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Patent Analysis of

Lighted solar hat

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10159294

Application Number

US14/135240

Application Date

19 December 2013

Publication Date

25 December 2018

Current Assignee

WATERS, MICHAEL

Original Assignee (Applicant)

WATERS, MICHAEL

International Classification

A42B1/06,A42B1/24

Cooperative Classification

A42B1/244,A42B1/242

Inventor

WATERS, MICHAEL

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10159294 Lighted solar hat 1 US10159294 Lighted solar hat 2 US10159294 Lighted solar hat 3
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Abstract

Headgear as provided herein includes a light source for providing light away therefrom, a rechargeable battery for providing power to the light source, and a solar panel for recharging the rechargeable battery mounted thereto. The headgear can include a housing configured to at least partially receive the light source, the solar panel, and the rechargeable battery therein. The housing is configured to mount to the hat and orient the electronic components in desired configurations.

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Claims

1. Headgear comprising:

a head-fitting portion for being disposed on a user's head; a brim portion extending from a forward lower edge of the head-fitting portion along a brim axis, the brim portion having upper and lower major surfaces of respective upper and lower fabric portions that cover a brim insert of the brim portion; at least one solar panel disposed on the brim portion to be engaged with the upper major surface of the brim portion; a housing including upper and lower housing portions mounted to the upper and lower major surfaces, respectively; threaded fasteners extending through the brim portion to mount the upper and lower housing portions to the brim portion, connect the upper and lower housing portion together, and compress the brim portion between the connected upper and lower housing portions; a rigid frame member of the upper housing portion mounted to the brim portion and having a central window opening aligned with the solar panel; a transparent cover member having a central raised portion, the cover member mounted to the brim portion such that the central raised portion extends into the central window opening of the frame member to cover the at least one solar panel aligned with the central window opening of the frame member to receive light energy; a flange of the transparent cover member that is lowered relative to the central raised portion and extends outwardly from the central raised portion; an inner surface of the rigid frame member extending about the central window opening with the flange of the transparent cover member captured between the inner surface of the rigid frame member and the upper major surface of the brim portion; a rechargeable power source mounted to one of the head-fitting portion or the brim portion and electrically connected to the at least one solar panel to receive recharging power from the at least one solar panel; and at least one light source mounted in the lower housing portion to be disposed under the brim portion so as to project light forwardly from the brim portion and electrically coupled to the rechargeable power source to receive power from the rechargeable power source.

2. The headgear of claim 1 including a power source housing in which the rechargeable power source is mounted to the head-fitting portion.

3. The headgear of claim 2 wherein the power source housing includes one or more ports mounted thereto and electrically connected to the rechargeable power source, the ports configured to receive plugs therein to provide power to external devices.

4. The headgear of claim 3 wherein the light source is electrically coupled to a plug, and the plug is configured to be coupled to one of the ports to electrically couple the rechargeable power source to the light source.

5. The headgear of claim 4 wherein the power source housing includes a switch device mounted thereto configured to control power distributed from the rechargeable power source.

6. The headgear of claim 5 wherein the power source housing includes a recess in an outer surface thereof, the recess having an opening to an interior of the power source housing; the switch device includes a switch base and a switch actuator extending outwardly from the switch base, the switch device being mounted to the power source housing so that the switch base is disposed in the interior thereof with the switch actuator projecting through the opening into the recess; and the recess is sized so that an actuation point of the switch device corresponds with an upper surface of the switch actuator being depressed into the recess to minimize inadvertent actuation of the switch device.

7. The headgear of claim 5 further comprising a second switch device mounted to the brim portion for controlling operation of the light source.

8. The headgear of claim 1 wherein the at least one solar panel comprises a plurality of solar panels; and the upper and lower major surfaces of the brim portion generally conform to a footprint of the plurality of solar panels so that an outboard edge of the brim portion has an irregular shape.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. Headgear comprising:
    • a head-fitting portion for being disposed on a user's head
    • a brim portion extending from a forward lower edge of the head-fitting portion along a brim axis, the brim portion having upper and lower major surfaces of respective upper and lower fabric portions that cover a brim insert of the brim portion
    • at least one solar panel disposed on the brim portion to be engaged with the upper major surface of the brim portion
    • a housing including upper and lower housing portions mounted to the upper and lower major surfaces, respectively
    • threaded fasteners extending through the brim portion to mount the upper and lower housing portions to the brim portion, connect the upper and lower housing portion together, and compress the brim portion between the connected upper and lower housing portions
    • a rigid frame member of the upper housing portion mounted to the brim portion and having a central window opening aligned with the solar panel
    • a transparent cover member having a central raised portion, the cover member mounted to the brim portion such that the central raised portion extends into the central window opening of the frame member to cover the at least one solar panel aligned with the central window opening of the frame member to receive light energy
    • a flange of the transparent cover member that is lowered relative to the central raised portion and extends outwardly from the central raised portion
    • an inner surface of the rigid frame member extending about the central window opening with the flange of the transparent cover member captured between the inner surface of the rigid frame member and the upper major surface of the brim portion
    • a rechargeable power source mounted to one of the head-fitting portion or the brim portion and electrically connected to the at least one solar panel to receive recharging power from the at least one solar panel
    • and at least one light source mounted in the lower housing portion to be disposed under the brim portion so as to project light forwardly from the brim portion and electrically coupled to the rechargeable power source to receive power from the rechargeable power source.
    • 2. The headgear of claim 1 including
      • a power source housing in which the rechargeable power source is mounted to the head-fitting portion.
    • 8. The headgear of claim 1 wherein
      • the at least one solar panel comprises
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Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This application pertains to lighted headgear and, more particularly, to lighted headgear having solar charging.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Often an individual desires a light focused to illuminate an area while performing a task or a light directed in a general forwardly direction along their line of sight for visibility. Holding a flashlight is an option, but such lighting devices are often cumbersome and may detract from the task being completed because only one hand is available for the task since the other hand is holding the flashlight. As a result, hands-free lighting is desirable so that both hands are available for performing a task in lighted conditions.

Headgear is known that may include light sources attached so as to illuminate an area within the wearer's line of vision. The light source may be an LED mounted to a brim portion of a baseball style hat. Generally, these hats have the LED mounted to direct light forwardly from the brim so that the LED axis is parallel with the fore-and-aft brim axis.

The lighted hat can be displayed on a store shelf in a manner so that a potential purchaser can operate an activation switch to turn on the light source. To this end, the hat may be provided to the store with a power source already included so that the light source can be activated by the consumer. However, because the lighted hat may be shipped in bulk to the store with the power source included, the power source can be unintentionally activated through contact of the activation switch with an adjacent one of the packed hats. In particular, where the activation switch is positioned on the hat brim, the light source can be inadvertently turned on during shipping by the hat brim of one hat engaging or depressing the activation switch of another hat nested therewith. Moreover, a user can leave the light source activated after the user is finished using it. For example, after a user has finished using the lighted hat, the user can leave the hat with the light source still activated. Any of these actions undesirably drains the power source so that a subsequent user might not be able to activate the light source.

To this end, it is beneficial to provide rechargeable batteries and a solar panel to recharge the batteries on a lighted hat. One such lighted hat is described in WO 2007/073219 and commercially available by 2C Light Company Limited. More particularly, the '219 application discloses a lighted hat having a completely integrated solar light brim. The brim is formed by layers of plastic and rubber having electronic components received in therebetween. The top of the brim includes a transparent layer of plastic having a rubber strip extending around the perimeter thereof leaving a central transparent portion that extends across a majority of the brim. The bottom of the brim includes a transparent layer of plastic with a pair of dome-shaped downward projections that form compartments therein and a rubber coating applied over the layer of plastic except for forward lens portions of the dome-shaped downward projections. One of the dome-shaped projections includes a downward facing opening therein that is covered by a flexible membrane. The top and bottom of the brim are sealed or molded together with the electronics received therebetween.

The electronics of the '219 hat include a solar panel aligned with the central translucent portion, a pair of light sources mounted within the compartments of the dome-shaped projections to shine light through the non-rubber coated forward lens portions thereof, rechargeable batteries received in each of the dome-shaped projections, and a pushbutton switch mounted in the one of the dome-shaped projections and aligned with the flexible membrane extending over the downward opening. Wires extend across the brim between the top and bottom portions thereof to connect the various components disposed in the separated dome-shaped projections. As is apparent, the construction of this brim is complicated and costly. Moreover, the electronics are sealed within the brim and are spread out over the width of the brim. While many people might be able to pay for the cost associated with such a construction, a person in poverty without a reliable source of energy may not be able to afford the luxury of the rechargeable light provided by a hat as disclosed in the '219 application.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect, lighted headgear is disclosed having a head-fitting portion for fitting on a user's head and a brim portion extending in a forward direction from the head-fitting portion. The brim portion includes upper and lower surfaces. An electronic assembly mounted to the hat includes a light source, rechargeable battery, a solar panel, and a switch device. The headgear includes a compact housing that is configured to receive the electronic assembly therein and to be mounted to the headgear. For example, the housing can have a compact width in the lateral direction across the brim so that it extends for less than the full lateral width of the brim. In one example, the lateral width of the brim portion is approximately two and a half to three times greater or more than the width of the housing. The compact housing couples to the brim portion to provide low cost hands free lighting having a rechargeable power source and solar panel. The compact housing mounts to the brim portion such that the solar panel is mounted adjacent to the upper surface of the brim portion and the light source is mounted to project light away from the brim portion. In this manner, the solar panel is more readily exposed to sunlight for recharging the battery when the headgear is worn outside during daylight hours.

In one form, the housing can include upper and lower portions. The upper portion of the housing can be mounted adjacent to the upper surface of the brim portion and the lower portion of the housing can be mounted adjacent to the lower surface of the brim portion, where adjacent as used herein is meant to include next to or at the respective surface. In one approach, brim-facing interior surfaces of the upper and lower housing portions engage the upper and lower surface of the brim portion respectively. The light sources can be mounted to the lower portion of the housing such that they direct light from below the brim portion forwardly of the brim portion, downwardly from the brim portion, or forwardly and downwardly at an angle to the fore-and-aft axis of the brim portion. The upper and lower portions of the housing can be configured to be coupled together so that the housing extends through the brim portion to extend beyond the brim portion thereabove and therebelow. In an alternative approach, externally-facing outer surfaces of the housing upper and/or lower portions can extend substantially flush with corresponding upper and lower brim portion surfaces when the upper and lower housing portions are mounted to the brim portion.

In another form, the headgear includes an electronic assembly including a light source, a rechargeable battery, a solar panel, and a switch device. The switch device is electrically coupled to the light source and has a base with an actuator extending therefrom for shifting by a user to shift the light source between on and off configurations. An upper housing portion is configured to mount to the brim portion adjacent to the upper surface thereof. The upper housing portion includes a frame that is sized to receive the solar panel therein to mount the solar panel for receiving solar or other light energy. A lower housing portion is configured to mount to the brim portion adjacent to the lower surface thereof. The lower housing portion includes a base having a switch opening therein and a bezel or tubular portion. The bezel has a bore extending therethrough that is sized to receive the light source therein and orient the light source to project light away from the brim portion, such as forwardly, downwardly, or at an angle therebetween. The switch device mounts to the lower housing portion so that the actuator thereof extends through the switch opening for being manipulated by a user. The rechargeable battery is received at least partially between the upper and lower housing portions so that the housing has a compact configuration for mounting to the hat.

In another aspect, the headgear includes a substantially water-proof housing mounted to the brim portion with upper and lower portions. An electronic assembly including a light source, a rechargeable battery, a solar panel, and a switch device is received within the housing. A bezel of the housing lower portion is configured to receive the light source and orient the light source adjacent to the brim portion lower surface for directing light away from the brim portion, such as in a forward direction, a downward direction, or at angles therebetween. A window portion of the housing upper portion is configured to receive and orient the solar panel adjacent to the brim portion upper surface for receiving solar or other light energy to charge the rechargeable battery. The housing lower portion includes a switch opening with a flexible cover sealed thereover. The switch device actuator extends into the flexible cover to be accessible by a user to shift the light source between one and off configurations. The switch device actuator can be configured to slide, such as with a slide switch device, or can be configured to be depressed, such as with a push-button switch device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a lighted hat having a brim portion and an electronic assembly showing an upper housing portion mounted to a top surface of the brim portion and a solar panel of the electronic assembly received within the upper housing portion;

FIG. 2 is a bottom perspective view of the lighted hat of FIG. 1 showing a lower housing portion mounted to a bottom surface of the brim portion with a sealed switch cover mounted thereto and light bezels extending therefrom;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the lighted hat of FIG. 2 showing the lower housing portion mounted to the bottom surface of the brim portion with a slide switch device of the electronic assembly mounted thereto;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the hat of FIG. 2 with the lower housing portion removed from the brim portion and pivoted to show the switch device and rechargeable batteries of the electronic assembly electrically coupled together;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a brim insert of the brim portion showing a through opening including outer extensions for the fasteners connecting the housing portions;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the electronic assembly showing the lower housing portion and the switch device, solar panel, and rechargeable battery removed from their mounting locations in the lower housing portion;

FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view of the upper housing portion having a frame portion and a cover with a raised central region sized to fit within the frame portion and a flange configured to engage the upper housing portion;

FIG. 8 is a front elevation view of the hat of FIG. 1 showing the upper and lower housing portions mounted to the brim portion and light sources oriented for projecting light forwardly of the hat;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of components of an alternative housing showing an alternative cover and the alternative lower housing portion having the electronic assembly received thereon with a ridge extending therearound and the alternative cover sized to extend over the solar panel for being engagingly sealed to the ridge;

FIG. 10 is a cross-section view of the brim portion of the hat of FIG. 1 showing the upper and lower housing portions mounted thereto and having the electronic assembly received therein with the light sources directing light at a forward and downward cant angle with respect to the fore-and-aft axis of the brim portion

FIG. 11 is a top plan view of a brim portion of a hat showing an alternative configuration for three solar panels to be mounted thereto;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of a brim portion of a hat showing an alternative configuration having two solar panels mounted thereto;

FIG. 13 is a top plan view of a brim portion of a hat showing an alternative configuration having three solar panels mounted thereto and the brim portion having an irregular shape to be generally complementary to the arrangement of the three solar panels;

FIG. 14 is a rear perspective view of a battery pack for electronic components showing attachment handles and two ports;

FIG. 15 is a front perspective view of the battery pack of FIG. 14 showing a power source compartment and a switch device; and

FIG. 16 is a rear elevational view of a hat having the battery pack of FIGS. 14 and 15 mounted to a rear portion of the hat.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Headgear is provided herein that includes at least one light source for providing light away therefrom, at least one rechargeable battery for providing power to the light source, and at least one solar panel for recharging the rechargeable battery mounted thereto. As such, the headgear includes a housing configured to at least partially receive the light source, the solar panel, and the rechargeable battery therein. The housing is configured to mount to the hat and advantageously orient the electronic components in desired configurations. For example, the housing mounts the solar panel to the hat so that it can easily receive energy for recharging the rechargeable batteries, and mounts the light sources for directing light away from the hat.

The headgear can be a baseball style hat with a crown portion and a brim portion extending forwardly from the crown portion. In this form, the hat can advantageously have the light sources mounted to a bottom surface of the brim portion and the solar panel mounted to an upper surface of the brim portion. As such, upper and lower housing portions can couple to one another through the brim portion or couple to the brim portion to protect and house the light sources, solar panel, and rechargeable batteries therebetween or therein.

Headgear 10 is shown in FIGS. 1-10 as a standard baseball style hat that includes a head-fitting portion 12 and a brim portion 14. As shown, the head-fitting portion 12 can be constructed from one or more panels 16 of a flexible material or fabric, and, if desired, can include one or more rigid members therebetween to provide structure to the crown 12. The head-fitting portion 12 could alternatively have an annular configuration, such as with visors or the like. The crown 12 can be fitted to a specific size or can have an adjustable strap 18 at a rear portion 20 thereof. Moreover, the crown 12 can include a hat band 21 attached thereto at a lower edge portion 22 thereof. If desired, the hat band 21 can have elastic and/or wicking properties for added comfort. The brim 14 extends forwardly from the lower edge portion 22 of the crown 12 at a forward portion 24 thereof.

The brim 14 has an upper major surface 26, a lower major surface 28, and an outboard edge 30 extending therebetween. In the illustrated form, the brim 14 includes a generally rigid brim insert 32 having upper and lower surfaces 34, 36. The brim 14 further includes upper and lower fabric coverings 38, 40 extending over and covering the corresponding upper and lower surfaces 34, 36 of the brim insert 32. If desired, plastic materials, or combinations of plastic and fabric can be used. The brim 14 of this form further includes a fabric piping 42 extending over the outboard edge 30 and connecting the upper and lower fabric portions 38, 40. As such, the top or upwardly facing surface of the upper fabric covering 38 and the bottom or downwardly facing surface of the lower fabric covering 40 correspond to the upper and lower major surfaces 26, 28 of the brim 14. Alternatively, if the brim 14 does not include the upper and lower fabric coverings 38, 40, the brim insert upper and lower surfaces 34, 36 can correspond to the upper and lower major surfaces 26, 28 of the brim insert 32.

The hat 10 includes an electronic assembly 44 mounted thereto, as shown in FIG. 6. The electronic assembly 44 includes one or more light sources 46, one or more solar panels 48, one or more rechargeable batteries 50, a switch device 52, and electrical connections 54, such as circuit boards, wires, solder, traces, or the like, therebetween. The switch device 52 is configured to shift the light sources 46 between on and off states and the solar panel 48 is configured to convert solar or light energy to recharging energy for the rechargeable battery 50. Preferably, the light sources 46 are light emitting diodes (LEDs) having an illumination chip 56, a lens 58 enclosing the illumination chip 56, and a pair of leads 60 projecting rearwardly away from the illumination chip 56 to an exterior rearward position. In addition or instead of the light sources 46, the hat 10 can have other electronic devices mounted thereto and operated by the electronic assembly 44, such as a camera device.

As illustrated, the electronic assembly 44 can be mounted to the brim 14 so that the light sources 46 are adjacent to the lower major surface 28 thereof and the solar panel 48 is adjacent to the upper major surface 26 of the brim 14. In other forms, the light sources 46 can be mounted at the outboard edge 30 of the brim 14, adjacent to the upper major surface 26 of the brim 14 or at least partially between the upper and lower major surfaces 26, 28 of the brim 14. In these various forms, the light sources 46 are mounted to the brim 14 to project light away therefrom, such as forward, downward, upward, sideways, or combinations thereof at angles therebetween. Additionally, the solar panel 48 can also be disposed at least partially between the upper and lower major surfaces 26, 28 of the brim 14.

To mount the electronic assembly 44 to the hat 10, the hat 10 further includes a compact electronic assembly housing 66 configured to at least partially receive the electronic assembly 44 therein. In one form, the housing 66 can include upper and lower housing portions or members 68, 70 configured to connect together to sandwich and clamp portions of the brim 14 therebetween. Specifically, the upper housing member 68 can be mounted to the brim upper major surface 26 so as to have at least a portion thereof adjacent to the brim upper surface 26 and the lower member 70 can be mounted to the brim lower major surface 28 so as to have at least a portion thereof adjacent to the brim lower surface 28. As shown in FIG. 8, the upper and lower housing portions 68, 70 can have a curvature generally complementary to the curvature of the brim 14.

In one form, the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 connect to one another through the brim 14 utilizing fasteners 72, such as screws or the like, or snap-fit structure. In order to preserve the aesthetics of the hat 10, the housing 66 is preferably configured so that the screws 72 are inserted from below the brim 14 through openings 73 in the lower housing member 70, so that the screws 72 are only visible underneath the brim 14. In another form, the housing 66 can have a single piece construction that is configured to snap fit or otherwise secure within an opening in the brim 14 so that the upper and lower housing portions 68, 70 are positioned adjacent to the upper and lower brim surfaces 26, 28. In either case, the housing 66 can be removable from the brim 14. As such, if desired, a user could utilize the housing 66 as a standalone rechargeable flashlight when separated from the hat 10 since the housing members 68, 70 can be connected together without the brim portion therebetween.

In one example, the brim 14 can have a lateral width of about 7 inches, a length along the fore-and-aft axis of about 3 inches, and a depth of about 0.25 inches. In addition, the housing 66 can have a lateral width of about 2.5 inches, a length along the fore-and-aft axis of about 2.5 inches, and a depth of about 0.45 inches. In another example, the upper and lower housing portions 68, 70 are separated by about 0.15 inches, such that the housing portions 68, 70 clamp and compress the brim 14 therebetween to deform the brim 14 by about 0.1 inches.

In the form using a multi-piece housing 66, the brim 14 can include openings 74 therethrough to easily allow connecting structure of the upper and lower housing portions 68, 70 to extend therethrough. The openings 74 can extend through the brim insert 32 and, if desired or applicable, the upper and lower fabric portions 38, 40. For secure connection, the upper and/or lower housing members 68, 70 can further include projections or bosses 76 that are configured to extend at least partially into the brim insert 32. In the form utilizing screw fasteners 72, the projections 76 include bores 78 therethrough to receive the screw fasteners 72. The bores of the projections 76 of the upper housing member 68 are threaded so that the screw fasteners 72 engage can the threads and tightly secure the upper and lower housing members 6870 together capturing the brim 14 therebetween. If desired, the lower housing member 68 can include indentations 80 around the openings 73 in a downwardly facing surface 82 thereof, so that the screw fasteners 72 don't project past the surface 82 after the housing has been assembled.

In the illustrated form, the housing portions 68, 70 include five projections 76 and the brim 14 includes five corresponding openings 74; however, other configurations can also be utilized. As shown, the housing portions 68, 70 include three projections 76 along the sides thereof closest to the crown 12 and two projections 76 on sides thereof closet to the brim front edge.

Instead of coupling together through the brim 14, the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 can couple to the brim 14. For example, the brim openings 74 can have threads therein or nuts or the like can be mounted within the openings 74. So configured, the screw fasteners 72 can be utilized to individually connect the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 to the brim by securing to threads within the openings 74.

The lower housing member 70, details of which are illustrated in FIGS. 2-4, 6, and 10, includes a generally planar base portion 84 and an offset or enlarged portion 86 that is offset with respect to adjacent portions of the base 84. As shown, the offset portion 86 is spaced from outer edges 88 of the lower housing portion 70 by perimeter portions 90 of the base 84. The perimeter portions 90 provide ideal placement for the openings 73, the indentations 80, and the projections 76 aligned therewith for the screw fasteners 72 so that the projections 76 or other connecting structure does not interfere with positioning of the electronic assembly 44 within the interior of the housing 66. In the illustrated form, the housing lower member 70 has a footprint with a rectangular rear portion 92 and a trapezoidal forward portion 94 with the offset portion 86 positioned generally within the rectangular rear portion 92.

As shown, the offset portion 86 is generally boxed shaped, having a front wall 96, a rear wall 98, side walls 100, and a bottom wall 102. The bottom wall 102 is described as such due to the orientation of the housing lower member 70 when mounted to the lower surface 28 of the brim 14. The offset portion 86 preferably has an open top 104 so that when the lower housing member 70 is mounted to the hat brim 14, the offset portion 86 provides a recessed well or compartment 116 for the larger components of the electronic assembly 44, such as the rechargeable battery 50.

The rechargeable batteries 50 are preferably mounted adjacent to the lower major surface 28 of the brim 14 and/or at least partially between the upper and lower brim major surfaces 26, 28, so that the housing 66 depth is minimized and the brim 14 maintains a streamlined appearance. Additionally, with the solar panel 48 mounted adjacent to the brim upper surface 26, the width of the housing 66 can have a more compact configuration with the rechargeable batteries 50 positioned underneath the solar panel. If desired, however, the rechargeable batteries 50 can also be mounted adjacent to the upper major surface 26 of the brim 14 or mounted to the crown 12 of the hat 10. Moreover, the solar panel 48 can be mounted at least partially between the upper and lower major surfaces 26, 28 of the brim 14 or to the crown portion 12.

As discussed above, the compartment 116 of the offset portion 86 provides additional space for the electronic assembly 44. Specifically, as the rechargeable batteries 50 are potentially the largest component of the electrical assembly 44, the compartment 116 of the offset portion 86 provides an ideal storage location therefor. Moreover, the offset portion 86 can have a different configuration than generally rectangular. For example, the offset portion 86 can conform to a footprint and/or depth of the rechargeable batteries 50.

As shown in FIG. 5, in order to provide additional room to carry the electronic assembly 44, the brim insert 32 can include a cut-out 106 therein located generally inbetween or connected to the hardware openings 74. By removing a portion of the brim insert 32, the rechargeable batteries 50 can be positioned at least partially between the upper and lower surfaces 34, 36 thereof, which advantageously allows the depth of the offset portion 86 to be minimized and, therefore, the hat 10 is able to maintain a generally traditional appearance.

Moreover, the upper and lower brim coverings 38, 40 can include a cut-out or opening 108 corresponding to the cut-out 106 in the brim insert 32. In the form illustrated in FIG. 4, the covering cut-out 108 is a pair of overlapping cuts in an X-shaped pattern. This configuration allows for fast assembly of the hat 10; i.e., quick preparation of the cut-out 108 during brim assembly. The cut-out 108 can be advantageously sized so that the solar panel 48 can be inserted through the brim 14 to be mounted adjacent to the upper surface 26 thereof. This configuration allows the electronic assembly 44 to be pre-assembled and wired, which saves time during assembly of the hat 10. Once mounted, the wires 54 can easily pass through the opening 108 connecting the solar panel 48 with other components of the electronic assembly 44. Alternatively, the covering cut-out 108 can be a removed portion of the covering material that generally corresponds to the shape of the brim insert cut-out 106.

The housing lower member 70 further includes a pair of bezels or tubular portions 110 that project away from the front wall 96 of the offset portion 86. The bezels 110 are shown connected with the base portion 84 of the lower housing member 70, but can be separated therefrom if desired. Moreover, the bezels 110 can be integral with the lower housing portion 70 as shown, or can be attached thereto.

The bezels 110 have a cylindrical bore 112 therethrough within an opening 114 into the interior 116 of the offset portion 86 and, therefore, in the interior of the housing 66 when the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 are coupled together. As such, the light sources 46 can be received within the bezels 110 and the bezels 110 are configured to orient the light sources 46 to provide light forwardly of the hat 10. If desired, the bores 112 of the bezels 110 can be angled downwardly with respect to the plane of the hat brim 14, as shown in FIG. 10, so as to provide light forwardly and downwardly of the hat 10, such as to a reading or working area of a wearer of the hat 10. In other forms, the bezels 110 and bores 112 can extend generally parallel to the plane of the hat brim 14 to project light forwardly of the hat 10, perpendicular to the plane of the hat brim 14 to project light downwardly, or be oriented outward to project light sideways of the hat 10, such as for safety lighting. Alternatively, the light sources can be mounted to the housing 66 to project light in other directions, such as sideways, to act as a safety mechanism. In the illustrated form, the bezels 110 are sized for the LEDs 46 to be mounted therein, so that the bezels 110 extend beyond the illumination chips 56 of the LEDs 46 to block stray light from shining into the eyes of a wearer of the hat 10. The bezels 108 can alternatively project from a forward facing surface of any other shaped offset or directly from the base 84.

The offset portion 86 can alternatively simply have the openings 114 in the front wall 96 thereof and the LEDs 46 can be positioned at least partially inside the offset portion 86 to project light forwardly through the openings 114. Moreover, it will be understood that the bezels 110 and other light directing structure described herein can also be provided on the upper housing member 68.

In one form, the bezels 108 can each have a socket at the opening 114 to the interior 116 of the housing 66 to separate the leads 60 of the light sources 46. Specifically, the opening 114 can have a span 118 thereacross to generally divide the opening 114 into two halves. As such, the span 118 can separate the leads 60 of the lights sources 46 for easier electrical connection to the other components of the electronic assembly 44.

Additionally, if more space for the bezel 110 and bore 112 therethrough is needed, the lower housing member 70 can include extensions 120 that project from an inner surface thereof 122 to be offset therefrom and aligned with in the bezels 110 on the outer surface 82. The extensions 120 provide additional thickness to the bezels 110 and, therefore, allow for a greater downward angle for the bore 112. As such, the hat 10 can be configured to provide a user with light in a more downwardly direction without increasing the thickness of the entire lower housing member 70, saving production costs.

The switch device 52 includes a base 124 and an actuator 126 extending away from the base 124 for shifting by a user. In the illustrated form, the switch device 52 is a slide switch, so the actuator 126 is configured to shift laterally with respect to the base 124 to cycle the light sources 46 between on and off configurations. It will be understood, however, that the switch device 52 can take any suitable form, including a push button switch, a rotary switch, or the like.

The switch device 52 is mounted to the lower housing member 70 to be accessible to a wearer of the hat 10 while the hat 10 is on the wearer's head. In one form, the switch device 52 is mounted to the inner surface 122 of the lower housing member 70 and the lower housing member 70 includes a switch opening 128 through which the switch actuator 126 extends. In the form utilizing a slide switch, the switch opening 128 can be an elongate opening to allow for lateral shifting of the actuator 126.

As discussed, the switch base 124 is mounted to the inner surface 122 of the lower housing member 70. In order to make the mounting process easier and ensure secure mounting of the switch device 52, the lower housing member 70 can further include an upstanding wall 130 on the inner surface 122 thereof that creates a bay or compartment 132 for reception of the switch device 52. The upstanding wall 130 extends around the switch actuator opening 128, so that the switch device 52 can be deposited within the bay 132 with its actuator 126 projecting downwardly through the opening 128. Preferably, the bay 132 is sized to generally match the footprint and depth of the switch base 124. If desired, the bay 132 can be sized so that the switch device 52 is received in a friction fit therein. Alternatively, or in addition thereto, an adhesive or epoxy can be applied over the switch device 52 after it has been mounted within the bay 132 and electrically attached to other components of the electrical assembly 44. The upper housing portion 68 can be also configured to include the bay 132 and switch actuator opening 128, and other features discussed above, so that the switch device 52 can be mounted to the upper housing member 68.

As described above, the upper housing member 68, details of which are shown in FIGS. 1 and 7, is configured to mount to the upper surface 26 of the brim 14. The upper housing member 68 includes a perimeter frame portion 134 defining a central window region 136. The central window region 136 provides an ideal placement for mounting the solar panel 48 to the upper surface 26 of the brim 14. Specifically, the solar panel 48 can be sized to fit within the central window region 136 and engage an inner surface 138 of the upper housing member 68 with edges 140 thereof to prevent the solar panel 48 from dislodging after the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 are secured together or coupled to the brim 14.

In order to protect the solar panel 48 from damage, i.e., from weather, debris, or other physical damage, the housing 66 can further include a cover 142 configured to extend over and cover the central window region 136, and the solar panel 48 mounted therein. The cover 142 includes a raised central region 144 configured to be generally complementary to the shape of the solar panel 48 and sized to fit within the central window region 136 of the upper housing member 68. The cover 142 further includes an outwardly extending flange 146 configured to engage the inner surface 138 of the upper housing member 68 so that the flange 146 is captured between the upper housing member 68 and the brim 14 when the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 are secured together or coupled to the brim 14. As shown, the flange 146 can include cut-outs 148 corresponding to the location of the projections 76 so that the flange 146 can easily nest into placement with the upper housing member 68.

As discussed above, the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 can be secured together with the projections 76 thereof abutting one another. In order to provide a tight grip on the brim 14 of the hat 10, the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 can each further include a rim 150 projecting inwardly toward the brim 14 from their respective inner surfaces that extends around the perimeter edges thereof. The rims 150 are preferably sized, so that when the housing 66 is assembled with the upper and lower housing members 68, 70 attached to one another, the rims 150 compress and slightly deform the brim 14 to ensure a secure mounting of the housing 66.

So configured, the housing 66 is configured to receive the electrical assembly therein and mount to the hat brim 14 to provide hands-free light with a rechargeable energy source.

In another configuration, the housing 66 can substantially prevent the ingress of water therein to minimize water damage to the components of the electronic assembly 44. Various waterproofing features of this second form of the housing 66 are shown in FIGS. 2 and 9. The upper and lower housing members 68, 70 can have substantially similar structures as set forth above, so only the differences will be discussed hereafter.

In this form, the housing 66 includes an enlarged cover 152 with a raised central region 154 that extends over to cover the solar panel 48 and fit within the window region 136 of the upper housing member 68 similar to the above cover 142. Instead of having the flange 146 that is configured to nest between the upper housing member 68 and the brim 14, the enlarged cover 152 includes a flange 156 that is configured to nest between the lower housing member 70 and the brim 14. Specifically, the raised central region 154 has a greater depth than the earlier described cover 142, so that the enlarged cover 152 passes through the openings 106, 108 in the brim insert 32 and the upper and lower coverings 34, 36 thereon. The flange 156 then extends outwardly to abut the perimeter portions 90 of the lower housing member 70. Advantageously, the lower housing member 70 can include a molded ridge 158 extending around the lower housing member 70 in the perimeter portions 90 thereof that aligns with the flange 156 of the enlarged cover 152. Using ultrasonic welding, adhesive, or the like, the enlarged cover 152 can then be sealed to the lower housing member 70 to thereby prevent the ingress of water therebetween.

While the configuration with the enlarged cover 152 substantially protects the electronic assembly 44 from water damage, the bezels 110 and the switch opening 128 can also be configured to prevent water ingress into the housing 66. For the bezels 110, a sealant can be inserted or deposited into the bore 112, which seals the opening 114 into the housing 66 and can protect the leads 60 of the light sources 46.

For the switch opening 128, a flexible rubber or plastic switch cover 160 can be mounted over the switch opening 128 in the lower housing member 70 and sealed or welded thereto. The switch actuator 126 projects through the openings 128 into the flexible cover 160 for being manipulated by a user. As such, the opening 128 is sealed against the ingress of water, but the flexibility of the switch cover 160 allows a user to actuate the switch device 52.

So configured, the electrical assembly 44 can be protected from water damage and a user of the hat 10 can be provided with cost-effective hands-free lighting having a rechargeable light source that can be used in adverse situations and settings. Such a hat 10 is particularly suitable for reliable lighting in areas without consistent electrical supply.

In another form, the electrical assembly 44 can include a port or socket 162 that is electrically connected to the rechargeable batteries 50 and is configured to receive a plug 164 therein for recharging the batteries. The port can be any suitable structure, such as USB, mini-USB, or the like. While the solar panel 48 can provide reliable recharging in many settings, the port 162 can provide a suitable alternative in situations having an electrical supply or can supplement the solar panel 48 when the rechargeable batteries 50 run out of power and a suitable recharging light source is unavailable. Moreover, a rubber cap or cover can be configured to plug the port 162 when it is not being used to protect the port 162 and other components of the electronic assembly 44 from damage, such as by water, debris, or the like.

Moreover, the port 162 can be used to charge or power devices not mounted to the hat 10. For example, a portable electronic device, such as a phone, tablet, or the like, can plug into the port and receive power from the rechargeable batteries 50. This is particularly advantageous in areas without a consistent electrical supply. The independent and rechargeable configuration of the hat 10 can be utilized to power and recharge devices in addition to the light sources 46.

Alternative brim and solar panel configurations are shown in FIGS. 11-13. As discussed previously, the headgear described herein generates power that is used to charge a rechargeable power source, which can then be used to power electrical devices mounted to the headgear or devices external thereto. In such cases, it can be beneficial to have solar panels covering as much surface area as possible so that the rechargeable power source can be kept in a charged condition. FIGS. 11-13 show alternative brim configurations having more solar panel surface area as compared to the headgear of FIG. 1.

In a first form, shown in FIG. 11, the brim 14 is structured as set forth above except that it includes three solar panels 48 mounted thereto in a staggered arrangement that is generally complementary to the curvature of the brim 14. The solar panels 48 can be electrically coupled to other components as set forth herein without limitation. Further, the brim 14 can have an upper housing portion 166 mounted thereto that is similarly structured to the upper housing portion 68 discussed above, except it is sized to extend around and cover the three solar panels 48. The upper housing portion 166 includes a perimeter frame portion 167 defining three central regions 169 therein where the solar panels 48 are disposed. Specifically, the solar panels 48 are sized to fit within the window regions 169 and engage an underside of the frame portion 167 with edges thereof to prevent the solar panels 48 from dislodging. The upper housing portion 166 can further include a single piece cover or three separate covers 171 that are configured to extend over and cover the solar panels 48 and secure between the housing and the brim with an outwardly extending flange, as described above.

By another approach, as shown in FIG. 13, an irregularly shaped brim 170 can have the three solar panels 48 of FIG. 11 mounted thereto and can further include indents or removed portions 172 forwardly of the side solar panels 48. In this manner, the forward edges # of each of the solar panels 48 are at approximately the same distance from the corresponding forward edge 173 of the brim portion 170. As such, a forward edge 173 of the brim portion 170 is generally complementary to the staggered arrangement of the solar panels 48 to provide a unique product display.

In a second from, shown in FIG. 12, the brim 14 is structured as set forth above except that it includes two relatively larger solar panels 174 compared to those described above. The larger solar panel provides a larger surface area to thereby produce more energy. The larger solar panels 174 provide good surface area coverage, while also reducing the electronic connections, components, and labor necessary for three or more solar panels. With the two solar panels 174 of FIG. 12, a lesser number of solar panels need to be electrically connected and a fewer number of electrical connections need to be mounted to the brim 14. The larger solar panels 174 can utilize protective housings as described herein, either individually or enlarged to cover both panels.

An alternative power source housing 182 for the electrical components described herein is shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. The power source 50 received in the brim 14 as described above, is restricted in that the size thereof is limited by how much weight can be mounted to the brim 14, as well as having to consider the size of structure being mounted to the brim 14 and its impact on the aesthetics of the hat 10. In contrast, the power source housing 182 can be mounted to a rear portion of a hat as described in U.S. application Ser. No. 13/725,558, filed on Dec. 21, 2012, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. Specifically, the power source housing 182 includes securing portions or handles 184 on three sides 186 thereof. So configured, hat 10 can then include three corresponding loops of material or a loop of material secured to the top handle 184 and a strip of material extending over the power source housing 182 through the side handles 184, such as an adjustment strap of a hat or the like. Additional mounting details and structure are disclosed in the '558 application, which is briefly described below and shown in FIG. 16.

More specifically, the power source housing 182 is mounted to the rear portion of a hat 2010 by three points of securement therebetween in a manner similar to that described in the '558 application. More particularly, an adjustable strap 2096 can pass through the spaces or openings between the side handles 184 and an outer surface of the housing sidewall to secure the power source housing 182 to the rear portion of the hat 2010 at two of the three points of securement. The two side handles 184 thus form the first and second points of securement with the rear portion of the hat 2010. The strap 2096 can extend laterally across an outer major surface 2088 of the housing 182, with the housing 182 oriented so that the outer major surface 2088 is the rearward surface.

Furthermore, the power source housing 182 can be oriented so that the top handle 184 is in the form of an upper securing member disposed at the top of the power source housing 182. The third point of securement is formed between the upper securing member 184 and a loop or upper strap portion 2098. The upper strap portion 2098 is located at the rear portion of the hat 2010, generally above and adjacent to the strap 2096 extending downwardly and transverse to the laterally extending strap 2096. The upper strap 2098 can be received through the opening or space between the top handle 184 and an outer surface of the corresponding housing sidewall portion.

The upper strap portion 2098 can be irremovably mounted to the upper securing member 184 in the form of a closed loop connection therebetween. Thus, while the strap 2096 can be easily adjusted within or removed from the openings between the side handles 184 and the corresponding sidewalls to adjust the tightness of the hat 2010, the upper strap portion 2098 remains relatively secure, permitting rotation adjustment of the closed loop connection but substantially preventing removal of the upper strap portion 2098 from the upper securing member 184. Therefore, if the strap 2096 is removed, the power source housing 182 stays coupled to the hat 2010 via the upper strap portion 2098 to ensure that the housing 182 is not misplaced or that it does not drop to the ground from the hat 2010. However, the upper securing member 184 could also be mounted to the upper strap portion 2098 in a manner permitting easy detachment if desired, such as by using a looped connection capable of repeated opening and closing, or providing a break in the upper securing member 184. The upper strap portion 2098 is preferably made from a flexible fabric material; however, other materials can also be used.

Turning back to the structure shown in FIGS. 14 and 15, the power source housing 182 includes a power source compartment 184, which can be sized and configured to receive one or more power sources 186 therein, which are preferably rechargeable, such as permanently mounted batteries or replaceable batteries, as desired. In the form of a permanently mounted battery, the housing 182 can be sealed shut to provide water tight protection. Alternatively, in the form of replaceable batteries, the power source compartment 184 can include a removable or movable cover 188 that is configured to be releasably secured to the housing 182 using suitable structure 190, such as snap-fit, tongue and groove, or the like.

The power source housing 182 can further receive a switch device 192 therein. In the illustrated form, the switch device 192 is a push button switch device having a switch base 194 and a switch actuator 196 that projects away from the switch base 194 and is shiftable with respect thereto. As such, the switch base 194 can be disposed within the housing 182 and the housing 182 includes an opening 198 sized to receive the actuator 196 extending therethrough. The actuator 196 is then accessible to a user of the electronic components coupled to the power source housing 182, as described in further detail below. When coupled to the hat 10, and specifically the light sources 46 thereof, the switch device 192 can be used to shift the light sources 46 between on and off configurations. Alternatively, the switch device 192 can be a master control that functions to control power distribution from the power sources 186. For example, a user can actuate the switch device 192 to an off configuration when electrical devices coupled thereto are not in use. This would prevent the switch device 52 coupled to the light sources 46 from being able to energize the light sources 46.

In order to protect against inadvertent actuation, the housing 182 can include a recessed well 200 having the opening 198 centrally therein. The activation point of the actuator 196, i.e., the point at which the device 192 is switched between on and off configurations, can then correspond to a location where an upper surface 202 of the actuator 196 is shifted from being above to below a raised surface 204 of the housing 182 extending around the recess 200 and the actuator 196 therein. With this configuration, the switch device 192 cannot be actuated by pressing the housing 182 against a flat surface, such as could easily happen if the housing 182 were left on a table, for example. Instead, a user has to at least partially press the actuator 196 down into the recess 200.

The power source housing 182 can further include a pair of ports 206 mounted therein and accessible through openings 208. The ports 206 can be utilized to receive plugs 210 therein to connect the power source housing 182 with other electrical components. The ports 206 can each further include a corresponding cover 211 that is configured to be connected to the port 206 to cover the opening 208 thereby protecting the port 206 from foreign debris and the like. The cover 211 can advantageously be attached to the housing 182 with a flexible tether 213 so that the cover 211 is not lost while not in use. A first one of the ports 206 can be utilized to connect the power source housing to the light sources 46, a camera device, such as that disclosed in PCT/US12/71469, filed Dec. 21, 2012, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, or the like. With such a configuration, rather than a permanently connected wire electrically coupling the light sources 46 to the power source, the light sources 46 instead can be electrically coupled to the power source 186 using a wire having a plug 210 on the end thereof that is configured to be inserted into the port 206. This allows for easier manufacturing of the hat because the light sources 46 can be coupled to the power source 186 after being mounted to the hat. The other of the ports 206 can be utilized, as discussed above, to charge or power devices not mounted to the hat 10. For example, a portable electronic device 212, such as a phone, tablet, or the like, can plug into the port and receive power from the rechargeable batteries 186. This is particularly advantageous in areas without a consistent electrical supply. The rechargeable configuration of the power source 186 for the hat 10 can be utilized to power and recharge devices in addition to the light sources 46 thereof.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that a wide variety of modifications, alterations, and combinations can be made with respect to the above described embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, and that such modifications, alterations, and combinations, are to be viewed as being within the scope of the invention.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Cap with spectacles INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY LTD,DARCY LESTER FLYNN 18 November 1999 16 March 2000
Illuminated safety helmet MANTHA ROBERT L,COLAIZZI ROBERT 28 August 1996 02 May 1997
Assembly for monitoring thermal conditions within a helmet CAIRNS & BROTHER INC 13 November 1990 14 May 1991
Optical signalling device, more particularly for an article of clothing FDI FINANZDIENSTLEISTUNGSINSTITUT AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT 10 July 1996 06 February 1997
Clear view (face cover) FLEMING, WILLIAM STUART 16 July 1999 17 February 2000
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US10159294 Lighted solar hat 1 US10159294 Lighted solar hat 2 US10159294 Lighted solar hat 3