Great research starts with great data.

Learn More
More >
Patent Analysis of

Trephine

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US9901355

Application Number

US14/004622

Application Date

12 March 2012

Publication Date

27 February 2018

Current Assignee

SMITH & NEPHEW, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

SMITH & NEWPHEW, INC.

International Classification

A61B17/16,A61F2/08,A61B17/88,A61F2/46

Cooperative Classification

A61B17/1635,A61B17/16,A61B17/1637,A61B17/1675,A61F2/0805

Inventor

BOURQUE, BERNARD J.,FAN, WEI LI,BLOUGH, REBECCA ANN,GRAF, BEN KIM,DAVIS, WILLIAM R.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US9901355 Trephine 1 US9901355 Trephine 2 US9901355 Trephine 3
See all images <>

Abstract

The present invention relates to medical apparatuses and procedures for reconstructing a ligament. There is provided a trephine (10) comprising an adaptor (11), an elongate reamer (12) coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem (13), wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, and wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine.

Read more

Claims

1. A trephine comprising an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the reamer support stem to slide proximally through the adaptor when a suitable axial force is applied at a distal end of the reamer support stem.

2. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein the reamer support stem is cannulated.

3. A trephine according to claim 2, wherein the reamer support stem is cannulated and permits a guide wire to be received therein.

4. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein the reamer is demountably coupled to the adaptor.

5. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein the reamer support stem comprises a shaft and collapsible collar.

6. A trephine according to claim 5, wherein the collapsible collar and reamer include complementary engagement means for coupling the collapsible collar to the reamer.

7. A trephine according to claim 6, wherein the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the collapsible collar to slide proximally over the shaft when a suitable axial force is applied to a distal end of the collapsible collar.

8. The trephine of claim 7, wherein the complementary engagement means is configured to disengage upon rotation of the collapsible collar relative to the shaft about the longitudinal axis in a first direction, wherein the engagement means is configured to enable rotation of the collapsible collar relative to the shaft about the longitudinal axis in the first direction while inhibiting rotation of the collapsible collar relative to the shaft about the longitudinal axis in a second direction.

9. A trephine according to claim 5, wherein the collapsible collar and reamer are coupled by friction-fit.

10. A system for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material, wherein the system comprises a trephine according to claim 1, and a guide wire.

11. A system according to claim 10, further comprising a plunger.

12. A system for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material, wherein the system comprises: a trephine comprising an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, a guide wire, and a pair of compaction pliers.

13. A system according to claim 12, wherein the compaction pliers comprise of a pair of levers pivotally joined at a fulcrum located in a distal region of the levers.

14. A system according to claim 13, wherein the compaction pliers comprise a set of jaws at distal ends of the levers, and a pair of handles proximally of the fulcrum.

15. A system according to claim 14, wherein the jaws are formed from a pair of opposed complementary shaped plates.

16. A method for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material in arthroscopic ligament reconstruction, the method comprises the steps of: i) drilling a guide wire through a bone;ii) sliding a trephine over the guide wire to engage the bone, the trephine including an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the reamer support stem to slide proximally through the adaptor when a suitable axial force is applied at a distal end of the reamer support stem; and iii) reaming a tunnel by advancing the trephine into the bone.

17. A method according to claim 16, wherein the ligament reconstruction is anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and the bone is a tibia.

18. A trephine comprising an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means includes a deflectable plunger mechanism for engagement with an aperture or groove.

Read more

Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A trephine comprising
    • an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the reamer support stem to slide proximally through the adaptor when a suitable axial force is applied at a distal end of the reamer support stem.
    • 2. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein
      • the reamer support stem is cannulated.
    • 4. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein
      • the reamer is demountably coupled to the adaptor.
    • 5. A trephine according to claim 1, wherein
      • the reamer support stem comprises
  • 10
    10. A system for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material, wherein
    • the system comprises
    • 11. A system according to claim 10, further comprising
      • a plunger.
  • 12
    12. A system for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material, wherein
    • the system comprises:
    • 13. A system according to claim 12, wherein
      • the compaction pliers comprise
  • 16
    16. A method for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material in arthroscopic ligament reconstruction, the method comprises
    • the steps of: i) drilling a guide wire through a bone
    • ii) sliding a trephine over the guide wire to engage the bone, the trephine including an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the reamer support stem to slide proximally through the adaptor when a suitable axial force is applied at a distal end of the reamer support stem
    • and iii) reaming a tunnel by advancing the trephine into the bone.
    • 17. A method according to claim 16, wherein
      • the ligament reconstruction is anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and the bone is a tibia.
  • 18
    18. A trephine comprising
    • an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine, and wherein the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor, wherein the complementary engagement means includes a deflectable plunger mechanism for engagement with an aperture or groove.
See all independent claims <>

Description

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to medical apparatuses and procedures in general, and more particularly to medical apparatuses and procedures for reconstructing a ligament.

In many cases, ligaments are torn or ruptured as the result of an accident. Accordingly, various procedures have been developed to repair or replace such damaged ligaments.

For example, in the human knee, the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (i.e., the “ACL” and “PCL”) extend between the top end of the tibia and the bottom end of the femur. Often, the anterior cruciate ligament (i.e., the ACL) is ruptured or torn as the result of, for example, a sports-related injury. Consequently, various surgical procedures have been developed for reconstructing the ACL.

In many instances, the ACL may be reconstructed by replacing the ruptured ACL with a graft ligament. More particularly, in such a procedure, bone tunnels are generally formed in both the top of the tibia and the bottom of the femur, with one end of the graft ligament being positioned in the femoral tunnel and the other end of the graft ligament being positioned in the tibial tunnel, and with the intermediate portion of the graft ligament spanning the distance between the bottom of the femur and the top of the tibia. The two ends of the graft ligament are anchored in their respective bone tunnels in various ways well known in the art so that the graft ligament extends between the bottom end of the femur and the top end of the tibia in substantially the same way, and with substantially the same function, as the original ACL. This graft ligament then cooperates with the surrounding anatomical structures so as to restore substantially normal function to the knee.

Various approaches for anchoring the two ends of the graft ligament in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels are known.

In a known procedure, the end of the graft ligament is placed in the bone tunnel, and then the graft ligament is fixed in place using a headless orthopedic screw, or interference screw. With this approach, the end of the graft ligament is placed in the bone tunnel and then the interference screw is advanced into the bone tunnel so that the interference screw extends parallel to the bone tunnel and simultaneously engages both the graft ligament and the side wall of the bone tunnel. In this arrangement, the interference screw essentially drives the graft ligament laterally, into engagement with the opposing side wall of the bone tunnel, whereby to secure the graft ligament to the host bone with a so-called “interference fit”. Thereafter, over time (e.g., several months), the graft ligament and the host bone grow together at their points of contact so as to provide a strong, natural joinder between the ligament and the bone.

Interference screws have proven to be an effective means for securing a graft ligament in a bone tunnel. However, the interference screw itself generally takes up a substantial amount of space within the bone tunnel, which can limit the extent of contact between the graft ligament and the bone tunnel. This in turn limits the region of bone-to-ligament in-growth, and hence can affect the strength of the joinder. It has been estimated that the typical interference screw obstructs about 50% of the potential bone-to-ligament integration region.

One approach to address this issue is to fabricate the interference screws from bioabsorbable materials, so that the interference screw is absorbed over time and bone-to-ligament in-growth can take place about the entire perimeter of the bone tunnel. In general, this approach has proven clinically successful. However, these absorbable interference screws still suffer from several disadvantages. Clinical evidence suggests that the quality of the bone-to-ligament in-growth is somewhat different than natural bone-to-ligament in-growth, and that the bioabsorbable polymers tend to be replaced by a fibrous mass rather than a well-ordered tissue matrix. Absorption can take a substantial period of time, around three years or so, and during this time, the bone-to-ligament in-growth is still restricted by the presence of the interference screw. In addition, for many patients, absorption is never complete, leaving a substantial foreign mass remaining within the body. This problem is exacerbated somewhat by the fact that absorbable interference screws generally tend to be fairly large in order to provide them with adequate strength, e.g., it is common for an interference screw to have a diameter (i.e., an outer diameter) of 8-12 mm and a length of 20-25 mm.

An alternative approach is disclosed in WO 2008/021474, which describes a composite interference screw for attaching a graft ligament to a bone. The composite interference screw comprises a screw frame for providing the short term strength needed to set the interference screw into position and to hold the graft ligament in position while bone-to-ligament ingrowth occurs, and an ingrowth core for promoting superior bone-to-ligament ingrowth. The screw frame is preferably formed from a bioabsorbable polymer, and the ingrowth core is a bone scaffold structure, also formed from a resorbable polymer, so that the composite interference screw substantially completely disappears from the surgical site over time. The bone scaffold structure may also be an allograft, formed from demineralised bone.

The screw frame includes apertures extending intermediate at least some of the screw threads. Those apertures facilitate contact between the side wall of the bone tunnel and ingrowth core.

It is desirable to utilise an autograft ingrowth core formed from the patient's own bone material. As discussed above, cruciate ligament reconstruction and other similar types of reconstructive surgery require a tendon or graft to be inserted in a bone tunnel. Placement of the tunnel is preferably made at the original attachment site of the ruptured ligament or tendon, and is said to be anatomically placed. The tunnel must have a length sufficient to provide appropriate graft engagement for stiffness and strength. When the bone tunnels are formed the drill findings are not generally collected, and are washed away in the drilling process.

In an alternative approach, the core of bone is harvested for future when the bone tunnel is created. Typically, a surgeon will use a coring trephine system to harvest bone from the patient and this will be used to fill the resultant defect to promote healing. Prior to harvesting the bone, a guide wire is drilled through the bone along the proposed path which the bone tunnel will take. The coring trephine system is cannulated and is slid over the guide wire prior to over-drill the path followed by the guide wire.

A particular problem of the above system is that it is difficult to maintain the trephine corer concentrically, relative to the guide wire. This can be overcome by including additional procedural steps as is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,423,823 which requires the removal of a guide pin after it has been drilled through the tibia. The introduction of a collared guide pin, and subsequent use of a cannulated core saw. Other systems require additional devices to stabilise the coring reamer while drilling.

However, these systems and methods require additional steps (and devices) to control the trephine while drilling, and thus increase the complexity and time required to carry out the procedure

Accordingly, there exists a need for a better arthroscopic approach.

SUMMARY

In its broadest sense the present invention provides a trephine comprising an adaptor, a reamer, and a reamer support stem.

According to an aspect of the present invention there is provided a trephine comprising an adaptor, an elongate reamer coupled thereto, and a reamer support stem, wherein the reamer support stem is mounted concentrically within the reamer and adaptor, and wherein at least a portion of the reamer support stem is slidably moveable about a longitudinal axis of the trephine.

Preferably, the reamer support stem is cannulated. More preferably, the reamer support stem is cannulated and permits a guide wire to be received therein. This allows the trephine to be slidably mounted over a guide wire which has been drilled into bone. As a result, the trephine can be used to harvest bone by directly engaging the guide wire, and without the need for additional guides.

Preferably, the reamer is demountably coupled to the adaptor.

Suitably, the reamer support stem and adaptor include complementary engagement means for coupling the reamer support stem to the adaptor. Preferably, the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the reamer support stem to slide proximally through the adaptor when a suitable axial force is applied at the distal end of the reamer support stem. Alternatively, the reamer support stem and adaptor are coupled by friction-fit. Preferably, the reamer support stem is demountably coupled with the adaptor.

Alternatively, the reamer support stem comprises a shaft and collapsible collar. Preferably, the collapsible collar and shaft include complementary engagement means for coupling the collapsible collar to the shaft. Preferably, the complementary engagement means disengage and allow the collapsible collar to slide proximally over the shaft when a suitable axial force is applied to the distal end of the collapsible collar. Alternatively, the collapsible collar and shaft are coupled by friction-fit. Preferably, the collapsible collar is demountably coupled with the shaft.

A system for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material, wherein the system comprises a trephine as described above and a guide wire.

Suitably, the system comprises a pair of compaction pliers. Preferably, the compaction pliers comprise of a pair of levers pivotally joined at a fulcrum located in a distal region of the levers. Preferably, the compaction pliers comprise a set of jaws at the distal ends of the levers, and a pair of handles proximally of the fulcrum. Preferably, the jaws are formed from a pair of opposed complementary shaped plates.

Suitably, the system further comprises a plunger. The plunger can be used to remove compacted bone from the jaws of the compaction pliers.

A method for forming a bone tunnel and harvesting bone material in arthroscopic ligament reconstruction, the method comprising the steps of:

    • i) drilling a guide wire through a bone;
    • ii) sliding a trephine, as described above, over the guide wire to engage the bone; and
    • iii) reaming a tunnel by advancing the trephine into the bone.

The method wherein the ligament is the anterior cruciate ligament, and the bone is the tibia.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other aspects of the invention will now be described with reference to the following drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an exploded side view of a trephine according to a first embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a close-up side view of the adaptor and distal end reamer support stem of the embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a close-up side view of the adaptor and reamer support stem of the embodiment of FIG. 1 in an assembled configuration;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the partially assembled trephine;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the assembled trephine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 6A-C are side, sectional side, and close up sectional views of the assembled trephine of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a sectional isometric view of the adaptor in the assembled trephine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 8A-E are isometric views illustrating the use of the trephine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 9A-C are isometric views of a set of compaction pliers for use with the trephine of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 10A-B are isometric views illustrating the use of the compaction pliers of FIG. 9A;

FIG. 11 is an exploded isometric view, from a first side, of a trephine according to a second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a side view of an assembled trephine of FIG. 10;

FIG. 13 is an exploded view of the collar assembly of the trephine of FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a close-up side view of the collar assembly and distal end of the reamer of the trephine of FIG. 10;

FIG. 15 is a close-up isometric view, from a first side, of the adaptor and proximal end of the reamer support stem of the trephine of FIG. 10;

FIG. 16 is a close-up isometric view, from a first side, of the assembled adaptor and reamer support stem of FIG. 14;

FIG. 17 is a section side view of the assembled trephine of FIG. 10;

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIGS. 1 to 5, there is shown an exploded view of a trephine 10 in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention. Trephine 10 is formed of an adaptor 11, a reamer 12 and a reamer support stem 13, each including an internal cannulation.

The adaptor 11 includes a body 14 interposed between a proximal leg 15 and distal head portion 20. Body 14 includes a channel 21 which extends between the outer surface of the adaptor and its internal cannulation. A plunger 22 is moveable within the channel 21, and at least a portion of the plunger extends into the internal cannulation of the adaptor. A series of spring washers 23 act to bias the plunger towards the cannulation in an assembled configuration with an external collar or cap 24 fitted to body 14. This arrangement will be described in greater detail below with reference to FIG. 6C. Adaptor leg 15 includes flattened regions 25 towards its proximal end which enable the trephine to be connected to a drill (not shown). Distal head 20 includes a pair of opposed radially extending pins 30.

Reamer 12 is formed from a cylindrical tubular member which has an internal diameter that is greater than the external diameter of distal head 20, of adaptor 11. This allows the reamer 12 to be slid onto the adaptor head 20 in an assembled configuration, as discussed with reference to FIGS. 4 and 5 below. Reamer 12 includes a series of bone engaging blades or teeth 31 at a distal end, and a pair of opposed adaptor pin-engaging grooves 32, at a proximal end. The grooves 32 are generally t-shaped, and allow the reamer to be locked on to the adaptor 11 in a bayonet-type arrangement. Although, the pin and groove arrangement are described as a pair of opposed complementary pins and grooves, other suitable arrangements comprising 3, 4 or more complementary pins and grooves could also be incorporated.

Reamer support stem 13 is formed from a cylindrical tubular member and has an external diameter that is less than the internal diameter of distal head 20, of adaptor 11. This enables the proximal end of the support stem 13 to be slid into distal head 20 of adaptor 11 (FIGS. 2 and 3). The proximal end of support stem 13 includes a tapered conical end which helps to facilitate its insertion into adaptor 11. The distal end of support stem 13 includes a slightly enlarged head 34, which itself includes bone-engaging teeth 35. The proximal region of the support stem 13 includes an aperture 33 which extends between the outer surface and the internal cannulation of the support stem 13. When the support stem is slid into adaptor 11, the portion of plunger 22 which extends into the internal cannulation of the adaptor engages with and extends into aperture 33 of support stem 13 to lock the adaptor 11 and support stem 13 together. A circumferential mark 40 is located in or on the outer surface of support stem 13, in a proximal region and distally of aperture 33.

FIGS. 2 and 3 show detailed views of adaptor 11 and the distal end of reamer support stem 13 as the two components of the trephine are engaged with one another. To aid engagement of aperture 33 of support stem 13 with plunger 22 of adaptor 11, laser mark 40 is provided so that the user knows how far to insert support stem 13.

In FIGS. 4 and 5, the final stage of assembly of trephine 10 is shown. Here, the reamer 12, which will generally be disposable, is slid onto support stem 13. Distal pin-engaging grooves of reamer 12 are lined up with pins 30 of adaptor 11, and the reamer is locked in position on the pins 30 with a small turn.

FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate the mechanism of engagement of reamer support stem and adaptor 11 in more detail. As shown, plunger 22 is biased towards reamer support stem 13 by spring washers 23 engages with aperture 33 of the support stem. In use of the trephine, as will be described in greater detail below, when a sufficiently large force is applied to the distal end of the support stem this will overcome the engagement of plunger 22 with aperture 33 and cause the support stem to advance proximally relative to the rest of the trephine. It will be recognised that the spring washers can be replaced with a spring or other suitable biasing means.

Referring now to FIGS. 8A-C, use of a trephine system according to the invention is described. The trephine system includes a trephine to core out the bone tunnel, compaction pliers to help cut and shape the harvested bone (see FIG. 9 and relevant description below), and instrumentation to aid in backfilling the bone in the centre of the an interference screw such as that described above, with reference to WO 2008/021474. The trephine system includes a variety of different sized reamers and reamer support stems to accommodate the range of tunnel sizes required for ligament reconstruction procedures.

The first step in the procedure is to insert a guide wire into the tibia, for example, along a path which the tibial tunnel will take (FIG. 8A). This is achieved using an external drill guide (not shown). In a typical procedure to repair a damaged anterior cruciate ligament, a guide wire having a diameter of 2.4 mm will generally be used. Next, the surgeon will select an appropriately sized trephine adaptor, reamer support stem, and reamer that matches to the diameter of the particular graft that will be used. The diameter size for the adaptor, reamer support stem, and reamer should be the same. The reamer support stem is then advanced into the adaptor, which seats properly in the adaptor when the circumferential laser mark on the support stem is flush with the distal end of the adaptor, and plunger 22 has engaged aperture 33 (FIG. 6C). The reamer is subsequently slid over the support stem and secured in place through the locking engagement of pins 30 and grooves 32, and the fully assembled trephine is attached to a drill through the adaptor leg (not shown).

The trephine assembly is then advanced over the guide wire until teeth 35 at the distal end of the reamer support stem engage bone at the point where the guide wire 41 enters the tibia. Further advancement of the trephine assembly initially causes the support stem to drill into the bone a short distance, until teeth 31 of reamer 12 engage with the bone. After which, the force required to advance the reamer becomes sufficient to dislodge plunger 22, located within the adaptor body 14, from within aperture 33 and the support stem 13 moves proximally through the adaptor body and stops advancing as the reamer progresses through the tibia. The reamer is advanced until its distal end fully breaches both tibial cortices and any soft tissue remnants on the tibial plateau (FIG. 8D). This step ensures that the bone harvested within the trephine system can be removed easily from the tibial tunnel.

The harvested bone from the trephine system is removed by first disengaging the adaptor and reamer support stem from the guide wire 41. The reamer is then removed from the guide wire 41 and bone plug 42 so that the harvested bone plug 42 exits the proximal, non-cutting, end of the reamer as shown in FIG. 8E. The harvested bone can be used to fill defects in, for example, patellar, tibia, and femoral harvest sites to promote healing.

In the case where the bone plug will be used in conjunction with the interference screw of WO 2008/021474, a set of compaction pliers will be required to cut the bone from the guide wire and to shape a suitable bone plug, as will be described. Referring now to FIGS. 9A-C, there is shown a set of medical pliers 50 for cutting and compacting bone. Pliers 50 consist of a pair of levers 51 pivotally joined at a fulcrum located in a distal region of the levers. A set of jaws 53 are provided at the distal ends of levers 51, and the region proximal of fulcrum 52 defines a pair of handles 54. This arrangement creates a mechanical advantage, allowing the force of a user's hand grip to be amplified and focused on an object held within jaws 53. The pliers 50 can be used to manipulate and cut objects too small to be handled with the fingers.

Jaws 53 are formed from a pair of opposed complementary shaped plates 55. As is more clearly shown in FIG. 9B, when shaped plates 55 are brought together, by the user gripping handles 54, a series of cylindrical voids 60 are formed. Accordingly, when, for example, bone tissue is placed between the jaws 53, and plates 55, and pressure is applied to handles 54, the bone tissue is compacted into cylindrical voids 60 to form cylindrical plugs of bone tissue. Edges 61 of shaped plates 55 may be sharpened to aid formation of the cylindrical bone plugs and cut them from any associated bone tissue which may remain within jaws 53 of pliers 50. In the illustrated embodiment, shaped plates includes a series of three complementary grooves which form three cylindrical voids 60, when jaws 53 are brought together. Each of the grooves have a different radius, which will provide three cylindrical bone plugs each having a different diameter. In alternative embodiments, not shown, each of the grooves have an identical radius, which will provide three identical cylindrical bone plugs.

Handles 54 also include biasing means in the form of a spring 62, to bias handles 54, and thus jaws 53, in an open configuration, and a thumb-operated latch to lock the handles and jaws in a desired position.

A plunger tool 64 (FIG. 9C) is also provided for use with pliers 50, to aid removal of cylindrical bone plugs, as will be described in greater detail below. Plunger 64 includes a flat proximal head 65, elongate body 66 and distal pin 69. Pin 69 has a diameter which corresponds to at least one of the cylindrical voids 60 formed by the closed plates 55 of pliers 50.

The medical pliers illustrated in FIGS. 9A-C, and described above, can be used in conjunction with the trephine system described herein. At the stage where the harvested bone is removed from the trephine system, still attached on guide wire 41 (FIG. 8E), medical pliers 50 can be used to remove the harvested bone from guide wire 41, as shown in FIG. 10A. The open jaws 53 are placed around and grip the harvested bone plug 42 as it is slid off guide wire 41. Additional pressure is then applied to plier handles 54 to shape the bone plug using the cutting edges of shaped plates 53 to reduce its size. The cylindrical voids 60 in the closed jaws 53 of the compaction act to compress and reshape the harvested bone. Next, latch 63 is closed to lock the pliers with the jaws closed in order to prepare for delivery of the bone plug into the aforementioned interference screw at the appropriate time, and once said screw is in position in bone tunnel.

Referring to FIG. 10B, in backfilling the cannulated interference screw 70, located in bone tunnel 71, pliers 50 are positioned directly over the screw by aligning the appropriate size laser mark 72 on jaws 53 to the centre of screw 70. Plunger tool 64 (not shown) in then inserted into the opposite end of the plier jaws and advanced forward to deliver the bone plug into the centre of the screw.

The described system provides an accurate concentric core of bone material by preventing travel of the reamer relative to the guide wire during drilling. The system also allows for the use of fewer devices, and ultimately saves time by allowing the harvesting step to be performed more easily. As discussed above, competitive trephine systems and methods of their use include additional steps or include additional guides to achieve a suitable bone plug. The described system can be used to obtain a bone plug more efficiently, without the need for additional instruments, or requiring additional procedural steps.

An alternative embodiment of a trephine in accordance with the present invention is shown in FIGS. 11 to 17.

According to FIG. 11, there is shown an exploded view of a trephine 10′ in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention. Trephine 10′ is formed of an adaptor 11′, a reamer 12′, a collapsible collar 75 and a reamer support stem 13′, each including an internal cannulation.

The adaptor 11′ includes a body 14′ interposed between a proximal leg 15′ and distal head portion 20′. Body 14′ includes a channel 21′ (FIG. 17) which extends between the outer surface of the adaptor and its internal cannulation. A plunger or pin (not shown) is moveable within the channel 21′, and at least a portion of the plunger extends into the internal cannulation of the adaptor. The plunger is biased towards the cannulation with an external collar or cap fitted to body 14′. Adaptor leg 15′ includes flattened regions 25′ towards its proximal end which enable the trephine to be connected to a drill (not shown). Distal head 20′ includes a series of radial grooves for engaging reamer 12′ in an assembled configuration. This will be described in greater detail below, with reference to FIG. 16.

Reamer 12′ is formed from a cylindrical tubular member, and includes a series of bone engaging blades or teeth 31′ at a distal end, and a pair of opposed adaptor pin-engaging grooves 32′ (FIG. 16), at a proximal end. The grooves 32′ are generally t-shaped, and allow the reamer to be locked on to the adaptor 11′ in a bayonet-type arrangement, as will be described below with reference to FIG. 16. The distal region of reamer 12′ includes a pair of opposed apertures 80 in the sidewall thereof.

Reamer support stem 13′ is formed from a cylindrical tubular member and has an external diameter that is less than the internal diameter of distal head 20′, of adaptor 11′. This enables the proximal end of the support stem 13′ to be slid into distal head 20′ of adaptor 11′ (FIG. 15). The proximal end of support stem 13′ includes one or more flattened regions 73 which prevent it from rotating independently from the adaptor 11′, when assembled and in use. The proximal region of the support stem 13′ also includes a circumferential groove 74. When the support stem is slid into adaptor 11′, the portion of adaptor plunger which extends into the internal cannulation of the adaptor engages with the circumferential groove 74 to lock the adaptor 11′ and support stem 13′ together.

Collapsible collar 75 is a cannulated tubular member whose external diameter is less than the internal diameter of reamer 12′, and whose internal cannulation has a diameter greater than the external diameter of reamer support stem 13′. Means for engaging reamer 12′, in the form of cams plates 81 are located towards the proximal end of collapsible collar 75. The collar 75, is thereby slidable within reamer 12′, and slidable on support stem 13′.

FIG. 12 shows the fully assembled trephine 10′.

FIG. 13 shows an exploded view of collapsible collar 75. The collar includes a sharpened distal tip 82, and a pair of rebated slots 83 at its proximal end. Within the rebated slots 83 are housed cams 81 which are outwardly biased by a series of springs 84. A distal collar cap 85 is affixed to collar 75 by means of a pair of screw 90, and prevents cams plates 81 from sliding distally rebated slots 83. The springs enable the cam plates 81 to move within the slots 83.

As shown in FIG. 14, during assembly of the trephine 10′, the collapsible collar 75 is loaded in reamer 12′ by applying pressure to the cam plates 81 and advancing the collar 75 into reamer 12′. Collar 75 locks within reamer 12′ through the action of cam plates 81 engaging apertures 80 in the sidewalls of reamer 12′, cam plates 81 clicking out of apertures 80. The collapsible collar 75 is designed to lock when the drill to which the trephine 10′ is attached is rotated to advance it into bone, and collapse into the reamer 12′ when the direction of rotation of the drill is reversed. This allows the reamer to travel over the collar 75 when harvesting bone tissue.

In an alternative arrangement, the cam plates are replaced by ball bearings or spherical cups that are outwardly radially biased by springs (not shown). In such an alternative embodiment the collapsible collar is held in place within the reamer in an analogous manner, but does not include a directional lock as described above. Accordingly, once the collapsible collar experiences a sufficiently large force to overcome its frictional fit within the reamer, as the trephine is being advanced into bone, it will collapse and allow the reamer to travel over the collar whilst harvesting bone tissue.

In the assembly of trephine 10′, reamer support stem 13′ is able to slide inside and out of the adaptor 11′, and the flattened region 73 prevents it from rotating independently from the adaptor 11′ (FIG. 15). One or more plungers 21′ engage with groove 74 and prevent it from falling out of the adaptor 11′. Additionally, stop edge 91 prevents the support stem 13′ from moving through the adaptor 11′ during cutting.

Referring to FIG. 16, head 20′ of adaptor 11′ includes a pair of concentric collars 92, between which lies a radial groove 93. Within radial groove 93 a pair of pins 94 are located, and pin-engaging grooves 32′ at the proximal end of reamer 12′ slide onto and interlock to engage the reamer and adaptor. The locking pins inside the groove of the adaptor stabilise the reamer when cutting and also prevent the reamer from falling out of the adaptor.

In FIG. 17 there is shown a section through the assembled trephine 10

Read more
PatSnap Solutions

Great research starts with great data.

Use the most comprehensive innovation intelligence platform to maximise ROI on research.

Learn More

Patent Valuation

$

Reveal the value <>

25.51/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

100.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

61.42/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

56.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

16.04/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
用于修复肌腱套(RTC)腱或韧带的方法和设备 柯惠LP公司 15 November 2005 04 November 2009
双螺纹中空缝合锚固件 德普伊米特克公司 16 September 2008 06 May 2009
可吸收椎体内支撑器 成都军区昆明总医院,中国科学院成都有机化学有限公司 23 January 2007 13 June 2012
多轴连接系统 黑石医药股份有限公司 24 August 2005 05 September 2007
骨螺钉 苏州微创脊柱创伤医疗科技有限公司 20 November 2009 25 May 2011
See full citation <>

More like this

Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Suture anchor delivery tool SUMMIT MEDICAL LIMITED 24 March 2016 29 September 2016
Differential compression bone screw IN2BONES USA, LLC,VARNER, KEVIN, E.,HEIER, KEITH, A.,HANSON, TRAVIS, W.,CHAMBERS, CASEY, M. 02 June 2017 07 December 2017
Bone anchor system having movable medial eyelet SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 24 March 2016 29 September 2016
Suture anchor with deformable cap SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 10 February 2017 17 August 2017
Fixation device and tissue fixation method for ACL reconstruction SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 07 April 2016 20 October 2016
Magnesium-based suture anchor devices UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH - OF THE COMMONWEALTH SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCTION 06 November 2015 12 May 2016
Suture anchor management WRIGHT MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY, INC. 28 May 2015 01 December 2016
Knotless suture or tissue anchor and method SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 22 December 2015 14 July 2016
Suture anchor system with reusable handle SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 05 January 2016 29 September 2016
Self-compressing screws for generating and applying compression within a body MX ORTHOPEDICS, CORP. 28 January 2016 04 August 2016
Two-part anchor with anchor inserter SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 11 December 2015 13 April 2017
Modular tissue repair kit and devices and method related thereto SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 29 October 2014 06 May 2016
Bone screw and implant delivery device PROVIDENCE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY, INC. 11 May 2016 17 November 2016
Suture anchor assembly for delivery of a therapeutic agent SMITH & NEPHEW, INC. 26 May 2017 14 December 2017
Suture anchor with soft anchor of electrospun fibers BIOMET SPORTS MEDICINE, LLC 30 March 2016 06 October 2016
Device for securing suture to an anchor body of a suture anchor CONMED CORPORATION 16 August 2017 22 February 2018
Device, kit and surgical method including sleeve WYLAND, DOUGLAS J. 12 August 2016 23 February 2017
Surgical fastener with predetermined resorption rate COVIDIEN LP 13 March 2013 01 August 2013
Method and apparatus for joint fusion EX TECHNOLOGY, LLC 19 November 2015 02 June 2016
Methods of fixating tissue to bone ARTHREX, INC. 11 August 2017 22 February 2018
See all similar patents <>

More Patents & Intellectual Property

PatSnap Solutions

PatSnap solutions are used by R&D teams, legal and IP professionals, those in business intelligence and strategic planning roles and by research staff at academic institutions globally.

PatSnap Solutions
Search & Analyze
The widest range of IP search tools makes getting the right answers and asking the right questions easier than ever. One click analysis extracts meaningful information on competitors and technology trends from IP data.
Business Intelligence
Gain powerful insights into future technology changes, market shifts and competitor strategies.
Workflow
Manage IP-related processes across multiple teams and departments with integrated collaboration and workflow tools.
Contact Sales
Clsoe
US9901355 Trephine 1 US9901355 Trephine 2 US9901355 Trephine 3