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Patent Analysis of

Surgical system with configurable rail-mounted mechanical arms

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US10159533

Application Number

US15/094179

Application Date

08 April 2016

Publication Date

25 December 2018

Current Assignee

AURIS HEALTH, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

AURIS SURGICAL ROBOTICS, INC.

International Classification

A61B17/00,A61G13/04,A61G13/10,A61B34/30,A61G13/06

Cooperative Classification

A61B34/30,A61G13/04,A61G13/06,A61G13/10,A61G13/101

Inventor

MOLL, FREDERIC,YU, ALAN

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 1 US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 2 US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 3
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Abstract

A robotic surgical system comprises a horizontal platform to support a patient, a rail positioned about the horizontal platform, a carriage operatively coupled to and configured to translate along the rail, and a robotic arm operatively coupled to the carriage and translated about the patient by the rail. The robotic arm is configured to operate on the patient in a variety of positions provided by the translating carriage. The rail provides a rounded path for the carriage, such as a U-shaped path. The U-shaped path may comprise a first leg and a second leg, the first leg longer than the second leg. Furthermore, the system may comprise a plurality of carriages operatively coupled to the rail and a plurality of robotic arms. Also, the system may further comprise a central base which the horizontal platform can articulate relative to, such as by translating horizontally or vertically, rotating, or titling.

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Claims

1. A medical device comprising:

a horizontal platform having a first lateral side, a second lateral side opposite the first lateral side, a top end, and a bottom end opposite the top end; a first linear rail portion extending along the first lateral side of the horizontal platform; a second linear rail portion extending along the second lateral side of the horizontal platform and toward and beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform; a carriage configured to translate along the second linear rail portion, the carriage being operatively coupled to the second linear rail portion; and a robotic arm operatively coupled to the carriage, wherein the robotic arm is configured to be moved about the horizontal platform by the carriage to perform a medical procedure on a patient on the horizontal platform, and wherein the entirety of the carriage is configured to be moved beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform along the second linear rail portion parallel to the second lateral side.

2. The medical device of claim 1, wherein a connecting section connects the first linear rail portion and the second linear rail portion.

3. The medical device of claim 2, wherein the first linear rail portion, the second linear rail portion, and the connection section form a rail path, wherein the rail path is U-shaped.

4. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the horizontal platform comprises an upper surface and a lower surface, wherein the upper surface is configured to support the patient thereon, and wherein the carriage and the robotic arm are positioned beneath the upper surface of the horizontal platform.

5. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising additional robotic arms, wherein at least one robotic arm of the additional robotic arms is continuously movable between the first and second lateral sides of the horizontal platform.

6. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising a central base, wherein the rail is positioned around the central base.

7. The medical device of claim 6, wherein the central base is shaped like a column.

8. The medical device of claim 6, wherein the horizontal platform is operatively coupled to the top of the central base.

9. The medical device of claim 6, wherein the horizontal platform is configured to one or more of translate horizontally relative to the central base, translate vertically relative to the central base, tilt relative to the central base, or rotate relative to the central base.

10. The medical device of claim 9, wherein the central base comprises a support stand for the horizontal platform, and wherein the support stand is configured to vertically translate to translate the horizontal platform vertically relative to the central base.

11. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the rail is disposed around the horizontal platform.

12. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the robotic arm is configured to be angled over the horizontal platform.

13. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the horizontal platform comprises a surgical bed, configured to support the weight of a patient.

14. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising additional robotic arms, wherein the additional robotic arms are configured to be delivered to a plurality of access points in the patient around the horizontal platform.

15. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising additional carriages configured to translate along the second linear rail portion.

16. The medical device of claim 15, wherein each individual robotic arm is operatively coupled to a corresponding individual carriage.

17. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the second linear rail portion includes a distal-most end that extends beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform.

18. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the robotic arm is configured to hold one or more tools for performing a ureteroscopy or hysteroscopy.

19. The medical device of claim 1, wherein the first linear rail portion is aligned with the second linear rail portion along a first length of the second linear rail portion, and wherein the first linear rail portion is not aligned with the second rail portion along a second length of the second linear rail portion.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A medical device comprising:
    • a horizontal platform having a first lateral side, a second lateral side opposite the first lateral side, a top end, and a bottom end opposite the top end
    • a first linear rail portion extending along the first lateral side of the horizontal platform
    • a second linear rail portion extending along the second lateral side of the horizontal platform and toward and beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform
    • a carriage configured to translate along the second linear rail portion, the carriage being operatively coupled to the second linear rail portion
    • and a robotic arm operatively coupled to the carriage, wherein the robotic arm is configured to be moved about the horizontal platform by the carriage to perform a medical procedure on a patient on the horizontal platform, and wherein the entirety of the carriage is configured to be moved beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform along the second linear rail portion parallel to the second lateral side.
    • 2. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • a connecting section connects the first linear rail portion and the second linear rail portion.
    • 4. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the horizontal platform comprises
    • 5. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising
      • additional robotic arms, wherein at least one robotic arm of the additional robotic arms is continuously movable between the first and second lateral sides of the horizontal platform.
    • 6. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising
      • a central base, wherein the rail is positioned around the central base.
    • 11. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the rail is disposed around the horizontal platform.
    • 12. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the robotic arm is configured to be angled over the horizontal platform.
    • 13. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the horizontal platform comprises
    • 14. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising
      • additional robotic arms, wherein the additional robotic arms are configured to be delivered to a plurality of access points in the patient around the horizontal platform.
    • 15. The medical device of claim 1, further comprising
      • additional carriages configured to translate along the second linear rail portion.
    • 17. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the second linear rail portion includes a distal-most end that extends beyond the bottom end of the horizontal platform.
    • 18. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the robotic arm is configured to hold one or more tools for performing a ureteroscopy or hysteroscopy.
    • 19. The medical device of claim 1, wherein
      • the first linear rail portion is aligned with the second linear rail portion along a first length of the second linear rail portion, and wherein
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Description

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE

All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The field of the present invention relates to a robotics platform that may be used in a number of surgical procedures. More particularly, the field of the invention pertains to robotic platforms that enable robotically-controlled tools to perform diagnostic and therapeutic surgical procedures.

BACKGROUND OF THE RELATED ART

Use of robotic technologies presents a number of advantages over traditional, manual surgery procedures. In addition to other advantages, robotic surgeries often allow for greater precision, control, and access. Despite these advantages, however, the pre-existing robotics platforms have built-in limitations that are tied to their structural designs and underpinnings. In the absence of a truly flexible system, hospitals and health care practitioners are forced to acquire a variety of robotic systems in order to robotically perform a variety of procedures. The high capital costs, combined with the relatively specialization of the systems, have slowed adoption of robotics platforms for surgery.

Accordingly, there is a need for a robotics platform that is configurable for a number of procedures.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In general, the present invention provides a medical device that comprises a rail having a rounded path, a carriage configured to translate along the rail, the carriage being operatively coupled to the rail, a robotic arm operatively coupled to the carriage, and a horizontal platform proximate to the rail, wherein the robotic arms are configured to perform medical procedures on a patient on the platform. In one aspect, the rounded path is U-shaped. In one aspect, the U-shaped path comprises of a first leg and a second leg, wherein the first leg is longer than the second leg. In another aspect, the rail is configured around a central base. In one aspect, the central base is shaped like a column.

In another aspect, a horizontal platform is operatively coupled to the top of the base. In one aspect, the rail is disposed below the platform. In one aspect, the rail is around the platform. In one aspect, the arm is configured to be angled over platform.

In another aspect, the platform is a surgical bed, configured to support the weight of a patient. In one aspect, the surgical bed comprises a first part and a second part, wherein the second part is configured to articulate relative to the first part.

In another aspect, the rail is configured around a horizontal platform. In one aspect, the platform is a surgical bed, configured to support the weight of a patient.

In another aspect, the rounded path is circular. In one aspect, the rail is disposed below the platform. In one aspect, the rail is around the platform.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be described, by way of example, and with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a surgical bed with an oval track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a surgical bed with a U-shaped track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates an alternative robotics platform to system 201 from FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5A illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5B illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 5A, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5C illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 5A, 5B, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5D illustrates several views of carriages for mechanical arms used in system 501 from FIGS. 5A, 5B;

FIG. 5E illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 5A, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7A illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms underneath the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7B illustrates the underside of the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7A;

FIG. 7C illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A, 7B;

FIG. 7D illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C;

FIG. 7E illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7C;

FIG. 7F illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7E;

FIG. 7G illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A-7F; and

FIGS. 8A and 8B illustrate a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms underneath the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Although certain preferred embodiments and examples are disclosed below, inventive subject matter extends beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses, and to modifications and equivalents thereof. Thus, the scope of the claims appended hereto is not limited by any of the particular embodiments described below. For example, in any method or process disclosed herein, the acts or operations of the method or process may be performed in any suitable sequence and are not necessarily limited to any particular disclosed sequence. Various operations may be described as multiple discrete operations in turn, in a manner that may be helpful in understanding certain embodiments; however, the order of description should not be construed to imply that these operations are order dependent. Additionally, the structures, systems, and/or devices described herein may be embodied as integrated components or as separate components.

In clinical applications, the design of the base of the robotics platform often constrains the types of procedures that may be performed by the system. For example, in a system where robotic appendages are only available around the abdomen, urology procedures are precluded from being performed. Likewise, robotic arms below the abdomen may not be useful for laparoscopic procedures. Accordingly, the present invention provides a flexible design such that robotic arms may be delivered to multiple access points in a patient around a surgical bed.

FIG. 1 illustrates a surgical bed with an oval track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the isometric view 100 of the robotic system 101, the system 101 comprises of a surgical bed 102, a rail 103 for mechanical arms 104, a support stand 105, and a system base 106. The surgical bed allows for a hinge 107 such that a portion 108 of surgical bed 102 may be declined at a different angle from the rest of the bed. This may be desirable for certain operations, such as when performing a procedure that requires access a patient's lower abdomen, such as ureteroscopy or hysteroscopy.

Encircling the surgical bed 102, the rail 103 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 104 to a desired location around the surgical bed 102. The rail 103, which may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 104 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms. The rail 103 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 104. The rail 103 may be fully circular and surround all sides of the surgical bed 102.

The mechanical arms 104 may be operatively coupled to the rail 103. The mechanical arms may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 104 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 104 may be coupled independently to the rail 103 or in groups via a mechanical carriage that may slide around the rail 103. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 104, the carriage may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, and aspiration to and from the arms 104 to the rail 103.

In combination or individually, the support stand 105 and the system base 106 may be used to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 104. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 101 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient.

FIG. 2 illustrates a surgical bed with a U-shaped track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the isometric view 200 of the robotic system 201, the system 201 comprises of a surgical bed 202, a rail 203 for mechanical arms 204, a support stand 205, and a system base 206. Like in system 101, the surgical bed 202 allows for a hinge 207 such that a portion 208 of surgical bed 202 may be declined at a different angle from the rest of the bed 202. As discussed earlier, this may be desirable for certain operations, such as when performing a procedure that requires access a patient's lower abdomen, such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

Running along the surgical bed 202, the rail 203 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 204 to a desired location around the surgical bed 202. Unlike rail 103, rail 203 uses a U-shape that enhances access the surgical bed 202. This may provide advantages when position the patient and accessing operative sites on a patient's lower abdomen. The longer leg of the rail 203 allows for the mechanical arms to be aligned to convey a medical instrument into the patient by means of a “virtual rail” such as one discussed in the aforementioned patent applications. As before, the rail 203 may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 204 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms. The rail 203 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 204.

In combination or individually, the support stand 205 and the system base 206 may be used to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 204. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 201 provides for an improved, comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient.

As deployed, the mechanical arms 104 from system 101 and mechanical arms 204 and system 201 are positioned to perform endolumenal procedures to access the access points in the lower abdomen (e.g., urology, ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy) and upper abdomen (e.g., bronchoscopy, gastro-intestinal).

FIG. 3 illustrates an alternative robotics platform to system 201 from FIG. 2. As shown in isometric view 300, system 301 incorporates all the technologies disclosed with respect to system 201 with the additional vertical translation apparatus 302 that enables control over the vertical height of the rail 303. System 301 thus allows for vertical translation of the rail 303 relative to the support stand 304.

FIG. 4 illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the isometric view 400 of the robotic system 401, the system 401 comprises of a surgical bed 402, a rail 403 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 404, a support stand 405, and a system base 406. The surgical bed 402 may be configured to translate horizontally to position patient 407 relative to mechanical arms 404.

Encircling the surgical bed 402, the rail 403 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 404 to a desired location around the surgical bed 402. The rail 403, which may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 404 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms. The rail 403 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 404.

The mechanical arms 404 may be operatively coupled to the rail 403. The mechanical arms 404 may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 404 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 404 may be coupled independently to the rail 403 or in groups via a mechanical carriage that may slide around the rail 403. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 404, the carriage may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, and aspiration to and from the arms 404 to the rail 403. The ability to translate the arms 404 and translate the bed 402 allows for nearly unlimited access to different portions of the anatomy of patient 407.

In combination or individually, the support stand 405 and the system base 406 may be used to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 404. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 401 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient. The support stand 405 may also translate vertically, allowing for easier access to the patient 407 and operative site.

As deployed in view 400, mechanical arms 404 may be positioned to access the abdomen of patient 407 for laparoscopic procedures.

FIG. 5A illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the isometric view 500 of the robotic system 501, the system 501 comprises of a surgical bed 502, a rail 503 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 504, 505, 506, a support stand 507, and a system base 508. The surgical bed 502 may be configured to translate horizontally to position a patient relative to mechanical arms 504, 505, 506.

Encircling the surgical bed 502, the rail 503 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 to a desired location around the surgical bed 502. The rail 503, which may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms 504, 505, 506. The rail 503 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 504, 505, 506.

The mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may be operatively coupled to the rail 503. The mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may be coupled independently to the rail 503 or individually or in groups via mechanical carriages that may slide around the rail 503. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 a carriage may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, and aspiration to and from the arms 504, 505, 506 to the rail 503. The ability to translate the arms 504, 505, 506 and translate the bed 502 allows for nearly unlimited access to different portions of the anatomy of a patient.

In combination or individually, the support stand 507 and the system base 508 may be used to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 504, 505, 506. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 501 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient. The support stand 507 may also translate vertically, allowing for easier access to the patient and operative site.

As deployed in view 500, mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 may be positioned to access the abdomen of patient for laparoscopic procedures, while the carriages on the other side of rail 503 may be positioned to hold mechanical arms to create a virtual rail for access points in the lower abdomen (e.g., urology, ureteroscopy, or hysteroscopy).

FIG. 5B illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 5A, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. Reverse isometric view 509 provides a different perspective of the robotic system 501, surgical bed 502, rail 503 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 504, 505, 506 a support stand 507, and a system base 508.

FIG. 5C illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 5A, 5B, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. Rear view 510 provides a different perspective of the robotic system 501, surgical bed 502, rail 503 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 504, 505, 506, support stand 507, and a system base 508.

FIG. 5D illustrates several views of carriages for mechanical arms used in system 501 from FIGS. 5A, 5B, 5C, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. Side views 511, 512, 513 provide different perspectives on a mechanically-driven carriage in system 501.

FIG. 5E illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 5A, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. View 514 provides a different perspective of the robotic system 501, surgical bed 502, rail 503 (or “track”), support stand 507, and system base 508, absent mechanical arms 504, 505, 506.

FIG. 6A illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms along the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the view 600, the system 601 comprises of a surgical bed 602, a rail 603 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 604, 605. The surgical bed 602 may be configured to translate horizontally to position a patient relative to mechanical arms 604, 605. The surgical bed 602 allows for a hinge 606 such that a portion 607 of surgical bed 602 may be declined at a different angle from the rest of the bed 602. As discussed earlier, this may be desirable for certain operations, such as when performing a procedure that requires access a patient's lower abdomen, such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

Underneath the surgical bed 602, the rail 603 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 604, 605 to a desired location around the surgical bed 602. The rail 603, which may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 604, 605 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms 604, 605. The rail 603 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 604, 605. As shown in FIG. 6A, there may be a shorter leg and longer leg portion of the U-shape rail 603. In some embodiments, the rail 603 may be fully circular, rather than a U-shaped.

The mechanical arms 604, 605 may be operatively coupled to the rail 603. The mechanical arms 604, 605 may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 604, 605 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 604, 605 may be coupled independently to the rail 603 or individually or in groups (as shown) via a mechanical carriage 608 that may slide around the rail 603. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 604, 605, the carriage 606 may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, and aspiration to and from the arms 604, 605 to the rail 603. The ability to translate the arms 604, 605 and translate the bed 602 allows for nearly unlimited access to different portions of the anatomy of a patient.

Not shown, system 601 may also incorporate a support stand and the system base to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 604, 605. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 601 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient. The support stand may also translate vertically, allowing for easier access to the patient and operative site. The support stand may also support vertical translation of the rail 603 in order to facilitate access to particular anatomical access points.

As deployed in view 600, mechanical arms 604, 605 on carriage 608 may be positioned to access the abdomen of patient for procedures, such as laparoscopy or endoscopy, while a carriage 609 on the other side of rail 603 may be positioned to hold additional mechanical arms.

FIG. 6B illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 6A. As shown in the view 610, mechanical arms 604, 605 on carriage 608 may be slidingly translated to the long side of the rail 603. View 610 also provides a view of a support base. As deployed in view 610, mechanical arms 604, 605 on carriage 608 may be positioned to form a virtual rail for access to the anatomical lumens in the lower abdomen for various procedures, such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy. To facilitate access surgical bed 602 has been slidingly translated forwards from the rail 603.

FIG. 7A illustrates a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms underneath the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the view 700, the system 701 comprises of a surgical bed 702, a rail 703 (or “track”) for mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708. The surgical bed 702 may be configured to translate horizontally to position patient 709 relative to mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708. The surgical bed 702 may include a hinge such that the lower portion of surgical bed 702 may be declined at a different angle from the rest of the bed 702. As discussed earlier, this may be desirable for certain operations, such as when performing a procedure that requires access a patient's lower abdomen, such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

Underneath the surgical bed 702, the rail 703 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 to a desired location around the surgical bed 702. The rail 703, which may be referred to as a “track” and the mechanical arms 704, 705 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms 704, 705, 706, 708. The rail 703 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708.

The mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be operatively coupled to the rail 703. The mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be coupled independently to the rail 703 or individually or in groups via a mechanical carriage that may slide around the rail 703. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708, the carriage may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, and aspiration to and from the arms 704, 705, 706, 708 to the rail 703. The ability to translate the arms 704, 705, 706, 708 and translate the bed 702 allows for nearly unlimited access to different portions of the anatomy of a patient.

System 701 may also incorporate support stand 710 and system base 711 to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 704, 705, 706, 708. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 701 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient. The rail 703 on support stand 710 may also translate vertically, allowing for easier access to the patient and operative site. The support stand may also telescope.

As deployed in view 700, mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be positioned to access the abdomen of patient 709 for laparoscopic procedures, using a variety of rigid or semi-rigid laparoscopic instruments.

FIG. 7B illustrates the underside of the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7A. As shown in the view 712, mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be coupled to the rail 703 using carriages 713 and 714, which may be slidingly translated along rail 703. Carriages 713 and 714 may be oriented at various angles from rail 703 to provide an additional access to the patient 709. View 712 also provides a view of a support base 709 which shows structures to vertically translate rail 703 and bed 702.

FIG. 7C illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A, 7B. As shown in side view 715, carriages 713 and 714 may be positioned along rail 703 such that mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 may be arranged to form a virtual rail to guide an endoscopic device 716 into an anatomical lumen in the lower abdomen of patient 709 for a procedure such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

FIG. 7D illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C. Top view 717 provides a different perspective of the positioning of mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 to form a virtual rail to guide an endoscopic device 716 into an anatomical lumen in the lower abdomen of patient 709 for a procedure such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

FIG. 7E illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7C. Isometric view 718 provides an alternative positioning of mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 to form a virtual rail to guide an endoscopic device 714 into an anatomical lumen in the lower abdomen of patient 709 for a procedure such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy. In view 717, the carriages 713 and 714 may be oriented below rail 703 to position mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 such that the virtual rail is positioned lower than shown in FIGS. 7C and 7D.

FIG. 7F illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIG. 7E. Side view 719 provides a different perspective of the positioning of carriages 713 and 714 such that mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 form a virtual rail to guide an endoscopic device 716 into an anatomical lumen in the lower abdomen of patient 709 for a procedure such as ureteroscopy, hysteroscopy, or colonoscopy.

FIG. 7G illustrates the surgical bed with a rounded track from FIGS. 7A-7F. View 719 shows stowage of mechanical arms 704, 705, 706, 708 through positioning of carriages 713 and 714 together along rail 703 under surgical bed 702.

FIGS. 8A and 8B illustrate a surgical bed with a rounded track for robotic arms underneath the edge of the bed, consistent with an embodiment of the present invention. As shown in the view 800, the system 801 comprises of a surgical bed 802, a rail 803 (or “track”) for mechanical arms, such as 804, 805. The surgical bed 802 may be configured to translate horizontally to position a patient relative to the mechanical arms. As shown in view 807 from FIG. 8B, the surgical bed 802 may tilted on the support stand 806 to improve physician access to the patient.

Underneath the surgical bed 802, the rail 803 provides a structure to slidingly translate the mechanical arms 804, 805 to a desired location around the surgical bed 802. The rail 803, which may be referred to as a “track”, and the mechanical arms 804, 805 may be slidingly translated along it in order to facilitate access for the arms. The rail 803 also provides allows for the conveyance and reception of power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to the mechanical arms.

The mechanical arms may be operatively coupled to the rail 803. The mechanical arms may also be robotic. The translation of the mechanical arms 804, 805 may be actuated either manually or robotically. The mechanical arms 804, 805 may be coupled independently to the rail 803 or individually or in groups via a mechanical carriage that may slide around the rail 803. In addition to providing structural support to the mechanical arms 804, 805 the carriage may be used to convey and receive power, controls, fluidics, aspiration to and from the arms 804, 805 to the support base 806. The ability to translate the arms 804, 805 and translate the bed 802 allows for nearly unlimited access to different portions of the anatomy of a patient.

System 801 may also incorporate support stand 806 to house electronics, fluidics, pneumatics, and aspiration. The electronics may be used from control, localization, navigation of the arms 804, 805. Thus, as a robotically-driven platform, system 801 provides for a comprehensive surgical bed and tool solution that may be used to perform any number of procedures around a patient. The rail 803 on support stand 806 may also translate vertically, allowing for easier access to the patient and operative site. The support stand may also telescope.

As deployed in view 800, mechanical arms 804, 805 may be positioned to access the abdomen of a patient for laparoscopic procedures, using a variety of rigid or semi-rigid laparoscopic instruments.

The aforementioned embodiments of the present invention may be designed to interface with robotics instrument device manipulators, tools, hardware, and software such as those disclosed in the aforementioned patent applications that are incorporated by reference. For example, the embodiments in this specification may be configured to be driven by an instrument drive mechanism or an instrument device manipulator that is attached to the distal end of a robotic arm through a sterile interface, such as a drape. As part of a larger robotics system, robotic control signals may be communicated from a remotely-located user interface, down the robotic arm, and to the instrument device manipulator to control the instrument or tool.

For purposes of comparing various embodiments, certain aspects and advantages of these embodiments are described. Not necessarily all such aspects or advantages are achieved by any particular embodiment. Thus, for example, various embodiments may be carried out in a manner that achieves or optimizes one advantage or group of advantages as taught herein without necessarily achieving other aspects or advantages as may also be taught or suggested herein.

Elements or components shown with any embodiment herein are exemplary for the specific embodiment and may be used on or in combination with other embodiments disclosed herein. While the invention is susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific examples thereof have been shown in the drawings and are herein described in detail. The invention is not limited, however, to the particular forms or methods disclosed, but to the contrary, covers all modifications, equivalents and alternatives thereof.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Robotic surgical instrument and methods using bragg fiber sensors HANSEN MEDICAL, INC. 01 February 2008 11 September 2008
Surgery methods using a robotic instrument system HANSEN MEDICAL, INC. 01 February 2008 05 February 2009
Robotic surgical system with forward-oriented field of view guide instrument navigation HANSEN MEDICAL, INC. 07 September 2007 03 April 2008
Robotic catheter system and methods AURIS HEALTH, INC. 10 January 2008 10 July 2008
Spinal surgery methods using a robotic instrument system HANSEN MEDICAL, INC. 01 February 2008 14 August 2008
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US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 1 US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 2 US10159533 Surgical configurable rail-mounted 3