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Patent Analysis of

Generating and executing a control flow

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10061590

Application Number

US14/980024

Application Date

28 December 2015

Publication Date

28 August 2018

Current Assignee

MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC.

International Classification

G06F9/38,G06F15/78,G11C11/408,G11C7/06,G11C11/4096

Cooperative Classification

G06F9/3877,G06F15/7821,G11C7/06,G11C11/4096,G11C7/1006

Inventor

WHEELER, KYLE B.,MURPHY, RICHARD C.,MANNING, TROY A.,KLEIN, DEAN A.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10061590 Generating executing control 1 US10061590 Generating executing control 2 US10061590 Generating executing control 3
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Abstract

The present disclosure provide apparatuses and methods related to generating and executing a control flow. An example apparatus can include a first device configured to generate control flow instructions, and a second device including an array of memory cells, an execution unit to execute the control flow instructions, and a controller configured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array.

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Claims

1. An apparatus comprising:

a first device configured to generate control flow instructions; anda second device, wherein the second device is a memory device, including:

an array of memory cells; an execution unit, coupled to the array, to execute the control flow instructions; and a controller configured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the execution unit comprises sensing circuitry, the sensing circuitry comprising a number of sense amplifiers and a number of compute components comprising transistors formed on pitch with memory cells of the array.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the controller controls the execution of the control flow instructions by controlling the sensing circuitry to perform at least one logical operation without performing a sense line address access.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the at least one logical operation includes at least one logical operation selected from the group comprising:

an AND operation; an OR operation; and an INVERT operation.

5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the controller is located on the first device and is configured to translate the control flow instructions into the at least one logical operation.

6. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the first device comprises a host having an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), and wherein none of the control flow instructions are executed by the ALU of the host.

7. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the first device is one of a central processing unit (CPU), a system on a chip (SoC), an application specific integrated circuitry (ASIC), and a memory buffer.

8. A method comprising:

dynamically generating control flow instructions on a first device; andexecuting the control flow instructions on a second device wherein the second device is a memory device, the second device comprising:

an array of memory cells; and a controller configured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array.

9. The method of claim 8, wherein generating the control flow instructions includes the first device fetching the control flow instructions from memory.

10. The method of claim 9, wherein the method includes decoding the control flow instructions on the first device.

11. The method of claim 9, wherein the method includes decoding at least partially decoding the control flow instructions on the first device and at least partially decoding the control flow instructions on the second device.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein the method includes the first device maintaining at least partial control over the control flow instructions while the control flow instructions are executed on the second device.

13. The method of claim 8, wherein executing the control flow instructions includes executing boolean control operations.

14. The method of claim 8, wherein executing the control flow instructions includes performing operations on data stored in the array other than a data write operation, a data read operation, and a data refresh operation.

15. The method of claim 8, wherein the method includes generating at least a portion of the control flow instructions on the first device while a different portion of the control flow instructions are being executed on the second device.

16. The method of claim 8, wherein dynamically generating control flow instructions includes:

generating a first number of control flow instructions that are associated with a first operation from a plurality of operations; and generating a second number of control flow instructions that are associated with a second operation from the plurality of operations.

17. An apparatus comprising:

a processing device configured to generate a plurality of command flows; anda plurality of memory devices, each of the plurality of memory devices including:

a memory array; sensing circuitry; and a controller configured to operate the sensing circuitry to concurrently execute command flow instructions corresponding to the command flows on data stored in the memory array.

18. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein each of the respective plurality of memory devices is configured to execute command flow instructions corresponding to a different one of the plurality of command flows.

19. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein each of the plurality of command flows is generated serially.

20. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the plurality of memory devices are configured to concurrently execute command flow instructions corresponding to different portions of at least one of the plurality of command flows.

21. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the controller of each of the respective plurality of memory devices is configured to receive command flow instructions from the processing device.

22. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein:

the sensing circuitry of each of the respective plurality of memory devices comprises a plurality of sense amplifiers and a plurality of compute components; the plurality of compute components comprise transistors formed on pitch with memory cells of the respective memory array; and the sensing circuitry is operated by the respective controller to execute the command flow instructions, wherein executing the command flow instructions includes performing at least one logical operation without transferring data via an input/output line of the array.

23. The apparatus of claim 22, wherein the at least one logical operation is selected from the group including:

an AND operation; an operation; and an invert operation.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    rising: a first device con
    • gured to generate control flow instructions; anda second device
    • wherein the second device is a memory device, including: an array of memory cells; an execution unit,
    • upled to the array, to execute the control flow instructions; and a controller co
    • igured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array. 2. The apparatus of
    • laim 1, wherein the executio unit c
      • mprises sensing ci cuitry, t
  • 8
    g: dynamica ly generat
    • g control flow instructions on a first device; andexecuting the co
    • rol flow instructions on a second device wherein the second device is a memory device, the second device comprising: an array of memory cells; and a controller con
    • gured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array. 9. The method of clai
    • 8, wherein generating th contro
      • flow instructions includes the first device fetching the control flow instructions from memory. 10. The method of cla
    • m 8, wherein executing the control
      • flow instructions includes executing boolean control operations. 14. The method of cla
    • m 8, wherein executing the control
      • flow instructions includes performing operations on data stored in the array other than a data write operation, a data read operation, and a data refresh operation. 15. The method of cla
    • m 8, wherein the method in ludes g
      • nerating at least a portion of the control flow instructions on the first device while a different portion of the control flow instructions are being executed on the second device. 16. The method of cla
    • m 8, wherein dynamically g neratin
      • control flow instructions includes: generating a first number of control flow instructions that are associated with a first operation from a plurality of operations; and generating a second number of control flow instructions that are associated with a second operation from the plurality of operations. 17. An apparatus comp
  • 17
    ising: a process ng device
    • nfigured to generate a plurality of command flows; anda plurality of me
    • ry devices, each of the plurality of memory devices including: a memory array; sensing circuitry; an
    • a controller conf
    • ured to operate the sensing circuitry to concurrently execute command flow instructions corresponding to the command flows on data stored in the memory array. 18. The apparatus of c
    • aim 17, wherein each of the re pective
      • plurality of memory devices is configured to execute command flow instructions corresponding to a different one of the plurality of command flows. 19. The apparatus of c
    • aim 17, wherein each of the pl rality
      • f command flows is generated serially. 20. The apparatus of c
    • aim 17, wherein the plurality f memor
      • devices are configured to concurrently execute command flow instructions corresponding to different portions of at least one of the plurality of command flows. 21. The apparatus of c
    • aim 17, wherein the controller of each
      • of the respective plurality of memory devices is configured to receive command flow instructions from the processing device. 22. The apparatus of c
    • aim 17, wherein: the sensing c rcuitry
      • of each of the respective plurality of memory devices comprises a plurality f sense a
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Description

PRIORITY INFORMATION

This application is a Non-Provisional of U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/100,717, filed Jan. 7, 2015, the contents of which are included by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates generally to semiconductor memory apparatuses and methods, and more particularly, to apparatuses and methods related to generating and executing a control flow.

BACKGROUND

Memory devices are typically provided as internal, semiconductor, integrated circuits in computers or other electronic systems. There are many different types of memory including volatile and non-volatile memory. Volatile memory can require power to maintain its data (e.g., host data, error data, etc.) and includes random access memory (RAM), dynamic random access memory (DRAM), static random access memory (SRAM), synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), and thyristor random access memory (TRAM), among others. Non-volatile memory can provide persistent data by retaining stored data when not powered and can include NAND flash memory, NOR flash memory, and resistance variable memory such as phase change random access memory (PCRAM), resistive random access memory (RRAM), and magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM), such as spin torque transfer random access memory (STT RAM), among others.

Electronic systems often include a number of processing resources (e.g., one or more processors), which may retrieve and execute instructions (e.g., control flow) and store the results of the executed instructions to a suitable location. A processor can comprise a number of functional units (e.g., herein referred to as functional unit circuitry) such as arithmetic logic unit (ALU) circuitry, floating point unit (FPU) circuitry, and/or a combinatorial logic block, for example, which can execute instructions to perform logical operations such as AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR, and XOR logical operations on data (e.g., one or more operands).

A number of components in an electronic system may be involved in providing instructions to the functional unit circuitry for execution. The instructions may be generated, for instance, by a processing resource such as a controller and/or host processor. Data (e.g., the operands on which the instructions will be executed to perform the logical operations) may be stored in a memory array that is accessible by the functional unit circuitry. The instructions and/or data may be retrieved from the memory array and sequenced and/or buffered before the functional unit circuitry begins to execute instructions on the data. Furthermore, as different types of operations may be executed in one or multiple clock cycles through the functional unit circuitry, intermediate results of the operations and/or data may also be sequenced and/or buffered.

In many instances, the processing resources (e.g., processor and/or associated functional unit circuitry) may be external to the memory array, and data can be accessed (e.g., via a bus between the processing resources and the memory array) to execute instructions. Data can be moved from the memory array to registers external to the memory array via a bus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system in accordance with the prior art.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a control flow and the execution of the control flow in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6 illustrates a schematic diagram of a portion of a memory array in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram illustrating sensing circuitry having selectable logical operation selection logic in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 8 is a logic table illustrating selectable logic operation results implemented by a sensing circuitry in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 9 illustrates a timing diagram associated with performing a logical operation and a shifting operation using sensing circuitry in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Examples of the present disclosure provide apparatuses and methods related to generating and executing a control flow. An example apparatus can include a first device configured to generate control flow instructions, and a second device including an array of memory cells, an execution unit to execute the control flow instructions, and a controller configured to control an execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in the array.

As used herein, a control flow refers to an order in which instructions (e.g., statements and/or function calls of a program) are executed. The order in which a number of instructions are executed can vary according to jumps, unconditional branches, conditional branches, loops, returns, and/or halts, among other instruction types associated with a program. In a number of examples, the number of instructions can also be function calls. An if-then statement is an example of a conditional branch. The condition evaluated in association with the if-then statement can be evaluated by a first device (e.g., a host processor) to generate a control flow. For example, a first set of instructions or a second set of instructions can be executed by a second device given the evaluation of a condition by the first device. The first device can further evaluate loops (e.g., for loops, while loops, etc.), for instance, to generate a number of instructions that are executed by a second device and an order associated with the number of instructions.

In various previous approaches, the control flow is generated and the instructions associated with the control flow are executed by a same device (e.g., a host processor). For example, the same device that generates a number of instructions and an order of execution associated with the instructions also executes the number of instructions according to the generated order. Generating the control flow and executing the instructions associated with the control flow in a same device can include generating the control flow before executing the instructions. For example, the control flow cannot be generated and the instructions executed at the same time if a single device is generating the control flow and executing the associated instructions.

In a number of examples according to the present disclosure, a first device can generate the control flow and a second device can execute the instructions corresponding to the control flow. For example, the control flow can be generated concurrently with the execution of the control flow. As used herein, instructions corresponding to a control flow, which may be referred to as “control flow instructions,” are meant to refer to instructions that involve manipulating data. For instance, instructions that involve manipulating data include instructions involving performing computations on data, which can include mathematical operations (e.g., addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division), which can include performing various Boolean logic operations such as AND, OR, invert, etc. Examples of instructions that do not involve manipulating data include memory commands such as data read, data write, and data refresh operations.

As an example, the first device can be a host. A host can include one of a central processing unit (CPU), a system on a chip (SoC), and an application specific integrated circuitry (ASIC), for instance. As an example, a SoC can comprise one or more processors and one or more controllers (e.g., channel controllers) coupled to a number of memory devices. A second device can be a memory device including a memory array, an execution unit, which can comprise sensing circuitry that includes a number of compute components, and a controller that controls of the execution unit to execute the instructions. The controller of the memory device can operate the compute components of the execution unit to coordinate the execution of the instructions associated with the control flow.

As an example, the instructions generated by a host can be executed by performing a number of operations. For example, an “add” instruction includes performing various logical operations. As used herein, instructions and operations are used interchangeably. Operations can be compare operations, swap operations, and/or logical operations (e.g., AND operations, OR operations, SHIFT operations, INVERT operations etc.). However, embodiments are not limited to these examples. As used herein, executing Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) operations is defined as performing a same operation on multiple elements in parallel (e.g., simultaneously). As used herein, an element is a numerical value that can be stored (e.g., as a bit-vector) in a memory array.

In the following detailed description of the present disclosure, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration how one or more embodiments of the disclosure may be practiced. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those of ordinary skill in the art to practice the embodiments of this disclosure, and it is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that process, electrical, and/or structural changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. As used herein, the designators “J,”“N,”“R,”“S,”“U,”“V,”“W,” and “X” particularly with respect to reference numerals in the drawings, indicates that a number of the particular feature so designated can be included. As used herein, “a number of” a particular thing can refer to one or more of such things (e.g., a number of memory arrays can refer to one or more memory arrays).

The figures herein follow a numbering convention in which the first digit or digits correspond to the drawing figure number and the remaining digits identify an element or component in the drawing. Similar elements or components between different figures may be identified by the use of similar digits. For example, 110 may reference element “10” in FIG. 1, and a similar element may be referenced as 210 in FIG. 2. As will be appreciated, elements shown in the various embodiments herein can be added, exchanged, and/or eliminated so as to provide a number of additional embodiments of the present disclosure. In addition, as will be appreciated, the proportion and the relative scale of the elements provided in the figures are intended to illustrate certain embodiments of the present invention, and should not be taken in a limiting sense.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system 100 in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. As used herein, a host 110, a memory device 120, a memory array 130, and/or sensing circuitry 150 might also be separately considered an “apparatus” and/or a device.

System 100 includes a host 110 coupled to memory device 120, which includes a memory array 130. Host 110 can be a host system such as a personal laptop computer, a desktop computer, a digital camera, a mobile telephone, or a memory card reader, among various other types of hosts. Host 110 can include a system motherboard and/or backplane and can include a number of processing resources (e.g., one or more processors, microprocessors, or some other type of controlling circuitry) such as a CPU, SoC, ASIC, and/or memory buffer (e.g., registered dual in-line memory module (DIMM)). The system 100 can include separate integrated circuits or both the host 110 and the memory device 120 can be on the same integrated circuit. The system 100 can be, for instance, a server system and/or a high performance computing (HPC) system and/or a portion thereof. Although the example shown in FIG. 1 illustrates a system having a Von Neumann architecture, embodiments of the present disclosure can be implemented in non-von Neumann architectures (e.g., a Turing machine), which may not include one or more components (e.g., CPU, ALU, etc.) often associated with a Von Neumann architecture.

For clarity, the system 100 has been simplified to focus on features with particular relevance to the present disclosure. The memory array 130 can be a DRAM array, SRAM array, STT RAM array, PCRAM array, TRAM array, RRAM array, NAND flash array, and/or NOR flash array, for instance. The array 130 can comprise memory cells arranged in rows coupled by access lines (which may be referred to herein as word lines or select lines) and columns coupled by sense lines (which may be referred to herein as digit lines or data lines). Although a single array 130 is shown in FIG. 1, embodiments are not so limited. For instance, memory device 120 may include a number of arrays 130 (e.g., a number of banks of DRAM cells). An example DRAM array is described in association with FIG. 6.

The memory device 120 includes address circuitry 142 to latch address signals provided over an I/O bus 156 (e.g., a data bus) through I/O circuitry 144. Address signals are received and decoded by a row decoder 146 and a column decoder 152 to access the memory array 130. Data can be read from memory array 130 by sensing voltage and/or current changes on the sense lines using sensing circuitry 150. The sensing circuitry 150 can read and latch a page (e.g., row) of data from the memory array 130. The I/O circuitry 144 can be used for bi-directional data communication with host 110 over the I/O bus 156. The write circuitry 148 is used to write data to the memory array 130.

Controller 140 decodes signals provided by control bus 154 from the host 110. These signals can include chip enable signals, write enable signals, and address latch signals that are used to control operations performed on the memory array 130, including data read, data write, and data erase operations. In various embodiments, the controller 140 is responsible for executing instructions from the host 110. The controller 140 can be a state machine, a sequencer, or some other type of controller.

As described further below, the controller 140 can comprise of multiple controllers (e.g., separate controller units). In a number of embodiments, the sensing circuitry 150 can comprise a number of sense amplifiers and a number of compute components, which may comprise an accumulator and can be used to perform logical operations (e.g., on data associated with complementary sense lines). In a number of embodiments, the sensing circuitry (e.g., 150) can be used to perform (e.g., execute) operations on data stored in array 130 and to store the results of the sort operation back to the array 130 without transferring data via a sense line address access (e.g., without firing a column decode signal) and/or without enabling a local I/O line coupled to the sensing circuitry. As such, operations can be performed using sensing circuitry 150 rather than and/or in addition to being performed by processing resources external to the sensing circuitry 150 (e.g., by a processor associated with host 110 and/or other processing circuitry, such as ALU circuitry, located on device 120 (e.g., on controller 140 or elsewhere)). In a number of embodiments the sensing circuitry 150 can be referred to as an execution unit. The execution unit may be coupled to the memory array 130 and/or may be decoupled from the memory array 130.

As such, in a number of embodiments, registers and/or an ALU external to array 130 and sensing circuitry 150 may not be needed to perform various operations as the sensing circuitry 150 can be controlled to perform the appropriate computations involved in performing operations using the address space of memory array 130. Additionally, operations can be performed without the use of an external processing resource. For instance, an external processing resource such as host 110 may generate a control flow, but the host 110 (e.g., an ALU of the host) may not be used to perform computations associated with executing the instructions corresponding to the control flow.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system 200 in accordance with the prior art. The system 200 includes a host 210, a memory device 220-1, and a memory device 220-2. The host 210 includes an ALU 260 and cache 262. Memory device 220-1 includes memory array 230.

As used herein, the host 210 is a first device and the memory device 220-1 is a second device. Memory device 220-1 and/or memory device 220-2 can be volatile memory and/or non-volatile memory. For example, memory device 220-1 can be a volatile memory (e.g., DRAM) and memory device 220-2 can be non-volatile memory (e.g., a hard drive, solid state drive (SSD), etc.).

In a number of previous approaches, the host 210 can request data from memory device 220-1. The memory device 220-1 can transfer the data stored in memory array 230 to the host 210. The memory device 220-1 can retrieve the data from memory device 220-2 (e.g., via a suitable interface represented by arrow 272) if memory device 220-1 does not have the requested data. The memory device 220-1 can store the data retrieved from memory device 220-2 in memory array 230. The data can be stored in cache 262 by the host 210. The data can be, for example, a set of executable instructions associated with performing a particular task (e.g., a program).

The ALU 260 can be used by the host 210 to identify the location of a number of instructions that need to be executed from the data stored in the cache 262. After each instruction is identified, by the ALU 260, the host 210 can execute the identified instruction (as indicated by arrow 268). For example, the host 210 can generate a control flow and can further execute the instructions associated with the control flow.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system 300 in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. The system 300 includes a host 310, a memory device 320-1, and a memory device 320-2. In this example, the host 310 includes an ALU 360 and cache 362, and the memory device 320-1 includes a controller 340, memory array 330, and sensing circuitry 350.

The host 310 can be referred to as a first device and can comprise a CPU, SoC which may include a number of processors and a number of channel controllers (not shown), for example, and/or an ASIC, among other types of devices. The host 310 can be used to generate a control flow, which includes instructions and an execution order associated with the instructions. In a number of examples, the host 310 can utilize the ALU 360 to generate the control flow. Generating a control flow is further described in FIG. 5.

The host 310 can request data associated with a program from memory device 320-1. The memory device can retrieve the requested data from memory array 330. The memory device can return the data to host 310. The host can store the data in cache 362 and utilize the ALU 360 to generate a control flow. In a number of examples, the data can be data associated with a set of executable instructions (e.g., a program). The program can be represented in various formats. For example, the program can be represented as a source file, an assembly file, an object file, and/or an executable file. In a number of examples, the program can be generated dynamically. For example, the program can be provided via assembly file and/or a buffer.

The data retrieved from memory array 330 can be used by host 310 to generate a control flow. For example, the ALU 360 can be used to retrieve a number of instructions that represent operations. FIG. 5 further describes the process of generating instructions.

In contrast to the example of FIG. 2, in which the control flow instructions generated by host 210 are executed on the host 210 (e.g., as indicated by arrow 268), in the example shown in FIG. 3, the host 310 can provide the control flow instructions and an order of execution associated with the instructions to the memory device 320-1 for execution on the device 320-1 (e.g., via an execution unit local to device 320-1). For example, although host 310 includes an ALU 360, which may be configured to execute control flow instructions generated by host 310, in a number of embodiments, the execution of the control flow instructions generated by host 310 occurs on a separate device (e.g., memory device 320-1). As an example, the memory device 320-1 can receive the control flow instructions from the host 310 at controller 340. The controller 340 can receive the instructions via a buffer, a memory array, and/or shift circuitry of memory device 320-1, for instance.

The controller 340 can control execution of the control flow instructions on data stored in memory cells in the memory array 330. For example, the controller 340 can control the execution of the instructions by controlling the sensing circuitry 350, which may serve as an execution unit, to perform a number of operations associated with the control flow instructions. In contrast, the memory device 220-1 shown in FIG. 2 may have a controller (not shown); however, such a controller would control execution of instructions other than command flow instructions. For example, a controller on device 220-1 might control execution of memory command operations such as data read, data write, and data refresh operations, which do not involve manipulation of data associated with computations, but would not control execution of command flow instructions.

Control flow instructions can include a number of operations including AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations. The number of operations can include other operations. For example the operations can be any number of binary operations and non-binary operations such as an addition operation, a multiplication operation, and/or a comparison operation. In a number of examples, the number of operations can be performed without transferring data via an input/output (I/O) line 634 in FIG. 6.

The controller 340 can control a plurality of compute components (e.g., compute components 631-0, 631-1, 631-2, 631-3, 631-4, 631-5, 631-6, 631-7, . . . , 631-X in FIG. 6, referred to generally as compute components 631) coupled to a plurality of sense lines (e.g., sense lines 605-0, 605-1, 605-2, 605-3, 605-4, 605-5, 605-6, 605-7, . . . , 605-S in FIG. 6, referred to generally as sense lines 605) and formed on pitch with the plurality of memory cells (e.g., memory cells 603-0, 603-1, 603-2, 603-3, 603-4, 603-5, 603-6, . . . , 603-J in FIG. 6, referred to generally as memory cells 603) in array 330. The controller can also control a plurality of sense amplifiers (e.g., sense amplifiers 606-0, 606-1, 606-2, 606-3, 606-4, 606-5, 606-6, 606-7, . . . , 606-U in FIG. 6, referred to generally as sense amplifiers 606) coupled to the plurality of compute components 631. The controller 340 can control the compute components 631 and the sense amplifiers 606 to execute the instructions.

For example, the controller 340 can activate a number of sense lines 605 and access lines (e.g., access lines 604-0, 606-1, 606-2, 606-3, 606-4, 606-5, 606-6, . . . , 606-R in FIG. 6, referred to generally as access lines 604) in array 330 to read the data in the array 330. The data can be stored in the sense amplifiers 606 and/or the compute components 631. The controller 340 can further activate the sense lines 605, access lines 604, and/or latches associated with the compute components 631 and/or sense amplifiers 606 to execute a number of operations on the data stored in the sense lines 605 and/or the compute components 631.

The controller 340 can also activate the sense lines 605 and/or the access lines 604 to store the results of the operations (e.g., the results of the execution of the number of instructions) back to the array 330. In a number of examples, the controller 340 can further transfer the results of the operations and/or an indication that the operations have been executed back to host 310.

In a number of examples, the controller 340 can comprise a number of controllers. For example, the controller 340 can comprise a first controller and a number of second controllers. The first controller can receive the number of instructions from the host 310. The instructions can include instructions to perform, for example, an addition operation. The first controller can translate the number of instructions into a number of AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations, for example. The first controller can provide the AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations to the number of second controllers. The number of second controllers can control the compute components 631 and the sense amplifiers 606 to execute the AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations. For example, the number of second controllers can activate the sense lines 605, access lines 604, and/or latches associated with the compute components 631 and/or sense amplifiers 606 to execute the AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations. In a number of examples, each of the number of second controllers can control the compute components 631 and/or the sense amplifiers 606 to execute at least one of the AND operations, OR operations, INVERT operations, and/or SHIFT operations.

In accordance with a number of embodiments, a device on which a control flow is generated (e.g., host 310) can be independent from a device on which the corresponding control flow instructions are executed (memory device 320-1). As an example, a control flow can be generated in a number of portions. For instance, the host 310 can generate a control flow that includes a first portion and a second portion, with the first portion comprising a first number of control flow instructions and the second portion comprising a second number of control flow instructions. As an example, the host 310 can generate a first number of instructions that are associated with the first portion of the control flow and provide them to the memory device 320-1. The host 310 can generate the second number of instructions that are associated with the second portion of the control flow while the execution of the first number of instructions is occurring on the memory device 320-1 (e.g., the generation of the second portion of the control flow can occur concurrently with execution of the first portion of the control flow). The memory device 320-1 can return a result of the execution of the first number of instructions to the host 310 and the host 310 can provide the second number of instructions to the memory device 320-1. The memory device 320-1 can provide the result of the execution of the second number of instructions and/or an indication that the second number of instructions have been executed to the host 310.

Separating the creation of the control flow from the execution of the control flow provides the ability to execute the control flow concurrently with the creation of the control flow. Furthermore, separating the creation of the control flow from the execution of the control flow eliminates the need to move data to be operated on in association with the execution of the control flow to a host 310, since the control flow instructions are executed via an execution unit on a device (e.g., 320-1) separate from the host 310.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an apparatus in the form of a computing system in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. System 400 includes a host 410 that can be analogous to host 310 in FIG. 3. FIG. 4 also includes memory devices 420-1, 420-2, . . . , 420-N (e.g., referred to generally as memory devices 420), which can be analogous to memory device 320.

In this example, each of the memory devices 420 includes a controller, a memory array, and sense circuitry. For example, memory device 420-1 includes controller 440-1, memory array 430-1, and sense circuitry 450-1, memory device 420-2 includes controller 440-2, memory array 430-2, and sense circuitry 450-2, and memory device 420-N includes controller 440-N, memory array 430-N, and sense circuitry 450-N. The controller 440-1, the controller 440-2, . . . , and the controller 440-N are referred to generally as controllers 440. The array 430-1, the array 430-2, . . . , and the array 430-N are referred to generally as arrays 430. The sense circuitry 450-1, the sense circuitry 450-2, . . . , and the sense circuitry 450-N are referred to generally as sense circuitry 450. As described further below, in a number of embodiments, the sense circuitry 450 can be operated (e.g., by a corresponding controller 440) to serve as an execution unit.

Host 410 can generate a number of different control flows. Each of the control flows can be associated with a particular memory device 420. For example, a first control flow can be associated with memory device 420-1, a second control flow can be associated with memory device 420-2, . . . , and an Nth control flow can be associated with memory device 420-N. Arrows from host 410 to devices 420-1 to 420-N represent an interface (e.g., bus) over which data, addresses, and/or commands can be transferred. However, the devices 420 may be coupled to the host 410 via a common bus, for instance.

As an example, each of the different control flows can be associated with a single (e.g., same) program and/or the different control flows can be associated with a different programs. For example, the first and second control flow can be associated with a first program and the Nth control flow can be associated with a second (e.g., different) program. The first control flow can be associated with a first portion of the first program that is independent from a second portion of the first program. The second control flow can be associated with a second portion of the first program that is independent from the first portion of the first program. A first portion of a program can be considered as being independent from a second portion of a program if executing a number of instructions associated with the first portion does not have an impact on the execution of a second number of instructions associated with the second portion of the program.

Each of the memory devices 420 can execute different instructions from a plurality of instructions associated with the plurality of control flows. For example, the memory device 420-1 can execute a first number of instructions associated with the first control flow, the memory device 420-2 can execute a second number of instructions associated with the second control flow, . . . , and the memory device 420-N can execute an Nth number of instructions associated with the Nth control flow.

In contrast to the example of FIG. 2, in which the creation of a control flow and execution of the corresponding control flow instructions occur on the same device, embodiments of the present disclosure can involve separating the creation of the control flows and the execution of the control flows, which can allow a number of processes to be executed concurrently. As used herein, a process refers to an instance of a program that is being executed. For example, a process can be executed concurrently with the execution of a second program.

Concurrent execution of a number of processes can include a host 410 generating control flows while the memory devices 420 are executing the control flows. For example, host 410 can generate a first control flow. The host 410 can provide the first control flow to memory device 420-1. The host 410 can generate a second control flow while the memory device 420-1 is executing a first number of instructions associated with the first control flow via the controller 440-1, the memory array 430-1, and the sense circuitry 450-1. The host 410 can provide the second control flow to memory device 420-2 while the memory device 420-1 is executing the first number of instructions associated with the first control flow. The host 410 can generate and provide an Nth control flow to the memory device 420-N while the memory device 420-1 and the memory device 420-2 are executing the first number of instructions associated with the first control flow and the second number of instructions associated with the second control flow, respectively. The memory device 420-2 can execute the second number of instructions via the controller 440-2, the memory array 430-2, and the sense circuitry 450-2. Each of the memory devices 420 can execute a different plurality of instructions associated with different control flows concurrently. For example, the memory device 410-2 can execute the first number of instructions, the memory device 410-2 can execute the second number of instructions, and the memory device 410-N can execute the Nth number of instructions concurrently. The memory device 410-N can execute the Nth number of instructions via the controller 440-N, the memory array 430-N, and the sense circuitry 450-N.

Each of the memory devices 420 can return a result of the execution of the different plurality of instructions and/or an indication that the different plurality of instructions have been executed. For example, the memory device 420-1 can inform the host 410 that the first number of instructions have been executed while the second number of instructions and the Nth number of instructions are being executed (e.g., on devices 420-2 and 420-N, respectively). The host 410 can generate a different control flow that is associated with the first control flow based on the result of the first number of instructions that are associated with the first control flow. The host 410 can provide the different control flow to the memory device 420-1 while the memory device 420-2 and the memory device 420-N are executing the second number of instructions and the Nth number of instructions, respectively. Each of the different control flows can be generated serially. For example, the second control flow can be generated after the first control flow is generated and the Nth control flow can be generated after the first control flow and the second control flow are generated. Each of a different number of instructions associated with the different control flows can be executed concurrently (e.g., at a same time). Each of the different number of instructions associated with the control flow can be executed concurrently with the creation of the different control flows.

The example of FIG. 4 provides the ability to generate a number of control flows and execute a number of control flows concurrently by separating the creation of the control flow from the execution of the control flow. Executing a number of control flows concurrently can increase productivity and can utilize a greater number of computational resources concurrently as opposed to executing a single control flow at a time as provided in the example of FIG. 2. As an example, the ALU 460 of host 410 can be configured to determine the manner in which control flows are generated and/or distributed among the devices 420 for execution.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a control flow and the execution of the control flow in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. FIG. 5 illustrates a system 500 that includes a device 510 and a device 520. Generating a control flow can include fetching, decoding, and generating control flow instructions, which can include memory operable instructions. Executing the memory operable instructions includes receiving the memory operable instructions 586, operating an execution unit (e.g., by activating access lines, sense lines, and latches), and returning the result of the execution of the memory operable instructions.

In the example shown in FIG. 5, device 510 can be a host (e.g., host 410) configured to generate control flows, and device 520 can be a memory device (e.g., device 420) configured to execute at least some control flow instructions generated by the device 510. Fetching, decoding, and/or generating memory operable instructions can be classified as host operable instructions. Host operable instructions are instructions that a host (e.g., device 510) uses to create memory operable instructions. For example, the host operable instructions are instructions that the host uses to create a number of operations that are executed by device 520. Memory operable instructions are further described below.

As described above the device 510 can be a host and the device 520 can be a memory device. Host 510 can be associated with a program counter. The program counter holds the memory address of the next instruction to be executed. The program counter can be incremented to get the address of the next instructions.

At 580, the device 510 fetches an instruction from memory using the program counter. At the end of the fetch operation the program counter can point to the next instruction that will be read at the next cycle. The device 510 can store the fetched instruction in a cache. Cache can be, for example, an instruction register and/or another form of memory.

At 582, the device 510 decodes the fetched instruction. Decoding the fetched instruction can include determining an operation to be performed based on op-code associated with the fetched instruction. For example, the device 510 can decode an instruction (e.g., fetched instruction) to determine that an addition operation is to be performed.

At 584, the device 510 generates memory operable instructions. Generating memory operable instructions can include dynamically generating memory operable instructions. Dynamically generating memory operable instructions can be synonymous with dynamically generating a control flow because the memory operable instructions can be control flow instructions that are associated with a control flow. The memory operable instructions can be dynamically generated when the device 510 evaluates the decoded instructions to generate the memory operable instructions. The device 510 can dynamically generate memory operable instructions by evaluating a decoded instruction to generate the memory operable instructions. For example, a decoded instruction can be an if-then statement. The if-then statement can be dynamically evaluated by the device 510. The device 510 can dynamically select a first memory operable instruction instead of a second memory operable instruction based on the evaluation of the if-then statement. In a number of examples, the memory operable instructions can be dynamically generated after a program has been compiled.

As used herein, memory operable instructions refers to instructions that are to be executed by the device 520. Memory operable instructions can include logical operations (e.g., AND operation, OR operations, etc.), addition operations, subtraction operations, multiplication operations, division operations, and/or comparison operations among other types of operations that can be associated with control flow instructions. Furthermore, memory operable instructions can include read operations and/or write operations (e.g., memory commands that do not involve manipulating data).

A plurality of memory operable instructions can be generated or a single memory operable instruction can be generated by device 510. At 586, the device 520 can receive the memory operable instructions. The memory operable instructions can be received at a controller (e.g., controller 340). At 588, the device 520 can activate access lines, sense lines, and/or latches to execute the memory operable instructions. For example, the controller can activate a number of access lines, sense lines, and/or latches associated with a memory array and/or sense circuitry in device 520. Activating the number of access lines, sense lines, and/or latches can move data from array in to the sensing circuitry.

The controller can further activate access lines, sense lines, and/or latches in sense circuitry to execute the memory operable instructions on the data stored in the sensing circuitry. In a number of examples, the result of the execution of the memory operable instructions can be stored back to the array. At 590, the result of the memory operable instructions can be returned to device 510.

In a number of examples, the device 510 and the device 520 at least partially decode the instructions. For example, the device 510 can partially decode an instruction to generate a memory operable instruction. The device 510 can provide the partially decoded memory operable instruction to the controller in device 520. The decoder can further decode the memory operable instruction and execute the fully decoded memory operable instruction.

In a number of examples, the device 510 can retain partial control over the memory operable instructions while the memory operable instructions are executed on device 520. The device 510 can retain partial control over the memory operable instructions by partially decoding the memory operable instructions. For example, the device 510 can partially decode memory operable instructions by translating a virtual address into a physical memory address and device 520 can retrieve an instruction from the translated physical memory address. The device 510 can retain partial control over the memory operable instructions by translating the virtual address into the physical memory address.

FIG. 6 illustrates a schematic diagram of a portion of a memory array 630 in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. The array 630 includes memory cells 603-0, 603-1, 603-3, 603-4, 603-5, 603-6, 603-7, 603-8, . . . , 603-J (e.g., referred to generally as memory cells 603), coupled to rows of access lines 604-0, 604-1, 604-2, 604-3, 604-4, 604-5, 604-6, . . . , 604-R and columns of sense lines 605-0, 605-1, 605-2, 605-3, 605-4, 605-5, 605-6, 605-7, . . . , 605-S, which may be referred to generally as access lines 604 and sense lines 605. Memory array 630 is not limited to a particular number of access lines and/or sense lines, and use of the terms “rows” and “columns” does not intend a particular physical structure and/or orientation of the access lines and/or sense lines. Although not pictured, each column of memory cells can be associated with a corresponding pair of complementary sense. The array 630 can be an array such as array 330 in FIG. 3 or array 430 in FIG. 4, for example.

Each column of memory cells can be coupled to sensing circuitry (e.g., sensing circuitry 150 shown in FIG. 1). In this example, the sensing circuitry comprises a number of sense amplifiers 606-0, 606-1, 606-2, 606-3, 606-4, 606-5, 606-6, 606-7, . . . , 606-U (e.g., referred to generally as sense amplifiers 606) coupled to the respective sense lines 605-0, 605-1, 605-2, 605-3, 605-4, 605-5, 605-6, 605-7, . . . , 605-S. The sense amplifiers 606 are coupled to input/output (I/O) line 634 (e.g., a local I/O line) via access devices (e.g., transistors) 608-0, 608-2, 608-3, 608-4, 608-5, 608-6, 608-7, . . . , 608-V. In this example, the sensing circuitry also comprises a number of compute components 631-0, 631-2, 631-3, 631-4, 631-5, 631-6, 631-7, . . . , 631-X (e.g., referred to generally as compute components 631) coupled to the respective sense lines. Column decode lines 610-0 to 610-W are coupled to the gates of transistors 608-0 to 608-V, respectively, and can be selectively activated to transfer data sensed by respective sense amplifiers 606-0 to 606-U and/or stored in respective compute components 631-0 to 631-X to a secondary sense amplifier 612 and/or to processing resources external to array 630 (e.g., via I/O line 634). In a number of embodiments, the compute components 631 can be formed on pitch with the memory cells of their corresponding columns and/or with the corresponding sense amplifiers 606.

The sensing circuitry (e.g., compute components 631 and sense amplifiers 606) can be controlled by the controller (e.g., 140, 340, and 440) to execute control flow operations in accordance with a number of embodiments described herein. The example described in association with FIGS. 3 to 5, demonstrate how operations can be performed on data (e.g., elements) stored in an array such as array 630.

FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram illustrating sensing circuitry having selectable logical operation selection logic in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. FIG. 7 shows a number of sense amplifiers 706 coupled to respective pairs of complementary sense lines 705-1 and 705-2, and a corresponding number of compute components 731 coupled to the sense amplifiers 706 via pass gates 707-1 and 707-2. The gates of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 can be controlled by a logical operation selection logic signal, PASS. For example, an output of the logical operation selection logic 713-6 can be coupled to the gates of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2.

According to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 7, the compute components 731 can comprise respective stages (e.g., shift cells) of a loadable shift register configured to shift data values left and right For example, as illustrated in FIG. 7, each compute component 731 (e.g., stage) of the shift register comprises a pair of right-shift transistors 781 and 786, a pair of left-shift transistors 789 and 790, and a pair of inverters 787 and 788. The signals PHASE 1R, PHASE 2R, PHASE 1L, and PHASE 2L can be applied to respective control lines 782, 783, 791 and 792 to enable/disable feedback on the latches of the corresponding compute components 831 in association with performing logical operations and/or shifting data in accordance with embodiments described herein. Examples of shifting data (e.g., from a particular compute component 731 to an adjacent compute component 731) is described further below with respect to FIG. 9.

The logical operation selection logic 713-6 includes the swap gates 742, as well as logic to control the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and the swap gates 742. The logical operation selection logic 713-6 includes four logic selection transistors: logic selection transistor 762 coupled between the gates of the swap transistors 742 and a TF signal control line, logic selection transistor 752 coupled between the gates of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and a TT signal control line, logic selection transistor 754 coupled between the gates of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and a FT signal control line, and logic selection transistor 764 coupled between the gates of the swap transistors 742 and a FF signal control line. Gates of logic selection transistors 762 and 752 are coupled to the true sense line through isolation transistor 750-1 (having a gate coupled to an ISO signal control line). Gates of logic selection transistors 764 and 754 are coupled to the complementary sense line through isolation transistor 750-2 (also having a gate coupled to an ISO signal control line). FIG. 9 illustrate timing diagrams associated with performing logical operations and shifting operations using the sensing circuitry shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 8 is a logic table illustrating selectable logic operation results implemented by a sensing circuitry (e.g., sensing circuitry shown in FIG. 7) in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. The four logic selection control signals (e.g., TF, TT, FT, and FF), in conjunction with a particular data value present on the complementary sense lines, can be used to select one of a plurality of logical operations to implement involving the starting data values stored in the sense amplifier 706 and compute component 731. The four control signals (e.g., TF, TT, FT, and FF), in conjunction with a particular data value present on the complementary sense lines (e.g., on nodes S and S*), controls the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and swap transistors 742, which in turn affects the data value in the compute component 731 and/or sense amplifier 706 before/after firing. The capability to selectably control the swap transistors 742 facilitates implementing logical operations involving inverse data values (e.g., inverse operands and/or inverse result), among others.

Logic Table 8-1 illustrated in FIG. 8 shows the starting data value stored in the compute component 731 shown in column A at 844, and the starting data value stored in the sense amplifier 706 shown in column B at 845. The other 3 column headings in Logic Table 8-1 refer to the state of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and the swap transistors 742, which can respectively be controlled to be OPEN or CLOSED depending on the state of the four logic selection control signals (e.g., TF, TT, FT, and FF), in conjunction with a particular data value present on the pair of complementary sense lines 705-1 and 705-2 when the ISO control signal is asserted. The “NOT OPEN” column corresponds to the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and the swap transistors 742 both being in a non-conducting condition, the “OPEN TRUE” column corresponds to the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 being in a conducting condition, and the “OPEN INVERT” column corresponds to the swap transistors 742 being in a conducting condition. The configuration corresponding to the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and the swap transistors 742 both being in a conducting condition is not reflected in Logic Table 8-1 since this results in the sense lines being shorted together.

Via selective control of the pass gates 707-1 and 707-2 and the swap transistors 742, each of the three columns of the upper portion of Logic Table 8-1 can be combined with each of the three columns of the lower portion of Logic Table 8-1 to provide nine (e.g., 3×3) different result combinations, corresponding to nine different logical operations, as indicated by the various connecting paths shown at 875. The nine different selectable logical operations that can be implemented by the sensing circuitry 750 are summarized in Logic Table 8-2.

The columns of Logic Table 8-2 show a heading 880 that includes the states of logic selection control signals (e.g., FF, FT, TF, TT). For example, the state of a first logic selection control signal (e.g., FF) is provided in row 876, the state of a second logic selection control signal (e.g., FT) is provided in row 877, the state of a third logic selection control signal (e.g., TF) is provided in row 878, and the state of a fourth logic selection control signal (e.g., TT) is provided in row 879. The particular logical operation corresponding to the results is summarized in row 847.

FIG. 9 illustrates a timing diagram associated with performing a logical AND operation and a shifting operation using the sensing circuitry in accordance with a number of embodiments of the present disclosure. FIG. 9 includes waveforms corresponding to signals EQ, ROW X, ROW Y, SENSE AMP, TF, TT, FT, FF, PHASE 1R, PHASE 2R, PHASE 1L, PHASE 2L, ISO, Pass, Pass*, DIGIT, and DIGIT_. The EQ signal corresponds to an equilibrate signal (not shown) associated with a sense amplifier (e.g., sense amplifier 706). The ROW X and ROW Y signals correspond to signals applied to respective access line (e.g., access lines ROW 1 and ROW 2 shown in FIG. 6) to access a selected cell (or row of cells). The SENSE AMP signal corresponds to a signal used to enable/disable a sense amplifier (e.g., sense amplifier 706). The TF, TT, FT, and FF signals correspond to logic selection control signals such as those shown in FIG. 7 (e.g., signals coupled to logic selection transistors 762, 752, 754, and 764). The PHASE 1R, PHASE 2R, PHASE 1L, and PHASE 2L signals correspond to the control signals (e.g., clock signals) provided to respective control lines 782, 783, 791 and 792 shown in FIG. 7. The ISO signal corresponds to the signal coupled to the gates of the isolation transistors 750-1 and 750-2 shown in FIG. 7. The PASS signal corresponds to the signal coupled to the gates of pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2 shown in FIG. 7, and the PASS* signal corresponds to the signal coupled to the gates of the swap transistors 742. The DIGIT and DIGIT_signals correspond to the signals present on the respective sense lines 705-1 (e.g., DIGIT (n)) and 705-2 (e.g., DIGIT (n)_).

The timing diagram shown in FIG. 9 is associated with performing a logical AND operation on a data value stored in a first memory cell and a data value stored in a second memory cell of an array. The memory cells can correspond to a particular column of an array (e.g., a column comprising a complementary pair of sense lines) and can be coupled to respective access lines (e.g., ROW X and ROW Y). In describing the logical AND operation shown in FIG. 9, reference will be made to the sensing circuitry described in FIG. 7. For example, the logical operation described in FIG. 9 can include storing the data value of the ROW X memory cell (e.g., the “ROW X” data value) in the latch of the corresponding compute component 731 (e.g., the “A” data value), which can be referred to as the accumulator 731, storing the data value of the ROW Y memory cell (e.g., the “ROW Y” data value) in the latch of the corresponding sense amplifier 706 (e.g., the “B” data value), and performing a selected logical operation (e.g., a logical AND operation in this example) on the ROW X data value and the ROW Y data value, with the result of the selected logical operation being stored in the latch of the compute component 731.

As shown in FIG. 9, at time T1, equilibration of the sense amplifier 706 is disabled (e.g., EQ goes low). At time T2, ROW X goes high to access (e.g., select) the ROW X memory cell. At time T3, the sense amplifier 706 is enabled (e.g., SENSE AMP goes high), which drives the complementary sense lines 705-1 and 705-2 to the appropriate rail voltages (e.g., VDD and GND) responsive to the ROW X data value (e.g., as shown by the DIGIT and DIGIT_signals), and the ROW X data value is latched in the sense amplifier 706. At time T4, the PHASE 2R and PHASE 2L signals go low, which disables feedback on the latch of the compute component 731 (e.g., by turning off transistors 786 and 790, respectively) such that the value stored in the compute component may be overwritten during the logical operation. Also, at time T4, ISO goes low, which disables isolation transistors 750-1 and 750-2. At time T5, TT and FT are enabled (e.g., go high), which results in PASS going high (e.g., since either transistor 752 or 754 will conduct depending on which of node ST2 or node SF2 was high when ISO was disabled at time T4 (recall that when ISO is disabled, the voltages of the nodes ST2 and SF2 reside dynamically on the gates of the respective enable transistors 752 and 754). PASS going high enables the pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2 such that the DIGIT and DIGIT_signals, which correspond to the ROW X data value, are provided to the respective compute component nodes ST2 and SF2. At time T6, TT and FT are disabled, which results in PASS going low, which disables the pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2. It is noted that PASS* remains low between time T5 and T6 since the TF and FF signals remain low. At time T7, ROW X is disabled, and PHASE 2R, PHASE 2L, and ISO are enabled. Enabling PHASE 2R and PHASE 2L at time T7 enables feedback on the latch of the compute component 731 such that the ROW X data value is latched therein. Enabling ISO at time T7 again couples nodes ST2 and SF2 to the gates of the enable transistors 752, 754, 762, and 764. At time T8, equilibration is enabled (e.g., EQ goes high such that DIGIT and DIGIT are driven to an equilibrate voltage such as VDD/2) and the sense amplifier 706 is disabled (e.g., SENSE AMP goes low).

With the ROW X data value latched in the compute component 731, equilibration is disabled (e.g., EQ goes low at time T9). At time T10, ROW Y goes high to access (e.g., select) the ROW Y memory cell. At time T11, the sense amplifier 706 is enabled (e.g., SENSE AMP goes high), which drives the complementary sense lines 705-1 and 705-2 to the appropriate rail voltages (e.g., VDD and GND) responsive to the ROW Y data value (e.g., as shown by the DIGIT and DIGIT_signals), and the ROW Y data value is latched in the sense amplifier 706. At time T12, the PHASE 2R and PHASE 2L signals go low, which disables feedback on the latch of the compute component 731 (e.g., by turning off transistors 786 and 790, respectively) such that the value stored in the compute component may be overwritten during the logical operation. Also, at time T12, ISO goes low, which disables isolation transistors 750-1 and 750-2. Since the desired logical operation in this example is an AND operation, at time T13, TT is enabled while TF, FT and FF remain disabled (as shown in TABLE 8-2, FF=0, FT=0, TF=0, and TT=1 corresponds to a logical AND operation). Whether enabling TT results in PASS going high depends on the value stored in the compute component 731 when ISO is disabled at time T12. For example, enable transistor 752 will conduct if node ST2 was high when ISO is disabled, and enable transistor will not conduct if node ST2 was low when ISO was disabled at time T12.

In this example, if PASS goes high at time T13, the pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2 are enabled such that the DIGIT and DIGIT_signals, which correspond to the ROW Y data value, are provided to the respective compute component nodes ST2 and SF2. As such, the value stored in the compute component 731 (e.g., the “ROW X” data value) may be flipped, depending on the value of DIGIT and DIGIT_(e.g., the ‘ROW Y” data value). In this example, if PASS stays low at time T13, the pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2 are not enabled such that the DIGIT and DIGIT_signals, which correspond to the ROW Y data value, remain isolated from the nodes ST2 and SF2 of the compute component 731. As such, the data value in the compute component (e.g., the ROW X data value) would remain the same.

At time T14, TT is disabled, which results in PASS going (or remaining) low, such that the pass transistors 707-1 and 707-2 are disabled. It is noted that PASS* remains low between time T13 and T14 since the TF and FF signals remain low. At time T15, ROW Y is disabled, and PHASE 2R, PHASE 2L, and ISO are enabled. Enabling PHASE 2R and PHASE 2L at time T15 enables feedback on the latch of the compute component 731 such that the result of the AND operation (e.g., “A” AND “B”) is latched therein. Enabling ISO at time T15 again couples nodes ST2 and SF2 to the gates of the enable transistors 752, 754, 762, and 764. At time T16, equilibration is enabled (e.g., EQ goes high such that DIGIT and DIGIT_are driven to an equilibrate voltage) and the sense amplifier 706 is disabled (e.g., SENSE AMP goes low).

The result of the AND operation, which is initially stored in the compute component 731 in this example, can be transferred back to the memory array (e.g., to a memory cell coupled to ROW X, ROW Y, and/or a different row via the complementary sense lines) and/or to an external location (e.g., an external processing component) via I/O lines.

FIG. 9 also includes (e.g., at 901) signaling associated with shifting data (e.g., from a compute component 731 to an adjacent compute component 731). The example shown in FIG. 9 illustrates two left shifts such that a data value stored in a compute component corresponding to column “N” is shifted left to a compute component corresponding to column “N-2”. As shown at time T16, PHASE 2R and PHASE 2L are disabled, which disables feedback on the compute component latches, as described above. To perform a first left shift, PHASE 1L is enabled at time T17 and disabled at time T18. Enabling PHASE 1L causes transistor 789 to conduct, which causes the data value at node SF1 to move left to node SF2 of a left-adjacent compute component 731. PHASE 2L is subsequently enabled at time T19 and disabled at time Tao. Enabling PHASE 2L causes transistor 790 to conduct, which causes the data value from node ST1 to move left to node ST2 completing a left shift.

The above sequence (e.g., enabling/disabling PHASE 1L and subsequently enabling/disabling PHASE 2L) can be repeated to achieve a desired number of left shifts. For instance, in this example, a second left shift is performed by enabling PHASE 1L at time T21 and disabling PHASE 1L at time T22. PHASE 2L is subsequently enabled at time T23 to complete the second left shift. Subsequent to the second left shift, PHASE 2L remains enabled and PHASE 2R is enabled (e.g., at time T24) such that feedback is enabled to latch the data values in the compute component latches.

Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, those of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that an arrangement calculated to achieve the same results can be substituted for the specific embodiments shown. This disclosure is intended to cover adaptations or variations of one or more embodiments of the present disclosure. It is to be understood that the above description has been made in an illustrative fashion, and not a restrictive one. Combination of the above embodiments, and other embodiments not specifically described herein will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the above description. The scope of the one or more embodiments of the present disclosure includes other applications in which the above structures and methods are used. Therefore, the scope of one or more embodiments of the present disclosure should be determined with reference to the appended claims, along with the full range of equivalents to which such claims are entitled.

In the foregoing Detailed Description, some features are grouped together in a single embodiment for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted as reflecting an intention that the disclosed embodiments of the present disclosure have to use more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, as the following claims reflect, inventive subject matter lies in less than all features of a single disclosed embodiment. Thus, the following claims are hereby incorporated into the Detailed Description, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
對一隨機存取記憶體(RAM)進行自我測試、配置及修復之方法 英属开曼群岛商格芯公司 01 September 2004 11 November 2009
반도체 메모리 장치 삼성전자주식회사 15 June 2009 23 December 2010
System and method for using a memory mapping function to map memory defects DELL PRODUCTS, L.P. 14 August 2008 18 February 2009
Digital computer ALLIANT COMPUTER SYSTEMS CORPORATION 17 June 1986 18 March 1987
應用於反及閘快閃記憶體之內建式自我修復方法及其系統 國立清華大學 21 December 2007 01 February 2011
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