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Patent Analysis of

Shockwave valvuloplasty catheter system

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10149690

Application Number

US15/213105

Application Date

18 July 2016

Publication Date

11 December 2018

Current Assignee

SHOCKWAVE MEDICAL, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

SHOCKWAVE MEDICAL, INC.

International Classification

A61B17/22,A61M25/10,A61N1/38,A61N1/05,A61F2/958

Cooperative Classification

A61B17/22022,A61M25/1002,A61N1/38,A61B2017/22025,A61B2017/22054

Inventor

HAWKINS, DANIEL,ADAMS, JOHN M.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10149690 Shockwave valvuloplasty catheter 1 US10149690 Shockwave valvuloplasty catheter 2
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Abstract

A valvuloplasty system comprises a balloon adapted to be placed adjacent leaflets of a valve. The balloon is inflatable with a liquid. The system further includes a shock wave generator within the balloon that produces shock waves. The shock waves propagate through the liquid and impinge upon the valve to decalcify and open the valve.

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Claims

1. An intravascular valvuloplasty method for breaking calcium deposits on a leaflet of an aortic valve, the leaflet being connected to the wall of the aorta and having inferior and superior concave regions, said method comprising:

advancing a catheter into the region of the aortic valve, said catheter carrying a tubular member formed from a non-compliant material that is fillable with a fluid, said tubular member carrying a shock wave generator having a pair of electrodes within the tubular member, the electrode pair for producing a plurality of high voltage pulses to generate electric arcs that create shock waves that propagate through the liquid and through the tubular member; advancing the tubular member so that a portion thereof fits within the superior concave region of a leaflet between the leaflet and the wall; and energizing the shock wave generator to produce a shock wave that propagates through the liquid for impinging upon the valve leaflet in order to break calcium deposits on the leaflet.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the catheter includes a lumen and wherein the tubular member is in fluid communication with the catheter lumen.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the electrode pair is connected to a voltage pulse generator.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. An intravascular valvuloplasty method for breaking calcium deposits on a leaflet of an aortic valve, the leaflet being connected to the wall of the aorta and having
    • inferior and superior concave regions, said method comprising: advancing a catheter into the region of the aortic valve, said catheter carrying a tubular member formed from a non-compliant material that is fillable with a fluid, said tubular member carrying a shock wave generator having a pair of electrodes within the tubular member, the electrode pair for producing a plurality of high voltage pulses to generate electric arcs that create shock waves that propagate through the liquid and through the tubular member
    • advancing the tubular member so that a portion thereof fits within the superior concave region of a leaflet between the leaflet and the wall
    • and energizing the shock wave generator to produce a shock wave that propagates through the liquid for impinging upon the valve leaflet in order to break calcium deposits on the leaflet.
    • 2. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the catheter includes a lumen and wherein
    • 3. The method of claim 1 wherein
      • the electrode pair is connected to a voltage pulse generator.
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Description

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Aortic calcification, also called aortic sclerosis, is a buildup of calcium deposits on the aortic valve in the heart. This often results in a heart murmur, which can easily be heard with a stethoscope over the heart. However, aortic calcification usually doesn't significantly affect the function of the aortic valve.

In some cases, though, the calcium deposits thicken and cause narrowing at the opening of the aortic valve. This impairs blood flow through the valve, causing chest pain or a heart attack. Doctors refer to such narrowing as aortic stenosis.

Aortic calcification typically affects older adults. But when it occurs in younger adults, it's often associated with an aortic valve defect that is present at birth (congenital) or with other illnesses such as kidney failure. An ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram) can determine the severity of aortic calcification and also check for other possible causes of a heart murmur.

At present there is no specific treatment for aortic calcification. General treatment includes the monitoring for further developments of heart disease. Cholesterol levels are also checked to determine the need for medications to lower cholesterol in the hope to prevent progression of aortic calcification. If the valve becomes severely narrowed, aortic valve replacement surgery may be necessary.

The aortic valve area can be opened or enlarged with a balloon catheter (balloon valvuloplasty) which is introduced in much the same way as in cardiac catheterization. With balloon valvuloplasty, the aortic valve area typically increases slightly. Patients with critical aortic stenosis can therefore experience temporary improvement with this procedure. Unfortunately, most or these valves narrow over a six to 18 month period. Therefore, balloon valvuloplasty is useful as a short-term measure to temporarily relieve symptoms in patients who are not candidates for aortic valve replacement. Patients who require urgent non-cardiac surgery, such as a hip replacement, may benefit from aortic valvuloplasty prior to surgery. Valvuloplasty improves heart function and the chances of surviving non-cardiac surgery. Aortic valvuloplasty can also be useful as a triage to aortic valve replacement in the elderly patient with poorly functioning ventricular muscle. Balloon valvuloplasty may temporarily improve ventricular muscle function, and thus improve surgical survival. Those who respond to valvuloplasty with improvement in ventricular function can be expected to benefit even more from aortic valve replacement. Aortic valvuloplasty in these high risk elderly patients has a similar mortality (5%) and serious complication rate (5%) as aortic valve replacement in surgical candidates.

The present invention provides an alternative treatment system for stenotic or calcified aortic valves. As will be seen subsequently, the embodiments described herein provide a more tolerable treatment for aortic stenosis and calcified aortic valves than the currently performed aortic valve replacement. The invention also provides a more effective treatment than current valvuloplasty therapy.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one embodiment, a valvuloplasty system comprises a balloon adapted to be placed adjacent leaflets of a valve, the balloon being inflatable with a liquid, and a shock wave generator within the balloon that produces shock waves that propagate through the liquid for impinging upon the valve. The balloon may be adapted to be placed on opposite sides of the valve leaflets or within the valve annulus.

The system may further comprise an elongated tube. The balloon may be at the distal end of the elongated tube.

The balloon may include a first balloon chamber and a second balloon chamber. The first and second balloon chambers may be longitudinally spaced from each other.

The elongated tube may include a lumen. The first and second balloon chambers are in fluid communication with the elongated tube lumen.

The shock wave generator may comprise a first shock wave source within the first balloon chamber and a second shock wave source within the second balloon chamber. The first and second shock wave sources may comprise a first electrical arc generator and a second electrical arc generator. The electrical arc generators may comprise at least one electrode adapted for connection to a voltage pulse generator. Each of the electrical arc generators may comprise an electrode pair adapted for connection to a voltage pulse generator. Each of the electrode pairs may comprise a pair of coaxially arranged electrodes.

They may further comprise a high voltage catheter including the first and second electrical arc generators. The first and second electrical arc generators may be longitudinally spaced from each other for being received within the first and second balloon chambers, respectively.

As mentioned above, the balloon may be adapted to be placed within the valve annulus. To that end, the balloon may have a reduced diameter portion adapted to be received within the valve annulus.

The balloon may be formed of a compliant material.

Alternatively, the balloon may be formed of a non-compliant material.

According to another embodiment, a catheter system comprises an elongated carrier and a balloon carried by the elongated carrier. The balloon is arranged to receive a fluid therein that inflates the balloon. The system further includes at least one arc generator including at least one pair of coaxially arranged electrodes within the balloon that forms a mechanical shock wave within the balloon.

The system may further include a cable comprising a center conductor and an outer conductive shield insulated from the inner conductor. A first one of the coaxially arranged electrodes may be at least in part formed by the center conductor of the cable, and a second one of the coaxially arranged electrodes may be at least in part formed by the outer conductive shield of the cable.

According to a further embodiment, a valvuloplasty method for treating a valve having leaflets and an annulus comprises placing a balloon adjacent to the leaflets of the valve, inflating the balloon with a liquid, and producing shock waves within the balloon that propagate through the liquid for impinging upon the valve leaflets and the valve annulus.

The placing steps may be performed by placing the balloon on opposite sides of the valve leaflets. Alternatively the placing step may be performed by placing the balloon within the valve annulus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The various described embodiments of the invention, together with representative features and advantages thereof, may best be understood by mating reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in the several figures of which like reference numerals identify identical elements, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a cut away view of the left ventricle, the aorta, and the aortic valve of a heart showing a reduced aortic valve open area and thickened valve leaflets due to calcium and fibrotic tissue;

FIG. 2 is a cut away view of the aortic valve of a heart with a treatment balloon placed on both sides of the aortic valve leaflets, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a schematic view of a dual shockwave balloon embodying the invention attached to a high voltage power supply; and

FIG. 4 is a cut away view of a heart showing an alternate valvuloplasty shock wave balloon according to a further embodiment and aspects of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to FIG. 1, it is a cut away view of the left ventricle 12, the aorta 14, and the aortic valve 26 of a heart 10 with a stenotic and calcified aortic valve 16. Here more particularly, it may be seen that the opening 17 of the stenotic and calcified aortic valve 16 is restricted in size and that the valve leaflets 18 are thickened with calcium deposits and fibrotic tissue. The thickened leaflets 18 and smaller valve opening 17 restrict blood flew from the heart creating excess work for the heart 10 and poor cardiac output. As previously mentioned, current treatment includes replacement of the valve or attempts too stretch the valve annulus with a balloon.

FIG. 2 is a cut away view of the aortic valve 10 with a treatment balloon 22 placed on both sides of the aortic valve leaflets 18. The balloon 22 may be formed from a compliant or a non-compliant material. The balloon, as seen in FIG. 2, is at the distal end of an elongated tube 23. The treatment balloon 22 has two longitudinally spaced chambers 24 and 26 that share a common inflation lumen 25 of the tube 25. Alternatively she balloon chambers 24 and 26 may not share the same inflation fluid path. The chambers 24 and 26 are longitudinally spaced such that chamber 24 is positioned on one side of the aortic valve leaflets 18 and chamber 26 is positioned on the other side or the aortic valve leaflets 18. The chambers 24 and 26 are inflated with saline/contrast mixture, for example. Each chamber 24 and 26 may contain an electrode (as shall be seen subsequently) that can produce electrical arcs to deliver timed shock waves. The shock waves can be synchronized to concurrently impinge upon both sides of the leaflets 18 to maximize the effectiveness of breaking calcium deposits. Such shock waves may be generated and also synchronized to the R wave of the heart 10 in a manner as described for example in application No. 61/061,170 filed on Jun. 13, 2008, which application is incorporated herein in its entirety.

FIG. 3 is a schematic view of a valvuloplasty system 11 embodying the present invention. The system 11 includes the dual shockwave balloon 22. The balloon 22 has received a high voltage catheter 32 that is connected to a high voltage power supply 30. The schematic representation shows the positioning of the balloon chambers 24 and 26 above and below the leaflets 18 of the aortic valve 16. As previously described, shock waves will impinge upon opposite sides of the leaflets 18 to more effectively break calcium deposits in the valve leaflets 18. The annulus will also be treated in this arrangement. To that end, the high voltage catheter 32 includes electrode pairs 34 and that are coaxially arranged electrodes placed in chambers 24 and 26 respectively of the balloon 22. More specifically, electrode pair 34 is at the distal end of a first cable and comprises a center conductor 33 and an outer conductive shield 35. Similarly, electrode pair 34 is at the distal end of a second came and comprises a center conductor 37 and an outer conductive shield 39. High voltage pulses from power supply 30 are applied to the electrode pairs 34 and 36 in a manner as described in the aforementioned application Ser. No. 61/061,170 to create shockwaves within the fluid within the chambers 24 and 26 of the balloon 22. The shock waves impinge upon the valve leaflets 18 and the valve annulus to cause the break up of calcium deposits and fibrotic tissue on the valve leaflets 18 and annulus to open the aortic valve 16.

FIG. 4 shows an alternate valvuloplasty shock wave balloon 42 at the distal end of an elongated tube 43. The balloon 42 is placed in the annulus of the aortic valve 16. To that end, the balloon 42 has a reduced diameter portion 45 for being received within the valve annulus. The balloon 42 has a nigh voltage catheter 44 therein that terminates in an electrode pair 44. As in the previous embodiment, the electrode pair 40 may comprise a pair of coaxially arranged electrodes where a center conductor may form at least a part of one electrode and at an outer conductive shield may form at least a part of the other electrode. The catheter 44 and its electrode pair 46 provide shock waves as previously described. Such an arrangement will decalcify the leaflets 18. This not only will decalcify the leaflets 18, but will also soften the aortic valve annulus and expand its diameter. Hence, the balloon 45 provides the added advantage of exerting expansion pressure directly to the annulus of the valve to remodel the annulus diameter.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, modifications may be made, and it is therefore intended to cover all such changes and modifications which fail within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Low pressure non-fragmenting rupture disks BS & B SAFETY SYSTEMS, INC. 12 November 1990 21 August 1991
冲击波瓣膜成形术导管系统 DJT有限责任公司 05 November 2009 07 December 2011
STOSSWELLENGENERATOR FUER MEDIZINISCHE ANWENDUNGSFAELLE DORNIER GMBH 11 October 1980 27 May 1982
周缘消融装置组件和方法 加利福尼亚大学董事会,阿特里昂尼克斯公司,埃莫里大学 08 July 1998 11 October 2000
Ultrasonic angioplasty balloon catheter THE JOE W. AND DOROTHY DORSETT BROWN FOUNDATION 04 February 1994 09 November 1994
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US10149690 Shockwave valvuloplasty catheter 1 US10149690 Shockwave valvuloplasty catheter 2