first portion 61 of the output coil bridge 6, and the second stator 2 has an edge portion 52 to allow for attachment of the second stator 2 to the second portion 62 of the output coil bridge 6. In an alternative embodiment shown in FIG. 2D, the first stator 1 has a tab member 71 to allow for attachment of the first stator 1 to the first portion 61 of the output coil bridge 6, and the second stator 2 has a tab member 72 to allow for attachment of the second stator 2 to the second portion 62 of the output coil bridge 6. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 may be mechanically supported in a variety of ways.

In as embodiment, as shown for example in FIGS. 7 and 8, the first stator 1 is located about a first end portion R1 of the rotor 8, and the second stator 2 is located about a second end portion R2 of the rotor 8. The dual stator 9 is magnetically coupled to the output coil bridge 6 and adjusted so that the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 of the first stator 1 match half of the poles 4 on the rotor 8 (i.e., alternating poles) and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 2 match the other half of the poles 4 of the rotor 8.

During operation of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 400, as the rotor 8 rotates, the first stator 1 will receive the magnetic flux of all the first magnetic polarity, e.g., north (N) polarity, poles 4 of the rotor 8, and the second stator 2 will receive all of the magnetic flux of the second magnetic polarity, e.g., south (S) polarity, poles 4 of the rotor 8. Thus, as the rotor 8 rotates, the magnetic flux of all the first magnetic polarity flows, alternately, from the first stator 1 to the second stator 2, and the magnetic flux of all the second magnetic polarity flows, alternately, from the second stator 2 to the first stator 1. In more detail, the magnetic flux flows or shifts, alternately, from a first configuration (e.g., shown in FIG. 2A), in which the poles of the first stator 1 are aligned with the south (S) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8, and the poles of the second stator 2 are aligned with the north (N) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8, to a second configuration (e.g., shown in FIG. 2B), in which the poles of the first stator 1 are aligned with the north (N) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8, and the poles of the second stator 2 are aligned with the south (S) polarity poles 4 of the rotor 8. As such, the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 of the dual stator 9 effectively become the accumulators of the magnetic flux.

The magnetic flux collected by the first stator 1 and the second stator 2 is directed to the output coil 10, via the output coil bridge 6 associated with the first stator 1 and the second stator 2, to generate AC voltage at the output. The output coil 10 functions similar to the secondary coil on a transformer. The output voltage from the output coil 10 is output via transmission lines 14 and 15. The output coil 10 could be replaced by any device requiring an alternating field, such as, for example, a shaded pole induction motor.

Referring to FIGS. 9-11, an embodiment of a dual stator 90 is shown for use with a rotor 98. In FIG. 9, the rotor field winding is omitted for simplicity. The dual stator 90 comprises a first stator 91 and a second stator 92. The first stator 91 and the second stator 92 require no windings. The rotor 98 and the dual stator 90, or portions thereof, may be fabricated out of electrical steel, e.g., to improve the magnetic flux strength and reduce hysteresis loss. As depicted in FIG. 9, alternate pole pieces 94 of the rotor 8 are of a first magnetic polarity, e.g., north (N) polarity while the other pole pieces 94 are of a second magnetic polarity, e.g., south (S) polarity, as the rotor 98 rotates.

The first stator 91 has a first side 1011 and a second side 1012. The second stator 92 has a first side 1021 and a second side 1022. In an embodiment, as shown for example in FIG. 10, the second side 1012 of the first stator 91 is disposed in opposing relation with the first side 1021 of the second stator 92. Alternatively, the first stator 1 and the second stator 92 may be arranged such that the first side 1011 of the first stator 91 is disposed in opposing relation with the second side 1022 of the second stator 92.

The dual stator 90 includes twelve poles, as best seen in FIGS. 9 and 11, of which the first stator 91 includes six poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 and the second stator 92 includes six poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11. In an embodiment, the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 of the first stator 91 and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 92 are constructed from thin lamination sheets stacked together, e.g., to reduce eddy current losses. It is to be understood that the dual stator 90 may be segmented into any suitable number of poles and should not be construed to be limited to only twelve poles. In an embodiment, as shown for example in FIG. 11, the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 the first stator 91 and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 92 are separate components. In an embodiment, the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 are attached to the ring-shaped portion 95 of the first stator 91 using threaded fasteners 97 and nuts 99, and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 are attached to the ring-shaped portion 95 of the second stator 92 using threaded fasteners 97 and nuts 99. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the poles of the first stator 91 and the poles of the second stator 92 may be attached in a variety of ways.

In an embodiment, the dual stator 90 may be magnetically coupled to the output coil bridge 6 and adjusted so that the poles P2, P4, P6, P8, P10 and P12 of the first stator 91 match half of the poles on the rotor 98 (i.e., alternating poles) and the poles P1, P3, P5, P7, P9 and P11 of the second stator 92 match the other half of the poles of the rotor 98. During operation, as the rotor 98 rotates, the first stator 91 will receive the magnetic flux of all the first magnetic polarity, e.g., north (N) polarity, poles of the rotor 98, and the second stator 92 will receive all of the magnetic flux of the second magnetic polarity, e.g., south (S) polarity, poles of the rotor 98.

FIG. 12 shows an embodiment of a three-phase, dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200. In FIG. 12, the rotor field winding is omitted for simplicity. Various parts of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200 may be formed of any of a variety of materials, including metallic and/or non-metallic materials. One or more parts of the dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200 may be constructed from electrical steel laminations.

The dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200 includes a first dual stator 1290A, which includes stators 14A and 15A, a second dual stator 1290B, which includes stators 14B and 15B, and a third dual stator 1290C, which includes stators 14C and 15C. The first dual stator is magnetically coupled to a first output coil bridge 16A, the second dual stator 1290B is magnetically coupled to a second output coil bridge 16B, and the third dual stator 1290C is magnetically coupled to a third output coil bridge 16C. It is to be understood that the armature may be segmented into any suitable number of poles and should not be construed to be limited to only twenty-one poles.

The first output coil bridge 16A has a first output coil 12A. The output voltage from the first output coil 12A is output via transmission line A. The second output coil bridge 16B has a second output coil 12B. The output voltage from the second output coil 12B is output via a transmission line B. The third output coil bridge 16C has a third output coil 12C. The output voltage from the third output coil 12C is output via a transmission line C. The first output coil bridge 16A, the second output coil bridge 16B, and the third output coil bridge 16C are similar to the output coil bridge 6 shown in FIGS. 4-6 and further description of like elements is omitted in the interests of brevity.

The dual-stator electrical generation apparatus 1200 includes a rotor 1208, which is disposed within the split armature to generate a magnetic field. In an embodiment, the rotor 1208 includes 24 pole pieces 1204 circumferentially located about a central portion 1203 of the rotor 1208. Alternate pole pieces 1204 of the rotor 1208 are of a first magnetic polarity, e.g., north polarity, while the other pole pieces 1204 are of a second magnetic polarity, e.g., south polarity, as the rotor 8 rotates. It is to be understood that the size, shape, and number of rotor poles, and the relative spacing between rotor poles, may be varied from the configuration depicted in FIG. 12. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the size and shape of the rotor 1208 will vary according to the number of poles on the first dual stator, the second dual stator, and the third dual stator.

Although embodiments have been described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings for the purpose of illustration and description, it is to be understood that the disclosed systems and apparatus are not to be construed as limited thereby. It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that various modifications to the foregoing embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of the disclosure. Further, the various features of the embodiments disclosed herein can be used alone, or in varying combinations with each other and are not intended to be limited to the specific combination described herein. Thus, the scope of the claims is not to be limited by the illustrated embodiments.

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31.0/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

32.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

72.1/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

26.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

16.45/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Magneto-electric generator EDISON-SPLITDORF CORPORATION 14 June 1935 25 May 1937
Position-control mechanism for stepwise rotating members SOLARI & C. UDINE S.P.A. 27 August 1975 12 April 1977
Machine dishwashing compositions containing sodium polyacrylate W. R. GRACE & CO. 02 August 1968 18 May 1971
Stepping motor for timekeeping mechanism KANTO SEIKI COMPANY, LIMITED 18 February 1977 09 May 1978
Split rotor multiphase generator CARINO ENERGY RENEWALBELS LTD. 14 January 2016 11 August 2016
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US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 1 US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 2 US10003222 Dual-accumulator electrical generation 3