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Patent Analysis of

Portable wireless electronic vapor device

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10058128

Application Number

US15/353969

Application Date

17 November 2016

Publication Date

28 August 2018

Current Assignee

LUNATECH, LLC

Original Assignee (Applicant)

LUNATECH, LLC

International Classification

A24F47/00,H01M10/0525,H01M10/44,H05B3/12,H01M10/34

Cooperative Classification

A24F47/008,H01M10/0525,H01M10/06,H01M10/345,H01M10/44

Inventor

CAMERON, JOHN,BECKER, DEAN,FEIN, GENE

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10058128 Portable wireless electronic vapor 1 US10058128 Portable wireless electronic vapor 2 US10058128 Portable wireless electronic vapor 3
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Abstract

A system, method, and device to integrate electronic vapor devices and electronic communication devices.

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Claims

1. An electronic vapor device comprising:

a device processor operable for controlling the electronic vapor device; at least one container for storing a vaporizable material; a vaporizing component operatively coupled to the device processor and controlled in part by the device processor, wherein the vaporizing component is in fluid communication with the at least one container for receiving at least a portion of the vaporizable material therefrom, wherein the vaporizing component is operable to vaporize the vaporizable material received therein; at least one vapor outlet coupled to the vaporizing component and configured to receive vapor generated by the vaporizing component, the at least one vapor outlet operable to expel the generated vapor from the electronic vapor device; a vaporizing power source operatively coupled to the vaporizing component, wherein the vaporizing power source is operable to generate a supply of power for operation of at least the vaporizing component; and an input/output connector operatively coupled to the device processor and configured to operatively connect the device processor to an input/output port of an associated electronic communication device, wherein the input/output connector is operable to receive a power supply generated by a power source of the associated electronic communication device and to transmit the received power supply to the vaporizing power source; wherein the device processor is operable to: determine a power availability status of the vaporizing power source for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and regulate the supply of generated power received from the associated electronic communication device provided to the vaporizing power source based on the determined power availability status.

2. The electronic vapor device of claim 1,

wherein the device processor is operable to determine, based on the determined power availability status, whether the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component; and based on a determination that the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is not sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component, generating at least one power provision control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of power supply received from the power source of the associated electronic communication device by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source; wherein the input/output connector is operable to provide at least a portion of the received power supply from the power source of the associated electronic communication device to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power provision control signal.

3. The electronic vapor device of claim 1,

wherein based on the determined power availability status of the vaporizing power source, the device processor is operable to generate at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of power supply received from the power source of the associated communication device by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; wherein the input/output connector is operable to provide at least a portion of the received power supply from the power source of the associated communication device to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal; and wherein the vaporizing component is operable to store at least a portion of the received power supply in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal.

4. The electronic vapor device of claim 1, wherein the vaporizing power source is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at least one of: a battery source, a connection to an electrical power source, and combinations thereof.

5. The electronic vapor device of claim 4 wherein the battery source is selected from the group of battery sources consisting of at least one of: lithium-ion batteries, thin film lithium-ion batteries, lithium-ion polymer batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, lead-acid batteries, and combinations thereof.

6. The electronic vapor device of claim 1, wherein the input/output connector is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port, a micro-USB port, a mini-USB port, a lightning port, a dock connector, and a wireless charging area.

7. The electronic vapor device of claim 1, wherein the associated electronic communication device is selected from the group of electronic communication devices consisting of: a portable computing device, a smartphone, a mobile phone, a music player, and an electronic gaming device.

8. A system for operating an electronic vapor device in conjunction with an electronic communication device comprising:

the electronic communication device comprising,

a first processor operable for controlling the electronic communication device, an electronic communication device power source operatively coupled to the first processor and operable to generate a supply of power for at least the operation of the electronic communication device, an input/output port operatively coupled to the first processor and configured to operatively connect the first processor to the input/output connector of the electronic vapor device, wherein the input/output port is operable to transmit a power supply generated by the electronic communication device power source to the electronic vapor device; andthe electronic vapor device comprising:

a second processor operable for controlling the electronic vapor device, at least one container configured to store a vaporizable material, a vaporizing component operatively coupled to the second processor and controlled in part by the second processor, wherein the vaporizing component is in fluid communication with the at least one container for receiving at least a portion of the vaporizable material therefrom, wherein the vaporizing component is operable to vaporize the vaporizable material received therein, at least one vapor outlet coupled to the vaporizing component and configured to receive a vapor generated by the vaporizing component, wherein the at least one vapor outlet is operable to expel the generated vapor from the electronic vapor device, a vaporizing power source operatively coupled to the vaporizing component, wherein the vaporizing power source is operable to generate a supply of vaporizing power for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and an input/output connector operatively coupled to the second processor and configured to operatively connect the second processor to an input/output port of the electronic communication device, wherein the input/output connector is operable to receive a power supply generated by the electronic communication device power source and to transmit the received power supply to the vaporizing power source, wherein the second device processor is operable to: determine a power availability status of the vaporizing power source for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and regulate the supply of generated power received from the electronic communication device power source provided to the vaporizing power source based on the determined power availability status.

9. The system of claim 8,

wherein at least one of the first processor and the second processor is operable to determine whether the determined power availability status of the vaporizing power source is sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component; and based on a determination that the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is not sufficient for operation of the vaporizing power source, generating at least one power provision control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of the power source received from the electronic communication device power source by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source; wherein the input/output connector is operable to provide at least a portion of the received power supply from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power provision control signal.

10. The electronic vapor device of claim 8,

wherein based on the determined power availability status of the vaporizing power source, at least one of the first processor and the second processor is operable to generate at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of the power supply received from the electronic communication device power source by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; wherein the input/output connector is operable to provide at least a portion of the received power supply from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal; and wherein the vaporizing component is operable to store at least a portion of the received power supply in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal.

11. The system of claim 8, wherein the vaporizing power source is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at least one of: a battery source, a connection to an electrical power source, and combinations thereof.

12. The system of claim 11 wherein the battery source is selected from the group of battery sources consisting of at least one of: lithium-ion batteries, thin film lithium-ion batteries, lithium-ion polymer batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, lead-acid batteries, and combinations thereof.

13. The system of claim 8, wherein the input/output connector is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port, a micro-USB port, a mini-USB port, a lightning port, a dock connector, and a wireless charging area.

14. The system of claim 8, wherein the electronic communication device is selected from the group of electronic communication devices consisting of: a portable computing device, a smartphone, a mobile phone, a music player, and an electronic gaming device.

15. A method of operating an electronic vapor device in conjunction with an electronic communication device, wherein:

(a) the electronic vapor device comprises a vapor device processor operable for controlling the electronic vapor device, a vaporizing component operable to vaporize a plurality of materials received therein and expel a generated vapor from the electronic vapor device, a vaporizing source operatively coupled to the vaporizing component, a vaporizing power source operable to generate a supply of power for at least the operation of the vaporizing component, and an input/output connector configured to operatively connect the electronic vapor device to an input/output port of the electronic communication device, and(b) the electronic communication device comprises an electronic communication device processor operable for controlling the electronic communication device, an electronic communication device power source operable to generate a supply for power for the operation of at least the electronic communication device, and an input/output port configured to operatively connect the electronic communication device to an input/output connector of the electronic vapor device, the method comprising the steps: receiving, at the vapor device processor, at least one command to vaporize at least one vaporizable material by the vaporizing component; generating, by the vapor device processor, at least one vaporizing control signal for controlling at least one operational parameter of the electronic vapor device in accordance with the at least one command; determining an amount of power required by the vaporizing component to vaporize the at least one vaporizable material in accordance with the at least one vaporizing control signal; determining a power availability status of the vaporizing power source for operation of the vaporizing component; determining, based on the power availability status of the vaporizing power source, at least one power supply provision parameter for supplying power from at least one of the vaporizing power source, the electronic communication device power source, and combinations thereof to the vaporizing component for operation thereof; generating at least one power supply regulation control signal for regulating the supply of power provided to the vaporizing component by at least one of the vaporizing power source, the electronic communication device power source, and combinations thereof in accordance with the at least one power supply provision parameter; providing a supply of power from at least one of the vaporizing power source, the electronic communication device power source, and combinations thereof to the vaporizing component in accordance with the at least one power supply regulation control signal; and vaporizing the at least one vaporizable material by the vaporizing component in accordance with the at least one vaporizing control signal.

16. The method of claim 15, further comprising:

transmitting, via the input/output port, at least a portion of power generated by the electronic communication device power source to the input/output connector in accordance with the at least one power supply regulation control signal; and transmitting, via the input/output connector, at least a portion of the received power supply to at least one of the vaporizing component, the vaporizing power source, and combinations thereof in accordance with the at least one power supply regulation control signal.

17. The method of claim 15, further comprising:

based on the determined power availability status of the vaporizing power source, generating at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of a power supply received from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; transmitting at least a portion of the received power supply from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal; and storing, by the vaporizing power source, at least a portion of the received power supply in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal.

18. The method of claim 15, wherein the vaporizing power source is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at least one of: a battery source, a connection to an electrical power source, and combinations thereof.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein the battery source is selected from the group of battery sources consisting of at least one of: lithium-ion batteries, thin film lithium-ion batteries, lithium-ion polymer batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, lead-acid batteries, and combinations thereof.

20. The method of claim 15, wherein the input/output connector is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port, a micro-USB port, a mini-USB port, a lightning port, a dock connector, and a wireless charging area.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    or device comprising: a devic processor
    • perable for controlling the electronic vapor device; at least one conta
    • er for storing a vaporizable material; a vaporizing compo
    • nt operatively coupled to the device processor and controlled in part by the device processor, wherein the vaporizing component is in fluid communication with the at least one container for receiving at least a portion of the vaporizable material therefrom, wherein the vaporizing component is operable to vaporize the vaporizable material received therein; at least one vapor
    • utlet coupled to the vaporizing component and configured to receive vapor generated by the vaporizing component, the at least one vapor outlet operable to expel the generated vapor from the electronic vapor device; a vaporizing power
    • ource operatively coupled to the vaporizing component, wherein the vaporizing power source is operable to generate a supply of power for operation of at least the vaporizing component; and an input/outpu
    • connector operatively coupled to the device processor and configured to operatively connect the device processor to an input/output port of an associated electronic communication device, wherein the input/output connector is operable to receive a power supply generated by a power source of the associated electronic communication device and to transmit the received power supply to the vaporizing power source; wherein the device
    • rocessor is operable to: determine a power availability status of the vaporizing power source for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and regulate the supply of generated power received from the associated electronic communication device provided to the vaporizing power source based on the determined power availability status. 2. The electronic v
    • por device of claim 1, wherein the device rocesso
      • is operable to determine, based on the determined power availability status, whether the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component; and based on a determination that the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is not sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component, generating at least one power provision control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of power supply received from the power source of the associated electronic communication device by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source; wherein the input/o tput co
    • por device of claim 1, wherein based on th determ
      • ned power availability status of the vaporizing power source, the device processor is operable to generate at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of power supply received from the power source of the associated communication device by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; wherein the input/o tput co
    • por device of claim 1, wherein the vaporiz ng powe
      • source is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at le st one of: a
    • por device of claim 1, wherein the input/o tput co
      • nector is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Un versal Serial
    • por device of claim 1, wherein the associa ed elec
      • ronic communication device is selected from the group of electronic communication devices consisting of: a po table computi
  • 8
    ating an electronic vapor device in conjunction with an electronic communication device comprising: the ele tronic com
    • nication device comprising, a first processor operable for controlling the electronic communication device, an electronic communication device power source operatively coupled to the first processor and operable to generate a supply of power for at least the operation of the electronic communication device, an input/output port operatively coupled to the first processor and configured to operatively connect the first processor to the input/output connector of the electronic vapor device, wherein the input/output port is operable to transmit a power supply generated by the electronic communication device power source to the electronic vapor device; andthe electronic
    • por device comprising: a second processor operable for controlling the electronic vapor device, at least one container configured to store a vaporizable material, a vaporizing component operatively coupled to the second processor and controlled in part by the second processor, wherein the vaporizing component is in fluid communication with the at least one container for receiving at least a portion of the vaporizable material therefrom, wherein the vaporizing component is operable to vaporize the vaporizable material received therein, at least one vapor outlet coupled to the vaporizing component and configured to receive a vapor generated by the vaporizing component, wherein the at least one vapor outlet is operable to expel the generated vapor from the electronic vapor device, a vaporizing power source operatively coupled to the vaporizing component, wherein the vaporizing power source is operable to generate a supply of vaporizing power for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and an input/output connector operatively coupled to the second processor and configured to operatively connect the second processor to an input/output port of the electronic communication device, wherein the input/output connector is operable to receive a power supply generated by the electronic communication device power source and to transmit the received power supply to the vaporizing power source, wherein the second device processor is operable to: determine a power availability status of the vaporizing power source for operation of at least the vaporizing component, and regulate the supply of generated power received from the electronic communication device power source provided to the vaporizing power source based on the determined power availability status. 9. The system of cla
    • m 8, wherein at least one of the
      • irst processor and the second processor is operable to determine whether the determined power availability status of the vaporizing power source is sufficient for operation of the vaporizing component; and based on a determination that the available power supply of the vaporizing power source is not sufficient for operation of the vaporizing power source, generating at least one power provision control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of the power source received from the electronic communication device power source by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source; wherein the input/ou put con
    • por device of claim 8, wherein based on the determi
      • ed power availability status of the vaporizing power source, at least one of the first processor and the second processor is operable to generate at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of the power supply received from the electronic communication device power source by the input/output connector to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; wherein the input/ou put con
    • im 8, wherein the vaporizi g power
      • source is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at lea t one of: a b
    • im 8, wherein the input/ou put con
      • ector is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Uni ersal Serial
    • im 8, wherein the electron c commu
      • ication device is selected from the group of electronic communication devices consisting of: a por able computin
  • 15
    ting an electronic vapor device in conjunction with an electronic communication device, wherein: (a) the ele tronic
    • vapor device comprises a vapor de ice proce
    • m 15, further comprising: t ansmitting, via th
      • input/output port, at least a portion of power generated by the electronic communication device power source to the input/output connector in accordance with the at least one power supply regulation control signal; and transmitting, vi
      • the input/output connector, at least a portion of the received power supply to at least one of the vaporizing component, the vaporizing power source, and combinations thereof in accordance with the at least one power supply regulation control signal. 17. The method of cla
    • m 15, further comprising: b sed on the determi
      • d power availability status of the vaporizing power source, generating at least one power storage control signal for controlling provision of at least a portion of a power supply received from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source for storage of at least a portion of the received power supply; transmitting at leas
      • a portion of the received power supply from the electronic communication device power source to the vaporizing power source in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal; and storing, by the
      • porizing power source, at least a portion of the received power supply in accordance with the at least one power storage control signal. 18. The method of cla
    • m 15, wherein the vaporizin power
      • ource is selected from the group of power sources consisting of at leas one of: a ba
    • m 15, wherein the input/out ut conn
      • ctor is selected from the group of connectors consisting of: a Univ rsal Serial B
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Description

BACKGROUND

Consumers utilize electronic vapor cigarettes, pipes, and modified vapor devices to enjoy what is commonly known as “vaping.” Vaping is an increasingly popular market segment, which has been, and continues to, steadily gaining market share over the last several years. Various types of personal vaporizers are known in the art. In general, such vaporizers are characterized by heating a solid to a smoldering point, vaporizing a liquid by heat, or nebulizing a liquid by heat and/or by expansion through a nozzle. Such devices are designed to release aromatic materials in the solid or liquid while avoiding high temperatures of combustion and associated formation of tars, carbon monoxide, or other harmful byproducts. Consumers often carry both an electronic communication device (e.g., a cellular phone) and a vapor device, causing the consumer to manage multiple devices throughout the day. It would be desirable, therefore, to develop new technologies to integrate vapour devices with other electronic devices, such as smartphones.

SUMMARY

It is to be understood that both the following general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive. In an aspect, disclosed is a system, method and device deployment of an electronic vapor device configured to connect by at least one of electronic or wireless connection to at least one other electronic device for the purpose of at least one of sharing data, synchronized symbiotic functionality and simultaneous utilization of devices.

In another aspect, provided is a method comprising receiving, at an electronic vapor device, a command to generate a vapor via an electronic communication device, drawing power from one or more of a first power source located in the electronic communication device or a second power source located in the electronic vapor device, applying the power to heat a vaporizable material to create the vapor, and expelling the vapor through an exhaust port for inhalation by a user.

In another aspect, provided is an apparatus comprising a detachable vaporizer comprising, an air intake, a vapor output, a container for storing a vaporizable material, and a mixing chamber coupled to the air intake for receiving air, the container for receiving the vaporizable material, and a heating element configured for heating the vaporizable material and the received air to generate a heated vapor. The apparatus can further comprise an electronic communication device, coupled to the detachable vaporizer via an input/output port, comprising a user input interface for controlling one or more functions of the detachable vaporizer and a first power source configured to supply power to the heating element.

In another aspect, provided is an apparatus comprising an air intake, a vapor output, a container for storing a vaporizable material, a mixing chamber coupled to the air intake for receiving air, the container for receiving the vaporizable material, and a heating element configured for heating the vaporizable material and the received air to generate a heated vapor, a heating casing enclosing the heating element, a power source configured to supply power to the heating element, a cooling element coupled to the mixing chamber, configured for receiving and cooling the heated vapor and providing the cooled vapor to the vapor output, and an input/output port configured for coupling to an electronic communication device to exchange one or more of power and data.

Additional advantages will be set forth in part in the description which follows or may be learned by practice. The advantages will be realized and attained by means of the elements and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features, nature, and advantages of the present disclosure will become more apparent from the detailed description set forth below when taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which like reference characters are used to identify like elements correspondingly throughout the specification and drawings.

FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of an exemplary electronic vapor device;

FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer;

FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer configured for vaporizing a mixture of vaporizable material;

FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer device configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 5 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 6 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 7 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 8 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer configured for filtering air;

FIG. 9 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 10 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 11 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 12 illustrates another exemplary vaporizer configured for smooth vapor delivery;

FIG. 13 illustrates an interface of an exemplary electronic vapor device;

FIG. 14 illustrates another interface of an exemplary electronic vapor device;

FIG. 15 illustrates several interfaces of an exemplary electronic vapor device;

FIG. 16 illustrates an exemplary operating environment;

FIG. 17 illustrates another exemplary operating environment;

FIG. 18 illustrates an exemplary electronic vaporizer device;

FIG. 19 illustrates an exemplary electronic vaporizer device;

FIG. 20 illustrates an exemplary electronic vaporizer device;

FIG. 21A illustrates another exemplary vapor device;

FIG. 21B illustrates another exemplary vapor device;

FIG. 21C illustrates another exemplary vapor device;

FIG. 21D illustrates an exemplary user interface for a vapor device;

FIG. 22A illustrates another exemplary vapor device;

FIG. 22B illustrates another exemplary vapor device;

FIG. 22C illustrates another exemplary vapor device; and

FIG. 23 illustrates an exemplary method.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before the present methods and systems are disclosed and described, it is to be understood that the methods and systems are not limited to specific methods, specific components, or to particular implementations. It is also to be understood that the terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting.

As used in the specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,”“an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. Ranges may be expressed herein as from “about” one particular value, and/or to “about” another particular value. When such a range is expressed, another embodiment includes from the one particular value and/or to the other particular value. Similarly, when values are expressed as approximations, by use of the antecedent “about,” it will be understood that the particular value forms another embodiment. It will be further understood that the endpoints of each of the ranges are significant both in relation to the other endpoint, and independently of the other endpoint.

“Optional” or “optionally” means that the subsequently described event or circumstance may or may not occur, and that the description includes instances where said event or circumstance occurs and instances where it does not.

Throughout the description and claims of this specification, the word “comprise” and variations of the word, such as “comprising” and “comprises.” means “including but not limited to,” and is not intended to exclude, for example, other components, integers or steps. “Exemplary” means “an example of” and is not intended to convey an indication of a preferred or ideal embodiment. “Such as” is not used in a restrictive sense, but for explanatory purposes.

Disclosed are components that can be used to perform the disclosed methods and systems. These and other components are disclosed herein, and it is understood that when combinations, subsets, interactions, groups, etc. of these components are disclosed that while specific reference of each various individual and collective combinations and permutation of these may not be explicitly disclosed, each is specifically contemplated and described herein, for all methods and systems. This applies to all aspects of this application including, but not limited to, steps in disclosed methods. Thus, if there are a variety of additional steps that can be performed it is understood that each of these additional steps can be performed with any specific embodiment or combination of embodiments of the disclosed methods.

The present methods and systems may be understood more readily by reference to the following detailed description of preferred embodiments and the examples included therein and to the Figures and their previous and following description.

As will be appreciated by one skilled in the art, the methods and systems may take the form of an entirely hardware embodiment, an entirely software embodiment, or an embodiment combining software and hardware aspects. Furthermore, the methods and systems may take the form of a computer program product on a computer-readable storage medium having computer-readable program instructions (e.g., computer software) embodied in the storage medium. More particularly, the present methods and systems may take the form of web-implemented computer software. Any suitable computer-readable storage medium may be utilized including hard disks, CD-ROMs, optical storage devices, or magnetic storage devices.

Embodiments of the methods and systems are described below with reference to block diagrams and flowchart illustrations of methods, systems, apparatuses and computer program products. It will be understood that each block of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, respectively, can be implemented by computer program instructions. These computer program instructions may be loaded onto a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, or other programmable data processing apparatus to produce a machine, such that the instructions which execute on the computer or other programmable data processing apparatus create a means for implementing the functions specified in the flowchart block or blocks.

These computer program instructions may also be stored in a computer-readable memory that can direct a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to function in a particular manner, such that the instructions stored in the computer-readable memory produce an article of manufacture including computer-readable instructions for implementing the function specified in the flowchart block or blocks. The computer program instructions may also be loaded onto a computer or other programmable data processing apparatus to cause a series of operational steps to be performed on the computer or other programmable apparatus to produce a computer-implemented process such that the instructions that execute on the computer or other programmable apparatus provide steps for implementing the functions specified in the flowchart block or blocks.

Accordingly, blocks of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations support combinations of means for performing the specified functions, combinations of steps for performing the specified functions and program instruction means for performing the specified functions. It will also be understood that each block of the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, and combinations of blocks in the block diagrams and flowchart illustrations, can be implemented by special purpose hardware-based computer systems that perform the specified functions or steps, or combinations of special purpose hardware and computer instructions.

Various aspects are now described with reference to the drawings. In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of one or more aspects. It may be evident, however, that the various aspects may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known structures and devices are shown in block diagram form in order to facilitate describing these aspects.

In an aspect, disclosed is an electronic vapor (eVapor) device, which has the ability to work in tandem with an electronic communication device by at least one of design, power and functionality. The eVapor device can be an add-on that fits snugly onto a portable communication device handset or tablet (e.g., a shuttle attachment). The eVapor device may be attached through any electrical connection on the communication device or via a wired, wireless network, RFID, Bluetooth or other communication network.

The eVapor device can be self-powered, can derive power from the communication device or provide the communication device with power. The eVapor device can also be recharged independently or simultaneously, with power first supplying one device, then the other, or with both devices being powered simultaneously, or variations and gradations of the same.

The eVapor device can also contain all or part of the functionality of the handset or tablet device, or those attributes may be shared or completely housed within the communication device. Further, the eVapor device may not be an add-on but rather a continuous device built into the communication device capable of being refilled and recharged without removing the eVapor device. Alternatively, the eVapor device can be disposable and act as a cartridge with somewhere between no smart functionality and a complete suite of smart functionality built into the eVapor device.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary electronic vapor device 100 as described herein. The electronic vapor device 100 can be, for example, an e-cigarette, an e-cigar, an electronic vapor device, a hybrid electronic communication handset coupled/integrated vapor device, a robotic vapor device, a modified vapor device “mod,” a micro-sized electronic vapor device, a robotic vapor device, and the like. The vapor device 100 can comprise any suitable housing for enclosing and protecting the various components disclosed herein. The vapor device 100 can comprise a processor 102. The processor 102 can be, or can comprise, any suitable microprocessor or microcontroller, for example, a low-power application-specific controller (ASIC) and/or a field programmable gate array (FPGA) designed or programmed specifically for the task of controlling a device as described herein, or a general purpose central processing unit (CPU), for example, one based on 80×86 architecture as designed by Intel™ or AMD™, or a system-on-a-chip as designed by ARM™. The processor 102 can be coupled (e.g., communicatively, operatively, etc. . . . ) to auxiliary devices or modules of the vapor device 100 using a bus or other coupling.

The vapor device 100 can comprise a power supply 120 and a power supply 138. The power supply 120 and the power supply 138 can comprise one or more batteries and/or other power storage device (e.g., capacitor) and/or a port for connecting to an external power supply. The one or more batteries can be rechargeable. The one or more batteries can comprise a lithium-ion battery (including thin film lithium ion batteries), a lithium ion polymer battery, a nickel-cadmium battery, a nickel metal hydride battery, a lead-acid battery, combinations thereof, and the like. For example, an external power supply can supply power to the vapor device 100 and a battery can store at least a portion of the supplied power. The one or more batteries can be deployed with a phone and/or an accessory device. In an aspect, the one or more batteries can be utilized to power at least one of the phone and/or the accessory device. In an aspect, the accessory device can be a “shuttle” type device that affixes to the phone to provide functionality, such as vapor functionality, increased battery power functionality, and the like.

In an aspect, the power supply 120 can be configured to supply power exclusively to components that are not directly associated with vaping functionality. For example, the power supply 120 can be configured to exclusively provide power to the processor 102, a memory device 104, a network access device 106, and an input/output 112. Thus, the power supply 120 can be configured to not provide power to a vaporizer 108. In another aspect, the power supply 120 can be configured to supply power to all components of the vapor device 100, including the vaporizer 108.

In another aspect, the power supply 138 can be configured to supply power exclusively to components that are directly associated with vaping functionality. For example, the power supply 138 can be configured to exclusively provide power to the vaporizer 108. Thus, the power supply 138 can be configured to not provide power to the processor 102, the memory device 104, the network access device 106, and the input/output 112. In another aspect, the power supply 138 can be configured to supply power to all components of the vapor device 100. In another aspect, the power supply 138 can serve as a backup power source for the vapor device 100 in the event the power supply 120 fails and/or has insufficient energy to power the vapor device 100.

Any combination of components can be configured to be powered exclusively by either the power supply 120 or the power supply 138. Furthermore, some components may be directly related to vaping functionality in some devices, but not in others (e.g., the processor 102).

In an aspect, the power supply 120 and/or the power supply 138 can be configured to provide power to an electronic communication device, such as a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, and the like.

In an aspect, one or more charging methods can be used to charge the power supply 120 and the power supply 138. For example, wireless charging (e.g., inductive and/or conductive), supplying a constant DC or pulsed DC power source to a battery being charged, a motion-powered charger, a pulse charger, a solar charger, a wind charger, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) charger, combinations thereof, and the like. In a further aspect, the power supply 120 and the power supply 138 can be charged via a hand crank incident to the vapor device 100.

The vapor device 100 can comprise a memory device 104 coupled to the processor 102. The memory device 104 can comprise a random access memory (RAM) configured for storing program instructions and data for execution or processing by the processor 102 during control of the vapor device 100. When the vapor device 100 is powered off or in an inactive state, program instructions and data can be stored in a long-term memory, for example, a non-volatile magnetic optical, or electronic memory storage device (not shown). Either or both of the RAM or the long-term memory can comprise a non-transitory computer-readable medium storing program instructions that, when executed by the processor 102, cause the vapor device 100 to perform all or part of one or more methods and/or operations described herein. Program instructions can be written in any suitable high-level language, for example, C, C++, C# or the Java™, and compiled to produce machine-language code for execution by the processor 102.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a network access device 106 allowing the vapor device 100 to be coupled to one or more ancillary devices (not shown) such as via an access point (not shown) of a wireless telephone network, local area network, or other coupling to a wide area network, for example, the Internet. In that regard, the processor 102 can be configured to share data with the one or more ancillary devices via the network access device 106. The shared data can comprise, for example, usage data and/or operational data of the vapor device 100, a status of the vapor device 100, a status and/or operating condition of one or more the components of the vapor device 100, text to be used in a message, a product order, payment information, and/or any other data. Other shared data can comprise one or more of, type of vaporizable and/or non-vaporizable material used, frequency of usage, location of usage, recommendations, communications (e.g., text messages, advertisements, photo messages), simultaneous use of multiple devices, and the like. Similarly, the processor 102 can be configured to receive control instructions from the one or more ancillary devices via the network access device 106. For example, a configuration of the vapor device 100, an operation of the vapor device 100, and/or other settings of the vapor device 100, can be controlled by the one or more ancillary devices via the network access device 106. For example, an ancillary device can comprise a server that can provide various services and another ancillary device can comprise a smartphone for controlling operation of the vapor device 100. In some aspects, the smartphone or another ancillary device can be used as a primary input/output of the vapor device 100 such that data is received by the vapor device 100 from the server, transmitted to the smartphone, and output on a display of the smartphone. In an aspect, data transmitted to the ancillary device can comprise a mixture of vaporizable material and/or instructions to release vapor. For example, the vapor device 100 can be configured to determine a need for the release of vapor into the atmosphere. The vapor device 100 can provide instructions via the network access device 106 to an ancillary device (e.g., another vapor device) to release vapor into the atmosphere.

In an aspect, data can be shared anonymously. The data can be shared over a transient data session with an ancillary device. The transient data session can comprise a session limit. The session limit can be based on one or more of a number of puffs, a time limit, and a total quantity of vaporizable material. The data can comprise usage data and/or a usage profile.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can also comprise an input/output device 112 coupled to one or more of the processor 102, the vaporizer 108, the network access device 106, and/or any other electronic component of the vapor device 100. Input can be received from a user or another device and/or output can be provided to a user or another device via the input/output device 112. The input/output device 112 can comprise any combinations of input and/or output devices such as buttons, knobs, keyboards, touchscreens, displays, light-emitting elements, a speaker, and/or the like.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise one or more speakers 111. The one or more speakers 111 can be configured to provide audio to a user. In an aspect, the one or more speakers can be configured to provide audio to a single user. For example, the one or more speakers can be comprised in headphones, earphones, earpieces, ear buds, or the like. In an aspect, the one or more speakers 111 can be configured to present a message received via the network access device 106. In an aspect, the message can comprise an audio message in an aspect, the audio message can comprise a voice message, a phone call, a multimedia message with an audio component, or the like. In an aspect, the message can comprise a data stream with an audio component. For example, the message can be from a music streaming service. In an aspect, the message can comprise a text message. In an aspect, the text message can be converted to speech. In an aspect, the one or more speakers 111 can be configured to present media. In an aspect, the media can be stored locally, in the memory device 104. In an aspect, the media can comprise an audio component. For example, the media can be music. In an aspect, the media can be text. In an aspect, the text can be converted to speech.

In an aspect, the input/output device 112 can comprise an interface port (not shown) such as a wired interface, for example a serial port, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) port, an Ethernet port, or other suitable wired connection. The input/output device 112 can comprise a wireless interface (not shown), for example a transceiver using any suitable wireless protocol, for example WiFi (IEEE 802.11), Bluetooth®, infrared, or other wireless standard. For example, the input/output device 112 can communicate with a smartphone via Bluetooth® such that the inputs and outputs of the smartphone can be used by the user to interface with the vapor device 100. In an aspect, the input/output device 112 can comprise a user interface. The user interface user interface can comprise at least one of lighted signal lights, gauges, boxes, forms, check marks, avatars, visual images, graphic designs, lists, active calibrations or calculations, 2D interactive fractal designs, 3D fractal designs, 2D and/or 3D representations of vapor devices and other interface system functions. In an aspect, regardless of whether the vapor device 100 comprises a display, the vapor device 100 can communicate with an authorized electronic device to provide a user interface via the authorized electronic device that controls functionality of the vapor device 100.

In an aspect, the input/output device 112 can be coupled to an adaptor device to receive power and/or send/receive data signals from an electronic device. For example, the input/output device 112 can be configured to receive power from the adaptor device and provide the power to the power supply 120 to recharge one or more batteries. The input/output device 112 can exchange data signals received from the adaptor device with the processor 102 to cause the processor to execute one or more functions.

In an aspect, the input/output device 112 can comprise a touchscreen interface and/or a biometric interface. For example, the input/output device 112 can include controls that allow the user to interact with and input information and commands to the vapor device 100. For example, with respect to the embodiments described herein, the input/output device 112 can comprise a touch screen display. The input/output device 112 can be configured to provide the content of the exemplary screen shots shown herein, which are presented to the user via the functionality of a display. User inputs to the touch screen display are processed by, for example, the input/output device 112 and/or the processor 102. The input/output device 112 can also be configured to process new content and communications to the system 100. The touch screen display can provide controls and menu selections, and process commands and requests. Application and content objects can be provided by the touch screen display. The input/output device 112 and/or the processor 102 can receive and interpret commands and other inputs, interface with the other components of the vapor device 100 as required. In an aspect, the touch screen display can enable a user to lock, unlock, or partially unlock or lock, the vapor device 100. The vapor device 100 can be transitioned from an idle and locked state into an open state by, for example, moving or dragging an icon on the screen of the vapor device 100, entering in a password/passcode, and the like. The input/output device 112 can thus display information to a user such as a puff count, an amount of vaporizable material remaining in the container 110, battery remaining, signal strength, combinations thereof, and the like.

In an aspect, the input/output device 112 can comprise an audio user interface. A microphone can be configured to receive audio signals and relay the audio signals to the input/output device 112. The audio user interface can be any interface that is responsive to voice or other audio commands. The audio user interface can be configured to cause an action, activate a function, etc, by the vapor device 100 (or another device) based on a received voice (or other audio) command. The audio user interface can be deployed directly on the vapor device 100 and/or via other electronic devices (e.g., electronic communication devices such as a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, a dedicated audio user interface device, and the like). The audio user interface can be used to control the functionality of the vapor device 100. Such functionality can comprise, but is not limited to, custom mixing of vaporizable material (e.g., eLiquids) and/or ordering custom made eLiquid combinations via an eCommerce service (e.g., specifications of a user's custom flavor mix can be transmitted to an eCommerce service, so that an eLiquid provider can mix a custom eLiquid cartridge for the user). The user can then reorder the custom flavor mix anytime or even send it to friends as a present, all via the audio user interface. The user can also send via voice command a mixing recipe to other users. The other users can utilize the mixing recipe (e.g., via an electronic vapor device having multiple chambers for eLiquid) to sample the same mix via an auto-order to the other users' devices to create the received mixing recipe. A custom mix can be given a title by a user and/or can be defined by parts (e.g., one part liquid A and two parts liquid B). The audio user interface can also be utilized to create and send a custom message to other users, to join eVapor clubs, to receive eVapor chart information, and to conduct a wide range of social networking, location services and eCommerce activities. The audio user interface can be secured via a password (e.g., audio password) which features at least one of tone recognition, other voice quality recognition and, in one aspect, can utilize at least one special cadence as part of the audio password.

The input/output device 112 can be configured to interface with other devices, for example, exercise equipment, computing equipment, communications devices and/or other vapor devices, for example, via a physical or wireless connection. The input/output device 112 can thus exchange data with the other equipment. A user may sync their vapor device 100 to other devices, via programming attributes such as mutual dynamic link library (DLL) ‘hooks’. This enables a smooth exchange of data between devices, as can a web interface between devices. The input/output device 112 can be used to upload one or more profiles to the other devices. Using exercise equipment as an example, the one or more profiles can comprise data such as workout routine data (e.g., timing, distance, settings, heart rate, etc. . . . ) and vaping data (e.g., eLiquid mixture recipes, supplements, vaping timing, etc. . . . ). Data from usage of previous exercise sessions can be archived and shared with new electronic vapor devices and/or new exercise equipment so that history and preferences may remain continuous and provide for simplified device settings, default settings, and recommended settings based upon the synthesis of current and archival data.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a vaporizer 108. The vaporizer 108 can be coupled to one or more containers 110. Each of the one or more containers 110 can be configured to hold one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. The vaporizer 108 can receive the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials from the one or more containers 110 and heat the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials until the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials achieve a vapor state. In various embodiments, instead of heating the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials, the vaporizer 108 can nebulize or otherwise cause the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials in the one or more containers 110 to reduce in size into particulates. In various embodiments, the one or more containers 110 can comprise a compressed liquid that can be released to the vaporizer 108 via a valve or another mechanism. In various embodiments, the one or more containers 110 can comprise a wick (not shown) through which the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials is drawn to the vaporizer 108. The one or more containers 110 can be made of any suitable structural material, such as, an organic polymer, metal, ceramic, composite, or glass material. In an aspect, the vaporizable material can comprise one or more of, a Propylene Glycol (PG) based liquid, a Vegetable Glycerin (VG) based liquid, a water based liquid, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the vaporizable material can comprise Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), combinations thereof, and the like. In a further aspect, the vaporizable material can comprise an extract from duboisia hopwoodii.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a mixing element 122. The mixing element 122 can be coupled to the processor 102 to receive one or more control signals. The one or more control signals can instruct the mixing element 122 to withdraw specific amounts of fluid from the one or more containers 110. The mixing element can, in response to a control signal from the processor 102, withdraw select quantities of vaporizable material in order to create a customized mixture of different types of vaporizable material. The liquid withdrawn by the mixing element 122 can be provided to the vaporizer 108.

The vapor device 100 may include a plurality of valves, wherein a respective one of the valves is interposed between the vaporizer 108 and a corresponding one of outlet 114 and/or outlet 124 (e.g., one or more inlets of flexible tubes). Each of the valves may control a flow rate through a respective one of the flexible tubes. For example, each of the plurality of valves may include a lumen of adjustable effective diameter for controlling a rate of vapor flow there through. The assembly may include an actuator, for example a motor, configured to independently adjust respective ones of the valves under control of the processor. The actuator may include a handle or the like to permit manual valve adjustment by the user. The motor or actuator can be coupled to a uniform flange or rotating spindle coupled to the valves and configured for controlling the flow of vapor through each of the valves. Each of the valves can be adjusted so that each of the flexible tubes accommodate the same (equal) rate of vapor flow, or different rates of flow. The processor 102 can be configured to determine settings for the respective ones of the valves each based on at least one of: a selected user preference or an amount of suction applied to a corresponding one of the flexible tubes. A user preference can be determined by the processor 102 based on a user input, which can be electrical or mechanical. An electrical input can be provided, for example, by a touchscreen, keypad, switch, or potentiometer (e.g., the input/output 112). A mechanical input can be provided, for example, by applying suction to a mouthpiece of a tube, turning a valve handle, or moving a gate piece.

The vapor device 100 may further include at least one light-emitting element positioned on or near each of the outlet 114 and/or the outlet 124 (e.g., flexible tubes) and configured to illuminate in response to suction applied to the outlet 114 and/or the outlet 124. At least one of an intensity of illumination or a pattern of alternating between an illuminated state and a non-illuminated state can be adjusted based on an amount of suction. One or more of the at least one light-emitting element, or another light-emitting element, may illuminate based on an amount of vaporizable material available. For example, at least one of an intensity of illumination or a pattern of alternating between an illuminated state and a non-illuminated state can be adjusted based on an amount of the vaporizable material within the vapor device 100. In some aspects, the vapor device 100 may include at least two light-emitting elements positioned on each of the outlet 114 and/or the outlet 124. Each of the at least two light-emitting elements may include a first light-emitting element and an outer light-emitting element positioned nearer the end of the outlet 114 and/or the outlet 124 than the first light-emitting element. Illumination of the at least two light-emitting elements may indicate a direction of a flow of vapor.

In an aspect, input from the input/output device 112 can be used by the processor 102 to cause the vaporizer 108 to vaporize the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. For example, a user can depress a button, causing the vaporizer 108 to start vaporizing the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. A user can then draw on an outlet 114 to inhale the vapor. In various aspects, the processor 102 can control vapor production and flow to the outlet 114 based on data detected by a flow sensor 116. For example, as a user draws on the outlet 114, the flow sensor 116 can detect the resultant pressure and provide a signal to the processor 102. In response, the processor 102 can cause the vaporizer 108 to begin vaporizing the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials, terminate vaporizing the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials, and/or otherwise adjust a rate of vaporization of the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. In another aspect, the vapor can exit the vapor device 100 through an outlet 124. The outlet 124 differs from the outlet 114 in that the outlet 124 can be configured to distribute the vapor into the local atmosphere, rather than being inhaled by a user. In an aspect, vapor exiting the outlet 124 can be at least one of aromatic, medicinal, recreational, and/or wellness related. In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise any number of outlets. In an aspect, the outlet 114 and/or the outlet 124 can comprise at least one flexible tube. For example, a lumen of the at least one flexible tube can be in fluid communication with one or more components (e.g., a first container) of the vapor device 100 to provide vapor to a user. In more detailed aspects, the at least one flexible tube may include at least two flexible tubes. Accordingly, the vapor device 100 may further include a second container configured to receive a second vaporizable material such that a first flexible tube can receive vapor from the first vaporizable material and a second flexible tube receive vapor from the second vaporizable material. For example, the at least two flexible tubes can be in fluid communication with the first container and with second container. The vapor device 100 may include an electrical or mechanical sensor configured to sense a pressure level, and therefore suction, in an interior of the flexible tube. Application of suction may activate the vapor device 100 and cause vapor to flow.

In another aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a piezoelectric dispersing element. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can be charged by a battery, and can be driven by a processor on a circuit board. The circuit board can be produced using a polyimide such as Kapton, or other suitable material. The piezoelectric dispersing element can comprise a thin metal disc which causes dispersion of the fluid fed into the dispersing element via the wick or other soaked piece of organic material through vibration. Once in contact with the piezoelectric dispersing element, the vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be vaporized (e.g., turned into vapor or mist) and the vapor can be dispersed via a system pump and/or a sucking action of the user. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can cause dispersion of the vaporizable material by producing ultrasonic vibrations. An electric field applied to a piezoelectric material within the piezoelectric element can cause ultrasonic expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric material, resulting in ultrasonic vibrations to the disc. The ultrasonic vibrations can cause the vaporizable material to disperse, thus forming a vapor or mist from the vaporizable material.

In some aspects, the connection between a power supply and the piezoelectric dispersing element can be facilitated using one or more conductive coils. The conductive coils can provide an ultrasonic power input to the piezoelectric dispersing element. For example, the signal carried by the coil can have a frequency of approximately 107.8 kHz. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can comprise a piezoelectric dispersing element that can receive the ultrasonic signal transmitted from the power supply through the coils, and can cause vaporization of the vaporizable liquid by producing ultrasonic vibrations. An ultrasonic electric field applied to a piezoelectric material within the piezoelectric element causes ultrasonic expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric material, resulting in ultrasonic vibrations according to the frequency of the signal. The vaporizable liquid can be vibrated by the ultrasonic energy produced by the piezoelectric dispersing element, thus causing dispersal and/or atomization of the liquid. In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can be configured to permit a user to select between using a heating element of the vaporizer 108 or the piezoelectric dispersing element. In another aspect, the vapor device 100 can be configured to permit a user to utilize both a heating element of the vaporizer 108 and the piezoelectric dispersing element.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a heating casing 126. The heating casing 126 can enclose one or more of the container 110, the vaporizer 108, and/or the outlet 114. In a further aspect, the heating casing 126 can enclose one or more components that make up the container 110, the vaporizer 108, and/or the outlet 114. The heating casing 126 can be made of ceramic, metal, and/or porcelain. The heating casing 126 can have varying thickness. In an aspect, the heating casing 126 can be coupled to the power supply 120 and/or the power supply 138 to receive power to heat the heating casing 126. In another aspect, the heating casing 126 can be coupled to the vaporizer 108 to heat the heating casing 126. In another aspect, the heating casing 126 can serve an insulation role.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a filtration element 128. The filtration element 128 can be configured to remove (e.g., filter, purify, etc) contaminants from air entering the vapor device 100. The filtration element 128 can optionally comprise a fan 130 to assist in delivering air to the filtration element 128. The vapor device 100 can be configured to intake air into the filtration element 128, filter the air, and pass the filtered air to the vaporizer 108 for use in vaporizing the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. In another aspect, the vapor device 100 can be configured to intake air into the filtration element 128, filter the air, and bypass the vaporizer 108 by passing the filtered air directly to the outlet 114 for inhalation by a user.

In an aspect, the filtration element 128 can comprise cotton, polymer, wool, satin, meta materials and the like. The filtration element 128 can comprise a filter material that at least one airborne particle and/or undesired gas by a mechanical mechanism, an electrical mechanism, and/or a chemical mechanism. The filter material can comprise one or more pieces of a filter fabric that can filter out one or more airborne particles and/or gasses. The filter fabric can be a woven and/or non-woven material. The filter fabric can be made from natural fibers (e.g., cotton, wool, etc.) and/or from synthetic fibers (e.g., polyester, nylon, polypropylene, etc.). The thickness of the filter fabric can be varied depending on the desired filter efficiencies and/or the region of the apparel where the filter fabric is to be used. The filter fabric can be designed to filter airborne particles and/or gasses by mechanical mechanisms (e.g., weave density), by electrical mechanisms (e.g., charged fibers, charged metals, etc.), and/or by chemical mechanisms (e.g., absorptive charcoal particles, adsorptive materials, etc.). In as aspect, the filter material can comprise electrically charged fibers such as, but not limited to, FILTRETE by 3M. In another aspect, the filter material can comprise a high density material similar to material used for medical masks which are used by medical personnel in doctors' offices, hospitals, and the like. In an aspect, the filter material can be treated with an anti-bacterial solution and/or otherwise made from anti-bacterial materials. In another aspect, the filtration element 128 can comprise electrostatic plates, ultraviolet light, a HEPA filter, combinations thereof, and the like.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a cooling element 132. The cooling element 132 can be configured to cool vapor exiting the vaporizer 108 prior to passing through the outlet 114. The cooling element 132 can cool vapor by utilizing air or space within the vapor device 100. The air used by the cooling element 132 can be either static (existing in the vapor device 100) or drawn into an intake and through the cooling element 132 and the vapor device 100. The intake can comprise various pumping, pressure, fan, or other intake systems for drawing air into the cooling element 132. In an aspect, the cooling element 132 can reside separately or can be integrated the vaporizer 108. The cooling element 132 can be a single cooled electronic element within a tube or space and/or the cooling element 132 can be configured as a series of coils or as a grid like structure. The materials for the cooling element 132 can be metal, liquid, polymer, natural substance, synthetic substance, air, or any combination thereof. The cooling element 132 can be powered by the power supply 120, the power supply 138, by a separate battery (not shown), or other power source (not shown) including the use of excess heat energy created by the vaporizer 108 being converted to energy used for cooling by virtue of a small turbine or pressure system to convert the energy. Heat differentials between the vaporizer 108 and the cooling element 132 can also be converted to energy utilizing commonly known geothermal energy principles.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a magnetic element 134. For example, the magnetic element 134 can comprise an electromagnet, a ceramic magnet, a ferrite magnet, and/or the like. The magnetic element 134 can be configured to apply a magnetic field to air as it is brought into the vapor device 100, in the vaporizer 108, and/or as vapor exits the outlet 114.

The input/output device 112 can be used to select whether vapor exiting the outlet 114 should be cooled or not cooled and/or heated or not heated and/or magnetized or not magnetized. For example, a user can use the input/output device 112 to selectively cool vapor at times and not cool vapor at other times. The user can use the input/output device 112 to selectively heat vapor at times and not heat vapor at other times. The user can use the input/output device 112 to selectively magnetize vapor at times and not magnetize vapor at other times. The user can further use the input/output device 112 to select a desired smoothness, temperature, and/or range of temperatures. The user can adjust the temperature of the vapor by selecting or clicking on a clickable setting on a part of the vapor device 100. The user can use, for example, a graphical user interface (GUI) or a mechanical input enabled by virtue of clicking a rotational mechanism at either end of the vapor device 100.

In an aspect, cooling control can be set within the vapor device 100 settings via the processor 102 and system software (e.g., dynamic linked libraries). The memory 104 can store settings. Suggestions and remote settings can be communicated to and/or from the vapor device 100 via the input/output device 112 and/or the network access device 106. Cooling of the vapor can be set and calibrated between heating and cooling mechanisms to what is deemed an ideal temperature by the manufacturer of the vapor device 100 for the vaporizable material. For example, a temperature can be set such that resultant vapor delivers the coolest feeling to the average user but does not present any health risk to the user by virtue of the vapor being too cold, including the potential for rapid expansion of cooled vapor within the lungs and the damaging of tissue by vapor which has been cooled to a temperature which may cause frostbite like symptoms.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can be configured to receive air, smoke, vapor or other material and analyze the contents of the air, smoke, vapor or other material using one or more sensors 136 in order to at least one of analyze, classify, compare, validate, refute, and/or catalogue the same. A result of the analysis can be, for example, an identification of at least one of medical, recreational, homeopathic, olfactory elements, spices, other cooking ingredients, ingredients analysis from food products, fuel analysis, pharmaceutical analysis, genetic modification testing analysis, dating, fossil and/or relic analysis and the like. The vapor device 100 can pass utilize, for example, mass spectrometry, PH testing, genetic testing, particle and/or cellular testing, sensor based testing and other diagnostic and wellness testing either via locally available components or by transmitting data to a remote system for analysis.

In an aspect, a user can create a custom scent by using the vapor device 100 to intake air elements, where the vapor device 100 (or third-party networked device) analyzes the olfactory elements and/or biological elements within the sample and then formulates a replica scent within the vapor device 100 (or third-party networked device) that can be accessed by the user instantly, at a later date, with the ability to purchase this custom scent from a networked ecommerce portal.

The vapor device 100 can comprise an intake. The intake can be receptacle for receiving air from an area surrounding the intake. In another aspect, the intake can be a receptacle for receiving at least a portion of a detachable vaporizer. In an aspect, the intake can form an airtight seal with a detachable vaporizer. In another aspect, the intake can form a non-airtight seal with a detachable vaporizer. The vapor device 100 can comprise a pump (or other similar suction mechanism) coupled to the intake. The pump can be configured to draw air from an area surrounding the intake. In an aspect, one or more fan 130 can be configured to assist the pump in drawing air into the vapor device 100.

Air drawn in by the pump through the intake 138 can be passed to an analysis chamber. The analysis chamber can be a receptacle within the vapor device 100 configured for holding the drawn air and for exposing the air to one or more sensors 136 in order to at least one of analyze, classify, compare, validate, refute, and/or catalogue the same. A result of the analysis can be, for example, a performance indicator for a detachable vaporizer (any measure indicative of whether a detachable vaporizer is performing as expected), an identification of at least one of medical, recreational, homeopathic, olfactory elements, spices, other cooking ingredients, ingredients analysis from food products, fuel analysis, pharmaceutical analysis, and the like. The vapor device 100 can utilize, for example, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, PH testing, particle and/or cellular testing, sensor based testing and other diagnostic and wellness testing either via locally available components or by transmitting data to a remote system for analysis. The mass spectrometry and/or gas chromatography systems disclosed herein can be implemented in a compact form factor, as is known in the art. Mass spectrometry is an analytical chemistry technique that identifies an amount and type of chemicals present in a sample by measuring the mass-to-charge ratio and abundance of gas-phase ions. A mass spectrum (plural spectra) is a plot of the ion signal as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The spectra are used to determine the elemental or isotopic signature of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.

In a typical mass spectrometry procedure, a sample of the drawn air, is ionized, for example by bombarding the air/vapor with electrons. This can cause some of the sample's molecules to break into charged fragments. These ions are then separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio, typically by accelerating them and subjecting them to an electric or magnetic field: ions of the same mass-to-charge ratio will undergo the same amount of deflection. The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles, such as an electron multiplier. Results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of detected ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules in the sample can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses stored on the memory device 104 or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. Thus, a composition of the drawn air can be determined.

In another aspect, nanosensor technology using nanostructures: single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), combined with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining process can be used. This technology provides a sensor array that can accommodate different nanostructures for specific applications with the advantages of high sensitivity, low power consumption, compactness, high yield and low cost. This platform provides an array of sensing elements for chemical detection. Each sensor in the array can comprise a nanostructure—chosen from many different categories of sensing material—and an interdigitated electrode (IDE) as a transducer. It is one type of electrochemical sensor that implies the transfer of charge from one electrode to another. This means that at least two electrodes constitute an electrochemical cell to form a closed electrical circuit. Due to the interaction between nanotube devices and gas molecules, the electron configuration is changed in the nanostructured sensing device, therefore, the changes in the electronic signal such as current or voltage were observed before and during the exposure of gas species (such as NO 2, NH 3, etc.). By measuring the conductivity change of the CNT device, the concentration of the chemical species, such as gas molecules in the air/vapor drawn from the vapor device 100, can be measured.

In another aspect, the one or more sensors 136 can be configured to sense negative environmental conditions (e.g., adverse weather, smoke, fire, chemicals (e.g., such as CO2 or formaldehyde), adverse pollution, and/or disease outbreaks, and the like). The one or more sensors 136 can comprise one or more of, a biochemical/chemical sensor, a thermal sensor, a radiation sensor, a mechanical sensor, an optical sensor, a mechanical sensor, a magnetic sensor, an electrical sensor, combinations thereof and the like. The biochemical/chemical sensor can be configured to detect one or more biochemical/chemicals causing a negative environmental condition such as, but not limited to, smoke, a vapor, a gas, a liquid, a solid, an odor, combinations thereof, and/or the like. The biochemical/chemical sensor can comprise one or more of a mass spectrometer, a conducting/nonconducting regions sensor, a SAW sensor, a quartz microbalance sensor, a conductive composite sensor, a chemiresitor, a metal oxide gas sensor, an organic gas sensor, a MOSFET, a piezoelectric device, an infrared sensor, a sintered metal oxide sensor, a Pd-gate MOSFET, a metal FET structure, a electrochemical cell, a conducting polymer sensor, a catalytic gas sensor, an organic semiconducting gas sensor, a solid electrolyte gas sensors, a piezoelectric quartz crystal sensor, and/or combinations thereof.

A semiconductor sensor can be configured to detect gases by a chemical reaction that takes place when the gas comes in direct contact with the sensor. Tin dioxide is the most common material used in semiconductor sensors, and the electrical resistance in the sensor is decreased when it comes in contact with the monitored gas. The resistance of the tin dioxide is typically around 50 kΩ in air but can drop to around 3.5 kΩ in the presence of 1% methane. This change in resistance is used to calculate the gas concentration. Semiconductor sensors can be commonly used to detect hydrogen, oxygen, alcohol vapor, and harmful gases such as carbon monoxide. A semiconductor sensors can be used as a carbon monoxide sensors. A semiconductor sensor can be used as a breathalyzers. Because the sensor must come in contact with the gas to detect it, semiconductor sensors work over a smaller distance than infrared point or ultrasonic detectors.

The thermal sensor can be configured to detect temperature, heat, heat flow, entropy, heat capacity, combinations thereof, and the like. Exemplary thermal sensors include, but are not limited to, thermocouples, such as a semiconducting thermocouples, noise thermometry, thermoswitches, thermistors, metal thermoresistors, semiconducting thermoresistors, thermodiodes, thermotransistors, calorimeters, thermometers, indicators, and fiber optics.

The radiation sensor can be configured to detect gamma rays, X-rays, ultra-violet rays, visible, infrared, microwaves and radio waves. Exemplary radiation sensors include, but are not limited to, nuclear radiation microsensors, such as scintillation counters and solid state detectors, ultra-violet, visible and near infrared radiation microsensors, such as photoconductive cells, photodiodes, phototransistors, infrared radiation microsensors, such as photoconductive IR sensors and pyroelectric sensors.

The optical sensor can be configured to detect visible, near infrared, and infrared waves. The mechanical sensor can be configured to detect displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, torque, pressure, mass, flow, acoustic wavelength, and amplitude. Exemplary mechanical sensors include, but are not limited to, displacement microsensors, capacitive and inductive displacement sensors, optical displacement sensors, ultrasonic displacement sensors, pyroelectric, velocity and flow microsensors, transistor flow microsensors, acceleration microsensors, piezoresistive microaccelerometers, force, pressure and strain microsensors, and piezoelectric crystal sensors. The magnetic sensor can be configured to detect magnetic field, flux, magnetic moment, magnetization, and magnetic permeability. The electrical sensor can be configured to detect charge, current, voltage, resistance, conductance, capacitance, inductance, dielectric permittivity, polarization and frequency.

Upon sensing a negative environmental condition, the one or more sensors 122 can provide data to the processor 102 to determine the nature of the negative environmental condition and to generate/transmit one or more alerts based on the negative environmental condition. The one or more alerts can be deployed to the vapor device 100 user's wireless device and/or synced accounts. For example, the network device access device 106 can be used to transmit the one or more alerts directly (e.g., via Bluetooth®) to a user's smartphone to provide information to the user. In another aspect, the network access device 106 can be used to transmit sensed information and/or the one or more alerts to a remote server for use in syncing one or more other devices used by the user (e.g., other vapor devices, other electronic devices (smartphones, tablets, laptops, etc. . . . ). In another aspect, the one or more alerts can be provided to the user of the vapor device 100 via vibrations, audio, colors, and the like deployed from the mask, for example through the input/output device 112. For example, the input/output device 112 can comprise a small vibrating motor to alert the user to one or more sensed conditions via tactile sensation. In another example, the input/output device 112 can comprise one or more LED's of various colors to provide visual information to the user. In another example, the input/output device 112 can comprise one or more speakers that can provide audio information to the user. For example, various patterns of beeps, sounds, and/or voice recordings can be utilized to provide the audio information to the user. In another example, the input/output device 112 can comprise an LCD screen/touchscreen that provides a summary and/or detailed information regarding the negative environmental condition and/or the one or more alerts.

In another aspect, upon sensing a negative environmental condition, the one or more sensors 136 can provide data to the processor 102 to determine the nature of the negative environmental condition and to provide a recommendation for mitigating and/or to actively mitigate the negative environmental condition. Mitigating the negative environmental conditions can comprise, for example, applying a filtration system, a fan, a fire suppression system, engaging a HVAC system, and/or one or more vaporizable and/or non-vaporizable materials. The processor 102 can access a database stored in the memory device 104 to make such a determination or the network device 106 can be used to request information from a server to verify the sensor findings. In an aspect, the server can provide an analysis service to the vapor device 100. For example, the server can analyze data sent by the vapor device 100 based on a reading from the one or more sensors 136. The server can determine and transmit one or more recommendations to the vapor device 100 to mitigate the sensed negative environmental condition. The vapor device 100 can use the one or more recommendations to activate a filtration system, a fan, a fire suppression system engaging a HVAC system, and/or to vaporize one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials to assist in countering effects from the negative environmental condition.

In an aspect, the vapor device 100 can comprise a global positioning system (GPS) unit 118. The GPS 118 can detect a current location of the device 100. In some aspects, a user can request access to one or more services that rely on a current location of the user. For example, the processor 102 can receive location data from the GPS 118, convert it to usable data, and transmit the usable data to the one or more services via the network access device 106. GPS unit 118 can receive position information from a constellation of satellites operated by the U.S. Department of Defense. Alternately, the GPS unit 118 can be a GLONASS receiver operated by the Russian Federation Ministry of Defense, or any other positioning device capable of providing accurate location information (for example, LORAN, inertial navigation, and the like). The GPS unit 118 can contain additional logic, either software, hardware or both to receive the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) signals, operated by the Federal Aviation Administration, to correct dithering errors and provide the most accurate location possible. Overall accuracy of the positioning equipment subsystem containing WAAS is generally in the two meter range.

FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer 200. The vaporizer 200 can be, for example, an e-cigarette, an e-cigar, an electronic vapor device, a hybrid electronic communication handset coupled/integrated vapor device, a robotic vapor device, a modified vapor device “mod,” a micro-sized electronic vapor device, a robotic vapor device, and the like. The vaporizer 200 can be used internally of the vapor device 100 or can be a separate device. For example, the vaporizer 200 can be used in place of the vaporizer 108.

The vaporizer 200 can comprise or be coupled to one or more containers 202 containing a vaporizable material, for example a fluid. For example, coupling between the vaporizer 200 and the one or more containers 202 can be via a wick 204, via a valve, or by some other structure. Coupling can operate independently of gravity, such as by capillary action or pressure drop through a valve. The vaporizer 200 can be configured to vaporize the vaporizable material from the one or more containers 202 at controlled rates in response to mechanical input from a component of the vapor device 100, and/or in response to control signals from the processor 102 or another component. Vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be supplied by one or more replaceable cartridges 206. In an aspect the vaporizable material can comprise aromatic elements. In an aspect, the aromatic elements can be medicinal, recreational, and/or wellness related. The aromatic element can include, but is not limited to, at least one of lavender or other floral aromatic eLiquids, mint, menthol, herbal soil or geologic, plant based, name brand perfumes, custom mixed perfume formulated inside the vapor device 100 and aromas constructed to replicate the smell of different geographic places, conditions, and/or occurrences. For example, the smell of places may include specific or general sports venues, well known travel destinations, the mix of one's own personal space or home. The smell of conditions may include, for example, the smell of a pet, a baby, a season, a general environment (e.g., a forest), a new car, a sexual nature (e.g., musk, pheromones, etc. . . . ). The one or more replaceable cartridges 206 can contain the vaporizable material. If the vaporizable material is liquid, the cartridge can comprise the wick 204 to aid in transporting the liquid to a mixing chamber 208. In the alternative, some other transport mode can be used. Each of the one or more replaceable cartridges 206 can be configured to fit inside and engage removably with a receptacle (such as the container 202 and/or a secondary container) of the vapor device 100. In an alternative, or in addition, one or more fluid containers 210 can be fixed in the vapor device 100 and configured to be refillable. In an aspect, one or more materials can be vaporized at a single time by the vaporizer 200. For example, some material can be vaporized and drawn through an exhaust port 212 and/or some material can be vaporized and exhausted via a smoke simulator outlet (not shown).

The mixing chamber 208 can also receive an amount of one or more compounds (e.g., vaporizable material) to be vaporized. For example, the processor 102 can determine a first amount of a first compound and determine a second amount of a second compound. The processor 102 can cause the withdrawal of the first amount of the first compound from a first container into the mixing chamber and the second amount of the second compound from a second container into the mixing chamber. The processor 102 can also determine a target dose of the first compound, determine a vaporization ratio of the first compound and the second compound based on the target dose, determine the first amount of the first compound based on the vaporization ratio, determine the second amount of the second compound based on the vaporization ratio, and cause the withdrawal of the first amount of the first compound into the mixing chamber, and the withdrawal of the second amount of the second compound into the mixing chamber.

The processor 102 can also determine a target dose of the first compound, determine a vaporization ratio of the first compound and the second compound based on the target dose, determine the first amount of the first compound based on the vaporization ratio, and determine the second amount of the second compound based on the vaporization ratio. After expelling the vapor through an exhaust port for inhalation by a user, the processor 102 can determine that a cumulative dose is approaching the target dose and reduce the vaporization ratio. In an aspect, one or more of the vaporization ratio, the target dose, and/or the cumulative dose can be determined remotely and transmitted to the vapor device 100 for use.

In operation, a heating element 214 can vaporize or nebulize the vaporizable material in the mixing chamber 208, producing an inhalable vapor/mist that can be expelled via the exhaust port 212. In an aspect, the heating element 214 can comprise a heater coupled to the wick (or a heated wick) 204 operatively coupled to (for example, in fluid communication with) the mixing chamber 210. The heating element 214 can comprise a nickel-chromium wire or the like, with a temperature sensor (not shown) such as a thermistor or thermocouple. Within definable limits, by controlling power to the wick 204, a rate of vaporization can be independently controlled. A multiplexer 216 can receive power from any suitable source and exchange data signals with a processor, for example, the processor 102 of the vapor device 100, for control of the vaporizer 200. At a minimum, control can be provided between no power (off state) and one or more powered states. Other control mechanisms can also be suitable.

In another aspect, the vaporizer 200 can comprise a piezoelectric dispersing element. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can be charged by a battery, and can be driven by a processor on a circuit board. The circuit board can be produced using a polyimide such as Kapton, or other suitable material. The piezoelectric dispersing element can comprise a thin metal disc which causes dispersion of the fluid fed into the dispersing element via the wick or other soaked piece of organic material through vibration. Once in contact with the piezoelectric dispersing element, the vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be vaporized (e.g., turned into vapor or mist) and the vapor can be dispersed via a system pump and/or a sucking action of the user. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can cause dispersion of the vaporizable material by producing ultrasonic vibrations. An electric field applied to a piezoelectric material within the piezoelectric element can cause ultrasonic expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric material, resulting in ultrasonic vibrations to the disc. The ultrasonic vibrations can cause the vaporizable material to disperse, thus forming a vapor or mist from the vaporizable material.

In an aspect, the vaporizer 200 can be configured to permit a user to select between using the heating element 214 or the piezoelectric dispersing element. In another aspect, the vaporizer 200 can be configured to permit a user to utilize both the heating element 214 and the piezoelectric dispersing element.

In some aspects, the connection between a power supply and the piezoelectric dispersing element can be facilitated using one or more conductive coils. The conductive coils can provide an ultrasonic power input to the piezoelectric dispersing element. For example, the signal carried by the coil can have a frequency of approximately 107.8 kHz. In some aspects, the piezoelectric dispersing element can comprise a piezoelectric dispersing element that can receive the ultrasonic signal transmitted from the power supply through the coils, and can cause vaporization of the vaporizable liquid by producing ultrasonic vibrations. An ultrasonic electric field applied to a piezoelectric material within the piezoelectric element causes ultrasonic expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric material, resulting in ultrasonic vibrations according to the frequency of the signal. The vaporizable liquid can be vibrated by the ultrasonic energy produced by the piezoelectric dispersing element, thus causing dispersal and/or atomization of the liquid.

In an aspect, a single housing can comprise the vaporizer 200 and one or more speakers 111. For example, a headphone housing can comprise the vaporizer 200 and the one or more speakers 111. In an aspect, one or more of the vaporizer 200 and the one or more speakers 111 can be integrated into the housing. In an aspect, the housing can comprise a compartment wherein the vaporizer 200 and/or accessories for the vaporizer 200 can be easily stored and removed. For example, accessories for the vaporizer 200 can comprise vaporizable liquid. In an aspect, the housing can comprise a compartment wherein the one or more speakers 111 and/or accessories for the one or more speakers 111 can be easily stored and removed. For example, accessories for the one or more speakers 111 can include a media source, such as a smartphone.

FIG. 3 illustrates a vaporizer 300 that comprises the elements of the vaporizer 200 with two containers 202a and 202b containing a vaporizable material, for example a fluid or a solid. In an aspect, the fluid can be the same fluid in both containers or the fluid can be different in each container. In an aspect the fluid can comprise aromatic elements. The aromatic element can include, but is not limited to, at least one of lavender or other floral aromatic eLiquids, mint, menthol, herbal soil or geologic, plant based, name brand perfumes, custom mixed perfume formulated inside the vapor device 100 and aromas constructed to replicate the smell of different geographic places, conditions, and/or occurrences. For example, the smell of places may include specific or general sports venues, well known travel destinations, the mix of one's own personal space or home. The smell of conditions may include, for example, the smell of a pet, a baby, a season, a general environment (e.g., a forest), a new car, a sexual nature (e.g., musk, pheromones, etc. . . . ). Coupling between the vaporizer 200 and the container 202a and the container 202b can be via a wick 204a and a wick 204b, respectively, via a valve, or by some other structure. Coupling can operate independently of gravity, such as by capillary action or pressure drop through a valve. The vaporizer 300 can be configured to mix in varying proportions the fluids contained in the container 202a and the container 202b and vaporize the mixture at controlled rates in response to mechanical input from a component of the vapor device 100, and/or in response to control signals from the processor 102 or another component. For example, based on a vaporization ratio. In an aspect, a mixing element 302 can be coupled to the container 202a and the container 202b. The mixing element can, in response to a control signal from the processor 102, withdraw select quantities of vaporizable material in order to create a customized mixture of different types of vaporizable material. Vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be supplied by one or more replaceable cartridges 206a and 206b. The one or more replaceable cartridges 206a and 206b can contain a vaporizable material. If the vaporizable material is liquid, the cartridge can comprise the wick 204a or 204b to aid in transporting the liquid to a mixing chamber 208. In the alternative, some other transport mode can be used. Each of the one or more replaceable cartridges 206a and 206b can be configured to fit inside and engage removably with a receptacle (such as the container 202a or the container 202b and/or a secondary container) of the vapor device 100. In an alternative, or in addition, one or more fluid containers 210a and 210b can be fixed in the vapor device 100 and configured to be refillable. In an aspect, one or more materials can be vaporized at a single time by the vaporizer 300. For example, some material can be vaporized and drawn through an exhaust port 212 and/or some material can be vaporized and exhausted via a smoke simulator outlet (not shown).

FIG. 4 illustrates a vaporizer 200 that comprises the elements of the vaporizer 200 with a heating casing 402. The heating casing 402 can enclose the heating element 214 or can be adjacent to the heating element 214. The heating casing 402 is illustrated with dashed lines, indicating components contained therein. The heating casing 402 can be made of ceramic, metal, and/or porcelain. The heating casing 402 can have varying thickness. In an aspect, the heating casing 402 can be coupled to the multiplexer 216 to receive power to heat the heating casing 402. In another aspect, the heating casing 402 can be coupled to the heating element 214 to heat the heating casing 402. In another aspect, the heating casing 402 can serve an insulation role.

FIG. 5 illustrates the vaporizer 200 of FIG. 2 and FIG. 4, but illustrates the heating casing 402 with solid lines, indicating components contained therein. Other placements of the heating casing 402 are contemplated. For example, the heating casing 402 can be placed after the heating element 214 and/or the mixing chamber 208.

FIG. 6 illustrates a vaporizer 600 that comprises the elements of the vaporizer 200 of FIG. 2 and FIG. 4, with the addition of a cooling element 602. The vaporizer 600 can optionally comprise the heating casing 402. The cooling element 602 can comprise one or more of a powered cooling element, a cooling air system, and/or or a cooling fluid system. The cooling element 602 can be self-powered, co-powered, or directly powered by a battery and/or charging system within the vapor device 100 (e.g., the power supply 120). In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can comprise an electrically connected conductive coil, grating, and/or other design to efficiently distribute cooling to the at least one of the vaporized and/or non-vaporized air. For example, the cooling element 602 can be configured to cool air as it is brought into the vaporizer 600/mixing chamber 208 and/or to cool vapor after it exits the mixing chamber 208. The cooling element 602 can be deployed such that the cooling element 602 is surrounded by the heated casing 402 and/or the heating element 214. In another aspect, the heated casing 402 and/or the heating element 214 can be surrounded by the cooling element 602. The cooling element 602 can utilize at least one of cooled air, cooled liquid, and/or cooled matter.

In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can be a coil of any suitable length and can reside proximate to the inhalation point of the vapor (e.g., the exhaust port 212). The temperature of the air is reduced as it travels through the cooling element 602. In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can comprise any structure that accomplishes a cooling effect. For example, the cooling element 602 can be replaced with a screen with a mesh or grid-like structure, a conical structure, and/or a series of cooling airlocks, either stationary or opening, in a periscopic/telescopic manner. The cooling element 602 can be any shape and/or can take multiple forms capable of cooling heated air, which passes through its space.

In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can be any suitable cooling system for use in a vapor device. For example, a fan, a heat sink, a liquid cooling system, a chemical cooling system, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can comprise a liquid cooling system whereby a fluid (e.g., water) passes through pipes in the vaporizer 600. As this fluid passes around the cooling element 602, the fluid absorbs heat, cooling air in the cooling element 602. After the fluid absorbs the heat, the fluid can pass through a heat exchanger which transfers the heat from the fluid to air blowing through the heat exchanger. By way of further example, the cooling element 602 can comprise a chemical cooling system that utilizes an endothermic reaction. An example of an endothermic reaction is dissolving ammonium nitrate in water. Such endothermic process is used in instant cold packs. These cold packs have a strong outer plastic layer that holds a bag of water and a chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that result in an endothermic reaction when dissolved in water. When the cold pack is squeezed, the inner bag of water breaks and the water mixes with the chemicals. The cold pack starts to cool as soon as the inner bag is broken, and stays cold for over an hour. Many instant cold packs contain ammonium nitrate. When ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water, it splits into positive ammonium ions and negative nitrate ions. In the process of dissolving, the water molecules contribute energy, and as a result, the water cools down. Thus, the vaporizer 600 can comprise a chamber for receiving the cooling element 602 in the form of a “cold pack.” The cold pack can be activated prior to insertion into the vaporizer 600 or can be activated after insertion through use of a button/switch and the like to mechanically activate the cold pack inside the vaporizer 400.

In an aspect, the cooling element 602 can be selectively moved within the vaporizer 600 to control the temperature of the air mixing with vapor. For example, the cooling element 602 can be moved closer to the exhaust port 212 or further from the exhaust port 212 to regulate temperature. In another aspect, insulation can be incorporated as needed to maintain the integrity of heating and cooling, as well as absorbing any unwanted condensation due to internal or external conditions, or a combination thereof. The insulation can also be selectively moved within the vaporizer 600 to control the temperature of the air mixing with vapor. For example, the insulation can be moved to cover a portion, none, or all of the cooling element 602 to regulate temperature.

FIG. 7 illustrates a vaporizer 700 that comprises elements in common with the vaporizer 200. The vaporizer 700 can optionally comprise the heating casing 402 (not shown) and/or the cooling element 602 (not shown). The vaporizer 700 can comprise a magnetic element 702. The magnetic element 702 can apply a magnetic field to vapor after exiting the mixing chamber 208. The magnetic field can cause positively and negatively charged particles in the vapor to curve in opposite directions, according to the Lorentz force law with two particles of opposite charge. The magnetic field can be created by at least one of an electric current generating a charge or a pre-charged magnetic material deployed within the vapor device 100. In an aspect, the magnetic element 702 can be built into the mixing chamber 208, the cooling element 602, the heating casing 402, or can be a separate magnetic element 702.

FIG. 8 illustrates a vaporizer 800 that comprises elements in common with the vaporizer 200. In an aspect, the vaporizer 800 can comprise a filtration element 802. The filtration element 802 can be configured to remove (e.g., filter, purify, etc) contaminants from air entering the vaporizer 800. The filtration element 802 can optionally comprise a fan 804 to assist in delivering air to the filtration element 802. The vaporizer 800 can be configured to intake air into the filtration element 802, filter the air, and pass the filtered air to the mixing chamber 208 for use in vaporizing the one or more vaporizable or non-vaporizable materials. In another aspect, the vaporizer 800 can be configured to intake air into the filtration element 802, filter the air, and bypass the mixing chamber 208 by engaging a door 806 and a door 808 to pass the filtered air directly to the exhaust port 212 for inhalation by a user. In an aspect, filtered air that bypasses the mixing chamber 208 by engaging the door 806 and the door 808 can pass through a second filtration element 810 to further remove (e.g., filter, purify, etc) contaminants from air entering the vaporizer 800. In an aspect, the vaporizer 800 can be configured to deploy and/or mix a proper/safe amount of oxygen which can be delivered either via the one or more replaceable cartridges 206 or via air pumped into a mask from external air and filtered through the filtration element 802 and/or the filtration element 810.

In an aspect, the filtration element 802 and/or the filtration element 810 can comprise cotton, polymer, wool, satin, meta materials and the like. The filtration element 802 and/or the filtration element 810 can comprise a filter material that at least one airborne particle and/or undesired gas by a mechanical mechanism, an electrical mechanism, and/or a chemical mechanism. The filter material can comprise one or more pieces of, a filter fabric that can filter out one or more airborne particles and/or gasses. The filter fabric can be a woven and/or non-woven material. The filter fabric can be made from natural fibers (e.g., cotton, wool, etc.) and/or from synthetic fibers polyester, nylon, polypropylene, etc.). The thickness of the filter fabric can be varied depending on the desired filter efficiencies and/or the region of the apparel where the filter fabric is to be used. The filter fabric can be designed to filter airborne particles and/or gasses by mechanical mechanisms (e.g., weave density), by electrical mechanisms (e.g., charged fibers, charged metals, etc.), and/or by chemical mechanisms (e.g., absorptive charcoal particles, adsorptive materials, etc.). In as aspect, the filter material can comprise electrically charged fibers such as, but not limited to, FILTRETE by 3M. In another aspect, the filter material can comprise a high density material similar to material used for medical masks which are used by medical personnel in doctors' offices, hospitals, and the like. In an aspect, the filter material can be treated with an anti-bacterial solution and/or otherwise made from anti-bacterial materials. In another aspect, the filtration element 802 and/or the filtration element 810 can comprise electrostatic plates, ultraviolet light, a HEPA filter, combinations thereof, and the like.

FIG. 9 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer 900. The vaporizer 900 comprises elements in common with the vaporizer 200. In an aspect, the vapor expelled via the exhaust port 212 can be cooled by introduction of cooler air prior to inhalation by a user. Air can be drawn into the vaporizer 900 via an intake port 902. The intake port 902 can be the same intake port used to provide air input to the mixing chamber 208 or can be separate and distinct intake port. Air received in to the intake port 902 can be passed through a coil 904. The coil 904 can be of any suitable length and can reside proximate to the inhalation point of the vapor (e.g., the exhaust port 212). The temperature of the air is reduced as it travels through the coil 904. In an aspect, the coil 904 can comprise any structure that accomplishes a cooling effect. For example, the coil 904 can be replaced with a screen with a mesh or grid-like structure, a conical structure, and/or a series of cooling airlocks, either stationary or opening, in a periscopic/telescopic manner. The coil 904 can be any shape and/or can take multiple forms capable of cooling heated air, which passes through its space.

In an aspect, the coil 904 can be cooled by a cooling element 906. In an aspect, the coil 904 and the cooling element 906 can be combined into a single cooling element. Accordingly, the temperature of air is reduced as it travels through the coil 904 prior to mixing with vapor that is exiting the mixing chamber 208. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can be any suitable cooling system for use in a vapor device. For example, a fan, a heat sink, a liquid cooling system, a chemical cooling system, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can comprise a liquid cooling system whereby a fluid (e.g., water) passes through pipes in the vaporizer 900. As this fluid passes around the coil 904, the fluid absorbs heat, cooling air in the coil 904. After the fluid absorbs the heat, the fluid can pass through a heat exchanger which transfers the heat from the fluid to air blowing through the heat exchanger. By way of further example, the cooling element 906 can comprise a chemical cooling system that utilizes an endothermic reaction. An example of an endothermic reaction is dissolving ammonium nitrate in water. Such endothermic process is used in instant cold packs. These cold packs have a strong outer plastic layer that holds a bag of water and a chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that result in an endothermic reaction when dissolved in water. When the cold pack is squeezed, the inner bag of water breaks and the water mixes with the chemicals. The cold pack starts to cool as soon as the inner bag is broken, and stays cold for over an hour. Many instant cold packs contain ammonium nitrate. When ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water, it splits into positive ammonium ions and negative nitrate ions. In the process of dissolving, the water molecules contribute energy, and as a result, the water cools down. Thus, the vaporizer 900 can comprise a chamber for receiving the cooling element 906 in the form of a “cold pack.” The cold pack can be activated prior to insertion into the vaporizer 900 or can be activated after insertion through use of a button/switch and the like to mechanically activate the cold pack inside the vaporizer 900.

In an aspect, the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 can be selectively moved within the vaporizer 900 to control the temperature of the air mixing with vapor. For example, the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 can be moved closer to the exhaust port 212 or further from the exhaust port 212 to regulate temperature. In another aspect, insulation can be incorporated as needed to maintain the integrity of heating and cooling, as well as absorbing any unwanted condensation due to internal or external conditions, or a combination thereof. The insulation can also be selectively moved within the vaporizer 900 to control the temperature of the air mixing with vapor. For example, the insulation can be moved to cover a portion, none, or all of the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 to regulate temperature.

FIG. 10 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer 1000. The vaporizer 1000 is another aspect of the exemplary vaporizer 900. The vaporizer 1000 illustrates that heated vapor exiting the exhaust port 212 can be received in to the coil 904. The temperature of the vapor is reduced as it travels through the coil 904. The coil 904 can be of any suitable length. In an aspect, the coil 904 can comprise any structure that accomplishes a cooling effect. For example, the coil 904 can be replaced with a screen with a mesh or grid-like structure, a conical structure, and/or a series of cooling airlocks, either stationary or opening, in a periscopic/telescopic manner. The coil 904 can be any shape and/or can take multiple forms capable of cooling heated vapor, which passes through its space.

In an aspect, the coil 904 can be cooled by a cooling element 906. In an aspect, the coil 904 and the cooling element 906 can be combined into a single cooling element. Accordingly, the temperature of vapor is reduced as it travels through the coil 904 prior to exiting an exhaust port 212. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can be any suitable cooling system for use in a vapor device. For example, a fan, a heat sink, a liquid cooling system, a chemical cooling system, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can comprise a liquid cooling system whereby a fluid (e.g., water) passes through pipes in the vaporizer 1000. As this fluid passes around the coil 904, the fluid absorbs heat, cooling vapor in the coil 904. After the fluid absorbs the heat, the fluid can pass through a heat exchanger which transfers the heat from the fluid to air blowing through the heat exchanger. By way of further example, the cooling element 906 can comprise a chemical cooling system that utilizes an endothermic reaction. An example of an endothermic reaction, is dissolving ammonium nitrate in water. Such endothermic process is used in instant cold packs. These cold packs have a strong outer plastic layer that holds a bag of water and a chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that result in an endothermic reaction when dissolved in water. When the cold pack is squeezed, the inner bag of water breaks and the water mixes with the chemicals. The cold pack starts to cool as soon as the inner bag is broken, and stays cold for over an hour. Many instant cold packs contain ammonium nitrate. When ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water, it splits into positive ammonium ions and negative nitrate ions. In the process of dissolving, the water molecules contribute energy, and as a result, the water cools down. Thus the vaporizer 1000 can comprise a chamber for receiving the cooling element 906 in the form of a “cold pack.” The cold pack can be activated prior to insertion into the vaporizer 1000 or can be activated after insertion through use of a button/switch and the like to mechanically activate the cold pack inside the vaporizer 1000.

In an aspect, the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 can be selectively moved within the vaporizer 1000 to control the temperature of the vapor. For example, the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 can be moved closer to the exhaust port 212 or further from the exhaust port 212 to regulate temperature. In another aspect, insulation can be incorporated as needed to maintain the integrity of heating and cooling, as well as absorbing any unwanted condensation due to internal or external conditions, or a combination thereof. The insulation can also be selectively moved within the vaporizer 1000 to control the temperature of the vapor. For example, the insulation can be moved to cover a portion, none, or all of the cooling element 906 and the coil 904 to regulate temperature.

FIG. 11 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer 1100. The vaporizer 1100 is another aspect of the exemplary vaporizer 200. The vaporizer 1100 illustrates that heated vapor exiting the exhaust port 212 can be received in to a cooling chamber/screen 1102. The temperature of the vapor is reduced as it travels through the cooling chamber/screen 1102. The cooling chamber/screen 1102 can be of any suitable size. In an aspect, the cooling chamber/screen 1102 can comprise any shape that accomplishes a cooling effect.

In an aspect, the cooling chamber/screen 1102 can be cooled by the cooling element 906. In an aspect, the cooling chamber/screen 1102 and the cooling element 906 can be combined into a single cooling element. Accordingly, the temperature of vapor is reduced as it travels through the cooling chamber/screen 1102 prior to exiting the exhaust port 212. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can be any suitable cooling system for use in a vapor device. For example, a fan, a heat sink, a liquid cooling system, a chemical cooling system, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can comprise a liquid cooling system whereby a fluid (e.g., water) passes through pipes in the vaporizer 400. As this fluid passes around the cooling chamber/screen 1102, the fluid absorbs heat, cooling vapor in the cooling chamber/screen 1102. After the fluid absorbs the heat, the fluid can pass through a heat exchanger which transfers the heat from the fluid to air blowing through the heat exchanger. By way of further example, the cooling element 906 can comprise a chemical cooling system that utilizes an endothermic reaction. An example of an endothermic reaction is dissolving ammonium nitrate in water. Such endothermic process is used in instant cold packs. These cold packs have a strong outer plastic layer that holds a bag of water and a chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that result in an endothermic reaction when dissolved in water. When the cold pack is squeezed, the inner bag of water breaks and the water mixes with the chemicals. The cold pack starts to cool as soon as the inner bag is broken, and stays cold for over an hour. Many instant cold packs contain ammonium nitrate. When ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water, it splits into positive ammonium ions and negative nitrate ions. In the process of dissolving, the water molecules contribute energy, and as a result, the water cools down. Thus the vaporizer 1100 can comprise a chamber for receiving the cooling element 906 in the form of a “cold pack.” The cold pack can be activated prior to insertion into the vaporizer 1100 or can be activated after insertion through use of a button/switch and the like to mechanically activate the cold pack inside the vaporizer 1100.

In an aspect, the cooling element 906 and the cooling chamber/screen 1102 can be selectively moved within the vaporizer 1100 to control the temperature of the vapor. For example, the cooling element 1106 and the cooling chamber/screen 1102 can be moved closer to the exhaust port 212 or further from the exhaust port 212 to regulate temperature. In another aspect, insulation can be incorporated as needed to maintain the integrity of heating and cooling, as well as absorbing any unwanted condensation due to internal or external conditions, or a combination thereof. The insulation can also be selectively moved within the vaporizer 1100 to control the temperature of the vapor. For example, the insulation can be moved to cover a portion, none, or all of the cooling element 906 and the cooling chamber/screen 1102 to regulate temperature.

FIG. 12 illustrates an exemplary vaporizer 1200. The vaporizer 1200 is another aspect of the exemplary vaporizer 200. The vaporizer 1200 illustrates that heated vapor exiting the exhaust port 212 can be received in to an airlock system 1202. The temperature of the vapor is reduced as it travels through one or more chambers of the airlock system 1202. The airlock system 1202 (including the one or more chambers) can be of any suitable size. In an aspect, the airlock system 1202 can comprise any shape that accomplishes a cooling effect. Heated vapor can pass into a chamber of the airlock system 1202 and remain in the chamber for a period of time. During that time the temperature of the vapor can be decreased. As a user inhales vapor, the airlock system 1202 can cause the vapor to move from one chamber to another causing a cooling effect as a result of delayed inhalation of the vapor.

In an aspect, the airlock system 1202 can be cooled by the cooling element 906. In an aspect, the airlock system 1202 and the cooling element 906 can be combined into a single cooling element. Accordingly, the temperature of vapor is reduced as it travels through the airlock system 1202 prior to exiting the exhaust port 212. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can be any suitable cooling system for use in a vapor device. For example, a fan, a heat sink, a liquid cooling system, a chemical cooling system, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the cooling element 906 can comprise a liquid cooling system whereby a fluid (e.g., water) passes through pipes in the vaporizer 1200. As this fluid passes around the airlock system 1202, the fluid absorbs heat, cooling vapor in the airlock system 1202. After the fluid absorbs the heat, the fluid can pass through a heat exchanger which transfers the heat from the fluid to air blowing through the heat exchanger. By way of further example, the cooling element 906 can comprise a chemical cooling system that utilizes an endothermic reaction. An example of an endothermic reaction, is dissolving ammonium nitrate in water. Such endothermic process is used in instant cold packs. These cold packs have a strong outer plastic layer that holds a bag of water and a chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that result in an endothermic reaction when dissolved in water. When the cold pack is squeezed, the inner bag of water breaks and the water mixes with the chemicals. The cold pack starts to cool as soon as the inner bag is broken, and stays cold for over an hour. Many instant cold packs contain ammonium nitrate. When ammonium nitrate is dissolved in water, it splits into positive ammonium ions and negative nitrate ions. In the process of dissolving, the water molecules contribute energy, and as a result, the water cools down. Thus the vaporizer 1200 can comprise a chamber for receiving the cooling element 906 in the form of a “cold pack.” The cold pack can be activated prior to insertion into the vaporizer 1200 or can be activated after insertion through use of a button/switch and the like to mechanically activate the cold pack inside the vaporizer 1200.

In another aspect, insulation can be incorporated as needed to maintain the integrity of heating and cooling, as well as absorbing any unwanted condensation due to internal or external conditions, or a combination thereof. The insulation can also be selectively moved within the vaporizer 300 to control the temperature of the vapor. For example, the insulation can be moved to cover a portion, none, or all of the cooling element 906 and the airlock system 1202 to regulate temperature.

FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary vapor device 1300. The exemplary vapor device 1300 can comprise the vapor device 100 and/or any of the vaporizers disclosed herein. The exemplary vapor device 1300 illustrates a display 1302. The display 1302 can be a touchscreen. The display 1302 can be configured to enable a user to control any and/or all functionality of the exemplary vapor device 1300. For example, a user can utilize the display 1302 to enter a pass code to lock and/or unlock the exemplary vapor device 1300. The exemplary vapor device 1300 can comprise a biometric interface 1304. For example, the biometric interface 1304 can comprise a fingerprint scanner, an eye scanner, a facial scanner, and the like. The biometric interface 1304 can be configured to enable a user to control any and/or all functionality of the exemplary vapor device 1300. The exemplary vapor device 1300 can comprise an audio interface 1306. The audio interface 1306 can comprise a button that, when engaged, enables a microphone 1308. The microphone 1308 can receive audio signals and provide the audio signals to a processor for interpretation into one or more commands to control one or more functions of the exemplary vapor device 1300. The exemplary vapor device 1300 can further comprise a speaker 1312. The speaker 1312 can be configured to play audio (e.g., a song, a message, a phone call). In an aspect, the exemplary vapor device 1300 can connect to another device and serve as a wireless (or wired) speaker for presenting audio sourced from the other device.

FIG. 14 illustrates exemplary information that can be provided to a user via the display 1302 of the exemplary vapor device 1300 or via a display 1311 of an electronic device 1310 in communication with the exemplary vapor device 1300. The display 1302 can provide information to a user such as a puff count, an amount of vaporizable material remaining in one or more containers, battery remaining, signal strength, combinations thereof, and the like. The display 1311 can provide the same or different information to the user as available on the display 1302. In an aspect, the exemplary vapor device 1300 does not comprise the display 1302. The display 1311 can provide a user interface that provides information and provides control over one or more functions of the exemplary vapor device 1300. The one or more functions can comprise one or more of an audio function, a community function, an e-commerce function, or a vapor device operability function. The audio function can comprise connecting to the exemplary vapor device 1300 in order to stream audio to the exemplary vapor device 1300 to make use of the speaker 1312. The audio function can comprise managing one or more phone calls, voice mails, audio messages, songs, playlists, movies, ringtones, and the like. The community function can comprise at least one of a social networking function, transmitting or receiving a recommendation, transmitting or receiving a message, or transmitting or receiving a location of a user. The e-commerce function can comprise at least one of purchasing a component for use with the vapor device, purchasing a vaporizable or non-vaporizable material for use with the vapor device, purchasing another vapor device or components thereof, selling a component for use with the vapor device or another vapor device, selling a vaporizable or non-vaporizable material for use with the vapor device, or selling the vapor device or another vapor device. The device operability function can comprise at least one of controlling the vapor device, displaying diagnostic information, displaying repair information, displaying calibration information, displaying usage information, displaying a mixing interface to create/request a mixture, displaying an interface to adjust one or more vaporizing conditions (e.g., cooling element, temperature, and the like), or displaying information corresponding to detected constituents of material vaporized by the vapor device.

The user interface can comprise at least one of a lighted signal light, a gauge, a representation of a box, a representation of a form, a check mark, an avatar, a visual image, a graphic design, a list, an active calibration or calculation, a 2-dimensional fractal design, a 3-dimensional fractal design, a 2-dimensional representation of the vapor device or another vapor device, or a 3-dimensional representation of the vapor device or another vapor device. At least one of the 2-dimensional fractal design or the 3-dimensional fractal design can continuously or periodically expand or contract to various scales of the original fractal design.

FIG. 15 illustrates a series of user interfaces that can be provided via the display 1302 of the exemplary vapor device 1300 or via the display 1311 of the electronic device 1310 in communication with the exemplary vapor device 1300. In an aspect, the exemplary vapor device 1300 can be configured for one or more of multi-mode vapor usage. For example, the exemplary vapor device 1300 can be configured to enable a user to inhale vapor (nape mode) or to release vapor into the atmosphere (aroma mode). User interface 1500a provides a user with interface elements to select which mode the user wishes to engage, a Vape Mode 1502, an Aroma Mode 1504, or an option to go back 1506 and return to the previous screen. The interface element Vape Mode 1502 enables a user to engage a vaporizer to generate a vapor for inhalation. The interface element Aroma Mode 1504 enables a user to engage the vaporizer to generate a vapor for release into the atmosphere.

In the event a user selects the Vape Mode 1502, the exemplary vapor device 1300 will be configured to vaporize material and provide the resulting vapor to the user for inhalation. The user can be presented with user interface 1500b which provides the user an option to select interface elements that will determine which vaporizable material to vaporize. For example, an option of Mix 11508, Mix 21150, or a New Mix 1512. The interface element Mix 11508 enables a user to engage one or more containers that contain vaporizable material in a predefined amount and/or ratio. In an aspect, a selection of Mix 11508 can result in the exemplary vapor device 1300 engaging a single container containing a single type of vaporizable material or engaging a plurality of containers containing a different types of vaporizable material in varying amounts. The interface element Mix 21510 enables a user to engage one or more containers that contain vaporizable material in a predefined amount and/or ratio. In an aspect, a selection of Mix 21510 can result in the exemplary vapor device 1300 engaging a single container containing a single type of vaporizable material or engaging a plurality of containers containing a different types of vaporizable material in varying amounts. In an aspect, a selection of New Mix 1512 can result in the exemplary vapor device 1300 receiving a new mixture, formula, recipe, etc. . . . of vaporizable materials and/or engage one or more containers that contain vaporizable material in the new mixture.

Upon selecting, for example, the Mix 11508, the user can be presented with user interface 1500c. User interface 1500e indicates to the user that Mix 1 has been selected via an indicator 1514. The user can be presented with options that control how the user wishes to experience the selected vapor. The user can be presented with interface elements Cool 1516, Filter 1518, and Smooth 1520. The interface element Cool 1516 enables a user to engage one or more cooling elements to reduce the temperature of the vapor. The interface element Filter 1518 enables a user to engage one or more filter elements to filter the air used in the vaporization process. The interface element Smooth 1520 enables a user to engage one or more heating casings, cooling elements, filter elements, and/or magnetic elements to provide the user with a smoother vaping experience.

Upon selecting New Mix 1512, the user can be presented with user interface 1500d. User interface 1500d provides the user with a container one ratio interface element 1522, a container two ratio interface element 1524, and Save 1526. The container one ratio interface element 1522 and the container two ratio interface element 1524 provide a user the ability to select an amount of each type of vaporizable material contained in container one and/or container two to utilize as a new mix. The container one ratio interface element 1522 and the container two ratio interface element 1524 can provide a user with a slider that adjusts the percentages of each type of vaporizable material based on the user dragging the slider. In an aspect, a mix can comprise 100% on one type of vaporizable material or any percent combination (e.g., 50/50, 75/25, 85/15, 95/5, etc. . . . ). Once the user is satisfied with the new mix, the user can select Save 1526 to save the new mix for later use. In another aspect, any of the disclosed interface elements can comprise a slider, a dial, a numeric entry, combinations thereof, and the like. A mixture can comprise not only specific amounts of vaporizable materials to use in the mixture, but can further specify one or more vaporizing conditions. The one or more vaporizing conditions can comprise one or more of, application of a cooling element, application of a magnetic element, application of a smoothing element, a temperature the mixture should be vaporized at, and combinations thereof.

In the event a user selects the Aroma Mode 1504, the exemplary vapor device 1300 will be configured to vaporize material and release the resulting vapor into the atmosphere. The user can be presented with user interface 15000, 1500c, and/or 1500d as described above, but the resulting vapor will be released to the atmosphere.

In an aspect, the user can be presented with user interface 1500e. The user interface 1500e can provide the user with interface elements Identify 1528, Save 1530, and Upload 1532. The interface element Identify 1528 enables a user to engage one or more sensors in the exemplary vapor device 1300 to analyze the surrounding environment. For example, activating the interface element Identify 1528 can engage a sensor to determine the presence of a negative environmental condition such as smoke, a bad smell, chemicals, etc. Activating the interface element Identify 1528 can engage a sensor to determine the presence of a positive environmental condition, for example, an aroma. The interface element Save 1530 enables a user to save data related to the analyzed negative and/or positive environmental condition in memory local to the exemplary vapor device 1300. The interface element Upload 1532 enables a user to engage a network access device to transmit data related to the analyzed negative and/or positive environmental condition to a remote server for storage and/or analysis.

In one aspect of the disclosure, a system can be configured to provide services such as network-related services to a user device. FIG. 16 illustrates various aspects of an exemplary environment in which the present methods and systems can operate. The present disclosure is relevant to systems and methods for providing services to a user device, for example, electronic vapor devices which can include, but are not limited to, a nape-bot, micro-vapor device, vapor pipe, e-cigarette, hybrid handset and vapor device, and the like. Other user devices that can be used in the systems and methods include, but are not limited to, a smart watch (and any other form of “smart” wearable technology), a smartphone, a tablet, a laptop, a desktop, and the like. In an aspect, one or more network devices can be configured to provide various services to one or more devices, such as devices located at or near a premises. In another aspect, the network devices can be configured to recognize an authoritative device for the premises and/or a particular service or services available at the premises. As an example, an authoritative device can be configured to govern or enable connectivity to a network such as the Internet or other remote resources, provide address and/or configuration services like DHCP, and/or provide naming or service discovery services for a premises, or a combination thereof. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that present methods can be used in various types of networks and systems that employ both digital and analog equipment. One skilled in the art will appreciate that provided herein is a functional description and that the respective functions can be performed by software, hardware, or a combination of software and hardware.

The network and system can comprise a user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602e in communication with a computing device 1604 such as a server, for example. The computing device 1604 can be disposed locally or remotely relative to the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. As an example, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and the computing device 1604 can be in communication via a private and/or public network 1620 such as the Internet or a local area network. Other forms of communications can be used such as wired and wireless telecommunication channels, for example. In another aspect, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can communicate directly without the use of the network 1620 (for example, via Bluetooth®, infrared, and the like).

In an aspect, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can be an electronic device such as an electronic vapor device (e.g., vape-bot, micro-vapor device, vapor pipe, e-cigarette, hybrid handset and vapor device), a smartphone, a smart watch, a computer, a smartphone, a laptop, a tablet, a set top box, a display device, or other device capable of communicating with the computing device 1604. As an example, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602e can comprise a communication element 1606 for providing an interface to a user to interact with the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and/or the computing device 1604. The communication element 1606 can be any interface for presenting and/or receiving information to/from the user, such as user feedback. An example interface can be communication interface such as a web browser (e.g., Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, or the like). Other software, hardware, and/or interfaces can be used to provide communication between the user and one or more of the user device 1602, 1602b, and/or 1602c and the computing device 1604. In an aspect, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can have at least one similar interface quality such as a symbol, a voice activation protocol, a graphical coherence, a startup sequence continuity element of sound, light, vibration or symbol. In an aspect, the interface can comprise at least one of lighted signal lights, gauges, boxes, forms, words, video, audio scrolling, user selection systems, vibrations, check marks, avatars, matrix, visual images, graphic designs, lists, active calibrations or calculations, 2D interactive fractal designs, 3D fractal designs, 2D and/or 3D representations of vapor devices and other interface system functions.

As an example, the communication element 1606 can request or query various files from a local source and/or a remote source. As a further example, the communication element 1606 can transmit data to a local or remote device such as the computing device 1604. In an aspect, data can be shared anonymously with the computing device 1604. The data can be shared over a transient data session with the computing device 1604. The transient data session can comprise a session limit. The session limit can be based on one or more of a number of puffs, a time limit, and a total quantity of vaporizable material. The data can comprise usage data and/or a usage profile. The computing device 1604 can destroy the data once the session limit is reached.

In an aspect, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can be associated with a user identifier or device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c. As an example, the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c can be any identifier, token, character, string, or the like, for differentiating one user or user device (e.g., user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c) from another user or user device. In a further aspect, the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c can identify a user or user device as belonging to a particular class of users or user devices. As a further example, the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c can comprise information relating to the user device such as a manufacturer, a model or type of device, a service provider associated with the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c, a state of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c, a locator, and/or a label or classifier. Other information can be represented by the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c.

In an aspect, the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c can comprise an address element 1610 and a service element 1612. In an aspect, the address element 1610 can comprise or provide an internet protocol address, a network address, a media access control (MAC) address, an Internet address, or the like. As an example, the address element 1610 can be relied upon to establish a communication session between the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and the computing device 1604 or other devices and/or networks. As a further example, the address element 1610 can be used as an identifier or locator of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c, in an aspect, the address element 1610 can be persistent for a particular network.

In an aspect, the service element 1612 can comprise an identification of a service provider associated with the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and/or with the class of user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. The class of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can be related to a type of device, capability of device, type of service being provided, and/or a level of service. As an example, the service element 1612 can comprise information relating to or provided by a communication service provider (e.g., Internet service provider) that is providing or enabling data flow such as communication services to and/or between the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. As a further example, the service element 1612 can comprise information relating to a preferred service provider for one or more particular services relating to the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. In an aspect, the address element 1610 can be used to identify or retrieve data from the service element 1612, or vice versa. As a further example, one or more of the address element 1610 and the service element 1612 can be stored remotely from the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and retrieved by one or more devices such as the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and the computing device 1604. Other information can be represented by the service element 1612.

In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can be a server for communicating with the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. As an example, the computing device 1604 can communicate with the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c for providing data and/or services. As an example, the computing device 1604 can provide services such as data sharing, data syncing, network (e.g., Internet) connectivity, network printing, media management (e.g., media server), content services, streaming services, broadband services, or other network-related services. In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can allow the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602e to interact with remote resources such as data, devices, and files. As an example, the computing device can be configured as (or disposed at) a central location, which can receive content (e.g., data) from multiple sources, for example, user devices 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. The computing device 1604 can combine the content from the multiple sources and can distribute the content to user (e.g., subscriber) locations via a distribution system.

In an aspect, one or more network devices 1616 can be in communication with a network such as network 1620. As an example, one or more of the network devices 1616 can facilitate the connection of a device, such as user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c, to the network 1620. As a further example, one or more of the network devices 1616 can be configured as a wireless access point (WAP). In an aspect, one or more network devices 1616 can be configured to allow one or more wireless devices to connect to a wired and/or wireless network using Bluetooth or any desired method or standard.

In an aspect, the network devices 1616 can be configured as a local area network (LAN). As an example, one or more network devices 1616 can comprise a dual band wireless access point. As an example, the network devices 1616 can be configured with a first service set identifier (SSID) (e.g., associated with a user network or private network) to function as a local network for a particular user or users. As a further example, the network devices 1616 can be configured with a second service set identifier (SSID) (e.g., associated with a public/community network or a hidden network) to function as a secondary network or redundant network for connected communication devices.

In an aspect, one or more network devices 1616 can comprise an identifier 1618. As an example, one or more identifiers can be or relate to an Internet Protocol (IP) Address IPV4/IPV6 or a media access control address (MAC address) or the like. As a further example, one or more identifiers 1618 can be a unique identifier for facilitating communications on the physical network segment. In an aspect, each of the network devices 1616 can comprise a distinct identifier 1618. As an example, the identifiers 1618 can be associated with a physical location of the network devices 1616.

In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can manage the communication between the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and a database 1614 for sending and receiving data there between. As an example, the database 1614 can store a plurality of files (e.g., web pages), user identifiers or records, or other information. In one aspect, the database 1614 can store user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c usage information (including chronological usage), a status of a component of a device (e.g., coil failure), type of vaporizable and/or non-vaporizable material used, frequency of usage, location of usage, recommendations, communications (e.g., text messages, advertisements, photo messages), simultaneous use of multiple devices, one or more mixtures of vaporizable materials, and the like). The database 1614 can collect and store data to support cohesive use, wherein cohesive use is indicative of the use of a first electronic vapor devices and then a second electronic vapor device is synced chronologically and logically to provide the proper specific properties and amount of vapor based upon a designed usage cycle. As a further example, the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can request and/or retrieve a file from the database 1614. The user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c can thus sync locally stored data with more current data available from the database 1614. Such syncing can be set to occur automatically on a set time schedule, on demand, and/or in real-time. The computing device 1604 can be configured to control syncing functionality. For example, a user can select one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c to never by synced, to be the master data source for syncing, and the like. Such functionality can be configured to be controlled by a master user and any other user authorized by the master user or agreement.

In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can grant access rights to one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c to access certain information. For example, the computing device 1604 can receive a request from one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c to have access to one or more mixtures of vaporizable materials stored at the computing device 1604. The computing device 1604 can be configured to process the request by debiting a financial account associated with the requesting user and providing an access token to the user's requesting device to unlock access to the requested mixture. A mixture stored on the computing device 1604 can be transmitted/shared at the request of one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c that transmitted the mixture to the computing device 1604. The mixture can be sent to the one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c at the request of the uploading device and/or at any user request. The mixture can be provided with a limited number of uses. The mixture can be transmitted so that the receiving user can vaporize according to the mixture to determine if the user enjoys the mixture. If the user desires to continue using the mixture, the user can request access rights. In some aspects, a commission can be paid to the user that submitted the mixture to the computing device 1604 for each other user that pays for the access rights to the mixture. A mixture can comprise not only specific amounts of vaporizable materials to use in the mixture, but can further specify one or more vaporizing conditions. The one or more vaporizing conditions can comprise one or more of, application of a cooling element, application of a magnetic element, application of a smoothing element, a temperature the mixture should be vaporized at, and combinations thereof.

By way of example, usage information may include demographic information or other information about a user of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c. Demographic information can comprise one or more of a user's: age, gender, race, education level, location of residence, income, employment status, religion, marital status, property ownership, or known languages. The demographic information can be reported to the computing device 1604 if the user has opted in to having their usage activity tracked. For example, this information may be provided from the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c to the computing device 1604 at opt-in time. The computing device 1604 may store the demographic information in the database 1614. In various embodiments, the demographic information may be associated with an identifier of the user for easy retrieval. For instance, all records for a specific user may be associated with a user's identifier. As the computing device 1604 stores the demographic information for later use, the demographic information need not be provided during vapor usage that occurs subsequent to the user's initial opt-in. Although it should be understood that the user of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c may provide updated demographic information at their discretion and/or at the request of the computing device 1604. In various embodiments, the demographic information may include but is not limited to information about a user's age, gender, education level, location of residence, income, employment status, religion, marital status, ownership (e.g., home, car, etc.), and known languages. This information may be utilized to generate reports for specific groups. In one non-limiting example, demographic information may be utilized to identify a group of users as young adults living in urban areas. For instance, a report generated for this group of users might specify the most popular vaporizable materials consumed by young adults living in urban areas. In an aspect, users may be tracked by a global identifier instead of personally identifiable information (e.g., the user's name). Thus the identifier can be known to the computing device 1604 but anonymous or otherwise unknown to other entities.

In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can generate recommendation data. The recommendation data can comprise a recommendation for a vaporizable material that a user has not used, a recommendation for a vaporizable material that a user has used, a recommendation for a mixture of two or more vaporizable materials that a user has not used, a recommendation for a mixture of two or more vaporizable materials that a user has used, a recommendation for a brand, a recommendation for a sale, a recommendation for a retailer, a recommendation for a manufacturer, a recommendation for an event, a recommendation for a social network, or a combination thereof. The central server can determine the recommendation data based on data received from at least one of a retailer, a manufacturer, an electronic device user, a vapor device user, a social network, or a combination thereof. The recommendation data can be generated in response to receiving usage data from the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602e and can be provided back to one or more of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c.

The computing device 1604 can utilize one or more recommendation systems/methods. For example, the computing device 1604 can utilize a non-personalized systems recommend products to individual consumers based on averaged information about the products provided by other consumers. Examples of non-personalized product recommendation systems are those of Amazon.com and Moviefinder.com. The same product recommendations are made to all consumers seeking information about a particular product(s) and all product recommendations are completely independent of any particular consumer.

The computing device 1604 can utilize an item-to-item systems recommend other products to an individual consumer based on relationships between products already purchased by the consumer or for which the consumer has expressed an interest. The relationships employed typically are brand identity, fragrance, sales appeal, market distribution, and the like. In all cases the information on which the relationships are based is implicit. In other words, no explicit input regarding what the consumer is looking for or prefers is solicited by these systems. Rather, techniques such as data mining are employed to find implicit relationships between products for which the individual consumer has expressed a preference and other products available for purchase. The actual performance of products or whether the consumer (or other consumers) ultimately did prefer the products purchased play no part in formulating recommendations with these types of systems.

The computing device 1604 can utilize an attribute-based recommendation systems utilize syntactic properties or descriptive “content” of available products to formulate their recommendations. In other words, attribute-based systems assume that the attributes of products are easily classified and that an individual consumer knows which classification he or she should purchase without help or input from the recommendation system.

The computing device 1604 can utilize a content-based filtering recommendation systems are based on a description of the item and a profile of the user's preference. In a content-based recommender system, keywords are used to describe the items and a user profile is built recommendation system indicate the type of item this user likes. In other words, these algorithms try to recommend items that are similar to those that a user liked in the past (or is examining in the present). In particular, various candidate items are compared with items previously rated by the user and the best-matching items are recommended.

The computing device 1604 can utilize a collaborative filtering (also referred to as social-information filtering) recommendation system that typically records an extended product preference set that can be matched with a collaborative group. In other words, collaborative filters recommend products that “similar users” have rated highly. Often the social-information is a similar pattern of product preferences.

In an aspect, data can be derived by system and/or device analysis. Such analysis can comprise at least by one of instant analysis performed by the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c or archival data transmitted to a third party for analysis and returned to the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and/or computing device 1604. The result of either data analysis can be communicated to a user of the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c to, for example, inform the user of their eVapor use and/or lifestyle options. In an aspect, a result can be transmitted back to at least one authorized user interface.

In an aspect, the database 1614 can store information relating to the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c such as the address element 1610 and/or the service element 1612. As an example, the computing device 1604 can obtain the device identifier 1608a, 1608b, and/or 1608c from the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and retrieve information from the database 1614 such as the address element 1610 and/or the service elements 1612. As a further example, the computing device 1604 can obtain the address element 1610 from the user device 1602a, 1602b, and/or 1602c and can retrieve the service element 1612 from the database 1614, or vice versa. Any information can be stored in and retrieved from the database 1614. The database 1614 can be disposed remotely from the computing device 1604 and accessed via direct or indirect connection. The database 1614 can be integrated with the computing device 1604 or some other device or system. Data stored in the database 1614 can be stored anonymously and can be destroyed based on a transient data session reaching a session limit.

All the various data/information may be utilized by a report generator 1620 to generate reports for specific groups of users. In one example, the collected usage information, demographic information, and recommendation information can be associated with a user's identifier. The report generator 1620 can be configured for determining characteristics of a group. In various embodiments, these characteristics may be specified by a user desiring the report. In other cases, the characteristics may be parameters stored locally (e.g., on the computing device 1604 or another system). In various embodiments, such characteristics may include a specific demographic population. For instance, a non-limiting example of such characteristics might include all males between the ages of 18 and 32 living in the United States. Of course this is just one example of such characteristics. In general, any subset of demographic information may be specified as characteristics of a group. For instance, different advertisers may be interested in different types of groups for their products.

The report generator 1620 can be configured for defining a group as a subset of users having one or more of the characteristics. For instance, a user can search the database 1614 for all users that match the characteristics based on the demographic data collected (e.g., demographic data collected when the user opts-in to having their usage activities monitored/tracked). For instance, for the example above that specifies characteristics as being all males between the ages of 18 and 32 living in the United States, the report generator 1620 can search demographic information for users meeting these characteristics; the results list of users may be defined as the group for which a report is to be generated.

The report generator 1620 can be configured for generating a usage report based on collected usage information for users of the defined group. In various embodiments, the report may specify aggregate attributes for the group, such as what vaporizable material, what vapor device, what types of vaporizable material the group vaporizes most frequently, and the like. For instance, the report may specify a ranking of the most popular vaporizable materials consumed by users of the defined group. In other examples, the report may be more general in that types of vaporizable material (e.g., fruit flavored, menthol, nicotine, etc.) are ranked instead of specific vaporizable materials. As one non-limiting example, such a report might demonstrate that males between the ages of 18 and 32 living in the United States favor vaporizable material with nicotine over vaporizable material without. In general, the report may specific absolute and/or relative rankings for vaporizable material and/or types of vaporizable material, and any other rankable/measurable data point available in the usage data.

In various embodiments, the generated reports may be used by advertisers to select which vaporizable materials should be pursued for advertising. For instance, if an advertiser is targeting a demographic including males between the ages of 18 and 32 living in the United States, the advertiser could use the example report described above to target advertisements for specific products of interest to the group (including delivering an advertisement directly to the group's electronic vapor devices).

In an aspect, the computing device 1604 can comprise one or more modules for managing an eVapor Club 1620. The eVapor Club 1620 can be configured for conducting one or more financial transactions. For example, the eVapor Club 1620 can be configured to periodically debit one or more users' financial accounts for membership in the eVapor Club 1620 (including debiting at different amounts to account for different tiers of membership within the eVapor Club 1620). The eVapor Club 1620 can also be configured to debit one or more users' financial accounts for goods on as needed basis. The eVapor Club 1620 can be configured for analyzing one or more of usage data, demographic data, and user preferences to determine a good(s) to transfer to a user. Examples of user preferences include, but are not limited to, one or more of a tier of membership in an electronic vapor (eVapor) club, a time interval for periodic delivery of the good, a preferred retail location, a preferred delivery location. In one aspect, the eVapor Club 1620 can periodically initiate a transfer of a good to a user according to the user's tier of membership in the eVapor Club 1620 (e.g., cause a low, middle, or high quality vaporizable material to be mailed to the user or setup for pickup by the user at a retail location). The eVapor Club 1620 can select the good according to usage data (e.g., is the user low on a particular vaporizable material) and recommendation data (e.g., what other flavor of vaporizable material might the user like) and user preferences (e.g., has the user indicated a preference for one or more types of vaporizable materials). In another aspect, the eVapor Club 1620 can analyze usage data to determine if the user's is in particular need for a specific good (e.g., a replacement component for the electronic vapor device).

FIG. 17 illustrates an ecosystem 1700 configured for sharing and/or syncing data, and/or generating reports based on the data, such as usage information (including chronological usage), a status of a component of a device (e.g., coil failure), type of vaporizable and/or non-vaporizable material used, frequency of usage, location of usage, recommendation data, communications (e.g., text messages, advertisements, photo messages), simultaneous use of multiple devices, and the like) between one or more devices such as a vapor device 1702, a vapor device 1704, a vapor device 1706, and an electronic communication device 1708. In an aspect, the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706 can be one or more of an e-cigarette, an e-cigar, an electronic vapor modified device, a hybrid electronic communication handset coupled/integrated vapor device, a micro-sized electronic vapor device, or a robotic vapor device. In an aspect, the electronic communication device 1708 can comprise one or more of a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, and the like.

In an aspect data generated, gathered, created, etc., by one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706, and/or the electronic communication device 1708 can be uploaded to and/or downloaded from a central server 1710 via a network 1712, such as the Internet. Such uploading and/or downloading can be performed via any form of communication including wired and/or wireless. In an aspect, the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706, and/or the electronic communication device 1708 can be configured to communicate via cellular communication, WiFi communication, Bluetooth® communication, satellite communication, and the like. The central server 1710 can store uploaded data and associate the uploaded data with a user and/or device that uploaded the data. The central server 1710 can access unified account and tracking information to determine devices that are associated with each other, for example devices that are owned/used by the same user. The central server 1710 can utilize the unified account and tracking information to determine which of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706, and/or the electronic communication device 1708, if any, should receive data uploaded to the central server 1710. In an aspect, the central server 1710 can be configured to operate as an eVapor Club as described herein.

In an aspect, the uploading and downloading can be performed anonymously. The data can be shared over a transient data session with the central server 1710. The transient data session can comprise a session limit. The session limit can be based on one or more of a number of puffs, a time limit, and a total quantity of vaporizable material. The data can comprise usage data and/or a usage profile. The central server 1710 can destroy the data once the session limit is reached. While the transient data session is active, the central server 1710 can provide a usage profile to one of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706 to control the functionality for the duration of the transient data session.

For example, the vapor device 1702 can be configured to upload usage information related to vaporizable material consumed and the electronic communication device 1708 can be configured to upload location information related to location of the vapor device 1702. The central server 1710 can receive both the usage information and the location information, access the unified account and tracking information to determine that both the vapor device 1702 and the electronic communication device 1708 are associated with the same user. The central server 1710 can thus correlate the user's location along with the type, amount, and/or timing of usage of the vaporizable material. The central server 1710 can further determine which of the other devices are permitted to receive such information and transmit the information based on the determined permissions. In an aspect, the central server 1710 can transmit the correlated information to the electronic communication device 1708 which can then subsequently use the correlated information to recommend a specific type of vaporizable material to the user when the user is located in the same geographic position indicated by the location information.

In an aspect, one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706 can provide the respective users with an option to have usage activity tracked (e.g., upload usage data to the central server 1710). For example, if a user opts in to having usage activity tracked, the user can also provide demographic information about the user to the central server 1710. Demographic information can comprise one or more of a user's: age, gender, race, education level, location of residence, income, employment status, religion, marital status, property ownership, or known languages. The collected demographic information and the usage data can be utilized to generate one or more usage reports representing usage across one or more of the users of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706.

In another aspect, the central server 1710 can provide one or more social networking services for users of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, the vapor device 1706, and/or the electronic communication device 1708. Such social networking services include, but are not limited to, messaging (e.g., text, image, and/or video), mixture sharing, product recommendations, location sharing, product ordering, and the like.

In an aspect, the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706 can be in communication with the electronic communication device 1708 to enable the electronic communication device 1708 to generate a user interface to display information about and to control one or more functions/features of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706. The electronic communication device 1708 can request access to one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706 from the central server 1710. The central server 1710 can determine whether or not the electronic communication device 1708 (or a user thereof) is authorized to access the one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706. If the central server 1710 determines that access should be granted, the central server 1710 can provide an authorization token to the electronic communication device 1708 (or to the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706 on behalf of the electronic communication device 1708). Upon receipt of the authorization token, the one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706 can partake in a communication session with the electronic communication device 1708 whereby the electronic communication device 1708 generates a user interface that controls one or more functions/features of and displays information about the one or more of the vapor device 1702, the vapor device 1704, and/or the vapor device 1706.

Referring to FIG. 18, aspects of a system 1800 for are illustrated. A system 1800 may include, for example, an eVapor device 1802. In some versions the eVapor device 1802 comprises one of: a personal vaporizer, a smokeless pipe, an e-cigarette, an e-cigar, an eVapor pipe, a micro-eVapor device, a hybrid electronic communication and eVapor device, a vape Bot, a headset, and a monocle. Moreover, the eVapor apparatus 1802 can comprise any suitable component for providing vapor to a user. Generally, an eVapor device is an electronic device for use in providing a vapor output and typically includes a processor.

The eVapor device 1802 can comprise a plurality of intuitive buttons 1804-1818. The intuitive buttons can be symbols, icons, touch-sensitive, tactile. LED lights, etc., or any type of interactive button known in the art.

Tip control lights 1804 can be used to determine a brightness level of the tip light 1805 of the eVapor device 1802. For example, as commonly known in the art, an eVapor device 1802 comprises a tip light 1805 located at the tip of the eVapor device 1802, opposite of where a user inhales. The brightness and color of the tip light 1805 can be controlled using tip control lights 1804. For example, tip control lights 1804 can comprise a plurality of LED lights arranged linearly in a row, and the user can slide his/her finger across the lights in order to control the brightness and color of the tip light 1805. In some versions, tip control lights 1804 and tip light 1805 can be a variety of colors from the full spectrum of the rainbow.

Liquid flavor lights 1806 can be used to determine which flavors of eLiquid are being used. For example, liquid flavor lights 1806 can comprise a plurality of LED lights arranged linearly in a row. The liquid flavor lights 1806 can each be different colors, with each color corresponding to a different eLiquid flavor. By toggling different combinations of the liquid flavor lights 1806, the user can choose a variety of mixes of eLiquids to vaporize.

Icons 1808 can be used for E-commerce purposes. For example, icons 1808 can comprise shapes, symbols, and buttons, including, but not limited to, a dollar sign symbol, a shopping cart icon, and “Yes” and “No” buttons. Icons 1808 can be toggled in order to complete purchases online from an E-commerce vendor. Toggling icons 1808 will display information regarding the particular icon toggled. For example, the dollar sign will show how much something costs, the shopping cart will display the user's shopping cart, and the “Yes” and “No” buttons can be used to complete or cancel a transaction.

Audio command input 1810 can be used to give verbal commands to eVapor device 1802. For example, audio command input 1810 can comprise a microphone and speaker. For commands a user wants to issue to eVapor device, the user can talk into audio command input 1810, similar to methods well-known in the art for smartphones. The speaker can be used to present audio stored on the eVapor device 1802 or otherwise provided to the eVapor device 1802 (e.g., streamed wirelessly from a smartphone).

Draw lights 1812 can be used to determine how large of a drag the user takes from the eVapor device 1802. For example, draw lights 1812 can comprise a plurality of LED lights arranged linearly in a row. As the user takes a drag, each individual light can light up one at a time, one after another. The larger the drag, the more lights light up. This can indicate to the user how large of a drag, and how deep the inhalation per drag. Alternatively, a drag limit can be selected using draw lights 1812 in order to limit how large or small of a drag the user takes. In some versions, the draw lights 1812 can comprise different colors of lights, for example, ranging from a spectrum of dark to light colors.

Correspondence button 1818 can be used to indicate receipt of correspondence from other users. For example, correspondence button 1818 can be an envelope icon, indicating receipt of E-mail. Other icons can be used to indicate different messages. For example, emoji's, such as a happy face or sad face, can be displayed, as well as simple animations.

Location button 1816 can be used to send the user's location to friends in order to generate an invitation to meet. Location button 1816 can be an icon shaped like a house, or any other object correlating to a location.

Cooling button 1818 can be used to activate/de-activate a vapor cooling function. The cooling button 1818 can further be used to control an amount of vapor cooling applied (e.g., by holding down the cooling button 1818).

In use, eVapor device 1802 can be used to unlock and mix customized eLiquid combinations via an E-commerce service. For example, certain eLiquids can be unlocked by purchasing them from an E-commerce site using the intuitive interface 1802. Once unlocked, the eLiquid can be used by the user. In some versions, the eLiquid is locally available at the eVapor device 1802, such that the user does not have to await delivery in the mail. In some versions, the user can mix his/her own eLiquid mix using liquid flavor lights 1806. For example, the exact specifications of the user's custom flavor mix are transmitted to an E-commerce fulfillment center, so that the eLiquid provider can mix the custom eLiquid mix in a cartridge for the user. The custom mix is thereafter available to the user for re-ordering, or to be sent as a gift to friends. Alternatively, the mixing recipe can also be sent to friends, such that the friends can sample the custom mix to make alterations of their own for saving. As such, a user can create a custom mix from scratch, or can have the custom mix defined by parts, such as one part flavor A and two parts flavor B, etc. The interface 1800 also allows a user to customize messages to a plurality of other users, to join eVapor clubs, to receive eVapor chart information, and to conduct a wide range of social networking functions, location services, and eCommerce activities.

In related aspects, the liquid mix can be adapted to vaporize into a mixed aroma for the purpose of aromatherapy. For example, the aromatherapy can comprise imparting a prescribed aroma into a specified space utilizing the electronic vaporizing device as a distribution medium for the prescribed aroma. The electronic vaporizing device can be at least one of an eCig, a robotic electronic vaporizing device, a hybrid communication handset vaporizing device, or other electronic vaporing devices.

Various electronic personal vaporizing devices are known in the art, and are frequently being improved on. For example, details of a recent “Vapor Delivery Device” are disclosed by the inventor hereof in U.S. Patent Publication No. 2015/0047661, incorporated herein by reference. While the referenced publication provides a pertinent example of a personal vaporizer, it should be appreciated that various different designs for personal vaporizing devices are known in the art and may be adapted for use with the technology disclosed herein by one of ordinary skill. In addition, similar portable and personal devices for nebulizing liquids to create a mist for inhalation should be considered as generally encompassed within the meaning of “personal vaporizer” as used herein.

Referring to FIG. 19, alternative aspects of a system 1900 are illustrated. A single vapor device 1902 (also called a vaporizer or vaporizing device) is illustrated, but is should be appreciated that a recommendation system may include multiple such devices and ancillary equipment. The system 1900 may include an assembly 1902 for vaporizing a vaporizing fluid at a controlled rate, and optionally for combining vaporization of two or more different fluids in a controlled manner.

The assembly 1902 includes at least one container 1922 holding a vaporizable material 1930, sometimes referred to herein as a “first” container 1922 and “first” vaporizable material. In an aspect, the vaporizable material may be a fluid, such as a compressed gas, compressed liquid (e.g., a liquefied gas), or uncompressed liquid. Various suitable fluids are known in the art, for example, solutions of nicotine in glycerin, with or without flavor-enhancing agents, are known. In the alternative, or in addition, the first vaporizable material may be, or may include, a solid material. For embodiments using uncompressed liquids, the container 1922 may include a wick 1926 that carries the liquid to the vaporizing component 1920. Although the wick 1926 is shown only in the center of the container 1922 for illustrative clarity, it should be appreciated that the wick may substantially fill the container 1922. The container 1922 may be made of any suitable structural material, for example, an organic polymer, metal, ceramic, composite or glass material. Structural plastics may be preferred for disposable embodiments. Optionally, the apparatus 1902 may include one or more additional or “second” containers 1924 (one of potentially many shown), each configured similarly with a wick 1928 if suitable for the particular second vaporizable material 1932 being contained.

A vaporizer 1920 may be coupled to the first container 1922 and to any additional containers, e.g., second container 1924. For example, coupling may be via wicks 1926, 1924, via a valve, or by some other structure. The coupling mechanism may operate independently of gravity, such as by capillary action or pressure drop through a valve. The vaporizer 1920 is configured to vaporize the vaporizable material from the first container 1922 and any additional containers 1924 at controlled rates; in operation, the vaporizer vaporizes or nebulizes the material, producing an inhalable mist. In embodiments, the vaporizer may include a heater coupled to a wick, or a heated wick. A heating circuit may include a nickel-chromium wire or the like, with a temperature sensor (not shown) such as a thermistor or thermocouple. Within definable limits, by controlling suction-activated power to the heating element, a rate of vaporization may be controlled. At minimum, control may be provided between no power (off state) and one or more powered states. Other control mechanisms may also be suitable. The vaporizer can comprise one or more of a cooling element, a heating casing, and/or a magnetic element as described herein.

A processor 1908 is coupled to the vaporizer via an electrical circuit, configured to control a rate at which the vaporizer 1920 vaporizes the vaporizable material. In operation, the processor supplies a control signal to the vaporizer 1920 that controls the rate of vaporization. A receiver port 1912 is coupled to the processor, and the processor receives data determining the rate from the receiver port. Thus, the vaporization rate is remotely controllable, by providing the data. The processor 1908 may be, or may include, any suitable microprocessor or microcontroller, for example, a low-power application-specific controller (ASIC) designed for the task of controlling a vaporizer as described herein, or (less preferably) a general-purpose central processing unit, for example, one based on 80×86 architecture as designed by Intel™ or AMD™, or a system-on-a-chip as designed by ARM™ or chip fabricator. The processor 1908 may be communicatively coupled to auxiliary devices or modules of the vaporizing apparatus 1902, using a bus or other coupling. Optionally, the processor 1908 and some or all of its coupled auxiliary devices or modules may be housed within or coupled to a housing 1904, substantially enclosing the containers 1924, 1924, the vaporizer 1920, the processor 1908, the receiver port 1912, and other illustrated components. The assembly 1902 and housing 1904 may be configured together in a form factor of an electronic cigarette, an electronic cigar, an electronic hookah, a hand-held personal vaporizer, or other desired form.

In related aspects, the assembly 1902 includes a memory device 1906 coupled to the processor 1908. The memory device 1906 may include a random access memory (RAM) holding program instructions and data for rapid execution or processing by the processor during control of the vaporizer 1902. When the vaporizer 1902 is powered off or in an inactive state, program instructions and data may be stored in a long-term memory, for example, a non-volatile magnetic, optical, or electronic memory storage device, which is not separately shown. A controlled rate or measured rate of vaporization, material vaporizes, times of use, and other data may be stored in the device memory 1906 and/or provided and stored by an ancillary device 1938 or server 1942 in data store 1948.

Either or both of the RAM or the storage device may comprise a non-transitory computer-readable medium holding program instructions, that when executed by the processor 1908, cause the apparatus 1902 to perform a method or operations as described herein. Program instructions may be written in any suitable high-level language, for example, C, C++, C#, or JAVA™, and compiled to produce machine-language code for execution by the processor. Program instructions may be grouped into functional modules, to facilitate coding efficiency and comprehensibility. It should be appreciated that such modules, even if discernable as divisions or grouping in source code, are not necessarily distinguishable as separate code blocks in machine-level coding. Code bundles directed toward a specific type of function may be considered to comprise a module, regardless of whether or not machine code on the bundle can be executed independently of other machine code. In other words, the modules may be high-level modules only.

In a related aspect, the processor 1908 receives a user identifier and stores the user identifier in the memory device 1906. A user identifier may include or be associated with user biometric data, that may be collected by a biometric sensor or camera included in the assembly 1902 or in a connected or communicatively coupled ancillary device 1938, such as, for example, a smart phone executing a vaporizer interface application. The processor 1908 may generate data indicating a quantity of the vaporizable material 1930, 1932 consumed by the vaporizer 1920 in a defined period of time, and save the data in the memory device 1906. The processor 1908 and other electronic components may be powered by a suitable battery 1910, as known in the art, or other power source. A user identifier may be associated by a server 1942 with use data gathered via the communication network 1940, 1944 from the vaporizer 1902. The server 1942 may identify users with similar use profiles by comparing use data from data store 1948. The server 1942, or a coupled server, may provide the user with use data via a recommendation network interface that can be browsed via a smart phone or other ancillary device 1938. In addition, the user may use the recommendation network to connect with other users with similar use profiles.

The assembly 1902 may optionally include a sensor 1916, or multiple sensors 1916, 1918, to provide measurement feedback to the processor. For example, a sensor 1916 may be positioned downstream of the vaporizer, and the processor may derive the data used for controlling vaporization rate at least in part by interpreting a signal from the sensor correlated to a composition of vapor, a quantity of vapor, a density of vapor, or some combination of such qualities of the vapor emitted by the vaporizer. For further example, a sensor 1918 positioned upstream of the vaporizer, and the processor may derive the data at least in part by interpreting a signal from the sensor correlated to a composition of the vaporizable material 1930 contained in the container 1922, an amount of the vaporizable material remaining in the container, or to an amount of the vaporizable material passed from the container to the vaporizer, or some combination of such measurements. “Downstream” and “upstream” relate to the direction of air flow or air/vapor mixture flow through the apparatus 1902, as illustrated by discharge arrow 1934 and inlet 1936. Suction applied at a tip draws inlet air 1936 through the vaporizer 1920, discharging a vapor/air mixture 1935 at the tip. Sensors 1916, 1918 may include, for example, optical sensors, temperature sensors, motion sensors, flow speed sensors, microphones or other sensing devices.

The processor 1908 may derive test and analysis data from the sensor 1916, 1918 signals. In the alternative, or in addition, the processor 1908 may send sensor data to a remote server 1942 or ancillary device 1939 using communication channels as described below. The server 1942 and/or ancillary device 1939 may analyze and compile provided sensor data from the vaporizer 1902 and/or multiple other vaporizers, and output test and analysis to a user interface such as a remotely accessible web page, graphical user interface of a local application, or output device (e.g., electronic display or audio transducer) included in the vaporizer 1902.

In related aspects, the assembly may include a transmitter port 1914 coupled to the processor. The memory 1906 may hold a designated network address, and the processor 1908 may provide data indicating the quantity of the vaporizable material consumed by the vaporizer to the designated network address in association with the user identifier, via the transmitter port 1914. Other data may include times and durations of use, type of vaporizable material consumed, and other data.

An ancillary device, such as a smartphone 1938, tablet computer, or similar device, may be coupled to the transmitter port 1914 via a wired or wireless coupling. For example, the apparatus 1902 may include a serial port, for example a USB port, coupled to receiver and transmitter inputs to the processor 1908. In the alternative, or in addition, a wireless port (not shown) using Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11). Bluetooth, infrared, or other wireless standard may be coupled to the processor 1908. The ancillary device 1938 may be coupled to the processor 1908 for providing user control input to vaporizer control process operated executing on the processor 1908. User control input may include, for example, selections from a graphical user interface or other input (e.g., textual or directional commands) generated via a touch screen, keyboard, pointing device, microphone, motion sensor, camera, or some combination of these or other input devices, which may be incorporated in the ancillary device 1938. A display 1939 of the ancillary device 1938 may be coupled to the processor 1902, for example via a graphics processing unit (not shown) integrated in the ancillary device 1938. The display 1939 may include, for example, a flat screen color liquid crystal (LCD) display illuminated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or other lamps, a projector driven by an LED display or by a digital light processing (DLP) unit, or other digital display device. User interface output driven by the processor 1908 may be provided to the display device 1939 and output as a graphical display to the user. Similarly, an amplifier/speaker or other audio output transducer of the ancillary device 1938 may be coupled to the processor 1908 via an audio processing system. Audio output correlated to the graphical output and generated by the processor 1908 in conjunction with the ancillary device 1938 may be provided to the audio transducer and output as audible sound to the user.

The ancillary device 1938 may be communicatively coupled via an access point 1940 of a wireless telephone network, local area network (LAN) or other coupling to a wide area network (WAN) 1944, for example, the Internet. A server 1942 may be coupled to the WAN 1944 and to a database 1948 or other data store, and communicate with the apparatus 1902 via the WAN and couple device 1939. In alternative embodiments, functions of the ancillary device 1939 may be built directly into the apparatus 1902, if desired.

In related aspects, the processor 1908 may transmit measured or specified use data to the device 1938, which may relay the data to the server 1942 for providing, distributing, and sharing recommendation data in the network. For privacy protection, the server 1942 may delete the data after analysis to identify a common interest or use pattern for identifying like users. The server may protect use data from disclosure unless authorized by a user of the device 1902. The system 1900 may be used to implement a recommendation system as described herein. Other, similar systems may also be suitable.

FIG. 20 is a block diagram illustrating components of an apparatus or system 2000. The apparatus or system 2000 may include additional or more detailed components as described herein. For example, the processor 2010 and memory 2016 may contain an instantiation of a controller as described herein. As depicted, the apparatus or system 2000 may include functional blocks that can represent functions implemented by a processor, software, or combination thereof (e.g., firmware).

As illustrated in FIG. 20, the apparatus or system 2000 may comprise an electrical component 2002 for interfacing with another device, for example, an electronic communication device or an electronic vapor device. The electrical component 2002 may be, or may include, any form of communications port, wired or wireless. The apparatus 2000 can comprise a vaporizer 2020 which can be any vaporizer described herein, or otherwise known.

The apparatus 2000 may include a processor module 2010 having at least one processor, in the case of the apparatus 2000 configured as a controller configured to operate transceiver 2018. The processor 2010, in such case, may be in operative communication with the memory 2016, interface 2014 or transceiver 2018 via a bus 2012 or similar communication coupling. The processor 2010 may effect initiation and scheduling of the processes or functions performed by electrical component 2002.

In related aspects, the apparatus 2000 may include a network interface module operable for communicating with a server over a computer network. The apparatus may include a transceiver 2018 for transmitting and receiving information to/from a server. In further related aspects, the apparatus 2000 may optionally include a module for storing information, such as, for example, a memory device/module 2016. The computer readable medium or the memory module 2016 may be operatively coupled to the other components of the apparatus 2000 via the bus 2012 or the like. The memory module 2016 may be adapted to store computer readable instructions and data for enabling the processes and behavior of the electrical component 2002, and subcomponents thereof, or of the methods disclosed herein. The memory module 2016 may retain instructions for executing functions associated with the electrical component 2002.

In an aspect, illustrated in FIG. 21A, FIG. 21B, and FIG. 21C, provided is an example vapor device 2100. As shown in FIG. 21A, the vapor device 2100 can comprise a smartphone 2102 and a detachable vaporizer 2104. The smartphone 2102 and the detachable vaporizer 2104 can connect via an input/output port 2106 on the smartphone 2102 and an input/output port 2108 on the detachable vaporizer 2104. The input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108 can adhere to any proprietary standard. In another aspect, the input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108 can comprise one or more of, a USB connection, a dock connector (e.g., 20-24-30 pin connectors, lightning port connection, etc), Portable Digital Media Interface, and the like. The input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108 can be used to pass power and/or data between the smartphone 2102 and the detachable vaporizer 2104.

The detachable vaporizer 2104 can comprise a vaporize button 2110 that can be configured to initiate a process of vaporizing a vaporizable material contained within the detachable vaporizer 2104, resulting in vapor exiting an exhaust port 2112 for inhalation by a user. The exhaust port 2112 can be hingedly attached to the detachable vaporizer 2104 to enable the exhaust port 2112 to be stored within a housing of the detachable vaporizer 2104. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can comprise an exhaust port release button 2114 to disengage the exhaust port 2112 when stored and locked within the housing of the detachable vaporizer 2104. FIG. 21B illustrates the vapor device 2100 after the smartphone 2102 and the detachable vaporizer 2104 have been coupled via the input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can comprise a locking mechanism 2116. The locking mechanism 2116 can be configured to secure the detachable vaporizer 2104 to the smartphone 2102.

FIG. 21C illustrates the detachable vaporizer 2104. In an aspect, the detachable vaporizer 2104 can comprise the vaporizer 200 illustrated in FIG. 2 or the vaporizer 300 illustrated in FIG. 3, or any other vaporizer disclosed herein. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can receive air through an input/output port 2118. The received air can pass into a mixing chamber 2120. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can comprise or be coupled to one or more containers 2122 containing a vaporizable material, for example a fluid. A wick 2124, or a valve, can couple the one or more containers 2122 to the mixing chamber 2120. Coupling can operate independently of gravity, such as by capillary action or pressure drop through a valve. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can be configured to vaporize the vaporizable material from the one or more containers 2122 at controlled rates in response to mechanical input from the vaporize button 2110 and/or in response to control signals from the smartphone 2102 or another component. Vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be supplied by one or more replaceable cartridges. The one or more replaceable cartridges can contain a vaporizable material. If the vaporizable material is liquid, the cartridge can comprise the wick 2124 to aid in transporting the liquid to a mixing chamber 2120. In the alternative, some other transport mode can be used. In an aspect, one or more materials can be vaporized at a single time by the detachable vaporizer 2104.

In operation, a heating element 2126 can vaporize or nebulize the vaporizable material in the mixing chamber 2120, producing an inhalable vapor/mist that can be expelled via the exhaust port 2112. In an aspect, the heating element 2126 can be coupled to the wick (or a heated wick) 2124 and operatively coupled to (for example, in fluid communication with) the mixing chamber 2120. The heating element 2126 can comprise a nickel-chromium wire or the like, with a temperature sensor (not shown) such as a thermistor or thermocouple. Within definable limits, by controlling power to the wick 2124, a rate of vaporization can be independently controlled. The heating element 2126 can receive power through the input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108. For example, the heating element 2126 can receive power from a power supply built into the smartphone 2102. The heating element 2126 can vaporize or nebulize the vaporizable material in the mixing chamber 2120. The detachable vaporizer 2104 can exchange data signals with a processor of the smartphone 2102 through the input/output port 2106 and the input/output port 2108 for control of the detachable vaporizer 2104.

FIG. 21D illustrates a user interface 2130 that can be provided via a display of the smartphone 2102. User interface 2130 can comprise a header “Vapor App”2132, identifying to a user the application that is running on the smartphone 2102 is a vaping application. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Vape 2134 enables a user to engage the vaporizer 2104 to generate a vapor for inhalation.

The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Fluid Level 2136 that enables a user to receive information related to the amount of vaporizable material remaining in one or more containers of the vaporizer 2104. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Puff Count 2138 that enables a user to receive information related to an estimated number of inhalations remaining given current fluid levels in one or more containers of the vaporizer 2104.

The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element History 2140 that enables a user to receive historical information related to the user's vaping behavior. For example, when, where, what type of vaporizable material, what friends were in proximity, what music was playing on the smartphone 2102, combinations thereof and the like. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Friends 2142 that enables a user to engage a social networking module to access a friend list, determine locations of friends on the friend list, determine vaping history of friends on the friend list, message friends on the friend list, combinations thereof and the like.

The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Locations 2144 that enables a user to identify one or more locations providing vaping services, locations that are vaping friendly, and the like. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Supplies 2146 that enables a user to engage an e-commerce module to order vaping supplies, custom mixes, and the like.

The user interface 2130 can provides the user an option to select interface elements that will determine which vaporizable material to vaporize. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Mixes 2148 that enables a user to engage one or more containers that contain vaporizable material in a predefined amount and/or ratio. For example, selection of the interface element Mixes 2148 can result in engaging a single container containing a single type of vaporizable material or engaging a plurality of containers containing different types of vaporizable material in varying amounts. In an aspect, selection of the interface element Mixes 2148 can result in display of one or more additional interfaces.

The one or more additional interfaces can provide a user the ability to select an amount of each type of vaporizable material contained in a first container and/or second container. Any number of containers is contemplated. The user can be presented with a slider that adjusts the percentages of each type of vaporizable material based on dragging the slider. In an aspect, a mix can comprise 100% on one type of vaporizable material or any percent combination (e.g., 50/50, 75/25, 85/15, 95/5, etc. . . . ).

The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Smooth 2150 that enables a user to engage one or more heating casings, cooling elements, filter elements, and/or magnetic elements to provide the user with a smoother vaping experience. The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element Cool 2152 that enables a user to engage one or more cooling elements of the vaporizer 2104 to reduce the temperature of the vapor.

The user interface 2130 can provide a user with an interface element representing vaporizer 2104 battery power remaining 2154 and an interface element representing smartphone 2102 battery power remaining 2156. In an aspect, a user can selectively engage/disengage power to the vaporizer 2104 by sliding the interface element 2154 and/or the interface element 2156 to cover (disengage) or uncover (engage) power from a battery located in the vaporizer 2104 and a battery located in the smartphone 2102. In this manner, the user can choose to power the vaporizer 2104 from either the vaporizer battery or the smartphone battery, or both. The user can choose to cut all power to the vaporizer 2104 as well.

In an aspect, illustrated in FIG. 22A, FIG. 22B, and FIG. 22C, provided is an example vapor device 2200. As shown in FIG. 22A, the vapor device 2200 can comprise a smartphone 2102 and a detachable vaporizer 2202. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can comprise a vaporize button 2204 that can be configured to initiate a process of vaporizing a vaporizable material contained within the detachable vaporizer 2202, resulting in vapor exiting an exhaust port 2206 for inhalation by a user. The exhaust port 2206 can be hingedly attached to the detachable vaporizer 2202 to enable the exhaust port 2206 to be stored within a housing of the detachable vaporizer 2202. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can comprise an exhaust port release button 2208 to disengage the exhaust port 2206 when stored and locked within the housing of the detachable vaporizer 2202.

FIG. 22B illustrates the detachable vaporizer 2202 without being coupled to the smartphone 2102. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can comprise an input/output port 2210. The input/output port 2210 can couple to the input/output port (not shown) of the smartphone 2102. The input/output port of the smartphone and the input/output port 2210 can adhere to any proprietary standard. In another aspect, the input/output port of the smartphone and the input/output port 2210 can comprise one or more of, a USB connection, a dock connector (e.g., 20-24-30 pin connectors, lightning port connection, etc), Portable Digital Media Interface, and the like. The input/output port of the smartphone and the input/output port 2210 can be used to pass power and/or data between the smartphone 2102 and the detachable vaporizer 2202.

FIG. 22C illustrates the detachable vaporizer 2202. In an aspect, the detachable vaporizer 2202 can comprise the vaporizer 200 illustrated in FIG. 2 or the vaporizer 300 illustrated in FIG. 3, or any other vaporizer disclosed herein. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can receive air through an input/output port 2212. The received air can pass into a mixing chamber 2214. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can comprise or be coupled to one or more containers 2216 containing a vaporizable material, for example a fluid. A wick 2218, or a valve, can couple the one or more containers 2216 to the mixing chamber 2214. Coupling can operate independently of gravity, such as by capillary action or pressure drop through a valve. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can be configured to vaporize the vaporizable material from the one or more containers 2216 at controlled rates in response to mechanical input from the vaporize button 2208 and/or in response to control signals from the smartphone 2102 or another component. Vaporizable material (e.g., fluid) can be supplied by one or more replaceable cartridges. The one or more replaceable cartridges can contain a vaporizable material. If the vaporizable material is liquid, the cartridge can comprise the wick 2218 to aid in transporting the liquid to a mixing chamber 2214. In the alternative, some other transport mode can be used. In an aspect, one or more materials can be vaporized at a single time by the detachable vaporizer 2202.

In operation, a heating element 2220 can vaporize or nebulize the vaporizable material in the mixing chamber 2214, producing an inhalable vapor/mist that can be expelled via the exhaust port 2206. In an aspect, the heating element 2220 can be coupled to the wick (or a heated wick) 2218 and operatively coupled to (for example, in fluid communication with) the mixing chamber 2214. The heating element 2220 can comprise a nickel-chromium wire or the like, with a temperature sensor (not shown) such as a thermistor or thermocouple. Within definable limits, by controlling power to the wick 2218, a rate of vaporization can be independently controlled. In an aspect, the heating element 2220 can receive power through the input/output port 2210. For example, the heating element 2220 can receive power from a power supply built into the smartphone 2102. In another aspect, the heating element 2220 can receive power through one or more batteries 2222. The one or more batteries can be rechargeable. The one or more batteries can comprise a lithium-ion battery (including thin film lithium ion batteries), a lithium ion polymer battery, a nickel-cadmium battery, a nickel metal hydride battery, a lead-acid battery, combinations thereof, and the like. In an aspect, the one or more batteries 2222 can exclusively provide power to the detachable vaporizer 2202 and/or can be configured to provide power to both the detachable vaporizer 2202 and the smartphone 2102. In an aspect, the one or more batteries 2222 can provide backup power for the smartphone 2102. In another aspect, the one or more batteries 2222 can charge one or more batteries internal to the smartphone 2102. In another aspect, the one or more batteries 2222 can directly power the smartphone 2102. The heating element 2220 can vaporize or nebulize the vaporizable material in the mixing chamber 2214. The detachable vaporizer 2202 can exchange data signals with a processor of the smartphone 2102 through the input/output port 2210 for control of the detachable vaporizer 2202.

In an aspect, illustrated in FIG. 23, provided is a method 2300 comprising receiving, at an electronic vapor device, a command to generate a vapor via an electronic communication device at 2310. The command to generate a vapor via a detachable vaporizer can be received via an input interface located on the detachable vaporizer and/or via an input interface located on an electronic communication device. The electronic communication device can comprise one or more of a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, and combinations thereof.

The method 2300 can further comprise drawing power from one or more of a first power source located in the electronic communication device or a second power source located in the electronic vapor device at 2320. The first power source can comprise one or more batteries and the second power source can comprise one or more batteries. The one or more batteries can be rechargeable. The one or more batteries can comprise one or more of, a lithium-ion battery (including thin film lithium ion batteries), a lithium ion polymer battery, a nickel-cadmium battery, a nickel metal hydride battery, a lead-acid battery, and combinations thereof. The one or more batteries can be configured for one or more of, wireless charging (e.g., inductive and/or conductive), supplying a constant DC or pulsed DC power source to a battery being charged, a motion-powered charger, a pulse charger, a solar charger, a wind charger, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) charger, and combinations thereof. Drawing power from the first power source can comprise drawing power through an input/output port coupling the electronic communication device and the electronic vapor device. The method 2300 can further comprise providing power from the second power source to the electronic communication device. The method 2300 can further comprise applying the power to heat a vaporizable material to create the vapor vaporizer at 2330. The method 2300 can further comprise expelling the vapor through an exhaust port for inhalation by a user vaporizer at 2340.

In another aspect, provided is an apparatus comprising a detachable vaporizer comprising, an air intake, a vapor output, a container for storing a vaporizable material, and a mixing chamber coupled to the air intake for receiving air, the container for receiving the vaporizable material, and a heating element configured for heating the vaporizable material and the received air to generate a heated vapor. The apparatus can further comprise an electronic communication device, coupled to the detachable vaporizer via an input/output port, comprising a user input interface for controlling one or more functions of the detachable vaporizer and a first power source configured to supply power to the heating element.

The electronic communication device can comprise one or more of a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, and combinations thereof. The input/output port can comprise one or more of a USB connection, a dock connector, a Portable Digital Media Interface, and combinations thereof.

The power source can comprise one or more batteries. The one or more batteries can be rechargeable. The one or more batteries can comprise one or more of, a lithium-ion battery (including thin film lithium ion batteries), a lithium ion polymer battery, a nickel-cadmium battery, a nickel metal hydride battery, a lead-acid battery, and combinations thereof. The one or more batteries can be configured for one or more of, wireless charging (e.g., inductive and/or conductive), supplying a constant DC or pulsed DC power source to a battery being charged, a motion-powered charger, a pulse charger, a solar charger, a wind charger, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) charger, and combinations thereof.

The detachable vaporizer can comprise a cooling element coupled to the mixing chamber, configured for receiving and cooling the heated vapor and providing the cooled vapor to the vapor output. The cooling element can comprise one or more of, a coil, a cooling grid, a cylindrical structure, a single cooled element, an airlock system, or any combination thereof. The detachable vaporizer can comprise a heating casing enclosing the heating element. The heating casing can comprise ceramic, metal, and/or porcelain. The detachable vaporizer can comprise a magnetic element coupled to the cooling element, configured for receiving and magnetizing the cooled vapor and providing the cooled vapor to the vapor output. The detachable vaporizer can comprise a second power source configured to supply power to the heating element. The user input interface for controlling one or more functions of the detachable vaporizer can be configured to enable and disable the first power source and the second power source.

In another aspect, provided is an apparatus comprising an air intake, a vapor output, a container for storing a vaporizable material, a mixing chamber coupled to the air intake for receiving air, the container for receiving the vaporizable material, and a heating element configured for heating the vaporizable material and the received air to generate a heated vapor, a heating casing enclosing the heating element, a power source configured to supply power to the heating element, a cooling element coupled to the mixing chamber, configured for receiving and cooling the heated vapor and providing the cooled vapor to the vapor output, and an input/output port configured for coupling to an electronic communication device to exchange one or more of power and data.

The power source can comprise one or more batteries. The one or more batteries can be rechargeable. The one or more batteries can comprise one or more of, a lithium-ion battery (including thin film lithium ion batteries), a lithium ion polymer battery, a nickel-cadmium battery, a nickel metal hydride battery, a lead-acid battery, and combinations thereof. The one or more batteries are configured for one or more of, wireless charging (e.g., inductive and/or conductive), supplying a constant DC or pulsed DC power source to a battery being charged, a motion-powered charger, a pulse charger, a solar charger, a wind charger, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) charger, and combinations thereof.

The input/output port can comprise one or more of a USB connection, a dock connector, a Portable Digital Media Interface, and combinations thereof. The electronic communication device can comprise one or more of a smartphone, a smart watch, a tablet, a laptop, and combinations thereof.

The power source can be further configured to provide power to the electronic communication device. The cooling element can comprise one or more of, a coil, a cooling grid, a cylindrical structure, a single cooled element, an airlock system, or any combination thereof. The heating casing can comprise ceramic, metal, and/or porcelain. The apparatus can further comprise a magnetic element coupled to the cooling element, configured for receiving and magnetizing the cooled vapor and providing the cooled vapor to the vapor output.

In view of the exemplary systems described supra, methodologies that can be implemented in accordance with the disclosed subject matter have been described with reference to several flow diagrams. While for purposes of simplicity of explanation, the methodologies are shown and described as a series of blocks, it is to be understood and appreciated that the claimed subject matter is not limited by the order of the blocks, as some blocks may occur in different orders and/or concurrently with other blocks from what is depicted and described herein. Moreover, not all illustrated blocks can be required to implement the methodologies described herein. Additionally, it should be further appreciated that the methodologies disclosed herein are capable of being stored on an article of manufacture to facilitate transporting and transferring such methodologies to computers.

Those of skill would further appreciate that the various illustrative logical blocks, modules, circuits, and algorithm steps described in connection with the aspects disclosed herein can be implemented as electronic hardware, computer software, or combinations of both. To clearly illustrate this interchangeability of hardware and software, various illustrative components, blocks, modules, circuits, and steps have been described above generally in terms of their functionality. Whether such functionality is implemented as hardware or software depends upon the particular application and design constraints imposed on the overall system. Skilled artisans may implement the described functionality in varying ways for each particular application, but such implementation decisions should not be interpreted as causing a departure from the scope of the present disclosure.

As used in this application, the terms “component,”“module,”“system,” and the like are intended to refer to a computer-related entity, either hardware, a combination of hardware and software, software, or software in execution. For example, a component can be, but is not limited to being, a process running on a processor, a processor, an object, an executable, a thread of execution, a program, and/or a computer. By way of illustration, both an application running on a server and the server can be a component. One or more components may reside within a process and/or thread of execution and a component can be localized on one computer and/or distributed between two or more computers.

As used herein, a nebulizing device uses oxygen, compressed air or ultrasonic power to break up medical solutions and suspensions into small aerosol droplets that may be directly inhaled from a mouthpiece of the device. It may be electronic and battery powered as well known in the art. The definition of an “aerosol” as used herein is a “mixture of gas and liquid particles,” and the best example of a naturally occurring aerosol is mist, formed when small vaporized water particles mixed with hot ambient air are cooled down and condense into a fine cloud of visible airborne water droplets.

As used herein, a “vapor” includes mixtures of a carrier gas or gaseous mixture (for example, air) with any one or more of a dissolved gas, suspended solid particles, or suspended liquid droplets, wherein a substantial fraction of the particles or droplets if present are characterized by an average diameter of not greater than three microns. As used herein, an “aerosol” has the same meaning as “vapor,” except for requiring the presence of at least one of particles or droplets. A substantial fraction means 10% or greater; however, it should be appreciated that higher fractions of small (<3 micron) particles or droplets can be desirable, up to and including 100%. It should further be appreciated that, to simulate smoke, average particle or droplet size can be less than three microns, for example, can be less than one micron with particles or droplets distributed in the range of 0.01 to 1 micron. A vaporizer may include any device or assembly that produces a vapor or aerosol from a carrier gas or gaseous mixture and at least one vaporizable material. An aerosolizer is a species of vaporizer, and as such is included in the meaning of vaporizer as used herein, except where specifically disclaimed.

Various aspects presented in terms of systems can comprise a number of components, modules, and the like. It is to be understood and appreciated that the various systems may include additional components, modules, etc. and/or may not include all of the components, modules, etc. discussed in connection with the figures. A combination of these approaches can also be used.

In addition, the various illustrative logical blocks, modules, and circuits described in connection with certain aspects disclosed herein can be implemented or performed with a general purpose processor, a digital signal processor (DSP), an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or other programmable logic device, discrete gate or transistor logic, discrete hardware components, or any combination thereof designed to perform the functions described herein. A general purpose processor can be a microprocessor, but in the alternative, the processor can be any conventional processor, controller, microcontroller, system-on-a-chip, or state machine. A processor may also be implemented as a combination of computing devices, e.g., a combination of a DSP and a microprocessor, a plurality of microprocessors, one or more microprocessors in conjunction with a DSP core, or any other such configuration.

Operational aspects disclosed herein can be embodied directly in hardware, in a software module executed by a processor, or in a combination of the two. A software module may reside in RAM memory, flash memory, ROM memory, EPROM memory, EEPROM memory, registers, hard disk, a removable disk, a CD-ROM, a DVD disk, or any other form of storage medium known in the art. An exemplary storage medium is coupled to the processor such the processor can read information from, and write information to, the storage medium. In the alternative, the storage medium can be integral to the processor. The processor and the storage medium may reside in an ASIC or may reside as discrete components in another device.

Furthermore, the one or more versions can be implemented as a method, apparatus, or article of manufacture using standard programming and/or engineering techniques to produce software, firmware, hardware, or any combination thereof to control a computer to implement the disclosed aspects. Non-transitory computer readable media can include but are not limited to magnetic storage devices (e.g., hard disk, floppy disk, magnetic strips . . . ), optical disks (e.g., compact disk (CD), digital versatile disk (DVD) . . . ), smart cards, and flash memory devices (e.g., card, stick). Those skilled in the art will recognize many modifications can be made to this configuration without departing from the scope of the disclosed aspects.

The previous description of the disclosed aspects is provided to enable any person skilled in the art to make or use the present disclosure. Various modifications to these aspects will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the generic principles defined herein can be applied to other embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the disclosure. Thus, the present disclosure is not intended to be limited to the embodiments shown herein but is to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principles and novel features disclosed herein.

Unless otherwise expressly stated, it is in no way intended that any method set forth herein be construed as requiting that its steps be performed in a specific order. Accordingly, where a method claim does not actually recite an order to be followed by its steps or it is not otherwise specifically stated in the claims or descriptions that the steps are to be limited to a specific order, it is in no way intended that an order be inferred, in any respect. This holds for any possible non-express basis for interpretation, including: matters of logic with respect to arrangement of steps or operational flow; plain meaning derived from grammatical organization or punctuation; the number or type of embodiments described in the specification.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made without departing from the scope or spirit. Other embodiments will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice disclosed herein. It is intended that the specification and examples be considered as exemplary only, with a true scope and spirit being indicated by the following claims.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Low temperature electronic vaporization device and methods JUUL LABS, INC. 16 August 2012 09 August 2016
Cellular device case with auxiliary device power LOTUS VAPING TECHNOLOGIES, LLC. 23 July 2014 19 March 2015
Remote control of a device via text message VERIZON PATENT AND LICENSING INC. 05 December 2013 11 June 2015
Determining message format according to status information PERFETTO JOSH,CHATTERJEE SAURAV,SCHRAMM STEVEN D,WHITE MIKE 23 August 2006 22 February 2007
Vapor dispensation system and refill cartridge CRYSTAL COAST INNOVATIONS 14 July 2014 17 February 2015
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