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Patent Analysis of

Ready-to-bake batter and methods of making the same

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10149483

Application Number

US13/561688

Application Date

30 July 2012

Publication Date

11 December 2018

Current Assignee

KRAFT FOODS GROUP BRANDS LLC

Original Assignee (Applicant)

ECKSTROM, ELEANORE BROPHY

International Classification

A21D10/00,A21D10/04,A23C19/09

Cooperative Classification

A23C19/0912,A21D10/045,A21D10/00,A21D10/04

Inventor

ECKSTROM, ELEANORE BROPHY

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 1 US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 2 US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 3
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Abstract

A ready-to-bake batter and method for manufacture are provided. The method includes the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to at least 140° F. to create a heated mixture; injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture; aerating the heated mixture; and cooling the heated mixture to form a batter. The batter is stable when stored for over 120 days such that when baked, the batter provides a cake similar to a fresh made-from-scratch cake.

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Claims

1. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising the steps of:

combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture; injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture when the heated mixture has a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.; aerating and cooling the heated mixture concurrently to form a batter.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the aerating and cooling steps are performed in a scraped surface heat exchanger.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.

4. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.

5. The method of claim 1 wherein the sweetener is sugar.

6. The method of claim 1 wherein the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the inert gas is nitrogen.

8. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising the steps of:

combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture; and aerating and cooling the heated mixture concurrently to form a batter, wherein the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.

9. The method of claim 8 wherein the aerating and cooling step is performed in a scraped surface heat exchanger.

10. The method of claim 8 wherein the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.

11. The method of claim 8 further comprising the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.

12. The method of claim 8 wherein the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.

13. The method of claim 8 further comprising the step of injecting and inert gas into the heated mixture when the temperature of the heated mixture is at least 140° F.

14. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture; and aerating and cooling the heated mixture in a scraped surface heat exchanger to form a batter, wherein the aerating and cooling steps are performed concurrently; and wherein the heated mixture is maintained above 140° F. for less than 20 minutes to minimize cooking of the eggs and the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.

15. The method of claim 14 wherein the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.

16. The method of claim 14 further comprising the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.

17. The method of claim 14 wherein the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.

18. The method of claim 14 further comprising the step of injecting and inert gas into the heated mixture when the temperature of the heated mixture is at least 140° F.

19. The method of claim 1 wherein the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.

20. The method of claim 8 wherein the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.

21. The method of claim 14 wherein the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.

22. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture; injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture when the heated mixture has a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.; aerating the heated mixture; and cooling the heated mixture to form a batter; and wherein the mixture includes at least about 10% eggs.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising
    • the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture
    • heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture
    • injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture when the heated mixture has a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.
    • aerating and cooling the heated mixture concurrently to form a batter.
    • 2. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the aerating and cooling steps are performed in a scraped surface heat exchanger.
    • 3. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.
    • 4. The method of claim 1 further comprising
      • the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.
    • 5. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the sweetener is sugar.
    • 6. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.
    • 7. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the inert gas is nitrogen.
    • 19. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.
  • 8
    8. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising
    • the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture
    • heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture
    • and aerating and cooling the heated mixture concurrently to form a batter, wherein the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.
    • 9. The method of claim 8 wherein
      • the aerating and cooling step is performed in a scraped surface heat exchanger.
    • 10. The method of claim 8 wherein
      • the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.
    • 11. The method of claim 8 further comprising
      • the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.
    • 12. The method of claim 8 wherein
      • the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.
    • 13. The method of claim 8 further comprising
      • the step of injecting and inert gas into the heated mixture when the temperature of the heated mixture is at least 140° F.
    • 20. The method of claim 8 wherein
      • the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.
  • 14
    14. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising
    • the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture
    • heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture
    • and aerating and cooling the heated mixture in a scraped surface heat exchanger to form a batter, wherein the aerating and cooling steps are performed concurrently
    • and wherein the heated mixture is maintained above 140° F. for less than 20 minutes to minimize cooking of the eggs and the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.
    • 15. The method of claim 14 wherein
      • the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.
    • 16. The method of claim 14 further comprising
      • the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers to a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.
    • 17. The method of claim 14 wherein
      • the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.
    • 18. The method of claim 14 further comprising
      • the step of injecting and inert gas into the heated mixture when the temperature of the heated mixture is at least 140° F.
    • 21. The method of claim 14 wherein
      • the eggs are whole, liquid eggs.
  • 22
    22. A method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter, the method comprising
    • the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture
    • heating the mixture to a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F. to create a heated mixture
    • injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture when the heated mixture has a temperature in a range of about 140° F. to about 155° F.
    • aerating the heated mixture
    • and cooling the heated mixture to form a batter
    • and wherein the mixture includes at least about 10% eggs.
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Description

FIELD

The present application is directed to a ready-to-bake dessert product and its method of manufacture. More particularly, the present application relates to a cheesecake batter which can be stored for extended periods of time at refrigerated temperatures and then may be directly poured and baked to produce a high-quality cheesecake dessert.

BACKGROUND

Making a cheesecake from scratch using ingredients including a soft uncured cheese (such as cream cheese), butter, eggs, and sugar provides a quality dessert having premium flavor and texture. Preparing such a cheesecake, however, requires significant time and effort that many consumers today are unwilling or unable to expend. Various ready-to-use-type cheesecake products are known which are intended to allow the consumer to prepare a cheesecake in less time and with less effort. These products, however, sacrifice a certain degree of quality to convenience. To compensate for the decline in quality, it may be necessary for the consumer to add staple ingredients, such as cream cheese, in order to provide a cheesecake of a quality more closely resembling a from-scratch cheesecake.

Dry mixes may also offer certain time-saving advantages. Often, the mixes are made so that the consumer only adds water to the mix and bakes. These mixes can be stored at ambient temperature for extended periods of time. However, these mixes alone do not provide the quality of fresh ingredients. In fact, in some cases, the consumer may be required to add certain ingredients to improve the quality. However, having the consumer add ingredients detracts from the time-saving advantages of using a prepared mix, as well as increases the effort required by the consumer.

Cheesecake mixes are also known that can be used to prepare a cold-set cheesecake, thereby eliminating baking. U.S. Pat. No. 4,312,891, issued to Eisfeldt, is directed to a shelf-stable fluid product that gels upon setting at refrigerated temperatures. The product contains gelatin, starch, sweetening agent, and a protein source, which are believed to interact during preparation of the product to provide a reversible gel matrix. The consumer whips the product to incorporate air into the product and then refrigerates the product, allowing it to gel and form a cheesecake.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,594,255, issued to Wilson, is directed to a dry mix which can be used to prepare a sugar-free cheesecake. Milk is added to the mix, and the rehydrated mix then is whipped to mix the ingredients, as well as to incorporate air into the filling, which will affect the lightness of the texture of the final product. The mix is then poured into a prepared crust and chilled for several hours to allow the mix to gel and form a cheesecake.

These cold-set mixes also sacrifice a degree of quality because of the constitution of the ingredients and the method of preparation. Cold-set cheesecakes generally cannot offer the texture and mouthfeel of a baked-from-scratch cheesecake because of the addition of a gel component in the mix. Furthermore, although the cold-set method may be easier than baking, the benefits to texture and appearance from baking are lost.

Cheesecake products are known which can be used to prepare an improved-quality cheesecake when the consumer bakes the dessert rather than having it gel in the refrigerator. These products still save time because a complete (or nearly complete) mix is provided. One such ready-to-bake mix is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,732,772 to Nolte which discloses a ready-to-use cheesecake filling mix which, upon whipping and baking, produces a quality cheesecake filling. The filling mix contains, among other ingredients, cream, sugar, eggs, milk, and nonfat dry milk. Such a mix is storable for an extended period of time at refrigerator or freezer temperatures. The consumer aerates the filling mix by whipping and then bakes. Preparing a cheesecake from a mix of this type still requires effort and time on the part of the consumer. Moreover, failure to fully aerate the filling mix can result in a less desirable product.

Moreover, many of the prior cheesecake batters sacrifice flavor and texture for shelf life and stability. For example, ingredients having a longer shelf life are substituted for ingredients that traditionally may be used in made-from-scratch recipes. Conversely, ingredients used in traditional made-from-scratch recipes generally do not have as long of a shelf life and stability. In this regard, it may be desirable to have a cheesecake batter that has the taste and texture of a traditional made-from-scratch recipe with increased shelf life and stability. For example, it may be desirable to have a cheesecake batter that has a shelf life of at least 120 days.

SUMMARY

In one form, a ready-to-bake cheesecake batter and a method for producing such a batter is provided. In this regard, the batter may be used to bake a real, “authentic” full fat made from scratch cheesecake taste.

According to one form, the batter contains ingredients such as cream cheese, cream and eggs, and can be stored for an extended period in the refrigerator. For example, the batter may be stable for at least 120 days when refrigerated.

In accordance with one form, no additional ingredients need be added to the batter in order to prepare a cheesecake. Using this batter, a consumer can bake a cheesecake which has the quality and flavor of a baked-from-scratch cheesecake in an easy, time-saving manner.

The batter can be stored at refrigerated temperatures until used, at which time the consumer simply pours the batter into a prepared crust and bakes in the oven. Adding ingredients, mixing, and/or whipping are not required. The batter can be made in a variety of flavors and in a low-fat version.

In one form, a method for preparing a ready-to-bake batter is provided. The method includes the steps of combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to at least 140° F. to create a heated mixture; injecting an inert gas into the heated mixture; aerating the heated mixture; and cooling the heated mixture to form a batter.

A ready-to-bake batter and method for manufacture are provided. The method includes the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to at least 140° F. to create a heated mixture; and aerating and cooling the heated mixture concurrently to form a batter. Further, the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is at least 140° F.

A ready-to-bake batter and method for manufacture are provided. The method includes the steps of: combining cream cheese, cream, sweetener, and eggs to form a mixture; heating the mixture to at least 140° F. to create a heated mixture; and aerating and cooling the heated mixture in a scraped surface heat exchanger to form a batter. Further, the heated mixture is maintained above 140° F. for less than 20 minutes to minimize cooking of the eggs and the temperature of the heated mixture at the beginning of the aerating and cooling step is at least 140° F.

According to one form, the aerating and cooling steps are performed concurrently.

In accordance with one form, the aerating and cooling steps are performed in a scraped surface heat exchanger.

In one form, the cream cheese and cream are each preheated prior to combining with the eggs.

According to one form, the method further includes the step of cool filling the batter in one or more containers at a temperature below 60° F. prior to storage.

In accordance with one form, the sweetener is sugar.

In one form, the batter is stable for over 120 days when stored at a temperature at or below about 55° F.

According to one form, the inert gas is nitrogen and is injected when the heated mixture is at least 140° F.

In one form, the batter is stable when stored for over 120 days such that when baked, the batter provides a cake similar to a fresh made-from-scratch cake.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a process flow diagram illustrating one process for manufacturing ready-to-bake cheesecake batter;

FIG. 2A is a light microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been whipped while hot;

FIG. 2B is a light scanning microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been whipped while cold;

FIG. 2C is a light scanning microscopy of a cream cheese that has been whipped;

FIG. 2D is a light scanning microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been hot processed without whipping;

FIG. 3A is a confocal laser scanning microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been whipped while hot;

FIG. 3B is a confocal laser scanning microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been whipped while cold;

FIG. 3C is a confocal laser scanning microscopy of a cream cheese that has been whipped; and

FIG. 3D is a confocal laser scanning microscopy of a cheesecake batter that has been hot processed without whipping.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present application relates to a ready-to-bake cheesecake batter and a method for producing such a batter. In one form, the batter contains fresh, high quality ingredients, such as cream cheese, cream and eggs, and can be stored for an extended period in the refrigerator. In one form, no additional ingredients need be added to the batter in order to prepare a cheesecake. The batter may be processed using a hot whipping procedure whereby the combined ingredients are cooked and then whipped hot to aerate while cooling. It is hypothesized that the hot whipping helps enrobe inert gas cells with fat and/or protein to help stabilize the cells and thereby improve shelf life.

Using this batter, a consumer can bake a cheesecake which has the quality and flavor of a baked-from-scratch cheesecake in an easy, time-saving manner. Numerous flavor varieties of the cheesecake are possible. By “baked-from-scratch cheesecake” it is meant a cheesecake prepared in a conventional manner of combining fresh ingredients such as eggs, cream, and sugar, whipping the ingredients together to mix and aerate the batter, pouring the batter into a crust, and baking in an oven.

In one form, the cheesecake batter generally contains cream cheese, sweetener, cream, eggs and other optional ingredients such as stabilizers and flavoring agents. This product uses standard cream cheese as a base and egg ingredients to have the preferred texture and flavor after baking.

The cream cheese may be a full fat cream cheese or a reduced fat cream cheese. Using cream cheese and cream in the batter may provide a premium quality cheesecake. It should be noted that a variety of different forms of cream cheese may be used including, but not limited to, full fat cream cheese, reduced fat cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese and the like. These ingredients may provide the quality of a made-from-scratch cheesecake in a ready-to-use batter, so that the consumer need not purchase the cream cheese separately. Generally, the cheeses and cream provide the desired flavors, texture, and viscosity.

The sweetener may be sugar or other natural or processed sweeteners. The eggs may be pasteurized eggs, egg replacements, starches and the like. The preservatives may include calcium propionate, potassium sorbate, sorbic acid, phosphoric acid, and the like. Suitable emulsifiers include mono and diglycerides and the like. The flavoring agents may include any number of different flavoring and texturizing agents such as fruit flavoring, chocolate flavoring, cookie flavoring and the like.

It should be understood that other ingredients may also be included in the batter before, during and/or after processing. For example, the batter may also include flour, cornstarch, cream, sour cream, as well as other ingredients.

A standard New York style cheesecake includes 60-63% cream cheese, 12-15% sugar, 1.0-1.5% flour, 0.2-0.8% vanilla extract, 5-13 sour cream or heavy cream and 10-18% eggs. In one form, the ingredients in the batter include all the ingredients used to make a standard New York style cheesecake, with the exception of flour.

In one form, the cheesecake batter includes components in the ranges as listed below in Table 1. However, it should be understood that other ingredient ranges and also ingredients may also be utilized.


TABLE 1
Ingredient ranges
Ingredient
Range
Cream Cheese
60-68%
Cream
 5-10%
Sugar
10-15%
Vanilla Extract
0.05-0.15%
Liquid Whole Eggs
10-15%
Sugared Egg Yolks
1-5%
Sorbic Acid
0.05-0.1% 

One form of a process to manufacture batter will be described with reference to FIG. 1. Generally this process involves mixing and homogenizing with a cooking step to combat microorganisms and mold to improve shelf life. As will be described below in more detail, the ingredients may be added in a variety of combinations and orders and may also include pre-heated ingredients.

In one form, the cream cheese, sugar and cream are added first to reduce lumps of cream cheese and to dissolve the sugar. Afterwards, the eggs, vanilla and ascorbic acid may be added. It should be understood that ingredients may also be added in different orders. Additionally, in one form, the cream cheese and cream are preheated. According to one form, the cream cheese and cream may be preheated to 160-165° F.

As shown in FIG. 1, an input 20 containing hot cream, eggs, sugar, vanilla and sorbic acid are combined with an input 22 containing cream cheese. The inputs 20,22 are combined in a blender or mixer 24, such as a Pfaudler mixer. Generally, the ingredients may be mixed for 1-2 minutes with recirculation. The combined ingredients are then heated for about 1-5 minutes to a temperature range of about 145° F. to about 155° F. and held for about 1-5 minutes. In one form, steam may be used, as shown at reference number 26. In this regard, the steam may be used to quickly heat the combined ingredients while attempting to minimize cooking of the egg component in the combined ingredients. According to one form, the eggs should be maintained above 140° F. for less than 20 minutes. In another form, the eggs should be maintained above 140° F. for less than 10 minutes. In one form, the steam may be at a pressure of 40 p.s.i.g. at a saturated temperature of 331° F. However, it should be understood that other temperatures and pressures may also be used.

The heated, combined ingredients may then be optionally transferred to a surge tank 28 or directly transferred, such as via one or more pumps 30 to a scraped surface heat exchanger 32. Additionally, an inert gas, such as nitrogen may be added from a tank 34 to the heated, combined ingredients. In one form, the inert gas is added when the heated combined ingredients are at a temperature of above about 145° F. While shown as being added at the pump 30, the inert gas may also be added elsewhere during the process prior to cooling and packaging. Further, the inert gas may also or alternatively include other gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and the like.

The scraped surface heat exchanger 32 may be used to further aerate and also cool the heated combined ingredients to create a cheesecake batter. In this regard, the heated, combined ingredients are aerated and cooled such that air cells are formed. It is hypothesized that as the batter cools, the air cells are generally lined with a layer of protein and/or fat on the air cell surfaces to help stabilize the air cells. In one form, the batter enters the scraped surface heat exchanger 32 at a temperature of about 145° F. to about 155° F. and exits at a lower temperature, such as about 45° F. to about 65° F.

Generally, hot whipped refers to ingredients that are whipped and/or aerated at around 150° F. while cold whipping generally refers to ingredients that are whipped and/or aerated below about 50° F. Further, cold whipping may involve injecting the inert gas after the batter has been cooled. Other units may also be used besides a scraped surface heat exchanger. In one form, the unit(s) should be suitable to cool and/or provide shearing to whip the ingredients.

The batter is then passed on to a filler 36 where the batter may be placed in containers. It should be noted that the batter should be packaged into containers at a temperature range of about 45° F. to about 60° F. It was found that if the batter is not chilled prior to packaging, such as in the scraped surface heat exchanger 32, that the egg component may continue to cook which may result in an undesirable cheesecake when the batter is baked. For example, if the batter is permitted to stay above 140° F. for 1-3 days, the eggs may coagulate and result in poor performance of the batter.

FIGS. 2A-2D are light microscopy images of various forms of cheesecake batter and also a cream cheese. Referring to FIG. 2A, an image of a batter that has been whipped while hot, such as found in the process of FIG. 1 is shown. In this image, the batter includes air cells 40 that are small evenly dispersed droplets with a small amount of coalescence of the air cells 42. This generally illustrates a stable network or protein gel with embedded fat. FIG. 2B shows a similar batter that was first cooled to approximately 50° F. prior to whipping. As compared to FIG. 2A, the batter in FIG. 2B generally includes smaller cells 44 with a greater number of large coalesced cells 46. FIG. 2D illustrates a batter which was heated, but did not include any whipping. In this sample it can be seen that there are significantly fewer air cells 48. FIG. 2C illustrates cream cheese that was whipped and aerated. As can be seen in FIG. 2C, there are a significant number of irregular cells 50 of various sizes.

FIGS. 3A-3D are confocal laser scanning microscopy images of various forms of cheesecake batter and also a cream cheese and generally correspond with the batters and cheesecake found in FIGS. 2A-2D. As seen in FIG. 3A, a layer of fat and protein 52 is found on the air surface to stabilize the air cells 54. FIG. 3B, on the other hand, does not include any significant layering of fat and/or protein at the air cell 56 surfaces, but may include some particles. Similarly, the batter shown in FIG. 3D, which was hot processed, but not whipped, does not include any significant layering of fat and/or protein at the air cell 58 surfaces and includes few air cells whatsoever. The whipped cream cheese shown in FIB. 3C does include some protein and fat 60 at the surface of the air cells 62, but not quite to the level of layering found in the batter of FIG. 3A. Therefore, it is hypothesized that whipping of a hot mixture, such as in a scraped surface heat exchanger may provide a unique combination of protein and/or fat at the surface of the air cells to help stabilize the air cells. In some approaches, the air cells may be from about 1 to about 100 microns in size and have a layer of fat and/or protein surrounding substantially the entire air cell, and in some cases, the entire air cell. The layer of fat and protein may be about 1 to about 10 microns thick.

In one form, the consumer does not need to mix, add additional ingredients to, or otherwise prepare the batter before baking. Whipping in order to aerate the batter, however, sometimes may be desirable, although not required. Thus, whipping may produce an especially light and airy texture that some consumers may find desirable. Such whipping can be carried out, for example, using a wisp or a conventional home kitchen-type mixer. Additionally, the consumer may choose to add other ingredients to customize the flavor of the cheesecake. Such additional ingredients only enhance the flavoring already provided in the batter; they are not required in order to prepare a quality cheesecake from the batter of the invention. Of course, if desired, such flavor components could be added to the batter during manufacture.

In general, the consumer only has to open the container in which the batter is stored, pour or otherwise place the batter into a prepared crust, and then bake. The batter is readily pourable from the container and is easily spreadable in the crust. Generally the batter is a light yellow to cream color, although, if desired, other colorants can be included. When baked, the cheesecake is similar to a baked-from-scratch cheesecake. It has a light yellow interior with a lightly browned surface with a distinct cream cheese flavor, slightly sweetened, and a smooth mouthfeel. Using only a conventional home kitchen-type mixer, the resulting cheesecake is fluffy with a specific gravity of about 0.9. Further, the batter has a water activity of approximately 0.978 at 25.7° F. and a density of about 0.88-0.90 g/cc.

In some approaches, after cooking, the mixture can include hot whipping with an amount of nitrogen may be added thereto to form a cheese cake batter with an overrun of about 10-25%.

The batter is normally stored at refrigerated temperatures. An acceptable storage temperature is in the range of about 35° F. to about 45° F. When stored at these temperatures, the batter generally has a four to six month shelf life.

EXAMPLES

A number of exemplary processes and compositions were prepared to analyze a number of compositional and processing variables. For example, the types of ingredients as well as order of addition of ingredients were varied to compare the resulting batters. Further, different processing techniques and overruns were varied to compare the resulting batters.

Example 1

In Example 1, Sample A was prepared with the following formula:


% of Total
Description
Formula
Pounds/Batch
Cream Cheese (F201A13)
64.88%
77.86
Sugar
14.00%
16.80
Vanilla extract
0.09%
0.11
Heavy cream
6.76%
8.11
Whole Eggs (Liquid, Past.)
12.18%
14.62
Sugared Egg Yolks
2.03%
2.44
Sorbic Acid
0.06%
0.07
Total
100.00%
120

Sample A was prepared by heating cream cheese to 160-165° F. The mixture was collected and transferred to a Pfaudler kettle with heating and steam injection. The mixture was maintained in the Pfaudler kettle with agitation and recirculation. The mixture was allowed to reach 160° F. at which point eggs were added and then heated to 150° F. and held for approximately 4.5 minutes. The combined mixture was injected with nitrogen and whipping for an overrun of 15% and then cooled. The mixture was cooled to a temperature of approximately 45-55° F. and then packaged.

The results of Sample A produced a baked cheesecake that showed an expansion of the batter during cooking similar to a control made-from-scratch cheesecake. Sample A also resulted in a cooked cheesecake that had a continuous texture throughout and had a similar appearance and cooked height to the control cheesecake.

Example 2

In Example 2, a number of different samples with varying amounts of overrun were prepared. Samples B-D generally had the following formula:


Amount (lb)
% Weight
Item Name
463.9
64.9% 
Cream Cheese
100.1
14.0% 
Sugar
0.7
0.1%
10x Vanilla Extract
48.3
6.8%
Cream
87.1
12.2% 
Liquid Whole Eggs
14.5
2.0%
Sugared Egg Yolks
0.4
0.1%
Sorbic Acid
715
100% 

Each of Samples B-D was prepared by transferring heated cream cheese at 160-165° F. to a Pfaudler cooking kettle. Hot cream at a temperature of 160-165° F. along with sugar were added to the kettle and agitated with recirculation. Eggs, vanilla extract and sorbic acid were then added and mixed. The mixed ingredients were steam injected to 155° F. and held for 4.5 minutes. The heated, mixed ingredients were transferred to a surge kettle where Samples C and D were nitrogen injected before transferring to a scraped surface heat exchanger. The batter was cooled and then filled into tubs at 50-58° F.

Sample B did not have nitrogen injection, but did have air incorporated therein which resulted in 45% overrun. Sample C had a low level of nitrogen injection which resulted in approximately 15% overrun. Sample D had a medium level of nitrogen injection which resulted in approximately 30% overrun.

Samples B-D resulted in batters having the following attributes:


Property
Target Range
Moisture (%)
50.8-52.6%
Fat (%)
24%
Protein (%)
6.2-6.7   
pH
4.9
Salt (%)
0.6-0.9%

Sample C was preferred over the other samples as it had a preferred texture, taste and appearance that was closest to a control made-from-scratch cheesecake. Sample C was chosen for further stability testing that will be described in further detail below. Samples B and D resulted in cheesecakes that were too aerated and not as dense as the control cheesecake.

Example 3

In Example 3, Samples E-H were prepared to test order of addition of ingredients and amount of overrun. Generally, each of Samples E-H included the following formula:


Samples E-H
% of Total
Description
Formula
Pounds/Batch
Cream Cheese (F201A13)
64.88%
97.32
Sugar
14.00%
21.00
Vanilla extract
0.09%
0.14
Heavy cream
6.76%
10.14
Whole Eggs (Liquid, Past.)
12.18%
18.27
Sugared Egg Yolks
2.03%
3.05
Sorbic acid
0.06%
0.09
Total
100.00%
150

Generally, Sample E was prepared with eggs and sugar added first to evaluate if the batter would curdle and to compare the order of addition of ingredients. As the eggs were added first prior to the hot cream and hot cream cheese, the eggs curdled and the product was not packaged or further tested.

Sample F was prepared with cream cheese, sugar and hot cream added first and with no nitrogen injection. Sample G was prepared with cream cheese, sugar and hot cream added first with nitrogen injection for a target of 10% overrun. Sample H was prepared with cream cheese, sugar and hot cream added first with nitrogen added for a target of 15% overrun.

Generally, the ingredients were added as described above to a Pfaudler kettle which utilized heating and steam injection. The ingredients were held in the Pfaudler kettle with agitation and recirculation. The ingredients were heated to 150° F. and held for 4.5 minutes. Then, steam injection was used to heat above 155° F. The samples then had nitrogen injected and were cooled and whipped to have the respective amounts of overrun.

During Example 3, the nitrogen levels were somewhat difficult to control in the pilot plant. The cheesecakes that resulted from Samples F-H resulted in heights that were approximately the same as a control made-from-scratch cheesecake. However, the textures of the sample cheesecakes varied depending on the level of nitrogen. Sample H had a denser, more creamy texture.

Example 4

In Example 4, Sample I was prepared with the following formula:


Amount (lb)
% Weight
Item Name
937
64.7%
Cream Cheese
105
7.25%
Cream
200
13.81% 
Sugar
1.4
 0.1%
10x Vanilla Extract
174
12.01% 
Liquid Whole Eggs
30
2.07%
Sugared Egg Yolks
0.8
0.06%
Sorbic acid
1448
 100%

Approximately 470 lb of the cream cheese was combined with 105 lb of hot cream. Next, 200 lb of sugar was added. This mixture was then agitated. Next, the remainder of the cream cheese was added and then agitated. Next, 174 lb of whole eggs, 30 lb of sugared egg yolks, 1.4 lb of vanilla extract and 0.8 lb of sorbic acid were added. This mixture was then agitated. While being agitated, steam was injected at 157° F. and held for a minimum of 108 sec so the mixture was at 155° F. The heated mixture was then sent to a surface scraped heat exchanger with a nitrogen flow of 19.5 s.c.f.h. The cooled batter was then cold filled in containers at a temperature of about 50-58° F.

Generally, the finished batter should have the following properties:


Parameter
Target
Minimum
Maximum
Fat
  27%
26.5%
27.5%
Salt
 0.7%
0.6%
0.8%
Moisture
50.1%
49.0%
51.2%
pH
4.9
4.7
5.1
Protein
  6%
5.9%
6.1%

After baking, Sample I had a similar taste, texture and appearance as found for Sample C. Both of these samples were preferred as being closest to a control made-from-scratch cheesecake.

The stability of some of the samples was analyzed to determine the processing and ingredient differences on the batter. A control was prepared using the ingredients and methods described above for a standard New York style cheesecake made-from-scratch. This was compared with Sample C. The control was stored at 45° F. while one portion of Sample C was stored at 45° F. and another portion of Sample C was cycled between 45° F. and 55° F. where one week every thirty days the sample was held at 55° F. Portions of each of the samples were then cooked into a cheesecake eat 325° F. for one hour and twenty minutes after varying amounts of storage time. The results of the stability testing are shown below in the stability chart.


Stability Chart
Cheesecake
Description
Age
Condition
Observation
Conclusion
height (in.)
Control
1 Day
45° F.
Cheesecake: Slightly
Samples of cheesecakes are
1.5
lighter in color, slightly
comparable with the control
taller, stadium effect.
having a slightly drier
Sour, vanilla notes, firm,
texture and more sour
sweet, dry like a New
flavor. Sample of batter is
York style cheesecake,
consistent and not too
breaks down fast
aerated. Continue study.
Sample C
30 Days
45° F.
Batter: Density in a 4 oz.
Time stamp on 45° F. batter
1.5
cup: 111 g. Less sweet
13:13. Samples of
than baked cheesecake,
cheesecakes are comparable
milky, vanilla, smooth,
with the control having a
slightly aerated, stable,
slightly drier texture and
cream cheese, not as
more sour flavor. Sample of
much vanilla compared to
batter is consistent and not
the baked Control
too aerated. Continue
Cheesecake: darker in
study.
color, a little shorter than
control, stadium effect,
moist, no sour/cultured,
lighter in texture, easier to
eat, not as flavor overall,
good texture throughout,
faster rate of breakdown
than Control, no off-notes
Control
1 Day
45° F.
Cheesecake: Cracked in
Samples are comparable,
1.5
center, light brown on
continue study. Samples
edges with brown spots
were all baked in the same
on cheesecake. Slightly
oven due to time
grainy, creamy, dense,
constraints, so appearance
sour, sweet, typical, egg
varied greatly. The batter
note, graham cracker
sample had smoother
flavor, buttery
texture, but overall mild
cheesecake flavor.
Sample C
60 Days
45° F.
Batter: Smooth, sweet,
Samples are comparable,
1.625
slight aeration, creamy,
continue study. Samples
milky, mild flavor overall.
were all baked in the same
Cheesecake: Brown on
oven due to time
edges, stadium effect and
constraints, so appearance
almost burned on
varied greatly. The batter
cheesecake edge,
sample had smoother
smoother than control,
texture, but overall mild
less dense, less sour, less
cheesecake flavor.
sweet, milder overall, not
as eggy as control, vanilla,
firm/denser on outer
edge, caramel notes on
outside
Sample C
60 Days
Cycled -
Batter: Similar to 45 F.
Time stamp on 45° F. batter
1.625
45° F./55° F.
sample, but more
13:10, Time stamp on Cycled
sweetness and more
batter 13:13. All the
vanilla notes. Texture is
cheesecakes cracked and
little softer and slightly
were baked in the same
more aerated.
oven on 06/13/11, so the
Cheesecake: Stadium
prototypes showed more of
effect, brown on edges,
a stadium effect and
cracked similar to 45 F.
browning on edges. Cycled
sample, sweeter than 45 F.
sample turned onto plate
sample, more vanilla,
showed yellow syneresis on
smooth, creamy,
bottom. Samples were
caramelized notes on top,
comparable when baked
graham flavor
and compared to control in
flavor, continue study.
Control
1 Day
45° F.
Cheesecake: Pale in
Samples are comparable,
1.5625
appearance with a few
continue study. All
brown spots, no cracks,
cheesecakes were baked
Stadium effect (slight).
individually in the same
dense, powdery, sour
oven. No cracks on Control,
cream flavor, sweetness,
but cracks in Batter.
not very much cream
Prototype was less dense
cheese, tart, sour bite
than Control cheesecake.
Sample C
90 Days
45° F.
Batter: Sweet, vanilla,
Samples are comparable,
1.75
slightly aerated, fast rate
continue study. All
of breakdown, cream
cheesecakes were baked
cheese, sour, no off-notes.
individually in the same
Cheesecake: Crack in
oven. No cracks on Control,
cheesecake, most brown
but cracks in Batter.
of all, stadium effect most
Prototype was less dense
pronounced, dark spots,
than Control cheesecake.
less dense, not as cohesive
in mouth, not sour, no
tartness, sweet, clean,
cream cheese,
caramelized, top of a flan
flavor
Sample C
90 Days
Cycled -
Batter: Not as much
Time stamp on 45° F. batter
1.6875
45° F./55° F.
sweet, not as much vanilla
13:07, Time stamp on Cycled
as 45° F. sample, softer
batter 13:10. The prototypes
than 45° F. sample, less
showed more of a stadium
whipped, more dense,
effect and browning on
lower flavor, more sour.
edges. Both batter samples
Cheesecake: No cracks,
turned onto plate showed
brown on edges, smooth,
yellow syneresis on bottom.
browning even. More
Samples were comparable
dense than 45° F. sample,
when baked and compared
caramelized, vanilla on
to control in flavor, continue
top, more sour than 45° F.
study.
sample, slight skin on top,
slower rate of breakdown
in mouth than 45° F.
sample, but fast rate of
breakdown compared to
Control

The matter set forth in the foregoing description and accompanying drawings is offered by way of illustration only and not as a limitation. While particular embodiments have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from the broader aspects of applicants' contribution. The actual scope of the protection sought is intended to be defined in the following claims when viewed in their proper perspective based on the prior art.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Process of preparing batters adapted for refrigerated storage THE GLIDDEN COMPANY 10 July 1957 02 May 1961
Food product KAL KAN FOODS INC US 15 November 1971 30 April 1974
System and Method for Producing a Packaged Batter BEAULIEU KELLY 01 May 2007 19 March 2009
Refrigerator stable pressurized baking batter BLASTER FOOD TECHNOLOGIES, LP 08 June 2007 13 December 2007
Food Precursor Composition, Method for its Production and Uses Thereof TINE BA 14 July 2006 18 June 2009
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US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 1 US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 2 US10149483 Ready-to-bake batter 3