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Patent Analysis of

Caps for needleless connectors

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10016587

Application Number

US13/476772

Application Date

21 May 2012

Publication Date

10 July 2018

Current Assignee

EXCELSIOR MEDICAL CORPORATION

Original Assignee (Applicant)

GARDNER, CHRISTOPHER E.,WALAWALKER, CHIRAG SANJAY,COLQUITT, LARRY,WILSON, MARK,ANDERSON, WILLIAM

International Classification

A61M39/20,A61M25/00,A61M39/16

Cooperative Classification

A61M39/20,A61M25/0097,A61M2025/0056,A61M39/165,A61M2025/0018

Inventor

GARDNER, CHRISTOPHER E.,WALAWALKER, CHIRAG SANJAY,COLQUITT, LARRY,WILSON, MARK,ANDERSON, WILLIAM,ENROTH, SOFI,KANE, JEFFREY F.,LOGAN, JOSEPH N.,LAUN, DEBORAH,NAAS, ROBERT

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10016587 Caps needleless connectors 1 US10016587 Caps needleless connectors 2 US10016587 Caps needleless connectors 3
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Abstract

An antiseptic cap and packaging for use with a connector are provided. The antiseptic cap includes a material containing an antiseptic solution. Upon application of the cap to the connector, the material compresses thereby releasing the antiseptic solution. Packaging of the antiseptic cap typically includes a cap holder and a lid. A user could remove the cap from the cap holder before applying it to a connector. Alternatively, the cap holder may be used to apply the cap to the connector.

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Claims

1. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising: an antiseptic cap including an antiseptic fluid and a sidewall defining a chamber and an opening configured to allow a needleless connector to access the chamber, the sidewall including a bottom surface comprising a first end at a first height and a second end at a second height, the bottom surface further comprising a planar portion extending from the first end and an angular portion extending from the second end in a direction towards the first height, wherein the planar portion is angled relative to the angular portion, wherein the first height is different than the second height, and wherein the first end is positioned diametrically opposite the second end; and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.

2. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the cap holder includes a gripping area extending from a top surface of the cap holder.

3. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 2, wherein the gripping area is a wall extending in a vertical direction from a central portion of the cap holder.

4. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the bottom flange of the cap holder further comprises a flat bottom surface angled relative to the angular surface of the bottom flange.

5. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the needleless connector comprises a cannula access device.

6. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the first height is greater than the second height.

7. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 6, wherein the antiseptic cap further comprises a retention protrusion including an upper surface positioned below the first end of the bottom surface in a direction of the second end of the bottom surface, the retention protrusion being configured to engage a surface of the needleless connector.

8. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein an absorbent material is positioned within the chamber and wherein the absorbent material contains the antiseptic fluid.

9. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the bottom surface of the sidewall defines the opening and at least a portion of the opening is planar.

10. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the antiseptic cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.

11. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the cap holder is removably attached to the antiseptic cap.

12. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein the planar portion is angled between 1 to 89 degrees relative to the angular portion.

13. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:an antiseptic cap comprising: an antiseptic fluid; a sidewall; an opening comprising a first end and a second end, the second end located diametrically opposite the first end; an end wall; and a bottom surface at the opening, the bottom surface comprising an angled portion located between the first end of the opening and the second end of the opening, the angled portion extending at a non-orthogonal angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the cap, wherein the sidewall at the first end of the opening when measured from the end wall to the opening is greater than the sidewall at the second end of the opening; and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.

14. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13 further comprising a retention protrusion extending radially inwardly from an internal surface of the sidewall of the cap, the retention protrusion sized to engage a surface of the needleless connector below a septum.

15. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 14, wherein the retention protrusion includes an upper surface positioned at a location proximal from the first end of the opening of the opening in a direction of the second end.

16. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13, wherein the needleless connector comprises a cannula access device.

17. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13, wherein at least a portion of the opening is planar.

18. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13 further comprising a chamber housing an absorbent material that contains the antiseptic fluid.

19. The antiseptic cap assembly claim 13, wherein the cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.

20. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising: an antiseptic cap including a sidewall defining a chamber and an opening configured to allow a needleless connector to access the chamber, the sidewall including a bottom surface comprising a first end at a first height and a second end at a second height, the bottom surface further comprising a planar portion extending from the first end and an angular portion extending directly from the second end in a direction towards the first height, wherein the planar portion is angled relative to the angular portion, wherein the first height is different than the second height, and wherein the first end is positioned diametrically opposite the second end; and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.

21. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the cap holder includes a gripping area extending from a top surface of the cap holder.

22. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 21, wherein the gripping area is a wall extending in a vertical direction from a central portion of the cap holder.

23. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the cap holder is removably attached to the antiseptic cap.

24. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the bottom flange of the cap holder further comprises a flat bottom surface angled relative to the angular surface of the bottom flange.

25. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the needleless connector comprises a cannula access device.

26. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the first height is greater than the second height.

27. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 26, wherein the antiseptic cap further comprises a retention protrusion including an upper surface positioned below the first end of the bottom surface in a direction of the second end of the bottom surface, the retention protrusion being configured to engage a surface of the needleless connector.

28. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein an absorbent material is positioned within the chamber and wherein the absorbent material contains an antiseptic fluid.

29. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the bottom surface of the sidewall defines the opening and at least a portion of the opening is planar.

30. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the antiseptic cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.

31. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein the planar portion is angled between 1 to 89 degrees relative to the angular portion.

32. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:an antiseptic cap comprising: a sidewall; an opening comprising a first end and a second end, the second end located diametrically opposite the first end; an end wall; and a bottom surface at the opening, the bottom surface comprising an angled portion located between the first end of the opening and the second end of the opening and extending directly from the second end, the angled portion extending at a non-orthogonal angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the cap, wherein the sidewall at the first end of the opening when measured from the end wall to the opening is greater than the sidewall at the second end of the opening; and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.

33. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32 further comprising a retention protrusion extending radially inwardly from an internal surface of the sidewall of the cap, the retention protrusion sized to engage a surface of the needleless connector below a septum.

34. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 33, wherein the retention protrusion includes an upper surface positioned at a location proximal from the first end of the opening in a direction of the second end of the opening.

35. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein the needleless connector comprises a cannula access device.

36. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein at least a portion of the opening is planar.

37. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32 further comprising a chamber housing an absorbent material that contains an antiseptic fluid.

38. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein the cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:
    • an antiseptic cap including an antiseptic fluid and a sidewall defining a chamber and an opening configured to allow a needleless connector to access the chamber, the sidewall including a bottom surface comprising a first end at a first height and a second end at a second height, the bottom surface further comprising a planar portion extending from the first end and an angular portion extending from the second end in a direction towards the first height, wherein the planar portion is angled relative to the angular portion, wherein the first height is different than the second height, and wherein the first end is positioned diametrically opposite the second end
    • and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.
    • 2. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the cap holder includes a gripping area extending from a top surface of the cap holder.
    • 4. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the bottom flange of the cap holder further comprises
    • 5. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the needleless connector comprises
    • 6. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the first height is greater than the second height.
    • 8. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • an absorbent material is positioned within the chamber and wherein
    • 9. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the bottom surface of the sidewall defines the opening and at least a portion of the opening is planar.
    • 10. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the antiseptic cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.
    • 11. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the cap holder is removably attached to the antiseptic cap.
    • 12. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the planar portion is angled between 1 to 89 degrees relative to the angular portion.
  • 13
    13. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:
    • an antiseptic cap comprising: an antiseptic fluid
    • a sidewall
    • an opening comprising a first end and a second end, the second end located diametrically opposite the first end
    • an end wall
    • and a bottom surface at the opening, the bottom surface comprising an angled portion located between the first end of the opening and the second end of the opening, the angled portion extending at a non-orthogonal angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the cap, wherein the sidewall at the first end of the opening when measured from the end wall to the opening is greater than the sidewall at the second end of the opening
    • and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.
    • 14. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13 further comprising
      • a retention protrusion extending radially inwardly from an internal surface of the sidewall of the cap, the retention protrusion sized to engage a surface of the needleless connector below a septum.
    • 16. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13, wherein
      • the needleless connector comprises
    • 17. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13, wherein
      • at least a portion of the opening is planar.
    • 18. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 13 further comprising
      • a chamber housing an absorbent material that contains the antiseptic fluid.
    • 19. The antiseptic cap assembly claim 13, wherein
      • the cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.
  • 20
    20. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:
    • an antiseptic cap including a sidewall defining a chamber and an opening configured to allow a needleless connector to access the chamber, the sidewall including a bottom surface comprising a first end at a first height and a second end at a second height, the bottom surface further comprising a planar portion extending from the first end and an angular portion extending directly from the second end in a direction towards the first height, wherein the planar portion is angled relative to the angular portion, wherein the first height is different than the second height, and wherein the first end is positioned diametrically opposite the second end
    • and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.
    • 21. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the cap holder includes a gripping area extending from a top surface of the cap holder.
    • 23. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the cap holder is removably attached to the antiseptic cap.
    • 24. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the bottom flange of the cap holder further comprises
    • 25. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the needleless connector comprises
    • 26. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the first height is greater than the second height.
    • 28. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • an absorbent material is positioned within the chamber and wherein
    • 29. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the bottom surface of the sidewall defines the opening and at least a portion of the opening is planar.
    • 30. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the antiseptic cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.
    • 31. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 20, wherein
      • the planar portion is angled between 1 to 89 degrees relative to the angular portion.
  • 32
    32. An antiseptic cap assembly for a needleless connector, comprising:
    • an antiseptic cap comprising: a sidewall
    • an opening comprising a first end and a second end, the second end located diametrically opposite the first end
    • an end wall
    • and a bottom surface at the opening, the bottom surface comprising an angled portion located between the first end of the opening and the second end of the opening and extending directly from the second end, the angled portion extending at a non-orthogonal angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the cap, wherein the sidewall at the first end of the opening when measured from the end wall to the opening is greater than the sidewall at the second end of the opening
    • and a cap holder with a sidewall and a bottom flange having a first end and a second end, the bottom flange comprising an angular surface extending from the second end of the bottom flange and sloped with respect to the first end of the bottom flange, wherein the cap holder is sized to receive the antiseptic cap.
    • 33. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32 further comprising
      • a retention protrusion extending radially inwardly from an internal surface of the sidewall of the cap, the retention protrusion sized to engage a surface of the needleless connector below a septum.
    • 35. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein
      • the needleless connector comprises
    • 36. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein
      • at least a portion of the opening is planar.
    • 37. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32 further comprising
      • a chamber housing an absorbent material that contains an antiseptic fluid.
    • 38. The antiseptic cap assembly of claim 32, wherein
      • the cap is configured for compatibility with a ‘Y’ connector injection site or a ‘T’ connector injection site.
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Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to caps for cannula access devices, and, more particularly, to antiseptic caps for cannula access devices.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Intravenous (IV) devices are widely used to administer fluids to patients. In an IV dispensing system, a catheter is commonly caped into central veins (such as the vena cana) from peripheral vein sites to provide access to a patient's vascular system. The catheter could be connected to an injection site, such as a needleless cannula access device, which includes a split septum accessible by one end of a blunt tip plastic cannula. The other end of the blunt cannula could be connected to a fluid source, such as a conventional syringe or a fluid line in communication with a IV bag filled with fluid.

When the connectors are attached to each other, fluid from the fluid source can flow into the patient. These connectors are often separated from each other at various times, for example, when a patient needs to use the bathroom. When the connectors are disengaged from each other, the connectors are exposed and are prone to contamination. Current procedures to reduce contamination of the connectors involve swabbing the connectors with a disinfecting pad. These procedures are prone to human error and are often not implemented. Also, antiseptic caps such as Excelsior's SWABCAP antiseptic cap are used to clean and cover access points. However, when a cannula access device is disengaged from a blunt cannula, there is no standard manner in which to store the cannula access device, and protect it, until it is reattached to the blunt cannula.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an antiseptic cap and packaging for use with a connector. The antiseptic cap includes a material containing an antiseptic solution. Upon application of the cap to the connector, the material compresses thereby releasing the antiseptic solution. Packaging of the antiseptic cap typically comprises a cap holder and a lid. In some embodiments a user could remove the cap from the cap holder before applying it to a connector. In other embodiments the cap holder may be used to aid in application of the cap to the connector. A variety of embodiments could be used to facilitate different types of connectors. A number of different types of caps can be used to assist with cap application or removal.

In one embodiment, an antiseptic cap for a cannula access device includes a sidewall defining a chamber, an undercut defining a channel formed in the sidewall, and a retention protrusion extending radially inwardly from an internal surface of the sidewall. The retention protrusion is sized to engage a surface of the cannula access device. The retention protrusion could contact a surface of the cannula access device below the septum. A cap holder or a lid could be provided as part of an antiseptic cap assembly. The cap holder has a sidewall defining a chamber sized to receive the antiseptic cap.

In another embodiment, an antiseptic cap assembly for a cannula access device includes an antiseptic cap having a sidewall with an angled bottom surface having one end and an opposite end sloped with respect to the one end. The one end is at a first horizontal level, and the opposite end is at a second horizontal level with respect to the first horizontal level.

Additionally, in another embodiment, an antiseptic cap assembly for a cannula access device includes an antiseptic cap having a sidewall, and a ‘H’ clip with a first side portion, a second side portion, and a hinge section. The first side portion and the second side portion are sized to pivot about the hinge portion.

In another embodiment, an antiseptic cap could include a first aperture and an absorbent material having a second aperture. The antiseptic cap could include a pin in communication with the first aperture and the second aperture, the pin having a tip.

In yet another embodiment, an antiseptic cap could include a sidewall and an undercut defining a channel formed in the sidewall, the cap configured to engage a ‘Y’ connector injection site and a ‘T’ connector injection site. In another embodiment, an antiseptic cap could include a sidewall and an angled bottom surface, the cap configured to engage a ‘Y’ connector injection site and a ‘T’ connector injection site.

A method of cleaning and covering a cannula access device is provided. The method includes the steps of applying an antiseptic cap to a ‘Y’ connector injection site, and allowing the antiseptic cap to remain on and cover the ‘Y’ connector injection site. The antiseptic cap has an antiseptic fluid therein. The antiseptic cap could be applied to other cannula access devices, such as a ‘T’ connector injection site.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of an antiseptic cap engaged to an injection site according to the present invention;

FIG. 1B is a cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 1A engaged to an injection site;

FIG. 2A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap engaged to an injection site, where the antiseptic cap has one channel;

FIG. 2B is a cross-sectional view of an antiseptic cap of FIG. 2A engaged to an injection site;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view showing a cap assembly of the present invention, where an antiseptic cap and a cap holder each have an angled bottom surface;

FIG. 4A is a cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 3 applied to an injection site;

FIG. 4B is a cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 3 applied to the injection site, taken from the right side of the cap shown in FIG. 4A;

FIG. 4C is a cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 3 applied to a ‘T’ connector injection site;

FIG. 4D is a cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 3 applied to a ‘Y’ connector injection site;

FIG. 4E is cross-sectional view of the antiseptic cap and the cap holder of FIG. 3 applied to an injection manifold;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap assembly, where a cap holder has a generally planar top surface;

FIG. 6A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap assembly, where a cap and a cap holder each have a bottom surface comprising a flat portion and an angled portion;

FIG. 6B is cross-sectional view of the cap assembly of FIG. 6A;

FIG. 7A is an exploded perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, where a cap comprises a compressible top portion;

FIG. 7B is a cross-sectional view of the cap assembly of FIG. 7A;

FIG. 7C is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 7A applied to an injection site;

FIG. 8A is an exploded perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, where a cap has grip protrusions;

FIG. 8B is a cross-sectional assembled view of the cap assembly of FIG. 8A;

FIG. 8C is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 8A applied to an injection site;

FIG. 9A is an exploded perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, where a cap has two channels;

FIG. 9B is a cross-sectional assembled view of the cap assembly of FIG. 9A;

FIG. 9C is a cross-sectional assembled view of the cap assembly ofFIG. 9A from the right side of the cap shown in FIG. 9B.

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, where a cap has two channels;

FIG. 11A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap, where an antiseptic cap has three channels;

FIG. 11B is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 11A applied to an injection site, wherein the cap has retaining tabs that extend centrally within the cap;

FIG. 11C is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 11A applied to an injection site, wherein a cap has retaining tabs that extend downwardly within the cap;

FIG. 11D is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 11C applied to an injection site;

FIG. 11E is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap of FIG. 11A with annular gripping protrusions;

FIG. 11F is a perspective view of the cap of FIG. 11E;

FIG. 12A is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a solid annular protrusion;

FIG. 12B is a perspective view of the cap of FIG. 12A;

FIG. 13A is a side view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with squeeze grips and two engagement protrusions;

FIG. 13B is a bottom view of the cap of FIG. 13A;

FIG. 13C is a perspective view of the cap of FIG. 13A.

FIG. 14A is a side view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with squeeze grips;

FIG. 14B is a bottom view of the cap of FIG. 14A showing three engagement protrusions;

FIG. 14C is a perspective view of the cap of FIG. 14A;

FIG. 15A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, wherein the cap holder includes bellows;

FIG. 15B is a side view of the cap holder and lid of FIG. 15A;

FIG. 15C is side view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, wherein the cap holder includes a breakable portion;

FIG. 16A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with an ‘H’ clip;

FIG. 16B is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 16A;

FIG. 17A is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with an ‘H’ clip and connecting segments in a relaxed configuration;

FIG. 17B is a cross-sectional view of the cap with an ‘H’ clip of FIG. 17A when a force is applied to the ‘H’ clip in the direction of Arrows A;

FIG. 18 is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, wherein the cap holder includes an upper cylindrical wall;

FIG. 19A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly, wherein the cap holder is used as an applicator;

FIG. 19B is a perspective view of a cap with an ‘H’ clip in a cap holder, where the top portions of the ‘H’ clip are accessible;

FIG. 19C is a cross-sectional view of the cap and cap holder of FIG. 19B.

FIG. 20A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the cap assembly having an ‘H’ clip and a lid;

FIG. 20B is a bottom view of a cap and a lid of FIG. 20A;

FIG. 21A is a perspective view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap having a lower clip configuration;

FIG. 21B is a cross-sectional view of the cap and the injection site of FIG. 21A;

FIG. 22A is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of an antiseptic cap with a plunger applied to an injection site;

FIG. 22B is a cross-sectional view of the cap of FIG. 22A with the plunger fully engaged with the cap;

FIG. 23A is a side-view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a sliding ‘H’ clip;

FIG. 23B is a side-view of a cap with the sliding ‘H’ clip cap shown in FIG. 23A fully engaged with an injection site;

FIG. 23C is a side-view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a rotating ‘H’ clip applied to an injection site;

FIG. 23D is a partial cross-sectional view of the ‘H’ clip of the cap shown in FIG. 23C;

FIG. 23E is a side-view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a rotating ‘H’ clip applied to an injection site, where the legs rotate in the same plane;

FIGS. 24A-24C are perspective views showing another embodiment of a cap holder with a frangible element;

FIG. 25 is a cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a snap-on ‘H’ clip; and

FIG. 26 is cross-sectional view showing another embodiment of the antiseptic cap with a ‘H’ clip.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIGS. 1A-1B are views of an antiseptic cap10 engaged to an injection site 12. The injection site 12 could be a needleless cannula access device. One type of a cannula access device is known as INTERLINK, which is available from Baxter Healthcare Corp., based in Round Lake, Ill. Other types of cannula access devices are known as SAFELINE, which is available from B. Braun Medical Inc., based in Bethlehem, Pa. and LIFESHIELD, which is available from Hospira, Inc., based in Lake Forest, Ill.

The injection site 12 could be a conventional access connector, a connector known as a ‘T’ injection site, a connector known as a ‘Y’ site 14 (as shown in FIGS. 1A-1B), or a manifold which contains a plurality of connectors. The ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 includes a main arm 16, an angled branch 18 having one end 20 attached to the main arm 16 at an intersection 22, and a split septum 24 (FIG. 1B) accessible by one end of a blunt tip plastic cannula (not shown). The other types of injection sites will be described hereinafter.

The antiseptic cap 10 has a generally cylindrically shaped sidewall 26 that defines a chamber 28 sized to accommodate the injection site 12. The chamber 28 contains an antiseptic which could be carried by an absorbent material, such as a sponge 30, positioned within the chamber 28. Alternatively, the antiseptic cap 10 could be fully or partially formed of an adsorbent material. The sidewall 26 has an edge 32 that defines an open end. The antiseptic cap could include a substantially flat surface 34 that defines an opposite, closed end. The antiseptic cap could include a cylindrical groove 36 formed therein. The antiseptic cap 10 could be made from a thermoplastic elastomer, such as the thermoplastic elastomer sold by ExxonMobil under the trademark Santoprene, plastic, a plastic and thermoplastic elastomer combination, silicone, or any other suitable material.

The absorbent material could be made from foam, cotton, regenerated cellulose, porous plastic, urethane, silicone, bonded fiber, plastic non-woven, polyester, cellulose, or any other suitable material. A suitable porous plastic is a medical grade sintered porous plastic, which is available from Porex Corporation, based in Fairburn, Ga. Other suitable manufacturers of the porous plastic material include Filtrona, Genpore, and Thermopore. The porous plastic material could be made of any suitable polymer, such as polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon, etc. A suitable manufacturer of the bonded fiber material is Filtrona Porous Technologies, based in Richmond, Va. It is desirable that the absorbent material can retain a fluid such as a disinfectant. It is also desirable that the absorbent material is compressible and that the absorbed fluid is released on compression. The absorbent material could be natural or synthetic.

The absorbent material could be impregnated with an antiseptic fluid, an anticoagulant fluid, and/or an antimicrobial fluid. An example of a suitable antiseptic fluid is isopropyl alcohol. The concentration of the isopropyl alcohol could vary. It will be understood that other materials could be used, such as other alcohols, including ethanol, propanol, and/or butanol, or iodine, hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine, chlorhexidine gluconate, chlorhexidine acetate, silver, tricloscan, etc. The antiseptic, anticoagulant, and/or antimicrobial agent could be in liquid or solid form.

The use of the absorbent material is only exemplary. It will be understood that the absorbent material could be replaced with a material, which contains an antiseptic fluid, an anticoagulant fluid, and/or an antimicrobial fluid. Suitable materials include alcohols, including ethanol, propanol, isopropyl, and/or butanol, or iodine, hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine, chlorhexidine gluconate, chlorhexidine acetate, silver, tricloscan, etc. It will also be understood that an antiseptic fluid, an anticoagulant fluid, and/or an antimicrobial fluid could be applied directly to the antiseptic cap. For example, the antiseptic cap 10 could be made from an absorbent material, or the antiseptic cap 10 could be coated or impregnated with an antiseptic fluid, an anticoagulant fluid, and/or an antimicrobial fluid.

Referring to FIG. 1B, the antiseptic cap 10 is shown attached to the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 such that the sidewall 26 is adjacent the intersection 22 between the main arm 16 and the angled branch 18. In this position, the sponge 30 is compressed between the substantially flat surface 34 of the antiseptic cap 10 and the septum 24, which releases at least a portion of the antiseptic fluid to disinfect the surface of the septum 24 and areas adjacent to the septum 24. The antiseptic cap 10 can be allowed to remain attached to the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 for any suitable period of time where the antiseptic cap 10 disinfects and protects the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 until the next time the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 is accessed. When the antiseptic cap 10 is attached to the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14, the septum 24 is exposed to the antiseptic fluid. Also, when the antiseptic cap 10 is engaged to the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14, the antiseptic cap 10 serves as a physical barrier from contamination. The antiseptic cap 10 could be secured to the injection site 12 by vacuum or an interference fit. The antiseptic cap 10 could be configured with threads (not shown).

Although the embodiment of the antiseptic cap 10 shown in FIGS. 1A-1B is engaged to a ‘Y’ connector injection site 14, it will be understood that the antiseptic cap 10 could engage other types of injection sites, as will be described hereinafter.

FIGS. 2A-2B show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, indicated generally as 110, that is sized to engage and disinfect an injection site, such as the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14. The antiseptic cap 110 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the antiseptic cap 10 shown in FIGS. 1A-1B, unless stated otherwise. Like the antiseptic cap 10, the antiseptic cap 110 includes a sponge 130.

The antiseptic cap 110 could include an undercut 111 defining a channel formed in the generally cylindrical sidewall 126. The undercut 111 allows the antiseptic cap 110 to clear the angled branch 18 of the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14, as shown, or a ‘T’ connector injection site, thereby allowing additional areas below the septum 24 to be disinfected and protected, relative to the areas of the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 by the antiseptic cap 10 (FIGS. 1A-1B). In this position, the antiseptic cap 110 covers additional areas of the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 and is retained securely on the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14. The antiseptic cap 110 could include an annular engagement protrusion 113 protruding internally from the edge 132 of the generally cylindrical sidewall 126. The engagement protrusion 113 can engage an exterior surface 15 of the ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 further securing the cap 110 thereto.

The sidewall 126 has one bottom end 135 and an opposite bottom end 137 defined by the undercut 111. The one bottom end 135 is at a different height or horizontal level than the opposite bottom end 137. The one bottom end 135 of the sidewall 126 is sized to engage a surface of the injection site 14 at a first horizontal level, and the opposite bottom end 137 is sized to engage another surface of the injection site 14 at a second horizontal level with respect to the first horizontal level.

FIG. 3 shows a cap assembly 200 that includes another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 210. The cap assembly includes a cap holder 230 and the antiseptic cap 210 is sized to be positioned within the cap holder 230.

The cap holder 230 includes a sidewall 221 that defines a chamber 232 sized to receive the antiseptic cap 210 therein. The cap holder 230 could include a gripping area, such as a fin 234 extending from a top closed surface 223 of the cap holder 230. In one embodiment, the fin 234 is a vertical wall extending from a central surface of the top closed surface 223 of the cap holder 230. The fin 234 is configured for gripping the cap holder 230 to facilitate attachment of the cap holder 230 to the injection site 12. The cap holder 230 includes an annular flange 236 extending radially outwardly from a distal end 225 of the sidewall 221 and forming a bottom surface 238 of the cap holder 230. The annular flange 236 defines an opening formed in the chamber 232. The annular flange 236 can be angled such that one end 227 of the sidewall 221 is sloped with respect to an opposite end 229 of the sidewall 221. The cap holder 230 could be made from a rigid or semi-rigid material, such as high-density polyethylene, or any other suitable material.

In this embodiment, the antiseptic cap 210 includes an angled bottom surface 217. The angle formed by the bottom surface 217 of the antiseptic cap 210 could be the same as the angle formed by the annular flange 236 of the cap holder 230, or it could be different. In one embodiment, the angle formed by the bottom surface 217 of the antiseptic cap 210 is between one to eighty-nine degrees relative to a horizontal axis H. The angled bottom surface 217 can be angled such that one end 254 of the sidewall 256 is sloped with respect to an opposite end 258 of the sidewall 256. The one end 254 is at a different height or horizontal level than the opposite end 258. The one bottom end 254 of the sidewall 256 is sized to engage a surface of the injection site 14 at a first horizontal level, and the opposite bottom end 258 is sized to engage another surface of the injection site 14 at a second horizontal level with respect to the first horizontal level.

The antiseptic cap 210 could include finger gripping areas, such as a plurality of indentations 215 along a surface 219 of the antiseptic cap 210. The indentations 215 could be configured for gripping the antiseptic cap 210 to facilitate removal of the antiseptic cap 210 from the injection site 12.

The angled annular flange 236 of the cap holder 230 and the angled bottom surface 217 of the antiseptic cap 210 allow for compatibility with various injection sites, such as the ‘Y’ connector injection site and the ‘T’ connector injection site, as described herein.

As shown in FIG. 3, the cap holder 230 could be sealed with a material, such as a lid 250, which could be formed of a foil material, or a lid stock material, which can be applied to the annular flange of the cap holder by any suitable method such as by adhesive or by conductive or inductive heat sealing techniques. A pull tab 252 could be provided to facilitate removal of the lid 250 to provide access to the antiseptic cap 210.

The cap holder 230 could be used to aseptically apply the antiseptic cap 210 to an injection site. The cap holder 230 and the lid 250 cover and protect the antiseptic cap 210 to provide a sterile barrier.

The cap holder 230 could be configured to be removably attached to the antiseptic cap 210. For example, the cap holder 230 could be removed from the antiseptic cap 210 after the cap assembly 200 engages the injection site 12. Alternatively, the cap holder 230 could remain on the injection site 12 after the cap assembly 200 engages the injection site 12. As another alternative, a user may remove the antiseptic cap 210 from the cap holder 230 and then apply the antiseptic cap 210 to an injection site 12.

FIGS. 4A-4E are cross-sectional views of the antiseptic cap assembly 210 engaged to various types of injection sites. The angled annular flange of the cap holder and the angled bottom surface of the antiseptic cap allow the antiseptic cap 210 to attach to a conventional injection site 17 (as shown in FIGS. 4A-4B), the ‘T’ site connector 19 (as shown in FIG. 4C), and the ‘Y’ site connector 14 (as shown in FIG. 4D). Further, the cap 210 could be applied to an injection manifold 21 (as shown in FIG. 4E), which includes a plurality of injection sites. The antiseptic cap 210 is sized so that there is sufficient space for an antiseptic cap 210 to be applied to each injection site of the manifold 21. The sidewall 126 has one bottom end 135 and an opposite bottom end 137 defined by the undercut 111.

FIG. 5 shows another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 300. The cap assembly 300 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 200 shown in FIG. 3, unless stated otherwise. The cap assembly 300 includes a cap holder 330, an antiseptic cap 310 sized to be positioned within the cap holder 330, and a lid 350. In this embodiment, the cap holder 330 has a generally planar upper surface. A user could use an exterior surface 311 of the cap holder 330 to apply the cap 310 to an injection site.

FIGS. 6A-6B show another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 400. The cap assembly 400 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 200 shown in FIG. 3, unless stated otherwise. A bottom surface 438 of a flange 436 of the cap holder 430 is partially angled such that the bottom surface 438 is split into a flat portion 431 and an angled portion 433. Likewise, a bottom surface 417 of the antiseptic cap 410 is partially angled such that the bottom surface 417 is split into a flat portion 419 and an angled portion 421. The partially angled flange 436 of the cap holder 430 and the partially angled bottom surface 417 of the antiseptic cap 410 allow for compatibility with various injection sites, such as the ‘Y’ connector injection site and the ‘T’ connector injection site.

FIGS. 7A-7B show another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 500. The cap assembly 500 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 200 shown in FIG. 3, unless stated otherwise. The cap assembly 500 includes an antiseptic cap 510, a cap holder 530, and a lid 550.

The antiseptic cap 510 could include a top portion 513, a bottom portion 517, and a plurality of flanges 515 located between the top portion 513 and the bottom portion 517. The top portion 513 includes a generally ellipsoid-shaped sidewall 519 extending from the flanges 515. The generally ellipsoid-shaped sidewall 519 tapers (becomes smaller) upwardly and in a direction away from the flanges 515. The sidewall 519 defines a cavity 525 (FIGS. 7B-7C) to allow the sidewall 519 to be compressible, and facilitates gripping and removal of the antiseptic cap 510. The cap 510 could include an internal wall or protrusion 527 (FIGS. 7B-7C) extending downwardly into the cavity 525. When the antiseptic cap 510 engages the injection site 14, the absorbent material 512 compresses between the internal wall 527 and the top of the injection site 14. The antiseptic cap 510 could include finger grips 521 on an outer surface of the top portion 513.

The bottom portion 517 includes a sidewall 555 defining a chamber 561 with an annular retention protrusion 526 protruding from an edge 528 of an internal surface of the sidewall 555. The annular retention protrusion 526 is sized to mate against a bottom of the septum 24 and serves to retain the antiseptic cap 510 against the septum 24. The cap 510 could further include an undercut 511 defining a channel formed in the sidewall 555. The channel 511 allows for application to the ‘Y’ connector injection site and to the ‘T’ connector injection site. The antiseptic cap 510 could include a sealing blade 523 extending inwardly, and distally, from an internal surface of the sidewall 555. In one embodiment, the sealing blade 523 extends radially inwardly.

The cap holder 530 could include a sidewall 557 defining a chamber 532 sized to receive the sidewall 555 of the cap 510, a fin 534 extending from a bottom closed surface 559, and a flange 536 defining an open end into the chamber 532. Additionally, the cap holder 530 could include an axial protrusion 535 shaped to correspond to the chamber 561 of the antiseptic cap 510 to prevent deformation of the antiseptic cap 510, and to maintain the antiseptic solution in the antiseptic material 512. The cap holder 530 is sized to receive the sidewall 555 of the antiseptic cap 510 such that the channel formed in the sidewall 555 is situated over the axial protrusion 535.

When the antiseptic cap 510 is engaged to the cap holder 530, the sealing blade 523 is positioned between the sponge 512 (FIGS. 7B-7C) and the protrusion 535 formed in the cap holder 530. In this position, the internal sealing blade 523 serves to assist with retaining the sponge 512 in the cap 510 prior to engagement with an injection site 14. The sealing blade 523 also assists with maintaining the sponge 512 in position when the antiseptic cap 510 is engaged to the injection site. The sealing blade 523 provides constricting pressure against the external surface of the injection site 14 to secure the cap 510 to the injection site 14. The sealing blade 523 could be formed at any location along the length of the antiseptic cap 510 and could be a continuous or interrupted interior annular protrusion. While one sealing blade 523 is shown, it will be understood that the number of sealing blades, and the orientation thereof, could vary. The sealing blade 523 could be made from a flexible material or any other suitable material.

The lid 550 includes a generally ellipsoid-shaped outer wall 563 defining a chamber 551 sized to accommodate the sidewall 519 of the cap 510. The generally ellipsoid-shaped outer wall 563 tapers (becomes smaller) upwardly. The shape of the lid 550 is generally complimentary to the shape of the sidewall 519 of the antiseptic cap 510. The lid 550 further includes a flange 553 which can be applied to the flange 536 of the cap holder 530, and a tab 552 for removal of the lid 550. The lid 550 and the cap holder 530 cooperate to seal the antiseptic cap 510 within the cap holder 530.

FIGS. 8A-8C show another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 600. The cap assembly 600 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 500 shown in FIGS. 7A-7C, unless stated otherwise. The cap assembly 600 includes an antiseptic cap 610, a cap holder 630, and a lid 650.

Like the cap 510, the cap 610 could include engagement protrusions 613, an undercut 611 formed in the sidewall 651, and a sealing blade 623. Additionally, the cap 610 includes diametrically opposed grip protrusions 629 to assist a user in removal of the antiseptic cap 610 from the cap holder 630.

The cap holder 630 includes a flange 638, which could be pliable, with recesses 637 to accommodate the grip protrusions 629 of the antiseptic cap 610. The flange 638 assists a user in removing the antiseptic cap 610 from the cap holder 630. Like the cap holder 530, the cap holder 630 includes an axial protrusion 635 (FIG. 8B) shaped to correspond to the chamber 614 of the antiseptic cap 610 to retain the antiseptic material 612 in place, and to retain the antiseptic solution in the antiseptic material 612.

FIGS. 9A-9C show another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 700. The cap assembly 700 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 600 shown in FIGS. 8A-8C, unless stated otherwise. The cap assembly 700 includes an antiseptic cap 710, a cap holder 730, and a lid 750.

Like the antiseptic cap 610, the cap 710 comprises engagement protrusions 713, finger grips 715, and a sealing blade 723, as well as two diametrically opposed undercuts 711 defining two channels formed in a sidewall 761 and two legs 763, 765 extending from the sidewall 761. The sealing blade 723 (FIG. 9B) extends distally from an internal surface of the sidewall 761. It will be understood that more than one sealing blade 723 could be provided. The channels allow for application to the ‘Y’ connector injection site and to the ‘T’ connector injection site.

The cap holder 730 includes two outer legs 767, 769 and an internal protrusion 771 forming chambers 773, 775 within the two outer legs 767, 769. The chambers 773, 775 are sized to accommodate the legs 763, 765 of the antiseptic cap 710. The central chamber 732 of the cap holder 730 has a shallow depth to facilitate easy removal of the cap 710 from the cap holder 730. The lid 750 has a chamber 751 and is shaped to accommodate the shape of the cap 710 and to seal the cap 710 within the cap holder 730. The protrusion 771 can contact and form a seal for retaining antiseptic material within the antiseptic cap 710.

FIG. 10 shows another embodiment of a cap assembly, generally indicated as 800. The cap assembly 800 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the cap assembly 700 shown in FIGS. 9A-9C, unless stated otherwise. Here, the cap assembly 800 has a packaging configuration having a chamber 832 of the cap holder 830 with a depth comparable to the height of the antiseptic cap 810, and the cap 810 could be sealed therein by a lid 850 of foil or other flat material.

FIGS. 11A-11B show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 910. The antiseptic cap 910 includes a generally cylindrical wall 913, a central outer wall 915, and three undercuts 911 extending from the central outer wall 915. The undercuts 911 define three channels and three legs 917, 919, 921. The undercuts 911 allow for compatibility with INTERLINK valve types, such as the ‘Y’ connector injection site and the ‘T’ connector injection site. The antiseptic cap 910 could include gripping areas, such as a plurality of circumferentially spaced ribs 941 extending radially outwardly and axially along a peripheral surface of the generally cylindrical wall 913 of the cap 910. The cap 910 includes a sealing blade 923 extending proximally from an internal surface of the cap 910. The sealing blade 923 extends radially inwardly toward the center of the antiseptic cap 910. When the antiseptic cap 910 is engaged to an injection site, the sealing blade 923 is positioned between the sponge 512 and the top of the injection site 14.

FIGS. 11C-11D show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 1010. The antiseptic cap 1010 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the antiseptic cap 910 shown in FIGS. 11A-11B, unless stated otherwise. Here, the sealing blade 1023 of the antiseptic cap 1010 is positioned such that the sealing blade 1023 extends proximally away from the center of the cap 1010. When the antiseptic cap 1010 is engaged to an injection site, the sealing blade 1023 is positioned adjacent the side of the injection site.

FIGS. 11E-11F show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 1110. The antiseptic cap 1110 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the antiseptic cap 910 shown in FIGS. 11A-11B, unless stated otherwise. The antiseptic cap includes a gripping area, such as a circumferentially spaced axial finger grip 1129 extending radially outwardly from an edge 1113 of a sidewall 1111 of the cap 1110. The finger grip 1129 could be hollow and compressible, thereby facilitating gripping for application and removal of the cap 1110. It will be understood that more than one axial finger grip 1129 could be provided and that the finger grip 1129 could be solid.

The antiseptic cap 1110 includes sealing blades 1115 extending from an internal surface of the legs 1117, 1119, 1121. The sealing blades 1115 extend proximally and radially inwardly toward the center of the cap 1110. When the antiseptic cap 1110 is engaged to an injection site, the sealing blades 1115 are positioned against a sidewall of the injection site. The sealing blades 1115 maintain antiseptic volume on the entire top surface of an injection site, including the septum.

FIGS. 12A-12B show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 1210. The antiseptic cap 1210 operates and is constructed in manners consistent with the antiseptic cap 1110 shown in FIGS. 11E-11F, unless stated otherwise. The antiseptic cap includes a gripping area, such as a solid annular protrusion 1229 extending radially outwardly from a top surface 1211. The annular protrusion 1229 facilitates removal of the cap 1210 by providing a gripping surface for a user to pull up and remove the cap 1210 from an injection site, and an increased top surface by which to push down and apply the cap 1210 to an injection site. The antiseptic cap 1210 includes a sealing blade 1223 extending from an internal surface of the cap 1210. It will be understood that the protrusion 1229 could be hollow.

FIGS. 13A-13C show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 1310. The cap 1310 includes a sidewall 1317 that has a section 1319 extending toward a bottom surface 1331. The sidewall 1317 includes a plurality of squeeze grips 1315 on a section 1319 and a plurality of squeeze grips 1325 on an opposite section 1327 of the sidewall 1317. The sidewall 1317 defines a chamber 1329.

The antiseptic cap 1310 includes an undercut 1311 (FIG. 13C) defining a channel in the bottom edge 1331. Two diametrically opposed engagement protrusions 1313, 1333 extend from the bottom edge 1331 into the chamber 1329. It will be understood that the number of squeeze grips and engagement protrusions could vary.

When a radial force is applied to the squeeze grips 1315, 1325, the cap 1310 temporarily deforms into a generally oval shape so that the distance between the engagement protrusions 1313, 1333 increases until a user is able to apply, or remove, the cap 1310 from the injection site. Upon application and release of the cap 1310, the distance between the engagement protrusions 1313, 1333 decreases to secure the cap 1310 to the injection site.

FIGS. 14A-14C show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap, generally indicated as 1410. The cap 1410 includes a sidewall 1421 that has plurality of squeeze grips 1415 on one section 1423 of the sidewall 1421 and a plurality of squeeze grips 1425 on an opposite section 1427 of the sidewall 1421. The sidewall 1421 defines a chamber 1429.

The cap 1410 could include three engagement protrusions 1413, 1433, 1443 that extend from the bottom edge 1445 into the chamber 1429. The protrusions 1413, 1433, 1443 are approximately radially evenly spaced and one of the protrusions 1413 is opposite an undercut 1411 defining a channel formed in the sidewall 1421. While one of the protrusions 1413 has a trapezoidal shape and two of the protrusions 1433, 1443 have a triangular shape, each of the protrusions 1413, 1433, 1443 could be of varying sizes or the same size. When a radial force is applied at each of the squeeze grips 1415, 1425, the resulting deformation of the cap 1410 results in the distance between the engagement protrusions 1413, 1433, 1443 changing sufficiently to allow application or removal of the cap 1410 from an injection site. In one embodiment, one or more of the protrusions 1413, 1433, 1443 are not movable. It will be understood that the number of squeeze grips and engagement protrusions could vary.

FIGS. 15A-15C show packaging that could be used in connection with the antiseptic cap 910 (FIGS. 11A-11B), 1010 (FIGS. 11C-11D), 1110 (FIGS. 11E-11F), 1210 (FIGS. 12A-12B), 1310 (FIGS. 13A-13C), and 1410 (FIGS. 14A-14C). It will be understood that the packaging shown in FIGS. 15A-15C could be used in connection with other types of antiseptic caps.

FIGS. 15A-15B show a cap assembly 1500 that includes a cap 1510, a cap holder 1530 and a lid 1550. The cap holder 1530 has a generally accordion shape. In particular, the cap holder 1530 has a bellows section 1511 and a concave-shaped wall 1513 extending from the bellows section 1511. The bellows section 1511 is sized to compress when the antiseptic cap 1510 is applied to an injection site. The cap holder 1530 allows the cap 1510 to be applied aseptically. While the cap holder 1530 could be made from any suitable material, the cap holder 1530 is preferably made from a thermofoam material, a soft material, a flexible material, such as low density polyethylene, a thermoplastic elastomer, silicone, rubber, etc. The cap holder 1530 could be liquid-injected molded, blow-molded, etc. In one embodiment, the cap holder 1530 is transparent.

Alternatively, and as shown in FIG. 15C, the cap assembly 1600 includes a cap 1610 and a breakable cap holder 1630. The cap holder 1630 has a top housing portion 1611, a bottom housing portion 1613 removably and sealably attached to the top housing portion 1611, and a clamp-like handle 1615 separating the top housing portion 1611 and the bottom housing portion 1613. The top housing portion 1611 and the bottom housing portion 1613 cooperate to seal the cap 1610 within the cap holder 1630. Once the bottom housing portion 1613 is removed, the top housing portion 1611 of the cap holder 1630 could be used to aseptically apply the cap 1610 to the injection site.

FIGS. 16A-16B show an antiseptic cap 1710 with an ‘H’ clip 1760 having two pivotable side portions 1762, 1764 and a hinge section 1768 connecting the two side portions 1762, 1764. The side portion 1762 has a top portion 1711 and a bottom portion 1713 with an engagement protrusion 1715, and likewise, the side portion 1764 has a top portion 1717 and a bottom portion 1719 with an engagement protrusion 1721. The bottom portions 1713, 1719 are sized to move apart from each other by pivoting about hinges 1768 when the top portions 1711, 1717 are squeezed against each other. The ‘H’ clip 1760 could be made from polypropylene and polycarbonate, or any other suitable material. In one embodiment, the ‘H’ clip 1760 could be made from a harder material than the antiseptic cap. The ‘H’ clip 1760 could be removable from the cap 1710. The cap 1710 includes an indentation 1723 for securing the hinge section 1768. The hinge section 1768 could be formed from the inherent resilience of the ‘H’ clip material or it can be formed as a living hinge or otherwise.

To apply or remove the cap 1710, the top portions 1711, 1717 of the side portions 1762, 1764 are squeezed causing the bottom portions 1713, 1719 to pivot about the hinge section 1768. By pivoting about the hinge section 1768, the engagement protrusions 1715, 1721 of the bottom portions 1713, 1719 move away from each other providing sufficient space to remove the cap 1710 from, or apply the cap 1710 to, an injection site 14.

FIGS. 17A-17B show another embodiment of an antiseptic cap 1810 with an ‘H’ clip 1860. The top portion 1864 of the side portion 1862 of the ‘H’ clip 1860 includes a segment 1872, and the top portion 1811 of the side portion 1813 of the ‘H’ clip 1860 includes a segment 1815 pivotably connected to the segment 1872. The segments 1815, 1872 are in a linear position when force is not applied to the top portions 1811, 1864. When the top portions 1811, 1864 of the ‘H’ clip 1860 are squeezed, the two segments 1813, 1862 pivot upwardly, allowing the application or removal of the cap 1810 from an injection site. A user can axially push down on the segments 1815, 1872 to further facilitate application of the cap 1810 to the injection site.

There are several options for packaging the cap and the ‘H’ clip shown in FIGS. 16A-16B and the cap and the ‘H’ clip shown in FIGS. 17A-17B. An example of packaging is shown in FIG. 18, where the cap holder 1930 comprises a lower cylindrical wall 1939 and an upper cylindrical wall 1941 having a larger diameter than the diameter of the lower cylindrical wall 1939. The cap holder 1930 could include an annular shelf 1913 connecting the lower cylindrical wall 1939 and the upper cylindrical wall 1941, and an axial protrusion 1935, which can retain antiseptic within the antiseptic cap. The increased diameter of the upper cylindrical wall 1941 of the chamber 1932 provides increased access for a user to remove the cap 1910 from the cap holder 1930 by use of the top portions 1911, 1964 of the ‘H’ clip 1960. In this embodiment, there could a lid or cover.

Another example of packaging is shown in FIG. 19A, where the lid 2050 could be used as an applicator. The lid 2050 includes a cylindrical sidewall 2011 defining a chamber. The sidewall 2011 has a flange 2013 protruding from an edge 2015 that defines an open end. The lid 2050 could include a substantially flat surface 2017 that defines an opposite, closed end. The chamber has a depth that receives a portion of the ‘H’ clip 2060 and the antiseptic cap 2010. As shown in FIG. 19A, a user could push down on the lid 2050, applying force to the ‘H’ clip 2060 and thereby engage the antiseptic cap 2010 onto an injection site.

Another example of packaging is shown in FIGS. 19B-19C. A user could remove the cap 2010 from the cap holder 2030 by the top portions 2054, 2064 of the ‘H’ clip 2060. As in previous embodiments, the cap holder 2030 could comprise an axial protrusion 2035.

Another example of packaging is shown in FIGS. 20A-20B, where, instead of a cap holder, the chamber of the cap 2110 with a ‘H’ clip 2160 is sealed with a blister pack that includes a lid 2150 having a tab 2152 applied directly to the bottom surface of the cap 2110. The blister pack serves to maintain the antiseptic volume over the shelf life. The lid 2150 can be attached in any manner such as by an adhesive, and can be removed by peeling it off of the cap 2110.

Another embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 21A-21B. Shown is a cap 2210 having a clip 2260 with top portions 2254, 2264 and bottom portions 2274, 2284. The cap 2210 has an indentation 2273 that serves to prevent the clip2260 from sliding off past the top 2279 of the cap 2210. The clip 2260 has a key 2271 that fits into the indentation 2273 to secure the clip 2260 to the cap 2210.

When the clip 2260 engages the cap, the clip 2260 is positioned such that the top portions 2254, 2264 are below the top 2279 of the cap 2210. When the top portions 2254, 2264 of the cap 2260 are squeezed, the cap 2210 itself is also squeezed and deforms. This temporary deformation allows the side portions 2262, 2282 to pivot around the hinge 2268 so that the cap 2210 can be applied to an injection site 12.

FIGS. 22A-22B are cross sectional views of a further embodiment of the present invention. The cap 2310 comprises an aperture 2375, an antiseptic laden material 2312 with a cylindrical hole 2316 located within the cap 2310, and a push pin 2374 in communication with the aperture 2375 and the cylindrical hole 2316. The push pin 2374 includes an enlarged top portion 2376 and an arm 2378 having one end 2311 extending from the enlarged top portion 2376, and a tip 2313 at an opposite end 2315. The arm 2378 has a tapered section 2317 that tapers (becomes smaller) toward the tip 2313. An annular protrusion 2380 is provided on the push pin 2374.

The push pin 2374 is originally provided in a retracted position, where the tip 2313 is positioned within the cylindrical hole 2316. The push pin 2374 can move from the retracted position to an extended position, where the enlarged top portion 2376 is positioned against the substantially flat top surface 2319 of the cap 2310.

When the cap 2310 is applied to an injection site 12, as shown in FIG. 22A, the user pushes down on an enlarged top portion 2376 of the pin 2374. Once the pin 2374 is fully pushed down, as shown in FIG. 22B, the arm 2378 is engaged and inserted through the septum 24, where the tapered section 2317 of the arm 2378 contacts the underside of the septum 24 to secure the cap 2310 to the injection site 12. Once fully engaged, the annular protrusion 2380 on the push pin 2374 locks the cap 2310 on the injection site. It will be understood that the push pin 2374 could be non-movable.

Shown in FIGS. 23A-23B is another embodiment of the present invention where the cap 2410 comprises a sliding ‘H’ clip 2460. The two sides 2462 of the ‘H’ clip 2460 are connected by a hinged section 2468, where the cap 2410 comprises an upper section 2411, a lower section 2413, an indentation 2473 between the upper section 2411 and the lower section 2413. The indentation 2473 has a diameter less than the diameter of the upper section 2411 and the lower section 2413, and the indentation 2473 is slightly less in diameter than the diameter of the hinged section 2468 of the ‘H’ clip 2460. The cap 2410 is applied to an injection site 12, as shown in FIG. 23A, with the ‘H’ clip 2460 at the top of the indentation 2473 of the cap 2410 and the side portions 2462 flared out over the injection site 12. When the ‘H’ clip 2460 is pushed down on the cap 2410, as shown in FIG. 23B, the ‘H’ clip 2460 slides down the indentation 2473 of the cap 2410 until the hinge section 2468 is in contact with the lower section 2413. In this position, the engagement protrusions 2470 of the side portions 2462 engage the injection site 12, thereby securing the cap 2410 to the injection site 12. The indentation 2473 prevents the ‘H’ clip 2460 from sliding off the top or bottom of the cap 2410.

Shown in FIG. 23C is another variation of the previous embodiment, where the side portions 2562 of the cap 2510 rotate in separate parallel planes, instead of bending, to engage the injection site 21. In particular, the side portions 2562 rotate in a direction parallel to each other, in such a manner to rotate completely. FIG. 23D shows a locking mechanism of the ‘H’ clip 2560 of FIG. 23C. Locking protrusions 2561 in the side portions 2562 could be used in conjunction with the geometry of a groove 2571 in the cap 2510 or the geometry of the hinge section 2511, to lock the side portions 2562, where the side portions 2562 would be pulled out and rotated, such as by 180 degrees, before locking again.

Shown in FIG. 23E is a further embodiment of the present invention where the side portions 2662 of the ‘H’ clip 2660 rotate in the same plane to engage and disengage the cap 2610 from the injection site 12. In particular, the side portions 2662 rotate in a manner to only complete a partial rotation.

FIGS. 24A-24C is another embodiment of the present invention. The cap assembly 2700 could comprise a lid 2750 and cap holder 2730 having a frangible and removable element 2743. When the frangible element 2743 is removed by shown by arrows B and C, an undercut 2745 of the cap holder 2730 defines a channel to apply an antiseptic cap to an injection site, including a ‘Y’ connector injection site or ‘T’ connector injection site. The frangible element 2743 may be attached to the lid 2750 such that removing the frangible element 2743 removes the lid 2750 as well.

FIG. 25 is another embodiment showing an ‘H’ clip 2860 attached to the top of a cap 2810 by a snap-on protrusion 2877, preferably made of plastic. The cap 2810 also comprises an annular seal 2879 to maintain the antiseptic solution of the antiseptic material 2812 on the top of the septum of an injection site when applied to the injection site. The antiseptic cap 2810 could be made from a thermoplastic elastomer, such as the thermoplastic elastomer sold by ExxonMobil under the trademark Santoprene or any other suitable material.

FIG. 26 is another embodiment showing an ‘H’ clip with two legs 2960, a top 2910, and a hinge 2962.

It should be understood that various features of various embodiments disclosed herein could be used together without departing from the spirit or scope of the present invention. It should be understood that while the antiseptic cap is shown in connection with a ‘Y’ connector injection site 14 in certain embodiments, the antiseptic cap could engage other types of injection sites.

The antiseptic cap assembly could be incorporated in kits with flush syringes, caps for treating a catheter or needleless connector, and line access devices, etc. The antiseptic fluid used could include an anticoagulant material, and/or an antimicrobial material. Examples of antiseptic fluid that could be used are disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/821,190, filed on Jun. 22, 2007, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,167,847, and Ser. No. 12/214,526, filed on Jun. 19, 2008. The entire disclosures of U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 11/821,190 and 12/214,526 are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

It is contemplated that the devices described herein can be coated with an antiseptic coating by any suitable technique such as immersion of the part into an antiseptic solution, by spray coating the part with the antiseptic solution, by blending the antiseptic solution or material into the polymeric material used to fabricate the device.

A quantity of physiological, antimicrobial metal compound is added to the resin for direct molding of an article. Physiological, antimicrobial metals are meant to include the precious metals, such as silver, gold and platinum, and copper and zinc. Physiological, antimicrobial metal compounds used herein include oxides and salts of preferably silver and also gold, for example: silver acetate, silver benzoate, silver carbonate, silver citrate, silver chloride, silver iodide, silver nitrate, silver oxide, silver sulfa diazine, silver sulfate, gold chloride and gold oxide. Platinum compounds such as chloroplatinic acid or its salts (e.g., sodium and calcium chloroplatinate) may also be used. Also, compounds of copper and zinc may be used, for example: oxides and salts of copper and zinc such as those indicated above for silver. Single physiological, antimicrobial metal compounds or combinations of physiological, antimicrobial metal compounds may be used.

Preferred physiological, antimicrobial metal compounds used in this invention are silver acetate, silver oxide, silver sulfate, gold chloride and a combination of silver oxide and gold chloride. The particles of the silver compounds are sufficiently able to be extracted to form a zone of inhibition to prevent and kill bacteria growth.

In another preferred form of the invention the devices herein are impregnated with triclosan and silver compounds or triclosan and chlorhexidine, or chlorhexidine gluconate, or chlorhexidine acetate.

It will be understood that the embodiments described herein are merely exemplary and that a person skilled in the art may make many variations and modifications without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. All such variations and modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

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23.0/100 Score

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31.0/100 Score

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74.0/100 Score

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47.0/100 Score

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
随身携带消毒伸缩筷 武汉市第十一中学 20 December 2007 19 November 2008
自毁式无泄漏一次性注射器 张利国 19 August 2005 13 September 2006
Intravascular line and port cleaning methods, methods of administering an agent intravascularly, methods of obtaining/testing blood, and devices for performing such methods HYPROTEK, INC. 16 May 2007 29 November 2007
Needleless HUB disinfection device and method SAGE PRODUCTS, INC. 17 December 2007 18 June 2008
消毒棉 王平 19 January 2000 25 October 2000
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