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Patent Analysis of

Golf club head with removable component

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US9901794

Application Number

US15/213297

Application Date

18 July 2016

Publication Date

27 February 2018

Current Assignee

COBRA GOLF INCORPORATED

Original Assignee (Applicant)

COBRA GOLF INCORPORATED

International Classification

A63B53/04,A63B53/06,A63B59/00,A63B60/42,A63B60/52

Cooperative Classification

A63B53/06,A63B53/0466,A63B53/02,A63B60/42,A63B60/52

Inventor

BENO, TIM A.,BREIER, JOSHUA G.,CLAUSEN, KARL A.,CURTIS, ANDREW,KROLOFF, CALEB,MITZEL, STEVEN M.,MOREIRA, SCOTT H.,SANCHEZ, RICHARD ROMO,SORACCO, PETER L.

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US9901794 Golf club head removable 1 US9901794 Golf club head removable 2 US9901794 Golf club head removable 3
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Abstract

The invention provides a golf club head with a fully removable component that can withstand the stress of repeated hits. When assembled, the removable component is held in place by a fastening mechanism that includes structural elements that distribute the holding force across the component and tend to equalize the forces around the periphery where the component meets the body. The fastening mechanism may include a post that reaches across the open space within the hollow club head, pulling the removable component towards an opposed main club head body. Since a golf club of the present invention can be opened, it may include a mechanism on the inside for use by a golfer, such as an electronic device or an adjustment mechanism. The golf club may include a weight adjustment system that allows the club to be custom-fitted to a golfer.

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Claims

1. A golf club head assembly comprising: a club head body comprising a sole, a crown, a face, and a hosel; a removable component configured to be removed from and re-attached to a mounting portion of the club head body, wherein the removable component forms a portion of the club head body and when attached to the mounting portion fully encloses an interior space within the club head body; and the removable component comprises a fastening mechanism that includes a post connected to the removable component by a plurality of radiating truss structures, and when the removable component is attached to the mounting portion of the club head body, the post extends into the interior space of the club head body, and the plurality of radiating truss structures distributes a holding force across the removable component to equalize forces around a periphery of the removable component where the removable component engages the club head body.

2. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein the fastening mechanism comprises a receiving member configured to receive a screw such that, when the removable component is coupled to the club head body, the screw extends through the interior space of the club head body.

3. The club head assembly of claim 2, wherein the screw extends from the crown to the sole across the interior space of club head body.

4. The club head assembly of claim 2, wherein the screw is substantially vertical when the club head is at address.

5. The club head assembly of claim 2, wherein the club head body includes a boss with the screw extending therethrough, the screw being threadably engaged with the receiving member of the fastening mechanism of the removable component.

6. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein the removable component comprises a portion of the crown.

7. The club head assembly of claim 6, wherein the removable component comprises a majority of the crown.

8. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein the removable component comprises a portion of the sole.

9. The club head assembly of claim 8, wherein the removable component comprises a majority of the sole.

10. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein the club head body comprises a first piece defining the hosel and surrounding the face, and an intermediate piece connected to the first piece and defining a cutaway with an inner periphery defining an attachment perimeter for attaching the removable component.

11. The club head assembly of claim 10, wherein the attachment perimeter includes a plurality of tabs and corresponding recesses.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A golf club head assembly comprising:
    • a club head body comprising a sole, a crown, a face, and a hosel
    • a removable component configured to be removed from and re-attached to a mounting portion of the club head body, wherein the removable component forms a portion of the club head body and when attached to the mounting portion fully encloses an interior space within the club head body
    • and the removable component comprises a fastening mechanism that includes a post connected to the removable component by a plurality of radiating truss structures, and when the removable component is attached to the mounting portion of the club head body, the post extends into the interior space of the club head body, and the plurality of radiating truss structures distributes a holding force across the removable component to equalize forces around a periphery of the removable component where the removable component engages the club head body.
    • 2. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the fastening mechanism comprises
    • 6. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the removable component comprises
    • 8. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the removable component comprises
    • 10. The club head assembly of claim 1, wherein
      • the club head body comprises
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Description

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a golf club, and more particularly to a wood-type club head with separable components.

BACKGROUND

Some golfers desire a golf club that they can personalize to their playing style. For example, increasing heel or toe-weighting can help correct for a hook or a slice. However, adjustable golf clubs are fraught with problems. The adjustment mechanisms interfere with golf club aerodynamics and also trap soil or other environmental grime. Also, since the adjustment mechanisms can be fragile, they can break during golf. Additionally, the adjustment mechanisms add undesirable mass to the club head.

Some attempts have been made to move the mechanisms to the interior of the golf club. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 8,206,243 to Stites describes a club head with movable weight members contained internally. Unfortunately, the removable crown part for accessing the weight members may not cope with stress well. During a powerful drive, the crown may crack or pop off of the club head, causing great frustration to the golfer. It may be found that the removable crown—having much less structural support than the material of the body surrounding the crown—deforms differently than the body and flexes out of shape relative to the body, leading to rapid failures. Also, some removable body part designs such as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 8,435,135 to Stites do not really open up a hollow club head, but simply add a component on top of a fully enclosed part of a club head, or they only provide very limited access to the interior of the club head (e.g., U.S. Pub. 2010/0160091 to Boyd).

SUMMARY

The invention provides a golf club head with a fully removable component that can withstand the stress of repeated hits. When assembled, the removable component is held in place by a fastening mechanism that holds the component against the club head body. The fastening mechanism includes structural elements that distribute the holding force across the component and tend to equalize the forces around the periphery where the component meets the body. The fastening mechanism may include a post that reaches across the open space within the hollow club head, pulling the removable component towards an opposed main club head body. Preferably, the post receives an assembly screw. The post is connected to the removable component via a plurality of radiating truss structures to distribute forces across the component. The removable component is mated to the club head body at an opening in the body with a periphery complementary to a periphery of the component. The fastening mechanism tends to equalize stresses around this periphery, thus creating a golf club that can be opened but that is also highly effective for playing golf as well as being durable.

Since a golf club of the present invention can be opened, it may include a mechanism on the inside for use by a golfer, such as an electronic device or an adjustment mechanism. The golf club may include a weight adjustment system that allows the club to be custom-fitted to a golfer. A weight adjustment system can include a plurality of mount points at which one or more removable weights can be mounted. For example, each mount point can include a threaded receptacle and each weight can include a threaded post. Additionally or alternatively, the club head can include a non-threaded adjustment system that uses Velcro or an adhesive to provide a highly-adjustable mass distribution system. In some embodiments, the adjustment system uses other means such as channels, prongs, spikes, edges, etc., and attachable material such as silicone caulk or other sticky or gummy material that can be pressed in. The adjustment system can include snap-together or snap-in weights or any other suitable mechanism. Where the club head uses threaded weight members, the club head can be provided along with a tool for tightening the weight down on a mount point or removing it. In this way, a golfer can have the club fitted to his or her personal playing style, and can close the club by fastening the removable component in place so that an exterior of the club is smooth and free of features relating to weight mounting and thus can be aerodynamically optimized.

Since the adjustable components are contained within an enclosed club head, they are additionally protected from the elements. The adjustable components themselves will not tarnish through rapid exposure to environmental elements. Additionally, the exterior surface of the club head has minimal creases, deformations, inlets, or pockets that may trap and retain dirt and grime—which could otherwise interfere with the mass distribution of the club head.

In certain aspects, the invention provides a golf club head that includes a main club head body member defining a hosel, a ball-striking face, and at least a portion of a crown and a sole of the golf club head. The club head has a removable component interchangeably coupleable to the main club head body member at an attachment perimeter to create a playable club. The removable component may be a crown or a sole, for example, or the removable component may define a two-part club head (e.g., a clam-shell club head) or a multi-part club head.

The attachment perimeter may include a plurality of tabs and corresponding recesses. Preferably, the main club head body member includes a boss with a screw extending therethrough, the screw being threadably engaged with a post extending from an inner surface of the removable component. A washer may be included, disposed around the screw and retaining the screw within the boss. The removable component may include a majority of a crown and may optionally also include a portion or a majority of a heel-side skirt of the club head, a portion or a majority of a toe-side skirt of the club head, or both. The main club head body member may define a face cup, a hosel, and at least a portion of a sole of the club head. In some embodiments, the main club head body member comprises a majority of the sole.

In certain embodiments, the main body member includes a first piece defining the hosel and surrounding the ball-striking face, and an intermediate piece connected to the first and defining a cutaway with an inner periphery at the attachment perimeter.

In some embodiments, the club head body includes at least one mount point on an inside surface for attachment of a removable weight. The club head preferably also includes a weight attached to at least one of the mount points. The club head may include a plurality of mount points, wherein the removable weight can be threadably attached to any one of the plurality of mount points. Each mount point may include a casting and a threaded insert disposed within the casting.

Aspects of the invention provide a system for fitting a golf club that includes a hollow golf club head defining a crown, a sole, a hosel, and a ball striking face. The system also includes a plurality of mount points disposed on an inner surface of the golf club head with at least one weight member releasably coupleable to any of the plurality of mount points and a removable component for accessing the weight member and the mount points. The plurality of mount points may include at least one mount point on a toe-side of an inside surface of the sole, at least one mount point on a heel side of an inside surface of the sole, or both. Additionally or alternatively, the plurality of mount points includes at least one mount point on a forward area of an inside surface of the sole, at least one mount point on an aft area of an inside surface of the sole, or both. In some embodiments, each mount point comprises a raised casting with a threaded insert therein.

Each weight member may include a rigid body, a viscoelastic dampener on a mounting side of the rigid body, a threaded post extending from the mounting side, and a tool interface obverse to the threaded post. The weight member can have a screw extending through the rigid body and providing the threaded post, and a retaining washer holding the screw in the rigid body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a club head of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows a sole of a club head.

FIG. 3 depicts a club head with a removable component released.

FIG. 4 illustrates an adjustable mass system according to embodiments of the invention.

FIG. 5 gives a view into club head with its crown panel removed.

FIG. 6 shows a detail view of an inner periphery of a cutaway of club head body.

FIG. 7 depicts an alternative embodiment of removable component.

FIG. 8 presents an alternative structure for a removable component.

FIG. 9 illustrates a removable crown according to certain embodiments.

FIG. 10 shows a club head with a removable crown.

FIG. 11 depicts a removable component with a gasket.

FIG. 12 depicts an embodiment in which gasket has an L shaped cross-section.

FIG. 13 shows a removable component with an L-shaped edge.

FIG. 14 shows a two-layer gasket.

FIG. 15 shows a close-up detail view of a two layer gasket.

FIG. 16 shows a gasket that uses an O-ring.

FIG. 17 shows a detail view of the gasket and O-ring.

FIG. 18 illustrates a club head body with a removable component removed.

FIG. 19 shows a removable weight and a weight mount point.

FIG. 20 illustrates a two-piece construction for removable weight.

FIG. 21 shows an embodiment in which a removable weight includes a screw.

FIG. 22 depicts a threaded insert and a casting of a mount point.

FIG. 23 illustrates a threaded insert with a square cross-section.

FIG. 24 shows an embodiment for a removable weight.

FIG. 25 shows removable weight installed in club head.

FIG. 26 gives an informational guide.

FIG. 27 shows an informational display that may guide the location of weights.

FIG. 28 shows an exploded view of a golf club head.

FIG. 29 shows a cutaway view through club head.

FIG. 30 illustrate the use of O-ring to create a seal.

FIG. 31 shows a connection between crown and a club head body.

FIG. 32 depicts a removable component that sits on an intermediate piece.

FIG. 33 depicts an intermediate piece fixed to a club head body.

FIG. 34 gives another exploded view of club head.

FIG. 35 presents a cutaway view through an assembled club head.

FIG. 36 gives a detail view of an aft-area junction between components.

FIG. 37 gives a detail view of a forward-area junction between components.

FIG. 38 depicts a removable component with a plurality of tabs.

FIG. 39 shows a removable component and an intermediate piece.

FIG. 40 shows a club head with a subtractive mass adjustment system.

FIG. 41 gives a cross-section through a weight pad.

FIG. 42 shows an internal surface for a mass adjustment system.

FIG. 43 gives a close-up of a weight member.

FIG. 44 shows a set including translucent weights.

FIG. 45 depicts a false floor that includes holes for weight attachment.

FIG. 46 shows weight members for attachment to holes.

FIG. 47 shows an underside of a false floor.

FIG. 48 shows a club head with a removable component.

FIG. 49 depicts an assembly screw that fastens a removable component.

FIG. 50 illustrates a screw-down clamp mechanism.

FIG. 51 shows the use of a rigging mechanism.

FIG. 52 shows a capstan screw.

FIG. 53 shows a club head with an openable hatch.

FIG. 54 an shows openable hatch lifted around its hinged axis.

FIG. 55 shows mount points retaining weight members.

FIG. 56 shows a mount point and a weight member.

FIG. 57 shows a club head with a removable component.

FIG. 58 gives a perspective view of a club head.

FIG. 59 shows the back of a club head.

FIG. 60 gives a bottom view of a club head.

FIG. 61 illustrates turning a screw to unlock a removable component.

FIG. 62 shows pulling a lever to slide back a clamp.

FIG. 63 shows removing a cover.

FIG. 64 shows an interior of a club head.

FIG. 65 shows a cam lever on a club head.

FIG. 66 illustrates the cam lock mechanism provided by a shaft cam lever.

FIG. 67 depicts an alternative embodiment for a club head of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 shows a club head 101 of the present invention. Club head 101 may be any hollow type of club head such as any wood-type or hybrid-type club head. Preferably, club head 101 is a driver. Generally, club head 101 will include a club head body 105 defining an overall shape of the head. Club head 101 will generally include a ball-striking face 119 and a hosel 113. Club head 101 also includes a removable component 109. Any suitable portion of club head 101 may be removable. For example, removable component 109 may be a panel of the sole, the entire sole, an aft body, a crown panel, or other. As shown in FIG. 1, removable panel 109 is a crown portion of club head 101. Club head 101 includes a mechanism to fasten removable panel 109 in place.

FIG. 2 shows a sole 123 of club head 101. Visible on sole 123 is fastening mechanism 131 having screw 127 fastened therein. Screw 127 (or any other suitable fastener such as a barbed post, a cotter pin, or other binder) is accessible from an exterior of club head 101. When screw 127 is in place, removable component 109 is held in place and club head 101 can be used in playing golf. A golfer can use a tool, such as a specialty tool with a custom tip, to unfasten screw 127 via a tool interface surface, such as a shaped recessed tool port. A golfer can unscrew screw 127 and release it, thereby releasing removable component 109.

FIG. 3 depicts a club head 101 of certain embodiments with a removable component 109 released from club head body 105. In the depicted embodiment, removable component 109 includes an exterior crown panel 301 and an interior crown frame 305. While depicted in FIG. 3 as separated, exterior crown panel 301 and interior crown frame 305 may preferably be fastened together as a single component, either by adhesive, co-molding, by being monolithically formed, or by other suitable means.

Removable component 109 includes a post 311 for receiving screw 127. Component 109 is also held against body 105 by bumpers 325 to prevent rattling and to contribute to the playability of club head 101. One insight of the invention relates to the need to distribute stresses about a perimeter of component 109 for club head 101 to be durable and effective for playing. Without being bound by any particular mechanism, it may be theorized that the impact of hitting a golf ball sends shock waves through a club head. Where a removable panel or component is a simple curved but featureless panel, it will deform differentially relative to an overall club head body. By inclusion of a frame 305 or equivalent set of trusses or buttresses providing radial support between attachment post 311 and crown panel 301, deformation of removable panel 109 is minimized and made congruent with any deformation of club head body 105. Thus during a hit, the overall club head responds as a holistic body and imparts energy to the ball in the form of a good coefficient of restitution—rather than dissipating energy through mismatched parts in the form of noise, cracking, or vibrations. Thus the depicted embodiments may provide unexpectedly good playing benefits in comparison to other structures.

Since club head 101 includes removable component 109, access is provided to an interior of club head 101. Since an interior of club head 101 is accessible, club head 101 can be modified or altered to affect the properties or shape of club head 101. In certain embodiments, club head 101 includes a system of adjustable mass within the interior. In some embodiments, a removable component alters a shape of a club head. For example, a removable component may include a portion of, or all of, the hosel. A first removable component can be replaced with a second removable component to change a club from having a straight-necked hosel to an offset hosel.

FIG. 4 illustrates an adjustable mass system according to embodiments of the invention. As shown in FIG. 4, club head body 105 has removable component 109 removed revealing the interior. Club head 101 includes a set of weight mount points 401 therein. Each weight mount point 401 will typically include a mechanism 407 to which a removable weight may be affixed. Also shown in FIG. 4 is a removable weight 413 affixed to a weight mount point 401 in a toe-side area of the inside of the sole of club head 101.

Weight mount points 401 may be distributed in any suitable locations within club head 101. In general, it may be preferable to include points 401 on an interior of the sole 123 of club head 101 as golfers may find benefit in keeping a club head center of gravity low. Club head 101 may include any number of mount points 401, such as, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10 s, etc. In the depicted embodiment, club head 101 includes four mount points 401—one at each of face side, heel side, toe side, and aft side of the interior of sole 123. In some embodiments, club head 101 is made to have a certain mass such that when a certain number of removable weights 413 (e.g., one or two) are included, the overall mass of club head 101 is a desirable value FIG. 5 gives a view into club head 101 with its crown panel removed to illustrate the structure and orientation of frame 305. Frame 305 is shown as having four arms extending from post 311 towards a periphery of the frame and tapering to points towards the periphery. When screw 127 is tightened from a sole surface of club head 101, screw 127 pulls removable component 109 closed by tensile force. The tapering arms of frame 305 distribute the force across component 109, making for a playable club.

FIG. 6 shows a detail view of a point where an arm of frame 305 meets an inner periphery of the cutaway of club head body 105. Frame 305 may rest on bumpers 325, which may be provided by a viscoelastic material such as rubber or urethane. Inclusion of viscoelastic bumpers or a gasket (discussed in greater detail below) provide for desirable vibration dampening.

FIG. 7 depicts an alternative embodiment of removable component 709. Here, crown panel 301 sits on a frame 705 that has four substantially flat, vertical truss members extending from post 711 to a periphery of frame 705 (only two truss members are shown as frame 705 is drawn in cutaway view). Each of the four truss members substantially defines a triangle with a curved, crown-side edge, radiating away from the central post 711. Central post 711 receives assembly screw 127. Each of the radiating arms define open triangles to promote light weight. Central post 711 extends beneath the radiating arms.

Aspects of the invention relate to a removable component that provide the desirable features and good playing properties described here. For example, a removable component may include (e.g., as well as or instead of a truss) a heightened mass around the screw receptacle in which the thickness is tapered toward the other portion of the crown. In some embodiments, an internal truss structure is in a circular formation around the screw receptacle. The invention includes any structure that provides a solid consistent compression of the crown with the body.

FIG. 8 presents an alternative structure for a removable component 801 for use with club head body 105. Here, each of the radiating arms includes a shape similar to two joined triangles, not open, radiating from thick central post 811. Removable component 801 as shown in FIG. 8 may be monolithically formed (i.e., not have a separate frame and crown panel). This may be preferred for cost and simplicity.

FIG. 9 illustrates a removable crown 901 according to certain embodiments. Removable crown 901 is generally characterized by a central post for receiving assembly screw 127 and a set of radiating truss members. Additionally, crown 901 has a pattern of cutaway portions with apparently irregular borders. It may be found that including a network of apparently irregular cutaways promotes weight savings and strength. On the radiating trusses, the irregular border cutaways are cut through the truss members to create apertures. On the crown panel itself, the irregular border cutaways are cut into the inside surface but not all the way through, so that the exterior surface remains intact.

FIG. 10 shows a club head 101 of the present invention fitted with a removable crown 901. Assembly screw 127 extends through the sole of the club head and engages with post 911 of removable crown 901. This fastens crown 901 to main club head body 105. The radiating trusses distribute impact energy when ball striking face 119 hits a golf ball, so that club head 101 maintains an overall cohesive form and good coefficient of restitution, imparting high energy to the golf ball. A removable weight 413 can be seen mounted within club head 101 in FIG. 10. Additionally, it can be seen that removable crown 901 meets club head body 105 at a seam defined by a flange portion of club head body 105 extending under removable crown 901. This seam can be closed with a gasket, sealed with an adhesive, held together primarily by pressure from screw 127, or held in any other suitable fashion.

FIGS. 11-17 depict embodiments of the mounting edge (i.e., the outer periphery) for a removable component 109 of a club head of the present invention.

FIG. 11 depicts a removable component with a gasket 1105 extending around an outer periphery of the component. Gasket 1105 is preferably a viscoelastic material to prevent rattling and to distribute stresses uniformly

FIG. 12 depicts an embodiment in which gasket 1106 has an L shaped cross-section and lies interposed between removable component 109 and main club head body 105. It may be preferable to include this embodiment where removable component 109 and main club head body 105 are formed of unlike metals to mitigate galvanic corrosion between the metals. Additionally, the pliable form of gasket 1105 aids in forming a water-tight seal between removable component 109 and club head body 105.

Another useful benefit of a gasket relates to production economy. A gasket may be included to hide deviations in tolerance between two edges and thus to create a solid visual appearance of a seal. This allows for manufacturing to meet a slightly relaxed fit tolerance, which can provide considerable savings in time and cost during production.

FIG. 13 shows a removable component 109 with an L-shaped edge enclosing gasket 1105. This allows club head 101 to have the benefit of gasket 1105 in terms of excluding moisture and dampening shock and vibration but allows gasket 1105 to be concealed from an exterior of club head 101. Concealing gasket 1105 may provide useful benefits in manufacturing as tolerances are more lenient and a uniform appearance of gasket 1105 may not be required, since having a non-uniform gasket 1105 will not interfere with an exterior surface of club head 101 and thus not interfere with aerodynamics (e.g., in the embodiment depicted in FIG. 13).

FIG. 14 illustrates use of a two layer gasket.

FIG. 15 shows a close-up detail view of the two layer gasket of FIG. 14. Here, gasket 1105 is interposed between removable component 109 and interface layer 109. Interface layer 1109 may be of a softer material than gasket 1105 to improve the fit between removable component 109 and club head body 105.

FIG. 16 shows a gasket that uses an O-ring. Here, gasket 1105 is fitted with O-ring 1113 that extends around an outer periphery of removable component 109.

FIG. 17 shows a detail view of the gasket 1105 and O-ring 1113. O-ring 1113 protrudes from gasket 1105 and is itself compressible, which ensures a good fit between removable component 109 and club head body 105. Thus the depicted embodiment may provide for excellent weatherproofing. Also, O-ring 1113 may be found to be an easily replaceable component, thus allowing a club head 101 with a removable component 109 to last a long time and since deterioration of an O-ring does not require that club head 101 be taken out of service.

Golf club head 101 has a removable component 109, which provides access to an interior of the club head. This allows devices or mechanisms to be included inside of golf club head 101. Any suitable device may be included in club head 101 including, for example, an electronic device such as a shot detector, computer, GPS unit, battery pack, etc. Additionally, club head 101 can include moveable or adjustable mechanisms so that mass properties of a club head can be adjusted. In some embodiments, club head 101 includes one or a set of removable weights 413.

FIG. 18 illustrates a club head body 105 with removable component 109 removed revealing the interior. Club head 101 includes a set of weight mount points 401 therein. Weight mount ports may be arranged in any suitable locations in club head 101. In some embodiments, a weight mount port 401 is included in one or more of the leading area of the inside sole surface, the trailing area of the inside sole surface, a toe side of the inside sole surface, and a heel side of the inside sole surface. In FIG. 18, weight mount point 401 on the toe side of the inside sole surface is shown as having a removable weight 413 mounted on it.

In some embodiments, a club head of the invention includes a non-threaded adjustment system that uses Velcro or an adhesive to provide a highly-adjustable mass distribution system. With a non-threaded adjustment system, mass can be added in any continuous or non-discrete arrangement and the mass-positioning possibilities are, in fact, endless.

In certain embodiments, the adjustment system uses other means such as channels, prongs, spikes, edges, etc., and attachable material such as silicone caulk or other sticky or gummy material that can be pressed in. For example, an inner surface of the club head can include a solid (e.g., metal, carbon fiber, etc.) honeycomb mesh frame and material such as clay, caulk, compound, etc., can be pressed into the holes in a desired pattern. The adjustment system can include snap-together or snap-in weights or any other suitable mechanism.

FIG. 19 illustrates a relationship between removable weight 413 and weight mount port 401. Weight mount point 401 includes a mounting mechanism—here, a threaded socket 407. Threaded socket 407 may be fixed into, or created within, weight mount point 401 by any suitable mechanism, such as welding, glue, press-fit, or others. In some embodiments, weight ports are cast as part of the surrounding component and threads are then tapped in. In certain embodiments, the area of the club head defines a casting (e.g., with Ti) and threads are then machined in.

Removable weight 413 includes a corresponding threaded post (and may also include a gasket, washer, or other mechanisms, to mitigate vibration and aid in good fit). Removable weight 413 can thus be fixed into, or removed from, an interior of golf club head 101 via a threaded interface. Removable weight 413 preferably includes a tool interface on an exterior surface. FIGS. 20-25 illustrate constructions of removable weights 413 according to embodiments of the invention.

FIG. 20 illustrates a two-piece construction for removable weight 413. Removable weight 413 sits in mount point 401, which may be, for example, cast in titanium (e.g., where a portion of or all of a sole 123 of club head 101 is titanium). Removable weight 413 may be made of a dense material such as tungsten alloy. Disposed between the weight and the mount point is a polymer gasket 2005. In some embodiments, polymer gasket 2005 is adhered to the bottom surface of the tungsten alloy removable weight 413. Inside of the casting for the mount point is a threaded insert 407 (e.g., adhered to the Ti casting) or threads (e.g., tapped in) to receive threaded post of removable weight 413. Polymer gasket 2005 may preferably include both horizontal walls as well as vertical walls surrounding the Ti casting of mount point 401 to aid in dissipating shear stresses associated with a ball strike.

FIG. 21 shows an alternative embodiment in which a removable weight 2113 includes a screw member 2127 extending through the weight body. A washer 2133 may be disposed between the head of the screw and the weight body. Optionally, a retaining ring may be included. Screw member 2127 mates with threaded insert 407.

FIG. 22 depicts a relationship between threaded insert 407 and the casting of mount point 401. By including a flat edge, a spline, a corner, or an irregularity, threaded insert can be prevented from rotating within mount point 401. Threaded insert may have any suitable shape such as rectangle, star-shaped, hexagon, etc.

FIG. 23 illustrates an embodiment in which threaded insert 407 has a square cross-sectional shape to prevent rotation within mount point 401.

FIG. 24 shows an embodiment for a removable weight 2401. Cover 2417 defines an overall shape of removable weight 2401. Cover 2417 houses insert 2415 that provides mass. Insert 2415 can be any material of a desired density and may be, for example, tungsten-loaded rubber.

In some embodiments, insert 2415 further houses a ring member 2409 for additional weighting. Ring member 2409 may be varied to give weight 2401 a desired mass. For example, ring member 2409 may be a steel ring selected from a set of varying thickness, or ring member 2409 may be made from any other suitable material. Cover 2417 may sport medallion 2405. By including a separate medallion 2405, different information may be added to weight 2401 after its intended mass is set (e.g., by inserting one or a plurality of ring member 2409). Thus, a plurality of cover 2417 can be manufactured uniformly and used to create a variety of different weights 2401. Different weights 2401 can include different masses through the variation of ring member 2409 and the different masses can be communicated to the user by affixing a different medallion 2405 to the cover 2417.

In certain embodiments, different weight members have different masses by having differing densities in their constituent materials. For example, a weight member body or screw may be made with metals or other materials of different densities (e.g., some tungsten screws, some aluminum screws, etc.)

Removable weight 2401 includes a screw extending therethrough for coupling to threaded insert 407. In some embodiments, removable weight 2401 will include a retaining washer 2423 (e.g., rubber) to hold the screw inside of the weight.

FIG. 25 shows removable weight 2401 installed in club head 101. Weight 2401 is mounted to point 401 on an inside surface of the sole 123 of club head 101 via threaded insert 407 fixed therein (e.g., by glue). In the depicted embodiment, it will be noted that the cover 2417 defines an inner cylinder member that sits on the extended cylindrical wall of mount point 401. It may be found preferable to have weight 2401 bottom out, when being screwed into place, by having cover 2417 push against the protruding portion of mount point 401, as depicted. Since insert 2415 is preferably a pliable material such as rubber, the lowermost surface of insert 2415 deforms to conform to the curved inner surface of sole 123 thereby stabilizing removable weight 2401 inside of club head 101.

Since club head 101 can be opened and includes removable or repositionable weights, mass properties of the club head can be adjusted. In some embodiments, club head 101 can be opened by a golfer and re-closed (e.g., as many times as he or she would like). In certain embodiments, club head 101 is open initially, and is fitted to a golfer one time by adjusting the positions of the weights, and then closed and can optionally be sealed shut (e.g., by adhesive) once the club head is fitted to the golfer. Additionally, the club head may be provided with information to guide the positioning of weights. Information may be provided in the form of a color scheme, or labels on the weight mount points 401 or with an informational pamphlet, web page, computer program, or smart phone app that is made available to guide a golfer in locating weights.

FIG. 26 illustrates a way in which an interior of club head or an informational guide may be labelled to guide a golfer. In FIG. 26, the dashed circles and the numerals correspond to the dashed lines and numerals shown in FIG. 27.

FIG. 27 shows an informational display that may be used to guide a golfer in locating weights inside of club head 101. As can be seen by considering FIGS. 26 and 27 together, it will be noted that toe-side mount point 3 can aid in guiding the ball to the right and thus can correct a hook. Point 4 can guide the ball to the left and thus aid in correcting a slice. Point 1 can move a club head center of gravity back and increase MOI, making a club head more forgiving to off-center hits. Point 2 can create more drive, allowing a skilled golfer to obtain great distance with the club head.

An inside of a club head can include an informational display or other indicia on a surface or included (e.g., as a card, pamphlet, etc.) and can be printed, painted, electronic, etc. For example, a club head could include an LED or LCD screen that provides information such as a shot-tracking information, weighting suggestions, hit pattern history, etc. A club head could include slogans, inspirational phrases, initials. Information could be provided as a customizable feature, e.g., made-to-order for a golfer. For example, a golfer could opt to have a club head include a decal or a logo from a favorite sports team or an engraving or motto, etc. In some embodiments, a club head of the present invention is sold with one or a set of removable weights and the golfer is given information to guide the selection of location for the weights. For example, a printed card or pamphlet may be included with the packaging of the golf club. Alternatively, the golfer may be directed to a web page or computer program. A golfer may be provided with a single weight that, when taken with the mass of the club head, provides a desired overall weight (e.g., 195 grams, or 205 grams, etc.). In some embodiments, a golfer is provided with two (or more) weights that add up to the amount of mass necessary to provide the desired overall weight. For example, club head 101 may include a 1 gram weight and a 10 gram weight. Golfers can create a “draw bias” by putting the 10-gram weight in the heel (position 4 in FIG. 16) and the 1-gram weight in the toe (position 3). They can create a “neutral bias” by swapping the weights, putting the 10-gram weight in the toe and the 1-gram weight in the heel.

Preferably, golf club head 101 is offered in a kit that includes the removable weights and one or more tools for adjusting the club head. For example, assembly screw 127 and the screw of a repositionable weight can include the same size tool interface, and a single tool can be provided.

The invention further provides additional embodiments of a golf club with a removable component that creates a playable, watertight club head when assembled. FIGS. 26-31 illustrate an embodiment that uses an O-ring and a gasket. FIGS. 32-39 show the use of an intermediate body piece.

FIG. 28 shows an exploded view of a golf club head 2601 with a removable component 2609. Component 2609 sits on gasket 2615 which may be glued to the club head body 2605 (e.g., titanium). Assembly screw 127 is seated in club head body 2605 through the use of a shoulder member 2617 (e.g., Ti, Al, PTFE, carbon fiber, etc.) Screw 127 may be held in the place through a rubber washer or similar mechanism. O-ring 2621 extends around a perimeter of removable crown 2609.

FIG. 29 shows a cutaway view through club head 2601. It can be seen that center post 2611 extending down from removable component 2609 is fitted with a threaded insert 2619. This may be, for example, an aluminum insert co-molded into crown 2609. Screw 127 extends from screw shoulder 2617 to threaded insert 2619 to fasten removable component 2609 into place.

FIG. 30 illustrate the use of O-ring 2621 to create a seal between removable crown 2609 and club head body 2605 when the crown if fastened into place. Gasket 2615 helps seat crown 2609 in the correct position and prevents vibration or rattle between the parts. O-ring 2621 creates a moisture barrier and also can be replaced so that club head 2601 provides enduring utility.

FIG. 31 shows a leading edge of connection between crown 2609 and club head body 2605. Crown 2609 seats on gasket 2615 and O-ring 2621 provides a seal.

FIG. 32 depicts an alternative embodiment in which removable component 3209 sits on an intermediate piece 3251. Intermediate piece may be affixed to club head body 3205. For example, intermediate piece 3251 may be composite, club head body 3205 may include titanium, and intermediate piece 3251 may be glued to club head body 3205. A benefit of using intermediate piece 3251 includes forgiving manufacturing tolerances. Since the fabrication of club head body 3205 is not the same process that creates the mating surface or interface for attachment to a removable component, the manufacturing process need not satisfy both tolerances simultaneously. The inner perimeter of the cutaway portion of club head body 3205 can have greater variation in manufacturing, as it will be fixed to intermediate piece 3251 and finished. For example, gaps can be filled (e.g., with urethane or glue) and the surface may be finished (e.g., sanded and painted). Intermediate piece 3251 may be manufactured so that the inner perimeter of the cutaway through it will precisely match the outer perimeter of removable component 3209.

FIG. 33 depicts a related embodiment in which intermediate piece 3251 is fixed to club head body 3205. Here, intermediate piece 3251 includes an aft-most portion of club head 3201 and extends somewhat into a sole region of the club head. Preferably, intermediate piece 3251 is made with a ledge that slides into body 3205 and provides a mating surface for adhesive. Piece 3251 may be cemented to body 3205, which may be, e.g., titanium. Intermediate piece 3251 may be made from any suitable material including metals and polymers. In some embodiments, intermediate piece 3251 includes carbon-fiber reinforced plastic.

FIG. 34 gives another exploded view of club head 3201 to illustrate assembly of removable crown 3209 to the club head. Here, intermediate piece 3251 is illustrate spaced away to aid visualization and will normally be glued to club head body 3205 by ledge 3255. For manufacturing, ledge 3255 slides into body 3205 and provides a contact surface for glue. Post-manufacturing, removable component 3209 can be attached or removed through the use of screw 127, which engages with a screw post in component 3209, as discussed above.

FIG. 35 presents a cutaway view through an assembled club head 3201, showing intermediate piece 3251 disposed between club head body 3205 and removable component 3209. It can be seen that ledge 3255 on intermediate piece 3251 extends inside of body 3205.

FIG. 36 gives a detail view of an aft-area junction between components for certain embodiments of the invention. For the depicted embodiment, intermediate piece 3251 presents a ledge that extends down into body 3205. Removable component 3209 sits on a lip surrounding the cutaway through intermediate piece 3251.

FIG. 37 gives a detail view of a forward-area junction between components. Ledge 3255 of intermediate piece 3251 slides under body 3205. Here too, removable component 3209 sits on the lip surrounding the cutaway through intermediate piece 3251.

One insight of the invention includes the recognition that a golf club—particularly a driver type club—undergoes severe shock during routine play as the club is used to hit a ball at very high speeds. Including a cutaway hole in the overall hollow body of the club head can compromise its structural integrity. During the shock of a shot, the club head can deform, with severe deformation potentially being introduced at seed points around the outer periphery of a removable component or the inner periphery of a cutaway if these points are not adequately supported. The embodiments depicted herein address the structural requirements of such a club head, for example, at least by including a central post with radiating arms.

The invention includes any structure that provides a solid consistent compression of the crown with the body. In certain embodiments, a central post uses compressive stress to hold the removable component in place and the radiating arms distribute that stress uniformly about the periphery. In some embodiments, the structure includes circular, elliptical, or oblong channels that emanate from a post, or a structure with a tapering thickness, or a structure with a honeycomb or rectangular lattice structure to provide crown rigidity. Embodiments of the invention provide additional stabilization for the interface between the outer periphery of the removable component and the inner periphery of the cutaway in the form of a gasket or O-ring (see above), or in the form of an interlocking mechanism.

FIG. 38 depicts an embodiment in which a removable component 3209 includes a plurality of tabs 3261 provided to interlock with corresponding recess on the club head (e.g., directly on club head body 105 or on intermediate piece 3251. To best stabilize assembled club head 101, it may be preferable to include a plurality of post 3261 (e.g., at least 6) distributed around the perimeter of the removable component.

FIG. 39 shows a relationship between a removable component 3209 and intermediate piece 3251. The inner periphery of the cutaway through intermediate piece 3251 includes a plurality of recess 3265, each corresponding to one of post 3261 on removable component 3209. The posts and recesses stabilize the component on the club and prevent an edge of the component from shearing away from an edge of the cutaway during play, thus preventing the club head's overall form from being compromised.

In general, embodiments of the invention provide a metal wood golf club head with an access door or removable component on the upper or lower surface. A club head of the invention may include a mass adjustment system, e.g., on the interior of the club. In some embodiments, an upper surface or lower surface attachable shell gives access to the internal surface of a metal wood club head. The shell is fastened (screws, rivets, etc.) and sealed with an adhesive system (tape or “bead”) that prevents moisture from entering the head and provides good sound qualities. The adhesive system may not need strong adhesion to the door to be functional—e.g., it does not have to be excessively “sticky” to work. This may allow multiple installations and removals of the shell(s).

A mass adjustment system can be additive or subtractive. Additive mass systems have been illustrated and discussed above. An additive system is based on a minimum head structure that provides acceptable durability, sound, and ball launch conditions. The additive system than also uses mass that may be added. Additive mass may be provided by heavy tape, glued-in weights, screwed-in weights, “snap-in” weights, or any combination of them all to establish the optimum head weight, CG position and moment of inertia. In some embodiments, the head is originally formed through casting, stamping or composite build-up with no discretionary weight onboard—i.e. it is a light weight head. The head has basic functionality with good sound, acceptable durability, and acceptable golf ball launch conditions. Weight pad areas may be designated inside the head, for example, with markings for the placement of discretionary mass. Weights are located in specific combinations on the pad areas to obtain the desired head weight, center of gravity location, and moment of inertia. Weights can be heavy tape (commonly known as “lead tape”), snap-on, heavy metal infused thermoplastic, heavy metal infused rubber, heavy metal infused glue (i.e. “rat glue”), glued-on mass, screws, or others.

A subtractive system generally involves a club head that is manufactured to have a mass greater than a desired mass, such that the club can be customized by selectively removing mass. For example, a subtractive system may include specifically located weight pads that are molded (e.g., cast) into the head that can be machined away to establish the optimum head weight, CG position, or moment of inertia.

FIG. 40 shows a club head 4001 with a subtractive system. Club head 4001 includes a plurality of mass pads 4009. Pad can be taken to mean a defined or raised area (e.g., in the sense that a concrete “pad” is poured when building a shed). Weight pads 4009 are preferably areas of the overall body shell of club head 4001 that are thicker than the surrounding areas. Weight pads 4009 are incorporated into the head (cast, stamped, welded) and the baseline head has excessive discretionary mass—i.e. it is heavy. The head has basic functionality, good sound, acceptable durability and acceptable golf ball launch conditions.

FIG. 41 gives a cross-section through a weight pad 4009 as manufactured initially in a club head 4001 with a subtractive system. The weight pads may be machined away in a specific pattern to obtain desired head weight, center of gravity location and moment of inertia. For example, a consultant at a pro-shop can use a rotary tool, such as the rotary tool sold under the trademark DREMEL with a grinding attachment, and can remove weight pads 4009 to bias the club head according to a golfer's swing style.

Other mass adjustment systems are provided by the invention for use in a golf club head.

FIG. 42 shows an internal surface for a mass adjustment system for a hollow golf club (e.g. driver). Attachment pegs 4209 are fixed to the interior surface of the sole (or other interior or exterior surface) of the golf club head. Pegs 4209 can be provided by a metal, polymer, or other suitable material. Pegs 4209 may be formed as part of the sole material or attached after the sole shape is formed. The depicted mass adjustment system may include one or a plurality of weight members 4213 for attaching to pegs 4209.

FIG. 43 gives a close-up of a weight member 4213. Weight member 4213 can include a pattern of holes on a bottom surface to correspond to a pattern of pegs 4209. In an alternative embodiment, weight member 4213 includes a material that is deformable enough that the weight member is initially whole and solid, but is pushed down over pegs 4209, causing the surface to break and receive pegs 4209 (e.g., a material like a rubbery gelatin) and may be made from silicone, rubber, a polymer, or a similar material. Weights 4213 can be made from a flexible polymer that forms to the shape of the sole surface and snaps onto the attachment pegs. Weights 4213 withstand the impact force when hitting the golf club, but can be removed by prying them off of the pegs. Weights 4213 may be various shapes, sizes, thicknesses and densities. Weights 4213 can be placed anywhere on the peg pattern to achieve desired performance attributes.

FIG. 44 shows a set including translucent weights 4413. Translucent weights 4413 may be preferable to aid a user in understanding a mechanism by which the club head works. A golfer may view weights 4413 (e.g., as shown within FIG. 44) and see pegs 4209 that are inside of weight 4413 and intuitively understand that the weights 4413 are part of a repositionable weight set and understand that they can remove and reposition the weights.

FIG. 45 depicts a reversed embodiment in which a club head includes a false floor 4501 that includes holes for weight attachment. False floor 4501 is attached on the interior side of the sole of the golf club head.

FIG. 46 shows weight members 4513 for attachment to the holes in false floor 4501.

FIG. 47 shows an underside of the false floor 4501. Flexible weights 4513 include pegs molded on the bottom that can snap into holes. Weights can be removed by prying them off. The pegs go through false floor to snap in place.

The invention provides mechanisms suitable for fastening a removable component to a club head.

FIG. 48 shows a club head 4801 with removable component 4809 that can be removed from main club head body 4805. Central post 4811 extends from removable component 4809 and has a grooved side of the post. Assembly screw 4827 is threaded and the threads engage the groove portion of post 4811. When screw 4827 is rotated from the outside, the threads pull down on central post 4811, fastening removable component 4809 to club head 4801.

FIG. 49 depicts an alternative embodiment in which assembly screw 4927 fastens removable component 4909 to main club head body 4905. Component 4909 may include molded PEEK part 4915, attached with adhesive and molded with metal thread insert. When screw 4927 tightens, interface surfaces 4937 make contact and translate force downward. Preferably, screw 4923 is captured loosely within boss 4959 on main club head body 4905.

FIG. 50 illustrates a screw-down clamp mechanism that includes a clamp 5031. Assembly screw 5027 pushes one edge of clamp 5031, which thus engages and pulls down on mounting buttress 5011 of removable component 5009.

FIG. 51 shows the use of a rigging mechanism in which rigging line 5111 extends through a system of cleats 5123 inside of club head 5101.

FIG. 52 shows capstan screw 5127 in club head 5101. Rigging line 5111 spools around capstan screw 5127 such that when the screw is rotated, it takes up rigging line 5111. This applies tension to removable component 5109 through cleats 5123 mounted to removable component 5109. The illustrates rigging mechanism based on rig-line 5111, since it is tensioned by capstan screw 5127, stabilizes club head 5101, providing a club head that is enjoyable to play.

FIG. 53 shows a club head 5301 with an openable hatch 5309 connected to main club head body 5305.

FIG. 54 shows openable hatch 5309 lifted around its hinged axis to reveal an interior of club head 5301. The depicted structure may be a preferred embodiment, since 5309 is not immediately separable from club head 5301 and thus will remain with the club head.

FIG. 55 shows mount points 5501 retaining weight members 5513.

FIG. 56 shows a mount point 5501 and a weight member 5513 as shown inside of a club head in FIG. 55. It can be seen that weight members 5513 may include a button that can be pressed to release them from mount points 5501 and that weight members may be inserted by sliding them into mount points 5501. It may be found preferable to use non-round weight members so that they do not rotate during use of the club head. The cage shape of mount points 5501 may be preferred for fastening the weight members therein.

FIG. 57 shows a club head 5701 with removable component 5709 fastened by assembly screw 5727 according to certain embodiments.

FIG. 58 gives a perspective view of club head 5701.

FIG. 59 shows the back of club head 5701 to reveal lever 5739 being held in place by assembly screw 5727.

FIG. 60 gives a bottom view of club head 5701. Shaft cam lever 6051 is visible. Lever 5739 is a central component of the assembly mechanism of club head 5701 and FIGS. 61-63 illustrate the operation of the assembly mechanism.

FIG. 61 illustrates turning screw 5727 to unlock removable component 5709.

FIG. 62 shows a second step—pulling lever 5739 to slid back clamp 5731.

FIG. 63 shows the final step. A user may continue to pull on lever 5739. Clamp 5731 drops, allowing cover 5709 to be removed.

FIG. 64 shows the interior of club head 5701 in some embodiments and depicts an alternative mass adjustment system of certain embodiment. The depicted system includes one or a plurality of assembly posts 6039 to which a mass member 6013 may be fastened. Mass member 6013 may be deformable with an internal shoulder that snaps over the flared head of post 6039. A person can squeeze mass member 6013, causing the internal shoulder to deform away from the flared head of post 6039, allowing mass member 6013 to then be simply lifted off of post 6039. Additionally or alternatively, mass member 6013 can be provided for one-time mounting on posts 6039. Mass members 6013 may be non-deformable and may include an internal shoulder that snaps onto post 6039. Mass members 6013 may be mounted to posts 6039 by an adhesive (e.g., epoxy). In certain embodiments, posts 6039 and mass members 6013 are both threaded and mass members 6013 are screwed onto posts 6039.

FIG. 65 shows cam lever 6301 on club head 5701 for fastening a shaft to the club head.

FIG. 66 illustrates the cam lock mechanism provided by shaft cam lever 6051. The depicted mechanism may be included to allow a golfer to easily adjust their shaft-club head attachment.

FIG. 67 depicts an alternative embodiment for a club head 6701 of the invention. Here, the weight mount points need not include a threaded insert. As discussed above, the threads may be tapped in or machined in. Alternatively, the weight members can be non-threadably mounted, e.g., by snap-fit or by adhesives.

As used herein, the word “or” means “and or or”, sometimes seen or referred to as “and/or”, unless indicated otherwise. Any documents referenced in the disclosure are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

Although these inventions have been disclosed in the context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present inventions extend beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the inventions and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. In addition, while several variations of the inventions have been shown and described in detail, other modifications, which are within the scope of these inventions, will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art based upon this disclosure. It is also contemplated that various combinations or sub-combinations of the specific features and aspects of the embodiments can be made and still fall within the scope of the inventions. It should be understood that various features and aspects of the disclosed embodiments can be combined with or substituted for one another in order to form varying modes of the disclosed inventions. Thus, it is intended that the scope of at least some of the present inventions herein disclosed should not be limited by the particular disclosed embodiments described above.

References and citations to other documents, such as patents, patent applications, patent publications, journals, books, papers, web contents, have been made throughout this disclosure. All such documents are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

EXAMPLES

Example 1

Club heads were made that had a removable crown and did not include a structure of the invention. It was found that the main club head body broke on impact. Without being bound by any particular mechanisms, it may be theorized that the structures of the invention cause the body to compress and tension the crown in harmony with the body when the body deforms, thus providing support and avoiding breakage.

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33.0/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

It shows from an IP point of view how many competitors are active and innovations are made in the different technical fields of the company. On a company level, the market attractiveness is often also an indicator of how diversified a company is. Here we look into the commercial relevance of the market.

69.0/100 Score

Market Coverage

It shows the sizes of the market that is covered with the IP and in how many countries the IP guarantees protection. It reflects a market size that is potentially addressable with the invented technology/formulation with a legal protection which also includes a freedom to operate. Here we look into the size of the impacted market.

73.52/100 Score

Technology Quality

It shows the degree of innovation that can be derived from a company’s IP. Here we look into ease of detection, ability to design around and significance of the patented feature to the product/service.

53.0/100 Score

Assignee Score

It takes the R&D behavior of the company itself into account that results in IP. During the invention phase, larger companies are considered to assign a higher R&D budget on a certain technology field, these companies have a better influence on their market, on what is marketable and what might lead to a standard.

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
メタルウッドクラブ SASO MITSUHIRO 15 May 2003 02 December 2004
ゴルフクラブ MAKITA TAKANORI 07 July 1998 25 January 2000
ゴルフクラブヘッド ブリヂストンスポーツ株式会社 28 September 1994 09 April 1996
ゴルフクラブヘッド SUMITOMO RUBBER IND LTD 07 October 2002 22 April 2004
ゴルフ·クラブヘッド 復盛股▲分▼有限公司 16 April 2002 05 November 2003
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Golf club TAYLOR MADE GOLF COMPANY, INC. 10 July 2017 26 October 2017
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