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Patent Analysis of

Topical neurological stimulation

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10016600

Application Number

US14/893946

Application Date

30 May 2014

Publication Date

10 July 2018

Current Assignee

NEUROSTIM SOLUTIONS, LLC

Original Assignee (Applicant)

CREASEY, GRAHAM H.,TOONG, HOO-MIN

International Classification

A61N1/36,A61N1/04,A61B5/00,A61B5/04

Cooperative Classification

A61N1/36014,A61N1/0452,A61N1/0456,A61N1/0476,A61N1/36003

Inventor

CREASEY, GRAHAM H.,TOONG, HOO-MIN

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 1 US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 2 US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 3
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Abstract

A topical nerve stimulator patch and system are provided comprising a dermal patch; an electrical signal generator associated with the patch; a signal receiver to activate the electrical signal generator; a power source for the electrical signal generator associated with the patch; an electrical signal activation device; and a nerve feedback sensor.

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Claims

1. A topical nerve stimulation system patch comprising: a flexible substrate; a malleable dermis conforming bottom surface of the substrate comprising adhesive and adapted to contact the dermis; a flexible top outer surface of the substrate approximately parallel to the bottom surface; one or more electrodes positioned on the patch proximal to the bottom surface and located beneath the top outer surface and directly contacting the flexible substrate;electronic circuitry embedded in the patch and located beneath the top outer surface and integrated as a system on a chip that is directly contacting the flexible substrate, the electronic circuitry integrated as the system on the chip and comprising; an electrical signal generator integral to the malleable dermis conforming bottom surface configured to electrically activate the one or more electrodes; a signal activator coupled to the electrical signal generator; and a nerve stimulation sensor that provides feedback in response to a stimulation of one or more nerves; an antenna configured to communicate with a remote activation device; a power source in electrical communication with the electrical signal generator, and the signal activator; the signal activator configured to activate in response to receipt of a communication with the activation device by the antenna; the electrical signal generator configured to generate one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator; and the electrical stimuli configured to stimulate one or more nerves of a user wearing the nerve stimulation system patch at least at one location proximate to the patch.

2. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the top outer surface configured to maintain an approximately parallel relationship to the bottom surface when the patch is flexibly coupled to a curved portion of a dermis.

3. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, further comprising a feedback sensor configured to sense muscle activation of a user in response to the nerve stimulation.

4. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the antenna configured to communicate muscle activation data to the remote activation device.

5. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrical signal generator configured to generate a pattern of stimulation, sensing and analyzing, and revising the pattern based on the sensing.

6. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 5, the pattern initially begins with sensing and analyzing before stimulation.

7. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged as a plurality of concentric electrodes, and varying an amount of power from the power source at the electrodes causes a tissue depth of the stimulation to vary.

8. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips, and the electrical stimuli can be generated parallel to or perpendicular to the patch.

9. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged in a matrix, and the electrical stimuli can be generated between any of two or more electrodes in the matrix.

10. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged as interlocked pairs of electrodes that provide beam forming in response to an application of time-varying voltages.

11. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the nerve stimulation sensor comprises an array of sensors that function as a phased array antenna configured to receive ultrasound signals.

12. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 11, the array of sensors comprise piezoelectric sensors or micro-electro-mechanical sensors.

13. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes comprise adhesive conductive pads.

14. A method of using a topical nerve stimulation system patch for electrical stimulation, the method comprising:applying the patch to a dermis using adhesive, the patch comprising: a flexible substrate; a malleable dermis conforming bottom surface of the substrate comprising adhesive and adapted to contact the dermis; a flexible top outer surface of the substrate approximately parallel to the bottom surface; one or more electrodes positioned on the patch proximal to the bottom surface and located beneath the top outer surface and coupled to the flexible substrate;electronic circuitry embedded in the patch and located beneath the top outer surface and integrated as a system on a chip that is in direct contact with the flexible substrate, the electronic circuitry integrated as the system on the chip and comprising: an electrical signal generator integral to the malleable dermis conforming bottom surface configured to electrically activate the one or more electrodes; a signal activator coupled to the electrical signal generator; a nerve stimulation sensor that provides feedback in response to a stimulation of one or more nerves; an antenna configured to communicate with a remote activation device; a power source in electrical communication with the electrical signal generator, and the signal activator; the signal activator configured to activate in response to receipt of a communication with the activation device by the antenna; the electrical stimuli configured to stimulate one or more nerves of a user wearing the nerve stimulation system patch at least at one location proximate to the patch; generating one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator; and receiving feedback from the electrical stimuli.

15. The method of claim 14, the generating one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator comprises a pattern of stimulation, sensing and analyzing, and the pattern is revised based on the sensing.

16. The method of claim 15, the pattern initially begins with sensing and analyzing before stimulation.

17. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged as a plurality of concentric electrodes, further comprising varying an amount of power from the power source at the electrodes causing a tissue depth of the stimulation to vary.

18. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips, further comprising generating the electrical stimuli parallel to or perpendicular to the patch.

19. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged in a matrix, further comprising generating the electrical stimuli between any of two or more electrodes in the matrix.

20. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged as interlocked pairs of electrodes, further comprising providing beam forming in response to an application of time-varying voltages.

21. The method of claim 14, the nerve stimulation sensor comprises an array of sensors that function as a phased array antenna configured to receive ultrasound signals.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A topical nerve stimulation system patch comprising:
    • a flexible substrate
    • a malleable dermis conforming bottom surface of the substrate comprising adhesive and adapted to contact the dermis
    • a flexible top outer surface of the substrate approximately parallel to the bottom surface
    • one or more electrodes positioned on the patch proximal to the bottom surface and located beneath the top outer surface and directly contacting the flexible substrate
    • electronic circuitry embedded in the patch and located beneath the top outer surface and integrated as a system on a chip that is directly contacting the flexible substrate, the electronic circuitry integrated as the system on the chip and comprising
    • an electrical signal generator integral to the malleable dermis conforming bottom surface configured to electrically activate the one or more electrodes
    • a signal activator coupled to the electrical signal generator
    • and a nerve stimulation sensor that provides feedback in response to a stimulation of one or more nerves
    • an antenna configured to communicate with a remote activation device
    • a power source in electrical communication with the electrical signal generator, and the signal activator
    • the signal activator configured to activate in response to receipt of a communication with the activation device by the antenna
    • the electrical signal generator configured to generate one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator
    • and the electrical stimuli configured to stimulate one or more nerves of a user wearing the nerve stimulation system patch at least at one location proximate to the patch.
    • 2. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the top outer surface configured to maintain an approximately parallel relationship to the bottom surface when the patch is flexibly coupled to a curved portion of a dermis.
    • 3. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, further comprising
      • a feedback sensor configured to sense muscle activation of a user in response to the nerve stimulation.
    • 4. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the antenna configured to communicate muscle activation data to the remote activation device.
    • 5. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrical signal generator configured to generate a pattern of stimulation, sensing and analyzing, and revising the pattern based on the sensing.
    • 7. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged as a plurality of concentric electrodes, and varying an amount of power from the power source at the electrodes causes a tissue depth of the stimulation to vary.
    • 8. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips, and the electrical stimuli can be generated parallel to or perpendicular to the patch.
    • 9. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged in a matrix, and the electrical stimuli can be generated between any of two or more electrodes in the matrix.
    • 10. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes are arranged as interlocked pairs of electrodes that provide beam forming in response to an application of time-varying voltages.
    • 11. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the nerve stimulation sensor comprises
      • an array of sensors that function as a phased array antenna configured to receive ultrasound signals.
    • 13. The topical nerve stimulation patch of claim 1, the electrodes comprise
      • adhesive conductive pads.
  • 14
    14. A method of using a topical nerve stimulation system patch for electrical stimulation, the method comprising:
    • applying the patch to a dermis using adhesive, the patch comprising: a flexible substrate
    • a malleable dermis conforming bottom surface of the substrate comprising adhesive and adapted to contact the dermis
    • a flexible top outer surface of the substrate approximately parallel to the bottom surface
    • one or more electrodes positioned on the patch proximal to the bottom surface and located beneath the top outer surface and coupled to the flexible substrate
    • electronic circuitry embedded in the patch and located beneath the top outer surface and integrated as a system on a chip that is in direct contact with the flexible substrate, the electronic circuitry integrated as the system on the chip and comprising: an electrical signal generator integral to the malleable dermis conforming bottom surface configured to electrically activate the one or more electrodes
    • a signal activator coupled to the electrical signal generator
    • a nerve stimulation sensor that provides feedback in response to a stimulation of one or more nerves
    • an antenna configured to communicate with a remote activation device
    • a power source in electrical communication with the electrical signal generator, and the signal activator
    • the signal activator configured to activate in response to receipt of a communication with the activation device by the antenna
    • the electrical stimuli configured to stimulate one or more nerves of a user wearing the nerve stimulation system patch at least at one location proximate to the patch
    • generating one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator
    • and receiving feedback from the electrical stimuli.
    • 15. The method of claim 14, the generating one or more electrical stimuli in response to activation by the signal activator comprises
      • a pattern of stimulation, sensing and analyzing, and the pattern is revised based on the sensing.
    • 17. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged as a plurality of concentric electrodes, further comprising
      • varying an amount of power from the power source at the electrodes causing a tissue depth of the stimulation to vary.
    • 18. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips, further comprising
      • generating the electrical stimuli parallel to or perpendicular to the patch.
    • 19. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged in a matrix, further comprising
      • generating the electrical stimuli between any of two or more electrodes in the matrix.
    • 20. The method of claim 14, the electrodes are arranged as interlocked pairs of electrodes, further comprising
      • providing beam forming in response to an application of time-varying voltages.
    • 21. The method of claim 14, the nerve stimulation sensor comprises
      • an array of sensors that function as a phased array antenna configured to receive ultrasound signals.
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Description

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

© 2013 and 2014 GRAHAM CREASEY, MD, & HOO-MIN TOONG, PhD. This patent document contains material that is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever. 37 CFR § 1.71(d), (e).

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention pertains to the activation of nerves by topical stimulators to control or influence muscles, tissues, organs, or sensation, including pain, in humans and mammals.

BACKGROUND

Nerve disorders may result in loss of control of muscle and other body functions, loss of sensation, or pain. Surgical procedures and medications sometimes treat these disorders but have limitations. This invention pertains to a system for offering other options for treatment and improvement of function.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a depiction of a neuron activating a muscle by electrical impulse.

FIG. 2 is a representation of the electrical potential activation time of an electrical impulse in a nerve.

FIG. 3 is a cross section of a penis.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of a Topical Nerve Stimulator/Sensor (TNSS) component configuration including a system on a chip (SOC).

FIG. 5 is an illustration of the upper side of a Smart Band Aid™ (SBA) implementation of a TNSS showing location of battery, which may be of various types.

FIG. 6 is a an illustration of the lower side of the SBA of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is TNSS components incorporated into a SBA.

FIG. 8 is examples of optional neural stimulator and sensor chip sets incorporated into a SBA.

FIG. 9 is examples of optional electrode configurations for a SBA.

FIG. 10 is an example of the use of TNSS with a Control Unit as a System, in a population of Systems and software applications.

FIG. 11 shows a method for forming and steering a beam by the user of a plurality of radiators.

FIG. 12 is an exemplary beam forming and steering mechanism.

FIG. 13 illustrates exemplary Control Units for activating a nerve stimulation device.

FIG. 14 are exemplary software platforms for communicating between the Control Units and the TNSS, gathering data, networking with other TNSSs, and external communications.

FIG. 15 represents TNSS applications for patients with spinal cord injury.

FIG. 16 shows an example TNSS system.

FIG. 17 shows communications among the components of the TNSS system of FIG. 16 and a user.

FIG. 18 shows an example electrode configuration for electric field steering and sensing.

FIG. 19 shows an example of stimulating and sensing patterns of signals in a volume of tissue.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A method for electrical, mechanical, chemical and/or optical interaction with a human or mammal nervous system to stimulate and/or record body functions using small electronic devices attached to the skin and capable of being wirelessly linked to and controlled by a cellphone, activator or computer network.

The body is controlled by a chemical system and a nervous system. Nerves and muscles produce and respond to electrical voltages and currents. Electrical stimulation of these tissues can restore movement or feeling when these have been lost, or can modify the behavior of the nervous system, a process known as neuro modulation. Recording of the electrical activity of nerves and muscles is widely used for diagnosis, as in the electrocardiogram, electromyogram, electroencephalogram, etc. Electrical stimulation and recording require electrical interfaces for input and output of information. Electrical interfaces between tissues and electronic systems are usually one of three types:

a. Devices implanted surgically into the body, such as pacemakers. These are being developed for a variety of functions, such as restoring movement to paralyzed muscles or restoring hearing, and can potentially be applied to any nerve or muscle. These are typically specialized and somewhat expensive devices.

b. Devices inserted temporarily into the tissues, such as needles or catheters, connected to other equipment outside the body. Health care practitioners use these devices for diagnosis or short-term treatment.

c. Devices that record voltage from the surface of the skin for diagnosis and data collection, or apply electrical stimuli to the surface of the skin using adhesive patches connected to a stimulator. Portable battery-powered stimulators have typically been simple devices operated by a patient, for example for pain relief. Their use has been limited by;

i. The inconvenience of chronically managing wires, patches and stimulator, particularly if there are interfaces to more than one site, and

ii. The difficulty for patients to control a variety of stimulus parameters such as amplitude, frequency, pulse width, duty cycle, etc.

Nerves can also be stimulated mechanically to produce sensation or provoke or alter reflexes; this is the basis of touch sensation and tactile feedback. Nerves can also be affected chemically by medications delivered locally or systemically and sometimes targeted to particular nerves on the basis of location or chemical type. Nerves can also be stimulated or inhibited optically if they have had genes inserted to make them light sensitive like some of the nerves in the eye. The actions of nerves also produce electrical, mechanical and chemical changes that can be sensed.

The topical nerve stimulator/sensor (TNSS) is a device to stimulate nerves and sense the actions of the body that can be placed on the skin of a human or mammal to act on and respond to a nerve, muscle or tissue. One implementation of the TNSS is the Smart Band Aid™ (SBA). A system, incorporating a SBA, controls neuro modulation and neuro stimulation activities. It consists of one or more controllers or Control Units, one or more TNSS modules, software that resides in Control Units and TNSS modules, wireless communication between these components, and a data managing platform. The controller hosts software that will control the functions of the TNSS. The controller takes inputs from the TNSS of data or image data for analysis by said software, The controller provides a physical user interface for display to and recording from the user, such as activating or disabling the TNSS, logging of data and usage statistics, generating reporting data. Finally, the controller provides communications with other Controllers or the Internet cloud.

The controller communicates with the neurostim module, also called TNSS module or SBA, and also communicates with the user. In at least one example, both of these communications can go in both directions, so each set of communications is a control loop. Optionally, there may also be a control loop directly between the TNSS module and the body. So the system optionally may be a hierarchical control system with at least four control loops. One loop is between the TNSS and the body; another loop is between the TNSS and the controller; another loop is between the controller and the user; and another loop is between the controller and other users via the cloud, which may be located in the TNSS, the controller or the cloud, has several functions including: (1) sending activation or disablement signals between the controller and the TNSS via a local network such as Bluetooth; (2) driving the user interface, as when the controller receives commands from the user and provides visual, auditory or tactile feedback to the user; (3) analyzing TNSS data, as well as other feedback data such as from the user, within the TNSS, and/or the controller and/or or the cloud; (4) making decisions about the appropriate treatment; (5) system diagnostics for operational correctness; and (6) communications with other controllers or users via the Internet cloud for data transmission or exchange, or to interact with apps residing in the Internet cloud.

The control loop is closed. This is as a result of having both stimulating and sensing. The sensing provides information about the effects of stimulation, allowing the stimulation to be adjusted to a desired level or improved automatically.

Typically, stimulation will be applied. Sensing will be used to measure the effects of stimulation. The measurements sensed will be used to specify the next stimulation. This process can be repeated indefinitely with various durations of each part. For example: rapid cycling through the process (a-b-c-a-b-c-a-b-c); prolonged stimulation, occasional sensing (aaaa-b-c-aaaa-b-c-aaaa-b-c); or prolonged sensing, occasional stimulation (a-bbbb-c-a-bbbb-c-a-bbbb). The process may also start with sensing, and when an event in the body is detected this information is used to specify stimulation to treat or correct the event, for example, (bbbbbbbbb-c-a-bbbbbbbb-c-a-bbbbbbbbb). Other patterns are possible and contemplated within the scope of the application.

The same components can be used for stimulating and sensing alternately, by switching their connection between the stimulating circuits and the sensing circuits. The switching can be done by standard electronic components. In the case of electrical stimulating and sensing, the same electrodes can be used for both. An electronic switch is used to connect stimulating circuits to the electrodes and electric stimulation is applied to the tissues. Then the electronic switch disconnects the stimulating circuits from the electrodes and connects the sensing circuits to the electrodes and electrical signals from the tissues are recorded.

In the case of acoustic stimulating and sensing, the same ultrasonic transducers can be used for both (as in ultrasound imaging or radar). An electronic switch is used to connect circuits to the transducers to send acoustic signals (sound waves) into the tissues. Then the electronic switch disconnects these circuits from the transducers and connects other circuits to the transducers (to listen for reflected sound waves) and these acoustic signals from the tissues are recorded.

Other modalities of stimulation and sensing may be used (e.g. light, magnetic fields, etc) The closed loop control may be implemented autonomously by an individual TNSS or by multiple TNSS modules operating in a system such as that shown below in FIG. 16. Sensing might be carried out by some TNSSs and stimulation by others.

Stimulators are protocol controlled initiators of electrical stimulation, where such protocol may reside in either the TNSS and/or the controller and/or the cloud. Stimulators interact with associated sensors or activators, such as electrodes or MEMS devices.

The protocol, which may be located in the TNSS, the controller or the cloud, has several functions including:

(1) Sending activation or disablement signals between the controller and the TNSS via a local network such as Bluetooth. The protocol sends a signal by Bluetooth radio waves from the smartphone to the TNSS module on the skin, telling it to start or stop stimulating or sensing. Other wireless communication types are possible.

(2) Driving the user interface, as when the controller receives commands from the user and provides visual, auditory or tactile feedback to the user. The protocol receives a command from the user when the user touches an icon on the smartphone screen, and provides feedback to the user by displaying information on the smartphone screen, or causing the smartphone to beep or buzz.

(3) Analyzing TNSS data, as well as other feedback data such as from the user, within the TNSS, and/or the controller and/or or the cloud. The protocol analyzes data sensed by the TNSS, such as the position of a muscle, and data from the user such as the user's desires as expressed when the user touches an icon on the smartphone; this analysis can be done in the TNSS, in the smartphone, and/or in the cloud.

(4) Making decisions about the appropriate treatment. The protocol uses the data it analyzes to decide what stimulation to apply.

(5) System diagnostics for operational correctness. The protocol checks that the TNSS system is operating correctly.

(6) Communications with other controllers or users via the Internet cloud for data transmission or exchange, or to interact with apps residing in the Internet cloud. The protocol communicates with other smartphones or people via the internet wirelessly; this may include sending data over the internet, or using computer programs that are operating elsewhere on the internet.

A neurological control system, method and apparatus are configured in an ecosystem or modular platform that uses potentially disposable topical devices to provide interfaces between electronic computing systems and neural systems. These interfaces may be direct electrical connections via electrodes or may be indirect via transducers (sensors and actuators). It may have the following elements in various configurations: electrodes for sensing or activating electrical events in the body; actuators of various modalities; sensors of various modalities; wireless networking; and protocol applications, e.g. for data processing, recording, control systems. These components are integrated within the disposable topical device. This integration allows the topical device to function autonomously. It also allows the topical device along with a remote control unit (communicating wirelessly via an antenna, transmitter and receiver) to function autonomously.

Referring to FIG. 1, nerve cells are normally electrically polarized with the interior of the nerve being at an electric potential 70 mV negative relative to the exterior of the cell. Application of a suitable electric voltage to a nerve cell (raising the resting potential of the cell from −70 mV to above the firing threshold of −55 mV) can initiate a sequence of events in which this polarization is temporarily reversed in one region of the cell membrane and the change in polarization spreads along the length of the cell to influence other cells at a distance, e.g. to communicate with other nerve cells or to cause or prevent muscle contraction.

Referring to FIG. 2, graphically represents a nerve impulse from a point of stimulation resulting in a wave of depolarization followed by a repolarization that travels along the membrane of a neuron during the measured period. This spreading action potential is a nerve impulse. It is this phenomenon that allows for external electrical nerve stimulation.

Referring to FIG. 3, the dorsal genital nerve on the back of the penis or clitoris just under the skin is a purely sensory nerve that is involved in normal inhibition of the activity of the bladder during sexual activity, and electrical stimulation of this nerve has been shown to reduce the symptoms of the Over Active Bladder. Stimulation of the underside of the penis may cause sexual arousal, erection, ejaculation and orgasm.

A Topical nerve stimulator/sensor (TNSS) is used to stimulate these nerves and is convenient, unobtrusive, self-powered, controlled from a smartphone or other control device. This has the advantage of being non-invasive, controlled by consumers themselves, and potentially distributed over the counter without a prescription.

Referring to FIG. 4, the TNSS has one or more electronic circuits or chips that perform the functions of: communications with the controller, nerve stimulation via one or more electrodes 408 that produce a wide range of electric field(s) according to treatment regimen, one or more antennae 410 that may also serve as electrodes and communication pathways, and a wide range of sensors 406 such as, but not limited to, mechanical motion and pressure, temperature, humidity, chemical and positioning sensors. One arrangement would be to integrate a wide variety of these functions into an SOC, system on chip 400. Within this is shown a control unit 402 for data processing, communications and storage and one or more stimulators 404 and sensors 406 that are connected to electrodes 408. An antenna 410 is incorporated for external communications by the control unit. Also present is an internal power supply 412, which may be, for example, a battery. An external power supply is another variation of the chip configuration. It may be necessary to include more than one chip to accommodate a wide range of voltages for data processing and stimulation. Electronic circuits and chips will communicate with each other via conductive tracks within the device capable of transferring data and/or power.

In one or more examples, a Smart Band Aid™ incorporating a battery and electronic circuit and electrodes in the form of adhesive conductive pads may be applied to the skin, and electrical stimuli is passed from the adhesive pads into the tissues. Stimuli may typically be trains of voltage-regulated square waves at frequencies between 15 and 50 Hz with currents between 20 and 100 mA. The trains of stimuli are controlled from a smartphone operated by the user. Stimuli may be either initiated by the user when desired, or programmed according to a timed schedule, or initiated in response to an event detected by a sensor on the Smart Band Aid™ or elsewhere. Another implementation for males may be a TNSS incorporated in a ring that locates a stimulator conductively to selected nerves in a penis to be stimulated.

Referring to FIG. 5, limited lifetime battery sources will be employed as internal power supply 412, to power the TNSS deployed in this illustration as a Smart Band Aid™. These may take the form of Lithium Ion technology or traditional non-toxic MnO2 technologies. FIG. 5 illustrates different battery options such as a printable Manganese Oxide battery 516 and a button battery 518. A TNSS of different shapes may require different battery packaging.

FIG. 6 shows an alternate arrangement of these components where the batteries 616-618 are positioned on the bottom side of the SBA between the electrodes 610 and 620. In this example, battery 616 is a lithium ion battery, battery 617 is a MnO2 battery and battery 618 is a button battery. Other types of batteries and other battery configurations are possible within the scope of this application in other examples.

Aside from the Controller, the Smart Band Aid™ Packaging Platform consists of an assembly of an adhesive patch capable of being applied to the skin and containing the TNSS Electronics, protocol, and power described above.

Referring to FIG. 7 is a TNSS deployed as a Smart Band Aid™414. The Smart Band Aid™ has a substrate with adhesive on a side for adherence to skin, the SOC 400 previously described in FIG. 4, or electronic package, and one or more electrodes 408 disposed between the dermis and the adhesive surface. The electrodes provide electrical stimuli through the dermis to nerves and other tissue and in turn may collect electrical signals from the body, such as the electrical signals produced by muscles when they contract (the electromyogram) to provide data about body functions such as muscle actions.

Referring to FIG. 8, different chips may be employed to design requirements. Shown are sample chips for packaging in a TNSS in this instance deployed as a SBA. For example, neural stimulator 800, sensor 802, processor/communications 804 are represented. The chips can be packaged separately on a substrate, including a flexible material, or as a system-on-chip (SOC) 400. The chip connections and electronics package are not shown but are known in the art.

Referring to FIG. 9 SBAs with variations on arrangements of electrodes are shown. Each electrode may consist of a plurality of conductive contacts that give the electrode abilities to adjust the depth, directionality, and spatial distribution of the applied electric field. For all the example electrode configurations shown, 901-904, the depth of the electrical stimulation can be controlled by the voltage and power applied to the electrode contacts. Electric current can be applied to various electrode contacts at opposite end of the SBA, or within a plurality of electrode contacts on a single end of the SBA. The phase relationship of the signals applied to the electrode contacts can vary the directionality of the electric field. For all configurations of electrodes, the applied signals can vary over time and spatial dimensions. The configuration on the left, 901, shows a plurality of concentric electrode contacts at either end of the SBA. This configuration can be used to apply an electric stimulating field at various tissue depths by varying the power introduced to the electrode contacts. The next configuration, 902, shows electrodes 404 that are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips of electrical contacts. This allows the electric field to be oriented perpendicular or parallel to the SBA. The next configuration, 903, shows an example matrix of electrode contacts where the applied signal can generate a stimulating field between any two or more electrode contacts at either end of the SBA, or between two or more electrode contacts within a single matrix at one end of the SBA. Finally, the next configuration on the far right, 904, also shows electrodes that are arranged in a plurality of parallel strips of electrical contacts. As with the second configuration, this allows the electric field to be oriented perpendicular or parallel to the SBA. There may be many other arrangements of electrodes and contacts.

One or more TNSSs with one or more Controllers form a System. Systems can communicate and interact with each other and with distributed virtualized processing and storage services. This enables the gathering, exchange, and analysis of data among populations of systems for medical and non-medical applications.

Referring to FIG. 10, a system is shown with two TNSS units 1006, with one on the wrist, one on the leg, communicating with its controller, a smartphone 1000 or other control device. The TNSS units can be both sensing and stimulating and can act independently and also work together in a Body Area Network (BAN). Systems communicate with each other over a communication bridge or network such as a cellular network. Systems also communicate with applications running in a distributed virtualized processing and storage environment generally via the Internet 1002. The purpose for communications with the distributed virtualized processing and storage environment is to communicate large amounts of user data for analysis and networking with other third parties such as hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, researchers, and others. There are applications that gather, exchange, and analyze data from multiple Systems 1004. Third party application developers can access TNSS systems and their data to deliver a wide range of applications. These applications can return data or control signals to the individual wearing the TNSS unit 1006. These applications can also send data or control signals to other members of the population who employ systems 1008. This may represent an individual's data, aggregated data from a population of users, data analyses, or supplementary data from other sources.

Referring to FIG. 11, shown is an example of an electrode array to affect beam forming and beam steering. Beam forming and steering allows a more selective application of stimulation energy by a TNSS to nerves and tissue. Beam steering also provides the opportunity for lower power for stimulation of cells including nerves by applying the stimulating mechanism directionally to a target. In the use of an electrical beam lower power demand lengthens battery life and allows for use of low power chip sets. Beam steering may be accomplished in multiple ways for instance by magnetic fields and formed gates. FIG. 11 shows a method for forming and steering a beam by the use of a plurality of radiators 1102 which are activated out of phase with each other by a plurality of phase shifters 1103 that are supplied power from a common source 1104. Because the radiated signals are out of phase they produce an interference pattern 1105 that results in the beam being formed and steered in varying controlled directions 1106. Electromagnetic radiation like light shows some properties of waves and can be focused on certain locations. This provides the opportunity to stimulate tissues such as nerves selectively. It also provides the opportunity to focus the transmission of energy and data on certain objects, including topical or implanted electronic devices, thereby not only improving the selectivity of activating or controlling those objects but also reducing the overall power required to operate them.

FIG. 12 is another example of a gating structure 1200 used for beam shaping and steering 1202. The gating structure 1200 shows an example of an interlocked pair of electrodes that can be used for simple beam forming through the application of time-varying voltages. The steering 1202 shows a generic picture of the main field lobes and how such beam steering works in this example. FIG. 12 is illustrative of a possible example that may be used.

The human and mammal body is an anisotropic medium with multiple layers of tissue of varying electrical properties. Steering of an electric field may be accomplished using multiple electrodes, or multiple SBAs, using the human or mammal body as an anisotropic volume conductor. Electric field steering will discussed below with reference to FIGS. 18 and 19.

Referring to FIG. 13, the controller is an electronics platform that is a smartphone 1300, tablet 1302, personal computer 1304, or dedicated module 1306 that hosts wireless communications capabilities, such as Near Field Communications, Bluetooth, or Wi-Fi technologies as enabled by the current set of communications chips, e.g. Broadcom BCM4334, TI WiLink 8 and others, and a wide range of protocol apps that can communicate with the TNSSs. There may be more than one controller, acting together. This may occur, for example, if the user has both a smartphone control app running, and a key fob controller in his/her pocket/purse.

TNSS protocol performs the functions of communications with the controller including transmitting and receiving of control and data signals, activation and control of the neural stimulation, data gathering from on board sensors, communications and coordination with other TNSSs, and data analysis. Typically the TNSS may receive commands from the controller, generate stimuli and apply these to the tissues, sense signals from the tissues, and transmit these to the controller. It may also analyze the signals sensed and use this information to modify the stimulation applied. In addition to communicating with the controller it may also communicate with other TNSSs using electrical or radio signals via a body area network.

Referring to FIG. 14, controller protocol executed and/or displayed on a smartphone 1400, tablet 1402 or other computing platform or mobile device, will perform the functions of communications with TNSS modules including transmitting and receiving of control and data signals, activation and control of the neuro modulation regimens, data gathering from on board sensors, communications and coordination with other controllers, and data analysis. In some cases local control of the neuro modulation regimens may be conducted by controller protocol without communications with the user.

FIG. 15 shows potential applications of electrical stimulation and sensing for the body, particularly for users who may suffer from paralysis or loss of sensation or altered reflexes such as spasticity or tremor due to neurological disorders and their complications, as well as users suffering from incontinence, pain, immobility and aging. Different example medical uses of the present system are discussed below.

FIG. 16 shows the components of one example of a typical TNSS system 1600. TNSS devices 1610 are responsible for stimulation of nerves and for receiving data in the form of electrical, acoustic, imaging, chemical and other signals which then can be processed locally in the TNSS or passed to the Control Unit 1620. TNSS devices 1610 are also responsible for analysis and action. The TNSS device 1610 may contain a plurality of electrodes for stimulation and for sensing. The same electrodes may be used for both functions, but this is not required. The TNSS device 1610 may contain an imaging device, such as an ultrasonic transducer to create acoustic images of the structure beneath the electrodes or elsewhere in the body that may be affected by the neural stimulation.

In this example TNSS system, most of the data gathering and analysis is performed in the Control Unit 1620. The Control Unit 1620 may be a cellular telephone or a dedicated hardware device. The Control Unit 1620 runs an app that controls the local functions of the TNSS System 1600. The protocol app also communicates via the Internet or wireless networks 1630 with other TNSS systems and/or with 3rd party software applications.

FIG. 17 shows the communications among the components of the TNSS system 1600 and the user. In this example, TNSS 1610 is capable of applying stimuli to nerves 1640 to produce action potentials in the nerves 1640 to produce actions in muscles 1670 or other organs such as the brain 1650. These actions may be sensed by the TNSS 1610, which may act on the information to modify the stimulation it provides. This closed loop constitutes the first level of the system 1600 in this example.

The TNSS 1610 may also be caused to operate by signals received from a Control Unit 1620 such as a cellphone, laptop, key fob, tablet, or other handheld device and may transmit information that it senses back to the Control Unit 1620. This constitutes the second level of the system 1600 in this example.

The Control Unit 1620 is caused to operate by commands from a user, who also receives information from the Control Unit 1620. The user may also receive information about actions of the body via natural senses such as vision or touch via sensory nerves and the spinal cord, and may in some cases cause actions in the body via natural pathways through the spinal cord to the muscles.

The Control Unit 1620 may also communicate information to other users, experts, or application programs via the Internet 1630, and receive information from them via the Internet 1630.

The user may choose to initiate or modify these processes, sometimes using protocol applications residing in the TNSS 1610, the Control Unit 1620, the Internet 1630, or wireless networks. This software may assist the user, for example by processing the stimulation to be delivered to the body to render it more selective or effective for the user, and/or by processing and displaying data received from the body or from the Internet 1630 or wireless networks to make it more intelligible or useful to the user.

FIG. 18 shows an example electrode configuration 1800 for Electric Field Steering. The application of an appropriate electric field to the body can cause a nerve to produce an electrical pulse known as an action potential. The shape of the electric field is influenced by the electrical properties of the different tissue through which it passes and the size, number and position of the electrodes used to apply it. The electrodes can therefore be designed to shape or steer or focus the electric field on some nerves more than on others, thereby providing more selective stimulation.

An example 10×10 matrix of electrical contacts 1860 is shown. By varying the pattern of electrical contacts 1860 employed to cause an electric field 1820 to form and by time varying the applied electrical power to this pattern of contacts 1860, it is possible to steer the field 1820 across different parts of the body, which may include muscle 1870, bone, fat, and other tissue, in three dimensions. This electric field 1820 can activate specific nerves or nerve bundles 1880 while sensing the electrical and mechanical actions produced 1890, and thereby enabling the TNSS to discover more effective or the most effective pattern of stimulation for producing the desired action.

FIG. 19 shows a example of stimulating and sensing patterns of signals in a volume of tissue. Electrodes 1910 as part of a cuff arrangement are placed around limb 1915. The electrodes 1910 are external to a layer of skin 1916 on limb 1915. Internal components of the limb 1915 include muscle 1917, bone 1918, nerves 1919, and other tissues. By using electric field steering for stimulation, as described with reference to FIG. 18, the electrodes 1910 can activate nerves 1919 selectively. An array of sensors (e.g. piezoelectric sensors or micro-electro-mechanical sensors) in a TNSS can act as a phased array antenna for receiving ultrasound signals, to acquire ultrasonic images of body tissues. Electrodes 1910 may act as an array of electrodes sensing voltages at different times and locations on the surface of the body, with software processing this information to display information about the activity in body tissues, e.g. which muscles are activated by different patterns of stimulation.

The SBA's ability to stimulate and collect organic data has multiple applications including bladder control, reflex incontinence, sexual stimulations, pain control and wound healing among others. Examples of SBA's application for medical and other uses follow.

Medical Uses

Bladder Management

1) Overactive bladder: When the user feels a sensation of needing to empty the bladder urgently, he or she presses a button on the Controller to initiate stimulation via a Smart Band Aid™ applied over the dorsal nerve of the penis or clitoris. Activation of this nerve would inhibit the sensation of needing to empty the bladder urgently, and allow it to be emptied at a convenient time.

2) Incontinence: A person prone to incontinence of urine because of unwanted contraction of the bladder uses the SBA to activate the dorsal nerve of the penis or clitoris to inhibit contraction of the bladder and reduce incontinence of urine. The nerve could be activated continuously, or intermittently when the user became aware of the risk of incontinence, or in response to a sensor indicating the volume or pressure in the bladder.

Erection, ejaculation and orgasm: Stimulation of the nerves on the underside of the penis by a Smart Band Aid™ (electrical stimulation or mechanical vibration) can cause sexual arousal and might be used to produce or prolong erection and to produce orgasm and ejaculation.

Pain control: A person suffering from chronic pain from a particular region of the body applies a Smart Band Aid™ over that region and activates electrically the nerves conveying the sensation of touch, thereby reducing the sensation of pain from that region. This is based on the gate theory of pain.

Wound care: A person suffering from a chronic wound or ulcer applies a Smart Band Aid™ over the wound and applies electrical stimuli continuously to the tissues surrounding the wound to accelerate healing and reduce infection.

Essential tremor: A sensor on a Smart Band Aid™ detects the tremor and triggers neuro stimulation to the muscles and sensory nerves involved in the tremor with an appropriate frequency and phase relationship to the tremor. The stimulation frequency would typically be at the same frequency as the tremor but shifted in phase in order to cancel the tremor or reset the neural control system for hand position.

Reduction of spasticity: Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves can reduce spasticity for several hours after stimulation. A Smart Band Aid™ operated by the patient when desired from a smartphone could provide this stimulation.

Restoration of sensation and sensory feedback: People who lack sensation, for example as a result of diabetes or stroke use a Smart Band Aid™ to sense movement or contact, for example of the foot striking the floor, and the SBA provides mechanical or electrical stimulation to another part of the body where the user has sensation, to improve safety or function. Mechanical stimulation is provided by the use of acoustic transducers in the SBA such as small vibrators. Applying a Smart Band Aid™ to the limb or other assistive device provides sensory feedback from artificial limbs. Sensory feedback can also be used to substitute one sense for another, e.g. touch in place of sight.

Recording of mechanical activity of the body: Sensors in a Smart Band Aid™ record position, location and orientation of a person or of body parts and transmit this data to a smartphone for the user and/or to other computer networks for safety monitoring, analysis of function and coordination of stimulation.

Recording of sound from the body or reflections of ultrasound waves generated by a transducer in a Smart Band Aid™ could provide information about body structure, e.g. bladder volume for persons unable to feel their bladder. Acoustic transducers may be piezoelectric devices or MEMS devices that transmit and receive the appropriate acoustic frequencies. Acoustic data may be processed to allow imaging of the interior of the body.

Recording of Electrical Activity of the Body

Electrocardiogram: Recording the electrical activity of the heart is widely used for diagnosing heart attacks and abnormal rhythms. It is sometimes necessary to record this activity for 24 hours or more to detect uncommon rhythms. A Smart Band Aid™ communicating wirelessly with a smartphone or computer network achieves this more simply than present systems.

Electromyogram: Recording the electrical activity of muscles is widely used for diagnosis in neurology and also used for movement analysis. Currently this requires the use of many needles or adhesive pads on the surface of the skin connected to recording equipment by many wires. Multiple Smart Band Aids™ record the electrical activity of many muscles and transmit this information wirelessly to a smartphone.

Recording of optical information from the body: A Smart Band Aid™ incorporating a light source (LED, laser) illuminates tissues and senses the characteristics of the reflected light to measure characteristics of value, e.g. oxygenation of the blood, and transmit this to a cellphone or other computer network.

Recording of chemical information from the body: The levels of chemicals or drugs in the body or body fluids is monitored continuously by a Smart Band Aid™ sensor and transmitted to other computer networks and appropriate feedback provided to the user or to medical staff. Levels of chemicals may be measured by optical methods (reflection of light at particular wavelengths) or by chemical sensors.

Special Populations of Disabled Users

There are many potential applications of electrical stimulation for therapy and restoration of function. However, few of these have been commercialized because of the lack of affordable convenient and easily controllable stimulation systems. Some applications are shown in the FIG. 15.

Limb Muscle stimulation: Lower limb muscles can be exercised by stimulating them electrically, even if they are paralyzed by stroke or spinal cord injury. This is often combined with the use of a stationary exercise cycle for stability. Smart Band Aid™ devices could be applied to the quadriceps muscle of the thigh to stimulate these, extending the knee for cycling, or to other muscles such as those of the calf. Sensors in the Smart Band Aid™ could trigger stimulation at the appropriate time during cycling, using an application on a smartphone, tablet, handheld hardware device such as a key fob, wearable computing device, laptop, or desktop computer, among other possible devices. Upper limb muscles can be exercised by stimulating them electrically, even if they are paralyzed by stroke of spinal cord injury. This is often combined with the use of an arm crank exercise machine for stability. Smart Band Aid™ devices are applied to multiple muscles in the upper limb and triggered by sensors in the Smart Band Aids™ at the appropriate times, using an application on a smartphone.

Prevention of osteoporosis: Exercise can prevent osteoporosis and pathological fractures of bones. This is applied using Smart Band Aids™ in conjunction with exercise machines such as rowing simulators, even for people with paralysis who are particularly prone to osteoporosis.

Prevention of deep vein thrombosis: Electric stimulation of the muscles of the calf can reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis and potentially fatal pulmonary embolus. Electric stimulation of the calf muscles is applied by a Smart Band Aid™ with stimulation programmed from a smartphone, e.g. during a surgical operation, or on a preset schedule during a long plane flight.

Restoration of Function (Functional Electrical Stimulation)

Lower Limb

1) Foot drop: People with stroke often cannot lift their forefoot and drag their toes on the ground. A Smart Band Aid™ is be applied just below the knee over the common peroneal nerve to stimulate the muscles that lift the forefoot at the appropriate time in the gait cycle, triggered by a sensor in the Smart Band Aid™

2) Standing: People with spinal cord injury or some other paralyses can be aided to stand by electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles of their thigh. These muscles are stimulated by Smart Band Aids™ applied to the front of the thigh and triggered by sensors or buttons operated by the patient using an application on a smartphone. This may also assist patients to use lower limb muscles when transferring from a bed to a chair or other surface.

3) Walking: Patients with paralysis from spinal cord injury are aided to take simple steps using electrical stimulation of the lower limb muscles and nerves. Stimulation of the sensory nerves in the common peroneal nerve below the knee can cause a triple reflex withdrawal, flexing the ankle, knee and hip to lift the leg, and then stimulation of the quadriceps can extend the knee to bear weight. The process is then repeated on the other leg. Smart Band Aids™ coordinated by an application in a smartphone produce these actions.

Upper Limb

1) Hand grasp: People with paralysis from stroke or spinal cord injury have simple hand grasp restored by electrical stimulation of the muscles to open or close the hand. This is produced by Smart Band Aids™ applied to the back and front of the forearm and coordinated by sensors in the Smart Band Aids™ and an application in a smartphone.

2) Reaching: Patients with paralysis from spinal cord injury sometimes cannot extend their elbow to reach above the head. Application of a Smart Band Aid™ to the triceps muscle stimulates this muscle to extend the elbow. This is triggered by a sensor in the Smart Band Aid™ detecting arm movements and coordinating it with an application on a smartphone.

Posture: People whose trunk muscles are paralyzed may have difficulty maintaining their posture even in a wheelchair. They may fall forward unless they wear a seatbelt, and if they lean forward they may be unable to regain upright posture. Electrical stimulation of the muscles of the lower back using a Smart Band Aid™ allows them to maintain and regain upright posture. Sensors in the Smart Band Aid™ trigger this stimulation when a change in posture was detected.

Coughing: People whose abdominal muscles are paralyzed cannot produce a strong cough and are at risk for pneumonia. Stimulation of the muscles of the abdominal wall using a Smart Band Aid™ could produce a more forceful cough and prevent chest infections. The patient using a sensor in a Smart Band Aid™ triggers the stimulation.

Essential Tremor: It has been demonstrated that neuro stimulation can reduce or eliminate the signs of ET. ET may be controlled using a TNSS. A sensor on a Smart Band Aid™ detects the tremor and trigger neuro stimulation to the muscles and sensory nerves involved in the tremor with an appropriate frequency and phase relationship to the tremor. The stimulation frequency is typically be at the same frequency as the tremor but shifted in phase in order to cancel the tremor or reset the neural control system for hand position.

Non-Medical Applications

Sports Training

Sensing the position and orientation of multiple limb segments is used to provide visual feedback on a smartphone of, for example, a golf swing, and also mechanical or electrical feedback to the user at particular times during the swing to show them how to change their actions. The electromyogram of muscles could also be recorded from one or many Smart Band Aids™ and used for more detailed analysis.

Gaming

Sensing the position and orientation of arms, legs and the rest of the body produces a picture of an onscreen player that can interact with other players anywhere on the Internet. Tactile feedback would be provided to players by actuators in Smart Band Aids on various parts of the body to give the sensation of striking a ball, etc.

Motion Capture for Film and Animation

Wireless TNSS capture position, acceleration, and orientation of multiple parts of the body. This data may be used for animation of a human or mammal and has application for human factor analysis and design.

Sample Modes of Operation

A SBA system consists of at least a single Controller and a single SBA. Following application of the SBA to the user's skin, the user controls it via the Controller's app using Near Field Communications. The app appears on a smartphone screen and can be touch controlled by the user; for ‘key fob’ type Controllers, the SBA is controlled by pressing buttons on the key fob.

When the user feels the need to activate the SBA s/he presses the “go” button two or more times to prevent false triggering, thus delivering the neuro stimulation. The neuro stimulation may be delivered in a variety of patterns of frequency, duration, and strength and may continue until a button is pressed by the user or may be delivered for a length of time set in the application.

Sensor capabilities in the TNSS, are enabled to start collecting/analyzing data and communicating with the controller when activated.

The level of functionality in the protocol app, and the protocol embedded in the TNSS, will depend upon the neuro modulation or neuro stimulation regimen being employed.

In some cases there will be multiple TNSSs employed for the neuro modulation or neuro stimulation regimen. The basic activation will be the same for each TNSS.

However, once activated multiple TNSSs will automatically form a network of neuro modulation/stimulation points with communications enabled with the controller.

The need for multiple TNSSs arises from the fact that treatment regimens may need several points of access to be effective.

While illustrative systems and methods as described herein embodying various aspects of the present disclosure are shown, it will be understood by those skilled in the art, that the invention is not limited to these embodiments. Modifications may be made by those skilled in the art, particularly in light of the foregoing teachings. For example, each of the elements of the aforementioned embodiments may be utilized alone or in combination or subcombination with elements of the other embodiments. It will also be appreciated and understood that modifications may be made without departing from the true spirit and scope of the present disclosure. The description is thus to be regarded as illustrative instead of restrictive on the present invention.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Pluripotent mammalian cells REVIVICOR, INC. 15 June 2001 11 July 2002
Multivariate analysis of green to ultraviolet spectra of cell and tissue samples ARGOSE, INC. 20 February 2001 25 October 2001
Human lineage committed cell composition with enhanced proliferative potential, biological effector function, or both; methods for obtaining same; and their uses AASTROM BIOSCIENCES, INC. 23 February 1998 21 March 2002
Porcine spinal cord cells and their use in spinal cord repair DIACRIN, INC. 29 September 1998 26 September 2002
High throughput cell-based assay kits GREENWALT DALE 18 June 2001 27 December 2001
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US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 1 US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 2 US10016600 Topical neurological stimulation 3