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Patent Analysis of

Dermatome swivel double action valve

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US9901369

Application Number

US14/580467

Application Date

23 December 2014

Publication Date

27 February 2018

Current Assignee

ZIMMER SURGICAL, INC.

Original Assignee (Applicant)

ZIMMER SURGICAL, INC.

International Classification

B08B9/023,A61B90/70,A61B17/322,A61B17/00,A61B90/00

Cooperative Classification

A61B17/322,A61B90/70,A61B2090/0813,A61B2017/00544

Inventor

MAHAFFEY, MARK,STRASLICKA, BRUCE

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US9901369 Dermatome swivel double action valve 1 US9901369 Dermatome swivel double action valve 2 US9901369 Dermatome swivel double action valve 3
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Abstract

A method of cleaning a dermatome includes sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome, the inlet fluid path configured to deliver a pressurized fluid to an interior of the dermatome to power the dermatome when open, and the outlet fluid path configured to expel an exhaust fluid from the interior of the dermatome when open. The method further includes washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.

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Claims

1. A method of cleaning a dermatome, comprising: sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome, the inlet fluid path configured to deliver a pressurized fluid to an interior of the dermatome to power the dermatome when open, and the outlet fluid path configured to expel an exhaust fluid from the interior of the dermatome when open, the valve including a first bobbin at least partially defining the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path, and a second bobbin in adjustable communication with the first bobbin and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path; and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein washing the dermatome comprises sterilizing the dermatome.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein: the sealing of the inlet fluid path occurs at an inlet port of the valve of the dermatome, the inlet port at least partially defined by the second bobbin and configured for communication with the inlet fluid path; the sealing of the outlet fluid path occurs at an outlet port of the valve of the dermatome, the outlet port at least partially defined by the first bobbin and configured for communication with the outlet fluid path; and fluid from washing the dermatome is prevented from crossing the inlet and outlet ports into the interior of the dermatome while washing the dermatome.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein sealing the inlet fluid path comprises blocking the inlet fluid path with an inlet o-ring by engaging the second bobbin and a bobbin receiver of the valve with the inlet o-ring.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein sealing the outlet fluid path comprises blocking the outlet fluid path with an outlet o-ring by engaging the first bobbin and a casing of the valve with the outlet o-ring.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome creates a hermetic seal across the inlet fluid path and a hermetic seal across the outlet fluid path.

7. The method of claim 1, wherein sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome comprises simultaneously sealing the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path.

8. The method of claim 1, wherein sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome comprises removing a hose from engagement with the valve to automatically seal the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path.

9. A method of washing a dermatome, the method comprising: removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome to seal an inlet fluid path of the valve and seal an outlet fluid path of the valve, wherein the force acting on the valve opens the inlet fluid path to deliver a pressurized fluid to an interior of the dermatome and opens the outlet fluid path to expel an exhaust fluid from the interior of the dermatome, the valve including a first bobbin having a medial flange portion and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path, and a second bobbin in adjustable communication with the first bobbin and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path; and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.

10. The method of claim 9, wherein removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome comprises removing a hose from connection with the dermatome.

11. The method of claim 9, wherein the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path are sealed automatically when the force acting on the valve of the dermatome is removed.

12. The method of claim 9, further comprising: biasing a seal with a spring to seal the inlet fluid path at an inlet port; and biasing a seal with a spring to seal the outlet fluid path at an outlet port; wherein the force acting on the valve of the dermatome works against a bias of each of the springs.

13. The method of claim 9, further comprising: a spring operatively extending between the medial flange portion of the first bobbin and a bobbin receiver of the valve.

14. The method of claim 12, wherein fluid from washing the dermatome is prevented from crossing the inlet and outlet ports into the interior of the dermatome while washing the dermatome.

15. The method of claim 9, wherein removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome hermetically seals the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve.

16. A method of washing a dermatome, the method comprising: removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome, the valve including an inlet fluid path having an inlet seal and an outlet fluid path having an outlet seal, wherein the outlet fluid path is concentric about the inlet fluid path; automatically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve at an inlet port and automatically sealing the outlet fluid path of the valve at an outlet port in response to removing the force acting on the valve; and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.

17. The method of claim 16, further comprising: biasing the inlet seal against the force acting on the valve of the dermatome to seal the inlet fluid path of the valve; and biasing the outlet seal against the force acting on the valve of the dermatome to seal the outlet fluid path of the valve.

18. The method of claim 16, wherein automatically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve includes hermetically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve to prevent fluid from crossing the inlet and outlet ports into an interior of the dermatome while washing the dermatome.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method of cleaning a dermatome, comprising:
    • sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome, the inlet fluid path configured to deliver a pressurized fluid to an interior of the dermatome to power the dermatome when open, and the outlet fluid path configured to expel an exhaust fluid from the interior of the dermatome when open, the valve including a first bobbin at least partially defining the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path, and a second bobbin in adjustable communication with the first bobbin and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path
    • and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.
    • 2. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • washing the dermatome comprises
    • 3. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • : the sealing of the inlet fluid path occurs at an inlet port of the valve of the dermatome, the inlet port at least partially defined by the second bobbin and configured for communication with the inlet fluid path; the sealing of the outlet fluid path occurs at an outlet port of the valve of the dermatome, the outlet port at least partially defined by the first bobbin and configured for communication with the outlet fluid path; and fluid from washing the dermatome is prevented from crossing the inlet and outlet ports into the interior of the dermatome while washing the dermatome.
    • 4. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • sealing the inlet fluid path comprises
    • 6. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome creates a hermetic seal across the inlet fluid path and a hermetic seal across the outlet fluid path.
    • 7. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome comprises
    • 8. The method of claim 1, wherein
      • sealing an inlet fluid path and an outlet fluid path of a valve of the dermatome comprises
  • 9
    9. A method of washing a dermatome, the method comprising:
    • removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome to seal an inlet fluid path of the valve and seal an outlet fluid path of the valve, wherein the force acting on the valve opens the inlet fluid path to deliver a pressurized fluid to an interior of the dermatome and opens the outlet fluid path to expel an exhaust fluid from the interior of the dermatome, the valve including a first bobbin having a medial flange portion and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path, and a second bobbin in adjustable communication with the first bobbin and at least partially defining the inlet fluid path
    • and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.
    • 10. The method of claim 9, wherein
      • removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome comprises
    • 11. The method of claim 9, wherein
      • the inlet fluid path and the outlet fluid path are sealed automatically when the force acting on the valve of the dermatome is removed.
    • 12. The method of claim 9, further comprising:
      • biasing a seal with a spring to seal the inlet fluid path at an inlet port
      • and biasing a seal with a spring to seal the outlet fluid path at an outlet port
      • wherein the force acting on the valve of the dermatome works against a bias of each of the springs.
    • 13. The method of claim 9, further comprising:
      • a spring operatively extending between the medial flange portion of the first bobbin and a bobbin receiver of the valve.
    • 15. The method of claim 9, wherein
      • removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome hermetically seals the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve.
  • 16
    16. A method of washing a dermatome, the method comprising:
    • removing a force acting on a valve of a dermatome, the valve including an inlet fluid path having an inlet seal and an outlet fluid path having an outlet seal, wherein the outlet fluid path is concentric about the inlet fluid path
    • automatically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve at an inlet port and automatically sealing the outlet fluid path of the valve at an outlet port in response to removing the force acting on the valve
    • and washing the dermatome with the inlet and outlet fluid paths sealed.
    • 17. The method of claim 16, further comprising:
      • biasing the inlet seal against the force acting on the valve of the dermatome to seal the inlet fluid path of the valve
      • and biasing the outlet seal against the force acting on the valve of the dermatome to seal the outlet fluid path of the valve.
    • 18. The method of claim 16, wherein
      • automatically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve includes hermetically sealing the inlet fluid path of the valve and the outlet fluid path of the valve to prevent fluid from crossing the inlet and outlet ports into an interior of the dermatome while washing the dermatome.
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Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The disclosure is directed to dermatomes for surgically harvesting grafts of skin. More particularly, the disclosure is directed to dermatome valve assemblies.

BACKGROUND

Conventional dermatomes are used for cutting skin tissue to obtain transplantable skin grafts. A skin graft is a patch of healthy skin that is harvested from one area of the body or donor site to cover a damaged or skinless area of the body. Typically, a dermatome has a front end holding a flat blade to be placed in contact with a tissue surface and a motor to oscillate the blade from side to side to create a slicing action which cuts the tissue as the dermatome is moved along the tissue surface.

SUMMARY

The disclosure is directed to several alternative or complementary designs, materials and methods of using medical device structures and assemblies. Although it is noted that conventional dermatomes exist, there exists a need for improvement on those devices.

Accordingly, one illustrative embodiment may include a dermatome having a handle extending from a cutting head and a valve or attachment system connected to the handle. The attachment or valve system may include a first bobbin that at least partially defines a first flow path and a second flow path, and a second bobbin in adjustable communication with the first bobbin that also at least partially defines the first flow path. The first bobbin may at least partially define an outlet port, where the outlet port communicates with an outlet flow through the second flow path. In addition, the second bobbin may at least partially define an inlet port, where the inlet port communicates with an inlet flow through the first flow path. The ports may operate to open the paths in response to an application of a mechanical act to the valve or attachment system and the ports may operate to close the paths in response to the removal or absence of the mechanical act.

The above summary of some example aspects is not intended to describe each disclosed embodiment or every implementation of the claimed disclosure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The disclosure may be more completely understood in consideration of the following detailed description of various embodiments in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a dermatome according to an aspect of the disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a dermatome according to an aspect of the disclosure.

FIG. 3 is a side view of a dermatome attachment according to an aspect of the disclosure.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a dermatome attachment while the attachment is in a closed position.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a dermatome attachment with directional arrows indicating flows flowing through the aspect of the disclosure depicted in FIG. 4, while the attachment is in an open position.

FIG. 6 is an end view of FIG. 3. of the end of an aspect of the dermatome attachment configured to connect to a handle of the dermatome.

FIG. 7 is an end view of FIG. 3 of the end of an aspect of the dermatome attachment configured to connect to a fluid hose, where the end is an end opposite the end depicted in FIG. 6.

FIGS. 8A-8D are side cross-sectional views of a dermatome according to an aspect of the disclosure, where the dermatome is in different stages of connecting to an exemplary fluid hose in each figured iteration.

FIG. 9 is a partial perspective view of a dermatome and a hose according to an aspect of the disclosure.

While the disclosure is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit aspects of the claimed disclosure to the particular embodiments described. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the claimed disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

For the following defined terms, these definitions shall be applied, unless a different definition is given in the claims or elsewhere in this specification.

All numeric values are herein assumed to be modified by the term “about”, whether or not explicitly indicated. The term “about” generally refers to a range of numbers that one of skill in the art would consider equivalent to the recited value (i.e., having the same function or result). In many instances, the term “about” may be indicative as including numbers that are rounded to the nearest significant figure.

The recitation of numerical ranges by endpoints includes all numbers within that range (e.g., 1 to 5 includes 1, 1.5, 2, 2.75, 3, 3.80, 4, and 5).

Although some suitable dimensions, ranges and/or values pertaining to various components, features and/or specifications are disclosed, one of skill in the art, incited by the present disclosure, would understand desired dimensions, ranges and/or values may deviate from those expressly disclosed.

As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a”, “an”, and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. As used in this specification and the appended claims, the term “or” is generally employed in its sense including “and/or” unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.

The following detailed description should be read with reference to the drawings in which similar elements in different drawings are numbered the same. The detailed description and the drawings, which are not necessarily to scale, depict illustrative embodiments and are not intended to limit the scope of the claimed disclosure. The illustrative embodiments depicted are intended only as exemplary. Selected features of any illustrative embodiment may be incorporated into an additional embodiment unless clearly stated to the contrary.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 9, a dermatome 10 for harvesting grafts of skin tissue has a main body 12, with a head 14 (e.g., a cutting head) connected to a handle 16. Dermatome 10 may include a valve or an attachment 20 extending from handle 16 and configured to connect to a fluid hose 100 capable of providing a pressurized fluid to a fluid motor (not shown) of a dermatome 10, as well as an exhaust pathway extending from the motor of the dermatome 10 away from a sterile field of the surgical procedure within which dermatome 10 may be used.

As seen in FIGS. 2-8D, valve or attachment 20 may include a system for opening (i.e., unobstructing) and closing (i.e., obstructing) fluid flow paths into and out of handle 16. The valve system 20 may include a first bobbin 30, a second bobbin 40, an inlet port 60 at least partially defined by second bobbin 40 and an outlet port 62 at least partially defined by first bobbin 30. The system of attachment 20 may further include a first flow path 22 at least partially defined by first bobbin 30 (e.g., by an inner surface of a passage through first bobbin 30) and second bobbin 40 (e.g., between an outer surface of second bobbin 40 and an inner surface of receiver 90) and a second flow path 24 at least partially defined by first bobbin 30 (e.g., between an outer surface of first bobbin 30 and an inner surface of casing 50) and receiver 90 (e.g., between an outer surface of receiver 90 and an inner surface of casing 50). To either open and unobstruct or close and obstruct paths 22, 24, inlet port 60 and outlet port 62 may be opened or closed, respectively, by a single operation on the structure of attachment 20. In operation, attachment 20 may allow fluid to enter an interior of a dermatome to interact with a fluid motor driving the cutting blade when inlet port 60 and outlet port 62 are open for the purpose of powering the dermatome or for any other purpose, such as driving the cutting blade. Further, attachment 20 may operate to prevent fluid from entering an interior of main body 12 of dermatome 10 when inlet port 60 and outlet port 62 are closed.

FIG. 3 depicts a side view of attachment 20 that shows a housing or casing 50 generally enclosing the structure of attachment 20. Casing 50 may be unitarily formed or may comprise two or more pieces interconnected. As shown, casing 50 may include two members threadably coupled together to facilitate assembly of internal components. Casing 50 may take on any shape or size capable of generally enclosing the structure therein and connecting to dermatome handle 16 and fluid hose 100. For example, casing 50 may be generally concentric about the structure therein. A first end 52 of casing 50 may be configured for connection to fluid hose 100. The connection between fluid hose 100 and attachment 20 may be made by any hermetically sealed and releasable connection technique known in the art. For example, the connection between hose 100 and attachment 20 may be made using o-rings 18 and bearings or a bayonet locking system (as depicted in FIG. 9).

A second end 54 of casing 50 may be configured to connect to handle 16, as seen for example in FIGS. 1 and 2. The connection between attachment 20 and handle 16 may be made by any hermetically sealed and releasable connection technique known in the art. For example, the connection between attachment 20 and handle 16 may be made using o-rings 18 and bearings so as to allow handle 16 to swivel with respect to attachment 20. In other embodiments, attachment 20 may be permanently secured to handle 16.

FIG. 4 depicts portions of the interior structure of attachment 20 within casing 50. The interior structure may be generally concentric about a centered axis A-A extending through attachment 20 from a hose connecting end 26 to a handle connecting end 28 in an elongated direction of attachment 20. The structure may include first bobbin 30 and second bobbin 40, along with a first spring 80, a second spring 82 and an aerator or bobbin receiver 90. Within casing 50, bobbin receiver 90 may receive first bobbin 30 and second bobbin 40, where first bobbin 30 may extend through a first end 90a of bobbin receiver 90 and second bobbin 40 may extend through a second end 90b of bobbin receiver 90. Further, in an exemplary aspect, first spring 80 may surround the first end 90a of bobbin receiver 90 and extend between first bobbin 30 and an exterior step 92 positioned between a first end 90a and a second end 90b of bobbin receiver 90, while second spring 82 may be placed within second end 90b of bobbin receiver 90 and extend between second bobbin 40 and an interior step 94 of receiver 90. As a result of the connections, first flow path 22 may be defined by at least a hollow interior of first bobbin 30, an interior of bobbin receiver 90 and an exterior of second bobbin 40, as seen in FIG. 5. As also shown in FIG. 5, second flow path 24 may be an annular flow path concentric to first flow path 22 and may be defined by at least the structure of an interior of casing 50, an exterior of first bobbin 30 and an exterior of bobbin receiver 90. In addition, second bobbin 40 and bobbin receiver 90 may form inlet port 60 and first bobbin 30 and casing 50 may form outlet port 62.

Inlet port 60 may include an o-ring 18, or other mechanism capable of creating a hermetic seal, on either second bobbin 40 or bobbin receiver 90, or both, so as to provide the fluid tight seal when inlet port 60 is closed. Similarly, outlet port 62 may include an o-ring 18 or other mechanism capable of creating a hermetic seal on either first bobbin 30 or casing 50, or both, so as to provide the fluid tight seal when outlet port 62 is closed. In an exemplary aspect seen in at least FIGS. 4 and 5, o-rings 18 may be placed on second bobbin 40 and first bobbin 30, respectively, to provide the seal when ports 60, 62 are closed.

First bobbin 30 may be configured and located within casing 50, so as to be capable of receiving and engaging a pressurized fluid hose 100 or a fitting 120 thereof. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, first bobbin 30 may be unitarily formed and may have an elongated first end 32 extending generally from a front face 34a of an extension 34 and an elongated second end 36 extending generally from a back face 34b of extension 34. Although first bobbin 30 may be unitarily formed, it may alternatively be formed of two or more pieces configured to connect to one another. In addition, first bobbin 30 may have a substantially hollow interior extending therethrough, as seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, where the hollow interior may be configured to at least partially define first flow path 22.

Elongated first end 32 of first bobbin 30 may have an open terminal end 33 configured to abut a ball of a ball valve 122 located within a pressurized fluid hose 100. Between terminal end 33 and extension 34, elongated first end 32 may comprise at least one opening 35 configured to receive a pressurized fluid via an inner lumen 106 accessed through the opening of the ball valve 122 within fluid hose 100. Fluid from hose 100 may enter opening(s) 35 and flow through the interior of first bobbin 30 and follow first flow path 22. Extension 34 may include a front face 34a and a back face 34b, where front face 34a may be configured to engage casing 50 when in a closed position and back face 34b may be configured to engage first spring 80, as shown in FIG. 4, with first spring 80 surrounding elongated second end 36. Extension 34 and casing 50 may form outlet port 62 and may work together to block second flow path 24 when extension 34 is in a closed position. Extension 34 or casing 50, or both, may include a seal (e.g., an o-ring 18) to create a hermetic seal at outlet port 62. Elongated second end 36 of first bobbin 30 may extend to and within bobbin receiver 90. Elongated second end 36 may directly abut an interior of bobbin receiver 90 or may include a seal (e.g., an o-ring 18) to create a hermetic connection between second end 36 and receiver 90, or both. Second end 36 may slide within receiver 90 in response to a mechanical act applied to first bobbin 30 at front face 34a, or terminal end 33 or at another location. As second end 36 slides within receiver 90, back face 34b may act upon first spring 80 and second end 36 may contact and act on second bobbin 40.

Second bobbin 40 may be a unitary piece or comprise more than a single piece where the pieces are releasably connected. For example, as seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, second bobbin 40 may be made of a stem 42 and a stem nut 44 threadably engaging stem 42. Stem nut 44 may engage stem 42 at a first end 42a, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, or at any other location along stem 42. Stem nut 44 may include a first side 44a and a second side 44b, with fluid ports 45 extending from first side 44a to second side 44b. Fluid ports 45 may be discrete fluid ports, such as channels or flutes, placed concentrically, or otherwise, about stem 42 or fluid ports 45 may be a single hole extending annularly around stem 42. Second side 44b may abut second spring 82, where spring 82 may surround stem 42 of second bobbin 40 and extend from second side 44b to an interior step 94 of receiver 90. A second end 42b of stem 42 may be located adjacent a second end 90b of receiver 90 to form inlet port 60. Second end 90b of receiver 90 or second end 42b of stem 42, or both, may include a seal (e.g., o-ring 18) for providing a hermetic seal of inlet port 60 when attachment 20 is in a closed position. Thus, when attachment 20 is in a closed position, second end 42b may engage receiver 90 to close inlet port 60 and block first flow path 22. When in an open position, second end 42b and receiver 90 may separate to open inlet port 60 and allow fluid to flow therethrough along first flow path 22.

As seen in FIGS. 3-6, second end 54 of casing 50 located at a handle connecting end 28 of attachment 20 may have a first portion 54a with a diameter D1 and a second portion 54b with a diameter D2, where diameter D2 may be smaller than diameter D1. An exhaust plate 56 may extend from diameter D2 to diameter D1 and may include exhaust holes 58, as shown in FIG. 6, configured to receive fluid flowing through second flow path 24 and exhausted from the fluid motor. Exhaust holes 58 may take on any shape or size located within plate 56. Plate 56 may be unitarily formed as part of casing 50 or may be a plate added to bridge a gap between first portion 54a and second portion 54b, for instance.

Second portion 54b may form neck 70 and handle 16 may be configured to engage attachment 20 at neck 70 and first portion 54a. Handle 16 may engage neck 70 and first portion 54a in any manner creating a releasable hermetic seal at the engagements. For example, the hermetic seals may be made through the use of o-rings 18 and those o-rings 18 may circumscribe first portion 54a and second portion 54b or may be placed within an interior lumen (not shown) and annular lumen (not shown) of handle 16, or a combination thereof. Further, the interior lumen of handle 16 may connect to attachment 20 at neck 70 in any manner that allows for handle 16 to swivel with respect to attachment 20. For example, neck 70 may include at least one indentation 72 at one or more locations (axially or circumferentially, or both, displaced at more than one location) around the outer circumference of neck 70 for the purpose of receiving ball bearings or other connectors from handle 16. Alternatively or in addition, neck 70 may comprise ball bearings that engage handle 16. Further, indentation 72 may be an indented concentric ring around the circumference of neck 70, as shown for example in FIGS. 3-5, or any other indented shape.

An exemplary first end 52 of casing 50 located at a hose connecting end 26 of attachment 20 is depicted in FIGS. 3-5 and 7. First end 52 may be configured for connection to a fluid or air hose 100. The connection may be made through any connection technique desired. For example, a hose 100 may be connected to first end 52 through a bayonet lock, complementary threading, or any other releasable connecting technique known in the art. In addition, first end 52 may include one or more seals (e.g., an o-ring 18) for providing a hermetic seal between first end 52 and hose 100. Alternatively, or in addition, hose 100 may include seals for providing the hermetic seal between first end 52 and hose 100.

Different stages of an exemplary engagement between hose 100 and attachment 20 are seen in FIGS. 8A-8D. FIGS. 8A-8D depict hose 100 comprised of a fitting 120 engaged with an inner tubular member 102 and an outer tubular member 104, where fitting 120 may be used for making a connection with attachment 20. Fitting 120 may comprise a first end 120a and a second end 120b and may include a ball valve 122 located within or proximate second end 120b. First end 120a may be configured for connection to inner tubular member 102 and outer tubular member 104 through any known connection technique. For example, the connection may be facilitated with a glue substance or through a pressure fitting, such as crimping or other technique. Further, first end 120a may have channels 124 extending from first end 120a to second end 120b for the purpose of passing exhaust fluid to an annular lumen 108 of hose 100 or for any other purpose. Second end 120b may comprise an inner fitting portion 126 and an outer fitting portion 128. Inner fitting portion 126 may be configured to engage first bobbin 30 and provide a hermetic seal therebetween. The seal may be provided by, for example, one or more o-rings 18 circumferentially arranged around first bobbin 30 or within inner fitting portion 126 or both. Ball valve 122 may be located within inner fitting portion 126 and may be activated (e.g., lifted off a valve seat) in response to interacting with terminal end 33 of first bobbin 30 or may be activated in another manner. Outer fitting portion 128 of fitting 120 may engage an exterior of casing 50, as seen for example in FIGS. 8B-8D, or another portion of casing 50 exterior of second flow path 24. Such engagement may include providing a hermetic seal between casing 50 and outer fitting portion 128, where the hermetic seal may be provided by, for example, either outer fitting portion 128 or casing 50 including an o-ring 18, or a combination thereof.

In FIG. 8B, attachment 20 is depicted in a closed position and hose 100 has begun engagement with attachment 20, where second end 120b of fitting 120 has initially engaged casing 50 and first bobbin 30. FIG. 8C shows further engagement between attachment 20 and hose 100, where terminal end 33 of first bobbin 30 abuts ball valve 122 and begins to allow fluid to flow from hose 100 through openings 35 of elongated first end 32 of first bobbin 30. At the same time or at a proximate time, a terminal end 130 of inner fitting portion 126 may engage front face 34a of first bobbin 30 and place a force thereon sufficient to overcome the force of first spring 80 to move first bobbin 30 to open outlet port 62. It is noted that when outlet port 62 is initially opened, first bobbin 30 may not yet have moved into engagement with stem nut 44 of second bobbin 40 to open inlet port 60.

FIG. 8D depicts full engagement of hose 100 with attachment 20, where first bobbin 30 has been displaced a requisite amount by the connection between hose 100 and attachment 20 to open inlet port 60 along with outlet port 62. Inlet port 60 may open in response to first bobbin 30 contacting, and applying a force on, first side 44a of stem nut 44 of second bobbin 40, where the applied force overcomes the force of second spring 82 to activate and move second bobbin 40. Thus, a fully attached hose 100 opens the valves of attachment 20 allowing fluid to flow from an inner lumen 106 of hose 100 through first flow path 22 within attachment 20 to fluid motor (not shown), and then exhaust fluid from the fluid motor to and through second flow path 24 to annular lumen 108 of hose 100 via channels 124 in fitting 120.

Although FIGS. 8A-D depict the attachment of hose 100 to attachment 20 as an iterative process, the attachment may be achieved in one or more fluid steps, where, for example, a force from fitting 120 engaging attachment 20 overcomes a biasing force of springs 80, 82 and in response to the force, first bobbin 30 moves a sufficient distance to engage and press against second bobbin 40 to move second bobbin 40. This exemplary process ensures an outlet flow path may be opened prior to opening an inlet flow path.

Applying or connecting a hose 100 to attachment 20 may include the application of a single mechanical act to attachment 20; for example, the mechanical act may be the placing of a force or pressure greater than a threshold pressure or force on first bobbin 30 through terminal end 130 of inner fitting portion 126, or other portion of fitting 120 or hose 100, where the threshold pressure or force is a sufficient pressure or force to overcome a biasing force of springs 80, 82. The single mechanical act may be solely the application or connection of a hose 100 to attachment 20 or the connection of a hose 100 to attachment 20 such that fluid from hose 100 communicates with first flow path 22 or simply the application of a pressurized fluid against the first bobbin 30, or other mechanical act. Alternatively or in addition, an act acting on attachment 20 may include an electrical signal or other type of act or signal.

During the application of the single mechanical act, outlet port 62 may be opened prior to inlet port 60 opening, as seen from FIGS. 8B-8D, or ports 60, 62 may be opened simultaneously in response to the presence of the single mechanical act. In one example, the mechanical act may be the application of at least a threshold pressure of thirty-two (32) pounds per square inch (psi) or ˜2.2 bars of pressure, or any other desired pressure or force level, to front face 34a and terminal end 33 of first bobbin 30. In other instances, the threshold pressure may be set to sixteen (16) psi or more, twenty (20) psi or more, twenty-four (24) psi or more, twenty-eight (28) psi or more or thirty-six (36) psi or more or another desired amount of pressure or force. The amount of pressure applied to first bobbin 30 may be any pressure proportional to a combined or effective spring constant of first and second springs 80, 82. An exemplary effective spring constant would have enough pressure to keep inlet and outlet ports 60, 62 closed during washing and sterilization of dermatome 10. Further, in response to the absence or removal of the single mechanical act, ports 60, 62 may be closed and may remain closed until a further application of the mechanical act.

After or prior to using the above described system in an operation or other event utilizing a dermatome 10, it may be desirable to wash or sterilize dermatome 10. It has been realized that it is advantageous to prevent washing or sterilizing materials from entering the interior of dermatome 10. Such prevention of unwanted material within dermatome 10 during washing and sterilizing may be achieved by keeping inlet and outlet ports 60, 62 of attachment 20 in a closed position throughout the washing process. A closed position may be achieved, automatically or otherwise, by removing the application of the single mechanical act (e.g., removal of the applied force from the hose connection or other external pressure source) to attachment 20. Once the single mechanical act is absent, springs 80, 82 act on bobbins 30, 40 to close inner and outer ports 60, 62, respectively, which essentially may block first and second flow paths 22, 24. Such blockage, in addition to other hermetic seals of the system, will prevent unwanted materials from entering dermatome 10 and interacting with the fluid motor (not shown) and other interior parts of dermatome 10 throughout the washing or sterilization process. Accordingly, with hose 100 decoupled from attachment 20 of dermatome 10, inlet and outlet ports 60, 62 may be automatically closed such that dermatome 10 is ready to be washed or sterilized. Thereafter, dermatome 10 may be washed or sterilized without permitting fluids from the washing/sterilization process from entering into the internal components of dermatome and adversely affecting the performance and/or integrity of dermatome 10. Upon completion of the washing/sterilization process, hose 100 may be reattached to attachment 20 of dermatome 10 for use in a medical procedure.

Those skilled in the art will recognize that the present disclosure may be manifested in a variety of forms other than the specific embodiments described and contemplated herein. Accordingly, departure in form and detail may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the present disclosure as described in the appended claims.

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Patent Valuation

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35.36/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

86.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

67.39/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

64.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

19.85/100 Score

Legal Score

It shows the legal strength of IP in terms of its degree of protecting effect. Here we look into claim scope, claim breadth, claim quality, stability and priority.

Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Dermatome with ultrasonic cutting blade DADSON MANUFACTURING CORP. 25 November 2008 28 May 2009
Adjustable-depth cutting apparatus OEC EUROPE LTD 05 May 1978 16 December 1981
Improvements in or relating to surgical operating instruments for cutting skin CONCENTRIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY LIMITED,HAROLD BURKE 16 February 1954 15 May 1957
Dermatome With Orientation Guides ZIMMER SURGICAL, INC. 13 December 2007 18 June 2009
Bi- directional pilot type electromagnetic valves AISAN KOGYO KABUSHIKI KAISHA 28 August 2001 14 March 2002
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