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Patent Analysis of

Method and system for therapeutic use of ultra-violet light

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10149927

Application Number

US13/796139

Application Date

12 March 2013

Publication Date

11 December 2018

Current Assignee

THERMOTEK, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

THERMOTEK, INC.

International Classification

A61M1/00,A61N5/06,A61F13/02,A61F13/00,A61M35/00

Cooperative Classification

A61M1/0023,A61N5/0613,A61N5/0616,A61M1/0088,A61N2005/0661

Inventor

QUISENBERRY, TONY

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10149927 Method therapeutic 1 US10149927 Method therapeutic 2 US10149927 Method therapeutic 3
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Abstract

In one aspect, the present invention relates to a wound care system. The wound care system includes a power unit and a processor coupled to the power unit. An ultra-violet light-emitting diode array is electrically coupled to the processor. A thermoelectric element is thermally exposed to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array. A probe is optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array. The thermoelectric element cools the ultra-violet light emitting diode array thereby optimizing the ultra-violet light emitting diode array.

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Claims

1. A wound care system comprising:

a power unit; a processor coupled to the power unit; an ultra-violet light-emitting diode array electrically coupled to the processor; a thermoelectric element thermally exposed to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array; a probe optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array; a pump electrically coupled to the processor and that is fluidly coupled to the probe, the pump applying vacuum pressure to a wound area via the probe; an exudate bottle fluidly coupled to the pump; a probe solenoid disposed between, and fluidly coupled, to the pump and the exudate bottle; a first pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the pump; a second pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the exudate bottle; wherein, when closed, the probe solenoid isolates the probe and the exudate bottle for pressure testing via the first pressure sensor and the second pressure sensor to ensure that a seal is present between the probe and the wound area; and wherein the thermoelectric element absorbs excess heat from the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array and transfers the excess heat to an exhaust thereby optimizing the ultra-violet light emitting diode array.

2. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein the pump operates in at least one of a high vacuum state and a low vacuum state.

3. The wound care system of claim 1, comprising:

a pump solenoid fluidly coupled to the pump and electrically coupled to the processor; and a vent solenoid fluidly coupled to the pump and electrically coupled to the processor.

4. The wound care system of claim 3, wherein vacuum pressure is applied to the wound area via selective actuation of the pump solenoid, the probe solenoid, and the vent solenoid.

5. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array comprises at least one first diode and at least one second diode.

6. The wound care system of claim 5, wherein the at least one first diode emits UV-A light and the at least one second diode emits UV-C light.

7. The wound care system of claim 6, wherein the at least one second diode emits UV-C light for a duration of approximately three minutes per approximately 12 hours.

8. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein the probe is at least one of a patch probe, a spot probe, and a point probe.

9. The wound care system of claim 1, comprising:

a UV interlock optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array and electrically coupled to the processor; and wherein the UV interlock deactivates the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array upon disconnection of the probe.

10. A method for treating a wound area, the method comprising:

coupling a probe to a control unit via a control fiber port; applying the probe to a wound area; generating ultra-violet light via an ultra-violet light-emitting diode array; providing the ultra-violet light to the wound area via the probe; cooling the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array via a thermoelectric element that is thermally exposed to the light-emitting diode array; applying vacuum pressure to the wound area via a pump; isolating the probe from the pump via a probe solenoid disposed between the pump and an exudate bottle; and pressure testing the probe to ensure that a seal is present between the probe and the wound area via a first pressure sensor disposed between the pump and the probe solenoid and a second pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the exudate bottle.

11. The method of claim 10, wherein the applying vacuum pressure comprises selective actuation of a probe solenoid, a vent solenoid, and the pump solenoid.

12. The method of claim 10, wherein the applying vacuum pressure comprises:

applying a first vacuum pressure to the wound area for a first period of time; and applying a second vacuum pressure to the wound area for a second period of time.

13. The method of claim 12, wherein the first period of time includes a range of approximately 24 to approximately 48 hours following a surgery.

14. The method of claim 12, wherein the second period of time follows the first period of time.

15. The method of claim 12, wherein the first vacuum pressure is greater than the second vacuum pressure.

16. The method of claim 10 wherein the generating ultra-violet light comprises:

generating UV-A light via at least one first diode; and generating UV-C light via at least one second diode.

17. The method of claim 16, wherein the UV-C light is generated for a duration of approximately 3 minutes every 12 hours.

18. The method of claim 10, wherein the applying a probe comprises applying at least one of a patch probe, a spot probe, and a point probe.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A wound care system comprising:
    • a power unit
    • a processor coupled to the power unit
    • an ultra-violet light-emitting diode array electrically coupled to the processor
    • a thermoelectric element thermally exposed to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array
    • a probe optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array
    • a pump electrically coupled to the processor and that is fluidly coupled to the probe, the pump applying vacuum pressure to a wound area via the probe
    • an exudate bottle fluidly coupled to the pump
    • a probe solenoid disposed between, and fluidly coupled, to the pump and the exudate bottle
    • a first pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the pump
    • a second pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the exudate bottle
    • wherein, when closed, the probe solenoid isolates the probe and the exudate bottle for pressure testing via the first pressure sensor and the second pressure sensor to ensure that a seal is present between the probe and the wound area
    • and wherein the thermoelectric element absorbs excess heat from the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array and transfers the excess heat to an exhaust thereby optimizing the ultra-violet light emitting diode array.
    • 2. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein
      • the pump operates in at least one of a high vacuum state and a low vacuum state.
    • 3. The wound care system of claim 1, comprising:
      • a pump solenoid fluidly coupled to the pump and electrically coupled to the processor
      • and a vent solenoid fluidly coupled to the pump and electrically coupled to the processor.
    • 5. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein
      • the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array comprises
    • 8. The wound care system of claim 1, wherein
      • the probe is at least one of a patch probe, a spot probe, and a point probe.
    • 9. The wound care system of claim 1, comprising:
      • a UV interlock optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array and electrically coupled to the processor
      • and wherein the UV interlock deactivates the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array upon disconnection of the probe.
  • 10
    10. A method for treating a wound area, the method comprising:
    • coupling a probe to a control unit via a control fiber port
    • applying the probe to a wound area
    • generating ultra-violet light via an ultra-violet light-emitting diode array
    • providing the ultra-violet light to the wound area via the probe
    • cooling the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array via a thermoelectric element that is thermally exposed to the light-emitting diode array
    • applying vacuum pressure to the wound area via a pump
    • isolating the probe from the pump via a probe solenoid disposed between the pump and an exudate bottle
    • and pressure testing the probe to ensure that a seal is present between the probe and the wound area via a first pressure sensor disposed between the pump and the probe solenoid and a second pressure sensor disposed between the probe solenoid and the exudate bottle.
    • 11. The method of claim 10, wherein
      • the applying vacuum pressure comprises
    • 12. The method of claim 10, wherein
      • the applying vacuum pressure comprises:
    • 16. The method of claim 10 wherein
      • the generating ultra-violet light comprises:
    • 18. The method of claim 10, wherein
      • the applying a probe comprises
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Description

BACKGROUND

Field of the Invention

The present application relates generally to a wound care method and system utilizing pulsed ultra-violet light therapy and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a wound care method and system utilizing a thermoelectric element for thermal management of an array of ultra-violet light-emitting diodes.

History of the Related Art

An important aspect of patient treatment is wound care. Medical facilities are constantly in need of advanced technology for cleaning and treatment of skin wounds. Larger skin wounds present more serious issues of wound closure and infection prevention. The rapidity of migration over the wound of epithelial and subcutaneous tissue adjacent the wound is thus critical. Devices have been developed and/or technically described which address certain aspects of such wound healing. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,695,823 to Lina et al. (“Lina”) describes a wound therapy device that facilitates wound closure. A vacuum pump is taught for collecting fluids from the wound. WO 93/09727 discloses a solution for wound drainage by utilizing negative pressure over the wound to promote migration of epithelial and subcutaneous tissue over the wound.

Wound treatment may also be performed using light therapy. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 7,081,128 to Hart et al. (“Hart”) describes a method of treating various medical conditions such as, for example, joint inflammation, edema, etc., utilizing an array of Light Emitting Diodes (“LEDs”) contained on a flexible substrate that may be wrapped around an anatomical feature of a human body. U.S. Pat. No. 6,596,016 to Vreman et al. (“Vreman”) discloses a phototherapy garment for an infant having a flexible backing material, a transparent liner, and a flexible printed circuit sheet containing surface-mounted LEDs. The LEDs preferably emit high-intensity blue light, suitable for treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The device may include a portable power supply.

SUMMARY

The present application relates generally to a wound care method and system utilizing pulsed ultra-violet light therapy and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a wound care method and system utilizing a thermoelectric element for thermal management of an array of ultra-violet light-emitting diodes. In one aspect, the present invention relates to a wound care system. The wound care system includes a power unit and a processor coupled to the power unit. An ultra-violet light-emitting diode array is electrically coupled to the processor. A thermoelectric element is thermally exposed to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array. A probe is optically coupled to the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array. The thermoelectric element cools the ultra-violet light emitting diode array thereby optimizing the ultra-violet light emitting diode array.

In another aspect, the present invention relates to a method for treating a wound area. The method includes coupling a probe to a control unit via a control fiber port and applying the probe to a wound area. The method further includes generating ultra-violet light via an ultra-violet light-emitting diode array and providing the ultra-violet light to the wound area via the probe. The method further includes cooling the ultra-violet light-emitting diode array via a thermoelectric element.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete understanding of the present invention and for further objects and advantages thereof, reference may now be had to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a therapeutic system according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1B is a schematic diagram of the therapeutic system of FIG. 1 according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1C is a schematic diagram that illustrates use of a point probe of the therapeutic system of FIG. 1A according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1D is a perspective view of a patch probe according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1E is a schematic diagram that illustrates use of the patch probe of FIG. 1D according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1F is a cross-sectional plan view of a spot probe according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 1G is a flow diagram of a process for treating a wound area according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a therapeutic system including vacuum therapy according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2B is a schematic diagram of the therapeutic system of FIG. 2A according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2C is a schematic diagram illustrating use of a point probe during treatment of a wound area according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2D is a schematic diagram illustrating use of a patch probe according to an exemplary embodiment;

FIG. 2E is a schematic diagram illustrating use of a spot probe according to an exemplary embodiment; and

FIG. 2F is a flow diagram of a process for treating a wound according to an exemplary embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Various embodiments of the present invention will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings. The invention may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein.

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a therapeutic system 100 according to an exemplary embodiment. The therapeutic system 100 includes a control unit 102 optically coupled to at least one of a patch probe 104, a spot probe 106, and a point probe 108. In various embodiments, a belt clip (not shown) is disposed on a rear surface of the control unit 102. As will be discussed in more detail herein below, the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108 are interchangeable with each other and are adapted to be optically coupled to the control unit 102.

FIG. 1B is a schematic diagram of the therapeutic system 100 according to an exemplary embodiment. The control unit 102 (shown in FIG. 1) includes a power unit 120 electrically coupled to a processor 122, an ultra-violet light-emitting diode (“LED”) array 124, a thermoelectric element 126, and an air mover 128. In a typical embodiment, the power unit 120 is, for example, a battery, a fuel cell, or other appropriate power source as dictated by design requirements. Fuel cells are utilized in remote locations such as, for example, rural locations, research stations, and military applications. Fuel cells are typically compact, lightweight, and have no major moving parts. The power unit 120 is electrically coupled to a charge port 130. The charge port 130 is arranged to be electrically coupled to a charger 132. In a typical embodiment, the charger 132 is operable to be removeably coupled to the charge port 130 and supply an electrical charge to the power unit 120. In a typical embodiment, the charger 132 may utilize, for example, alternating-current (“AC”) power or direct-current (“DC”) power.

The processor 122 is electrically coupled to the power unit 120, the LED array 124, and the air mover 128. The processor 122 includes a power switch 134 and a touch screen 136. In a typical embodiment, the touch screen 136 allows adjustment of a plurality of treatment parameters such as, for example, a treatment time, a LED intensity, and the like. In a typical embodiment, the processor 122 may be, for example, a microprocessor.

The air mover 128 is electrically coupled to the processor 122 and the power unit 120. In a typical embodiment, the air mover 128 may be, for example, a turbine, a fan, or other device as dictated by design requirements. The air mover 128 is fluidly coupled to a warm side of the thermoelectric element 126 via an exhaust port 138. In a typical embodiment, the air mover 128 facilitates removal of heat from a warm side of the thermoelectric element 126.

The LED array 124 is electrically coupled to the power unit 120 and the processor 122. The LED array 124 is optically coupled to a control fiber port 140 via a plurality of fiber-optic strands 142. The LED array 124 includes a first diode 144, a second diode 146, a third diode 148, and a fourth diode 150. The first diode 144, the second diode 146, and the third diode 148 generate light having a wavelength in the range of approximately 400 nm to approximately 315 nm, commonly referred to as UV-A light. The fourth diode 150 generates light having a wavelength in the range of approximately 100 nm to approximately 280 nm, commonly referred to as UV-C light. Although the LED array 124 is shown and described herein as including the first diode 144, the second diode 146, the third diode 148, and the fourth diode 150, LED arrays utilizing principles of the invention may, in other embodiments, include any number of diodes. The control fiber port 140 is adapted for connection of at least one of the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108. The LED array 124 is thermally exposed to a cold side of the thermoelectric element 126.

The processor 122 modulates ultraviolet light generated by the LED array 124 to create various patterns of light, various intensities of light, and various durations of light. In a typical embodiment, the first diode 144, the second diode 146, and the third diode 148 generate approximately continuous UV-A light for application to, for example, a wound area. In other embodiments, the first diode 144, the second diode 146, and the third diode 148 generate pulsed emissions of UV-A light. In a typical embodiment, the fourth diode 150 generates pulsed emissions of UV-C light for application to the wound area. In a typical embodiment, the fourth diode 150 generates UV-C light for a duration of, for example, approximately three minutes approximately every twelve hours.

The patch probe 104 is optically coupled to a patch fiber port 152. The spot probe 106 is optically coupled to a spot fiber port 154. The point probe 108 is optically coupled to a point fiber port 156. The patch fiber port 152, the spot fiber port 154, and the point fiber port 156 are adapted to be removeably coupled to the control fiber port 140 thereby facilitating transmission of ultra-violet light from the LED array 124 to at least one of the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108.

During operation, the LED array 124 transmits ultra-violet light to at least one of the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108 via the plurality of fiber-optic strands 142 and the control fiber port 140. In a typical embodiment, the first diode 144, the second diode 146, and the third diode 148 generate approximately continuous UV-A light for application to, for example, a wound area. In other embodiments, the first diode 144, the second diode 146, and the third diode 148 generate pulsed emissions of UV-A light. In a typical embodiment, the fourth diode 150 generates pulsed emissions of UV-C light for application to the wound area. In a typical embodiment, the fourth diode 150 generates UV-C light for a duration of, for example, approximately three minutes approximately every twelve hours. The thermoelectric element 126 facilitates removal of excess heat generated by the LED array 124 thus cooling the LED array 124. It has been shown that approximately 70% of energy generated by an LED array such as, for example, the LED array 124, is heat energy rather than light. If excess heat is not removed from the LED array 124, an efficiency and reliability of the LED array 124 is negatively impacted. Thus, cooling the LED array 124, via the thermoelectric element 126, optimizes the LED array 124 and improves therapeutic efficacy of the therapeutic system 100. The thermoelectric element 126 transfers the excess heat to the exhaust port 138. The air mover 128 circulates air in the exhaust port 138 with an environment.

Ultra-violet light provided by the LED array 124 promotes wound healing and human tissue growth. Energy delivered by the LED array 124 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin. Ultra-violet light therapy is non-ablative, non-invasive, and painless. Ultraviolet light is capable of penetrating through several layers of skin to destroy infectious bacteria. According to exemplary embodiments, the ultraviolet light from the LED array 124 is in the range of approximately 100 to approximately 450 nanometers and higher, and energy levels of up to approximately 35,000 microwatt seconds/cm2, which are necessary to eliminate or destroy microorganisms such as, for example, bacteria, spores, algae and viruses. Most bacteria can be destroyed at ultra-violet energies of about 3,000 to about 5,000 microwatt-seconds/cm2 while mold spores may require energies of about 20,000 to about 35,000 mW-seconds/cm2.

The point probe 108 includes at least one fiber-optic strand 164 optically coupled to the point fiber port 156. In some embodiments, point probes utilizing principles of the invention may include a single fiber-optic strand. In some embodiments, the point probe 108 may be adapted as a catheter suitable for intravenous use. In still other embodiments, the point probe 108 may be adapted for point treatment of a surface wound.

FIG. 1C is a schematic diagram illustrating use of the point probe 108 during treatment of a wound area according to an exemplary embodiment. The point probe 108 is placed in a wound area 101. In a typical embodiment, ultra-violet light is thus applied to an interior of the wound area 101 via the at least one fiber-optic strand 158. Ultra-violet light, delivered to the wound area 101 via the point probe 108, promotes healing of the wound area 101 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the point probe 108 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 1D is a perspective view of the patch probe 104 according to an exemplary embodiment. The patch probe 104 includes a first layer 160 having a first gap 162 formed therein and a second layer 164 having a second gap (not shown) formed therein. The first layer 160 and the second layer 164 are constructed of, for example, urethane and are coupled to each other along a perimeter via a process such as, for example, welding. The second layer 164 includes an adhesive bottom surface 166. A fiber-optic array 168 is disposed between the first layer 160 and the second layer 164 so as to fill a space defined by the first gap 162 and the second gap. The fiber-optic array 168 is optically coupled to the patch fiber port 152 (shown in FIG. 1B).

FIG. 1E is a schematic diagram illustrating use of the patch probe 104 according to an exemplary embodiment. During operation, the adhesive bottom surface 166 is applied to a skin area 103 surrounding the wound area 101. The fiber optic array 168 is placed in direct contact with the wound area 101. Ultra-violet light is thus applied to the wound area 101 via the fiber-optic array 168. Ultra-violet light delivered to the wound area 101 via the patch probe 104 promotes healing of the wound area 101 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the patch probe 104 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 1F is a schematic diagram illustrating use of the spot probe 106 according to an exemplary embodiment. The spot probe 106 includes a shell 170 having a plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 172 disposed therein. The plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 172 are optically coupled to the spot fiber port 154 (shown in FIG. 1B). During operation, the shell 170 is placed over the wound area 101 thereby allowing treatment of the wound area 101 via the plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 172. Ultra-violet light delivered to the wound area 101 via the spot probe 106 promotes healing of the wound area 101 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the spot probe 106 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 1G is a flow diagram of a process for treating a wound area according to an exemplary embodiment. The process 180 begins at step 182. At step 184, at least one of the patch probe 104, the point probe 108, and the spot probe 106 are coupled to the control unit 102 via the control fiber port 140. At step 186, at least one of the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108 is applied to a wound area of a patient. At step 188, ultra-violet light is applied to the wound area via at least one of the patch probe 104, the spot probe 106, and the point probe 108. At step 190, the thermoelectric element 126 cools the LED array 124 thereby optimizing the LED array 124. The process 180 ends at step 192.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a therapeutic system 200 including vacuum therapy according to an exemplary embodiment. The therapeutic system 200 includes a control unit 202. The control unit 202 includes a control fiber port 241 and a fluid port 243. In a typical embodiment, the control fiber port 241 is optically coupled to a probe 245 via optical fibers. In a typical embodiment, the probe 245 is fluidly coupled to the fluid port 243 via a fluid line. A touch screen interface 210 is disposed on a front of the control unit 202. In a typical embodiment, the touch screen interface 210 utilizes an operating system such as, for example, Android 4.0 operating system, available from Google, Inc., or other similar operating system. In various embodiments, the probe 241 may be at least one of, for example, a patch probe 253 (shown in FIG. 2D), a point probe 248 (shown in FIG. 2C), and a spot probe 262 (shown in FIG. 2E).

FIG. 2B is a schematic diagram of the therapeutic system 200 according to an exemplary embodiment. The control unit 202 (shown in FIG. 2A) includes a power unit 222 electrically coupled to a processor 224, an ultra-violet light-emitting diode (“LED”) array 226, a thermoelectric element 228, and an air mover 230. In a typical embodiment, the power unit 222, the processor 224, the LED array 226, the thermoelectric element 228, and the air mover 230 are similar in construction and operation to the power unit 120, the processor 122, the LED array 124, the thermoelectric element 126, and the air mover 128 discussed above with respect to FIG. 1B. A charge module 225 is electrically coupled to the processor 224. In a typical embodiment, the charge module 225 may be, for example, an alternating current (“AC”) adapter. In a typical embodiment, the charge module facilitates charging of the power unit 222.

Still referring to FIG. 2B, the therapeutic system includes a pump 232 electrically coupled to the processor 224, a pump solenoid 234, a probe solenoid 236, a vent solenoid 238, and an exudate bottle 240. The pump solenoid 234, the probe solenoid 236, the vent solenoid 238, and the exudate bottle 240 are fluidly coupled to the pump 232. In addition, the pump solenoid 234, the probe solenoid 236, the vent solenoid 238 are electrically coupled to the processor 224. In a typical embodiment, the pump 232 operates in at least one of a high vacuum state and a low vacuum state. In the high vacuum state, the pump generates vacuum pressure in the range of approximately 75 mmHg to approximately 150 mmHg while, in the low vacuum state, the pump generates vacuum pressure in the range of approximately 25 mmHg to approximately 75 mmHg.

Still referring to FIG. 2B, an LED interlock 233 is electrically coupled to the processor 224 and optically coupled to the LED array 226. During operation, the LED interlock 233 prompts the processor 224 to deactivate the LED array 226 upon disconnection of a probe from the control fiber port 241. Such an arrangement prevents injury to, for example, an eye of a user.

Still referring to FIG. 2B, the pump solenoid 234 is fluidly coupled to the pump 232 and disposed between the pump 232 and a vent 242. The pump solenoid 234, when open, fluidly couples the pump 232 to the vent 242 and the probe solenoid 236. When closed, the pump solenoid 234 isolates the pump 232 from the vent 242. The vent solenoid 238 is fluidly coupled to the vent 242 between the pump solenoid 234 and the probe solenoid 236. When open, the vent solenoid 238 allows gas to escape to an atmosphere via the vent 242 and relieves vacuum pressure applied to the probe 245. When closed, the vent solenoid 238 prevents relief of vacuum pressure. The probe solenoid 236 is fluidly coupled to the pump solenoid 234 and the exudate bottle 240. The probe solenoid 236 is disposed between a first pressure sensor 244 and a second pressure sensor 246. When open, the probe solenoid 236 fluidly couples pump solenoid 234 to the exudate bottle 240. When closed, the probe solenoid 236 isolates, the exudate bottle 240 and the probe 245. Isolation of the exudate bottle 240 and the probe 245 allows the probe 245 to be tested, via the first pressure sensor 244 and the second pressure sensor 246, to ensure that a sufficient seal is present between the probe 245 and the wound site.

Still referring to FIG. 2B, during operation, the pump 232 operates in at least one of the high vacuum state or the low vacuum state. The processor directs the vent solenoid 238 to close thus preventing release of gas to the atmosphere. The processor directs the pump solenoid 234 and the probe solenoid 236 to open thus fluidly connecting the pump 232 to the exudate bottle 240 and the probe 245. Such an arrangement provides vacuum therapy to a wound site and removes fluid, contaminants, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials from the wound site. The fluid, contaminants, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials are collected in the exudate bottle 240.

Still referring to FIG. 2B, during operation, if a desired level of vacuum is exceeded, the processor 224 directs the vent solenoid 238 to open thereby relieving the vacuum applied to the wound area. Thus, the processor 224 maintains a desired level of vacuum via selective opening and closing of the pump solenoid 234 and the vent solenoid 238.

FIG. 2C is a schematic diagram illustrating use of a point probe 248 during treatment of a wound area according to an exemplary embodiment. The point probe 248 is placed in a wound area 201. Ultra-violet light is thus applied to an interior of the wound area 201 via the at least one fiber-optic strand 250. Vacuum pressure is applied to the wound area 201 via at least one tube 252, which is joined to the at least one fiber-optic strand 250. The at least one tube 252 is in fluid communication with the pump 232 and the exudate bottle 240 (shown in FIG. 2B). Vacuum pressure delivered to the wound area 201 via the point probe 248 removes accumulated fluid, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials from the wound area 201. Ultra-violet light delivered to the wound area 201 via the point probe 248 promotes healing of the wound area 201 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the point probe 248 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 2D is a schematic diagram illustrating use of the patch probe 253 according to an exemplary embodiment. During operation, an adhesive bottom surface 254 is applied to a skin area 203 surrounding the wound area 201. A fiber optic array 256 is placed in direct contact with the wound area 201. A recess 258 is formed above the fiber optic array 256. A tube 260 is fluidly coupled to the recess 258. The tube 260 is in fluid communication with the pump 232 and the exudate bottle 240 (shown in FIG. 2B). During operation, vacuum pressure is applied to the wound area 201 via the tube 260. Vacuum pressure delivered to the wound area 201 via the patch probe 253 removes accumulated fluid, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials from the wound area 201. In a typical embodiment, the fiber-optic array 256 is porous so as to allow removal of the accumulated fluid, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials from the wound area 201. Ultra-violet light is applied to the wound area 201 via the fiber-optic array 256. Ultra-violet light delivered to the wound area 201 via the patch probe 253 promotes healing of the wound area 201 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the patch probe 253 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 2E is a schematic diagram illustrating use of a spot probe 262 according to an exemplary embodiment. The spot probe 262 includes a shell 264 having a plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 266 disposed therein. The plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 266 are optically coupled to a spot fiber port 154 (not shown). A tube 268 is fluidly coupled to the shell. The tube 268 is in fluid communication with the pump 232 and the exudate bottle 240 (shown in FIG. 2B). During operation, vacuum pressure is applied to the wound area 201 via the tube 268. Vacuum pressure delivered to the wound area 201 via the spot probe 262 removes accumulated fluid, dead tissue, and other undesirable materials from the wound area 201. During operation, the shell 264 is placed over the wound area 201 thereby allowing treatment of the wound area 201 via the plurality of fiber-optic strand ends 266. Ultra-violet light delivered to the wound area 201 via the spot probe 262 promotes healing of the wound area 201 and human tissue growth. Energy delivered via the spot probe 262 enhances cellular metabolism, accelerates repair and replenishment of damaged skin cells, and stimulates production of collagen which is a foundation of healthy and smooth skin.

FIG. 2F is a flow diagram of a process for treating a wound according to an exemplary embodiment. A process 270 starts at step 272. At step 274, the processor 224 directs the pump 232 to operate in the high vacuum state. At step 276, the processor 224 directs the pump solenoid 234 and the probe solenoid 236 to open and also directs the vent solenoid 238 to close. At step 278, the pump 232 applies vacuum pressure of, for example, approximately 125 mmHg to the wound area. Such vacuum pressure is applied continuously for approximately 12 hours to approximately 48 hours following, for example, surgery. At step 280, the processor 224 directs the LED array 226 to provide ultraviolet light to the wound area. Such ultraviolet light is applied continuously for approximately 12 hours to approximately 48 hours following, for example, surgery. In particular, as discussed above, UV-A light is applied substantially continuously while UV-C light is applied at approximately three-minute intervals approximately every twelve hours.

Still referring to FIG. 2F, at step 284, the processor 224 directs the pump 232, while operating in the high vacuum state, and the vent solenoid 238 to reduce the level of vacuum pressure applied to the wound area to, for example, approximately 85 mmHg. At step 286, vacuum pressure of, for example, approximately 85 mmHg is applied to the wound area for approximately five minutes. At step 288, the processor 224 directs the pump 232 to operate in the low vacuum state and apply vacuum pressure of, for example, approximately 50 mmHg to the wound area. At step 290, vacuum pressure of, for example, approximately 85 mmHg is applied to the wound area for approximately two minutes. At step 292, the processor directs the LED array 226 to ultraviolet light to the wound area during steps 284-290. At step 294, steps 286-290 are repeated in sequence until the wound area heals. The process ends at step 296.

Although various embodiments of the method and system of the present invention have been illustrated in the accompanying Drawings and described in the foregoing Specification, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiments disclosed, but is capable of numerous rearrangements, modifications, and substitutions without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth herein. It is intended that the Specification and examples be considered as illustrative only.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Device for applying a high frequency electromagnetic field to living tissue to promote healing thereof BENTALL, RICHARD HUGH CAMERON 20 September 1982 06 April 1983
Shoulder conformal therapy component of an animate body heat exchanger ELKINS WILLIAM 01 March 2001 30 August 2001
Lost heat removal method for module of electrical elements ASCOM HASLER AG 13 December 1985 15 June 1989
Inflatable compression sleeve CLOTSOX LIMITED 23 March 2001 25 September 2002
Cooling system of electronic computer HITACHI, LTD. 25 November 1991 10 June 1992
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US10149927 Method therapeutic 1 US10149927 Method therapeutic 2 US10149927 Method therapeutic 3