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Patent Analysis of

Method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device

Updated Time 12 June 2019

Patent Registration Data

Publication Number

US9906058

Application Number

US14/324767

Application Date

07 July 2014

Publication Date

27 February 2018

Current Assignee

MOOG UNNA GMBH

Original Assignee (Applicant)

MOOG UNNA GMBH

International Classification

H02J7/00,H01M10/46,F03D7/02,H02J7/04,H02J7/34

Cooperative Classification

H02J7/0057,F03D7/0224,F03D7/0264,H02J7/007,H02J7/045

Inventor

THEOPOLD, TOBIAS,OPIE, RAY,SCHREINER, BJORN

Patent Images

This patent contains figures and images illustrating the invention and its embodiment.

US9906058 Method charging electric 1 US9906058 Method charging electric 2 US9906058 Method charging electric 3
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Abstract

A method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device (1) comprising the following steps: predicting the energy demand EB of the energy consumer (2), determining the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device (1) and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device (1), calculating a charging voltage UL, whereby the charging voltage UL is calculated in such a way that the energy EC stored in the emergency energy storage device (1) at this charging voltage UL is just enough to meet the predicted energy demand EB, taking into account losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri, and charging or discharging the emergency energy storage device (1) until the calculated charging voltage UL has been reached.

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Claims

1. A method for charging a supercapacitor of an electric emergency energy storage device of a pitch drive of a wind turbine, comprising the following steps: predicting an energy demand EB of the pitch drive; determining a capacitance C of the supercapacitor and an internal resistance Ri of the supercapacitor; calculating a charging voltage UL, wherein the charging voltage UL is calculated in such a way that an energy loss EV, being an amount of energy loss due to the determined internal resistance Ri, combined with a partial energy ET, being an amount of energy that corresponds to the difference between the energy EC stored in the supercapacitor at the charging voltage UL and the energy stored in the supercapacitor at a lower limit voltage UG, is substantially equal to the predicted energy demand EB; and charging or discharging the supercapacitor until the calculated charging voltage UL has been reached.

2. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein the predicted energy demand EB is expressed as a load current curve l(t) and a load resistance RL, or as a load current curve l(t) and a load voltage curve Û(t), or as a load resistance RL and a load voltage curve Û(t).

3. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 2, wherein the energy EC stored in the supercapacitor at the charging voltage UL is assumed to be the sum of the losses due to the internal resistance Ri of the supercapacitor at the load current curve l(t) prescribed by the predicted energy demand EB plus the electric energy supplied by the supercapacitor at the load current curve l(t).

4. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein a safety correction function is added to the predicted energy demand EB and/or the predicted energy demand EB is multiplied by a safety correction function.

5. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein the calculated charging voltage UL is increased by a constant value and/or multiplied by a safety factor.

6. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein a load measurement is carried out and the predicted energy demand EB is at least partially based on the results of the load measurement.

7. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein a status signal is emitted as a function of the calculated charging voltage UL, and/or of the predicted energy demand EB, and/or of the determined capacitance C, and/or of the determined internal resistance Ri.

8. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 7, wherein a first status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is not greater than a first limit value.

9. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 8, wherein a second status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than the first limit value and not greater than a second limit value.

10. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 9, wherein a third status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than the second limit value and not greater than a third limit value.

11. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 10, wherein a fourth status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than the third limit value and the third limit value is a maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max.

12. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 11, wherein, if the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max, the calculated charging voltage UL is reduced to the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max.

13. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium with program instructions for carrying out a method according to claim 1.

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Claim Tree

  • 1
    1. A method for charging a supercapacitor of an electric emergency energy storage device of a pitch drive of a wind turbine, comprising
    • the following steps: predicting an energy demand EB of the pitch drive
    • determining a capacitance C of the supercapacitor and an internal resistance Ri of the supercapacitor
    • calculating a charging voltage UL, wherein the charging voltage UL is calculated in such a way that an energy loss EV, being an amount of energy loss due to the determined internal resistance Ri, combined with a partial energy ET, being an amount of energy that corresponds to the difference between the energy EC stored in the supercapacitor at the charging voltage UL and the energy stored in the supercapacitor at a lower limit voltage UG, is substantially equal to the predicted energy demand EB
    • and charging or discharging the supercapacitor until the calculated charging voltage UL has been reached.
    • 2. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein
      • the predicted energy demand EB is expressed as a load current curve l(t) and a load resistance RL, or as a load current curve l(t) and a load voltage curve Û(t), or as a load resistance RL and a load voltage curve Û(t).
    • 4. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein
      • a safety correction function is added to the predicted energy demand EB and/or the predicted energy demand EB is multiplied by a safety correction function.
    • 5. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein
      • the calculated charging voltage UL is increased by a constant value and/or multiplied by a safety factor.
    • 6. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein
      • a load measurement is carried out and the predicted energy demand EB is at least partially based on the results of the load measurement.
    • 7. The method for charging an electric emergency energy storage device according to claim 1, wherein
      • a status signal is emitted as a function of the calculated charging voltage UL, and/or of the predicted energy demand EB, and/or of the determined capacitance C, and/or of the determined internal resistance Ri.
  • 13
    13. A non-transitory computer readable storage medium with program instructions for carrying out a method according to claim 1.
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Description

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates to a method for charging an electric emergency power storage device of an energy consumer.

BACKGROUND ART

Emergency energy storage devices that supply electric energy to energy consumers find widespread use. As a rule, the energy consumers that need to be supplied with emergency power are safety-relevant. Examples of such safety-relevant energy consumers are especially motors in passenger elevators or the pitch system in wind turbines.

If the external power grid fails, as can happen, for example, in the case of a building fire, the elevators have to be able to proceed to the nearest floor and then the doors have to open without receiving power from the external power grid so that the persons present in the elevator can be brought to safety.

Modern wind turbines are normally provided with electric pitch systems that have at least one electric motor—referred to as a pitch motor—for each rotor blade. By rotating the rotor blades around their longitudinal axes, such pitch systems regulate the position of the rotor blades relative to the wind and they are often the only reliable way to bring the rotor of a wind turbine to a standstill. This is achieved in that the pitch system rotates the rotor blades into the so-called feathered position and the rotor comes to a standstill since it is no longer being driven by the wind. Energy is normally supplied to the pitch system by the power grid into which the wind turbine also feeds the power it has generated. Failure of the power grid can give rise to a hazardous situation, for example, if the winds pick up, since the rotational speed of the rotor of the wind turbine might exceed the maximum permissible value and cause damage to the wind turbine or injury to persons who are in the vicinity.

In order to prevent such a hazardous situation, even if the power grid fails, it must be possible to move the rotor blades into the feathering position, even when the external power grid is not supplying energy to the pitch system. Towards this end, pitch systems known from the state of the art are equipped with one or more emergency energy storage devices which, in case of a power grid failure, ensure that energy is supplied to the pitch system, thus guaranteeing the functionality of the pitch system, at least until the rotor blades have been moved into the safe feathering position.

One problem encountered when electric energy is provided by an emergency energy storage device is that, as a rule, such emergency energy storage devices undergo an ageing process. This means that, after a certain service life, the emergency energy storage devices no longer meet the same performance parameters as they did in the beginning.

In particular, the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in an emergency energy storage device decreases over the course of time. The voltage or the maximum output are also parameters that might be affected. The rate and extent of the ageing process are dependent, among other things, on the ambient temperature and on the voltage at which the emergency energy storage device is charged.

In order to meet the desired performance parameters until the end of a selected time span, that is to say, until the end of the service life of the emergency energy storage device, and thus to ensure, for instance, the safety of the wind turbine, the emergency energy storage devices known from the state of the art are dimensioned in such a way that the desired performance parameters are exceeded at the beginning of the selected time span to such an extent that the desired performance parameters are still met at the end of the selected time span, in spite of the decline caused by ageing. This necessary over-dimensioning of the emergency energy storage device raises the costs accordingly. When it comes to emergency energy storage devices in wind turbines, it is especially the performance parameters relating to the maximum storable amount of energy that are over-dimensioned. Moreover, during the operation of the wind turbine, the emergency energy storage device is charged in such a way that the maximum amount of energy that is possible at a given point in time is always stored in the emergency energy storage device. This is done in order to ensure that sufficient energy is stored in the emergency energy storage devices at all times.

Before this backdrop, the objective of the invention is to put forward a method for charging an emergency energy storage device that takes into account and minimizes the ageing of the emergency energy storage device.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The above-mentioned envisaged and specified objective is achieved on the basis of the cited method for charging an emergency energy storage device (1) in that the method comprises the following steps: predicting the energy demand EB of the energy consumer (2), determining the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device, calculating a charging voltage UL, whereby the charging voltage UL is calculated in such a way that the energy stored in the emergency energy storage device at this charging voltage UL is just enough to meet the predicted energy demand EB, taking into account losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri, and charging or discharging the emergency energy storage device until the calculated charging voltage UL has been reached.

In another aspect, the invention relates to a computer program product to carry out the method according to the invention. This computer program product can be, for instance, a computer program that is executed in a control unit of a pitch system, whereby the latter has the necessary means to carry out the method steps.

In detail, there is a wide array of possibilities to configure and refine the method according to the invention for charging an electric emergency energy storage device. For this purpose, reference is hereby made to the patent claims that are subordinated to claim 1 as well as to the detailed description below of preferred embodiments of the invention making reference to the drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a schematic of the sequence of a first embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The predicted energy demand EB describes the energy that the energy consumer needs in order to perform the necessary work in case of an emergency situation such as, for example, a power failure.

In a simple case, the result of the prediction of the energy demand EB of the consumer can be an absolute amount of energy. The energy demand EB of the consumer can be predicted in different ways. For instance, the prediction can consist of assuming a constant value for the energy demand EB. As an alternative, the prediction can be based on a model that, for example, assumes a linear increase in the energy demand EB as the emergency energy storage device or the energy consumer ages.

Moreover, the time span over which the energy demand EB extends in an emergency situation can be divided into at least two time segments, a process in which an absolute amount of energy is predicted for each of these time segments. The time span over which the energy demand EB extends can be divided into any desired number of time segments, whereby an absolute amount of energy is predicted for each time segment. In particular, the time segments can be infinitesimally short. In another configuration of the invention, the result of the prediction of the energy demand EB is an—especially continuous—function of the time which indicates the momentary energy demand EB at each point in time of the time span over which the energy demand EB extends.

The energy demand EB corresponds to the energy that the energy consumer needs in order to perform a defined task. In the example of an energy consumer in an elevator, the task consists of proceeding to the nearest floor and opening the doors without power being supplied by the external power grid. In a wind turbine, the task consists, for example, of rotating one or more rotor blades, particularly all of the rotor blades, into the feathering position without the external power supply stemming from the wind.

The capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device can be determined in different ways. One method consists of briefly discharging the emergency energy storage device via a resistor and then measuring the voltage and the discharging current. On this basis, in turn, the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device can be calculated. An alternative method to determine the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device consists of employing a model to estimate the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and/or the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device. Such a model can entail, for instance, the assumption that the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device decreases linearly over the course of time and/or that the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device increases linearly over the course of time. The complexity of such a model, however, can be considerably greater and can also take into consideration linear or non-linear influences of a wide array of parameters such as, for example, the number of charging/discharging cycles, the charging voltage UL, the charging/discharging current, the temperature, etc. One model that takes the temperature into account, for example, on the basis of an earlier measured value for the capacitance C−1 of the emergency energy storage device, can determine the momentary capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device in that the momentary capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device is calculated on the basis of a known relationship between the temperature T and the capacitance C(T). The term “C(T)” here means that the capacitance C is a function of the temperature T. Such a model can be analogously implemented for the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device. The two last mentioned models require the temperature T to have been measured at the time of the earlier measurement of the capacitance C−1 of the emergency energy storage device or at the time of the earlier measurement of the internal resistance Ri,−1 of the emergency energy storage device as well as at the time of the momentary determination of the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device or of the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device. The temperature of the emergency energy storage device as well as the temperature prevailing inside the housing containing the emergency energy storage device or else the ambient temperature can be employed as the temperature T. Moreover, the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device can be determined by using a model while the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device can be determined by a measurement or vice versa.

A charging unit that supplies the charging voltage UL can be provided in order to charge the emergency energy storage device. For example, the charging unit can be in the form of a rectifier that rectifies the alternating current of a supply network into a direct current having a voltage that corresponds to the charging voltage UL.

If the calculated charging voltage UL is less than the momentary voltage U of the emergency energy storage device, it is discharged. This can be done, for example, in that only the charging voltage UL is applied to the emergency energy storage device, which then reaches the desired charging voltage UL through self-discharging. Alternatively, the emergency energy storage device can also be actively discharged in that, for example, an external resistance is applied to the emergency energy storage device until the charging voltage UL is reached.

Since the charging voltage UL and thus the energy EC stored in the emergency energy storage device are adapted to the predicted energy demand EB, a considerably longer service life is achieved for the emergency energy storage device.

Instead of charging the emergency energy storage device at the maximum charging voltage UL, max over its entire service life, the emergency energy storage device is only charged with the charging voltage UL needed at that particular moment, which, as a rule, is lower than the maximum charging voltage UL, max. Since the charging voltage UL here is lower than that of the state of the art, the ageing processes that take place within the emergency energy storage device are slowed down since the ageing processes are dependent to a considerable extent on the magnitude of the charging voltage UL. The increase in the service life achieved by means of the method according to the invention can also be utilized to dimension the emergency energy storage device smaller from the very start, that is to say, especially with a smaller capacitance C, which markedly lowers the costs of the emergency energy storage device.

According to an advantageous embodiment, the predicted energy demand EB is expressed as a load current curve l(t) and a load resistance RL, or as a load current curve l(t) and a load voltage curve Û(t), or as a load resistance RL and a load voltage curve Û(t).

The energy demand EB can be calculated if two of the three variables RL, l(t) and Û(t) are known. In this context, the load resistance RL is the resistance with which the emergency energy storage device is charged in an emergency situation. In particular, the load resistance RL can also be time-dependent. The load current curve l(t) is the current that is drawn from the emergency energy storage device in an emergency situation. The load current curve l(t) typically changes continuously during an emergency situation and can also briefly acquire negative values under certain conditions. The load voltage curve Û(t) corresponds to the voltage of the emergency energy storage device while electric energy is being drawn from the emergency energy storage device in an emergency situation. The energy demand EB results as the time integral of the product from the load resistance RL and the square of the load current curve l(t), or else as the time integral of the product from the load voltage curve Û(t) and the load current curve l(t), or else as the time integral of the quotient from the square of the load voltage curve Û(t) and the load resistance RL:

EB=t0t1RLI2(t)dt=t0t1U^(t)I(t)dt=t0t1U^2(t)RLdt

The limits of the integral are the starting point in time t0—from which the energy consumer needs energy from the emergency energy storage device in an emergency situation—and the end point in time t1—from which the energy consumer no longer needs energy from the emergency energy storage device. 100261 When energy is drawn from the emergency energy storage device, losses EV always occur that are due to the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device. Consequently, the stored energy EC is equal to the sum of the losses EV and the available energy EL:

EC=EV+EL

The charging voltage UL is thus calculated in such a manner that the available energy EL corresponds to the energy demand EB:

EC−EV=EL≅EB

In an advantageous embodiment, the energy stored in the emergency energy storage device at the charging voltage UL is assumed to be the sum of the losses at the internal resistor Ri of the emergency energy storage device at the load current curve l(t) prescribed by the predicted energy demand EB plus the electric energy EL supplied by the emergency energy storage device at this load current curve l(t).

In order to calculate the charging voltage UL, it is assumed that the internal resistor Ri is the only source of losses within the emergency energy storage device. In other words, it is assumed that the supplied electric energy EL results from the difference between the stored energy EC and the time integral of the product of the internal resistance Ri and the square of the load current curve l(t):

EL=EC−EV=EC−∫l0l1RiI2(t)dt

The limits of the integral, in turn, are the starting point in time t0—from which the energy consumer needs power from the emergency energy storage device in an emergency situation—and the end point in time t1—from which the energy consumer no longer needs power from the emergency energy storage device.

According to a particularly advantageous embodiment, the emergency energy storage device is a capacitor, especially a supercapacitor.

The term “capacitor” or “supercapacitor” as set forth below refers to one single capacitor cell as well as to a parallel connection and/or a series connection consisting of several capacitor cells. Therefore, in the case of several interconnected capacitor cells, the capacitance C of the capacitor designates the resulting total capacitance of the capacitor cells that are interconnected.

On the basis of the relationship between the energy EC stored in a capacitor at a charging voltage UL and the capacitance C of the capacitor

ECCUL2,

one obtains the following formula for determining the charging voltage:

UL=2C(EB+t0t1RiI2(t)dt)

The term “supercapacitor” comprises electrochemical capacitors that have a double-layer capacitance as well as a pseudocapacitance. Depending on which of the two capacitances is predominant, the supercapacitors are classified in one of three families. Supercapacitors in which the double-layer capacitance is predominant are referred to as electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC). Supercapacitors in which the pseudocapacitance predominates are referred to as pseudocapacitors. The term “hybrid capacitors” refers to supercapacitors in which the double-layer capacitance and the pseudocapacitance contribute approximately equally to the total capacitance C of the supercapacitor.

In a preferred embodiment, it is provided that, in the calculation of the charging voltage UL as the energy stored in the emergency energy storage device at the charging voltage UL, only a partial energy ET is taken into account, whereby the partial energy ET is the amount of energy that corresponds to the difference between the energy stored in the capacitor at the charging voltage UL and the energy stored in the capacitor at the lower limit voltage UG.

For technical reasons, some energy consumers can no longer draw energy from the capacitor if the voltage of the capacitor falls below a limit voltage UG. For this reason, the amount of energy E(UG) that remains unused when the limit voltage UG is reached in the capacitor is not taken into consideration in the calculation of the charging voltage UL, that is to say, the amount of energy E(UG) is subtracted from the energy E(UL) that is stored in the capacitor at the charging voltage UL. Thus, the partial energy ET taken into account in the calculation of the charging voltage UL is:

ET=E(UL)−E(UG)=½CUL2−½CUG2

Consequently, the following modified formula is obtained for calculating the charging voltage:

UL=UG2+2C(EB+t0t1RiI2(t)dt)

According to another preferred embodiment, it is provided that a safety correction function is added to the predicted energy demand EB and/or the predicted energy demand EB is multiplied by a safety correction function.

In order to ensure that the energy stored in the emergency energy storage device is sufficient to meet the predicted energy demand EB while taking into consideration losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri, it is advantageous to adapt the predicted energy demand EB by means of a safety correction function. In particular, this adaptation increases the predicted energy demand EB, which causes the calculated charging voltage UL to likewise turn out to be higher than without the adaptation of the predicted energy demand EB by means of the safety correction function. Since the predicted energy demand EB can be an absolute amount of energy as well as a function of the time, the safety correction function can likewise be expressed as an absolute value or as a time-dependent function.

Moreover, it is advantageous for the calculated charging voltage UL to be increased by a constant value and/or to be multiplied by a safety factor.

Instead of or in addition to the subsequent adaptation of the energy demand EB, the charging voltage UL can also be adapted after it has been calculated. This adaptation likewise ensures that the energy EC stored in the emergency energy storage device is sufficient to meet the predicted energy demand EB, taking into account losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri.

According to a preferred embodiment, a load measurement is carried out and the predicted energy demand EB is at least partially based on the results of the load measurement.

In this case, the term “load measurement” refers to the measurement of the energy drawn from the emergency energy storage device during an emergency situation or during normal operation of the energy consumer. This load measurement makes it possible to more precisely estimate the energy demand EB for a future emergency situation. The results of the load measurement are thus used to predict the energy demand EB of the energy consumer. In this context, the prediction of the energy demand EB can be based partially or else completely on the load measurement. In the latter case, it is therefore assumed that the energy demand EB of the energy consumer in a previous emergency situation essentially corresponds to the energy demand EB of the energy consumer in the next emergency situation.

In an advantageous embodiment, the energy consumer is an electric motor, especially a pitch motor.

The described method is particularly advantageous for energy consumers whose emergency energy storage devices are very labor-intensive to service or replace. This is especially the case for pitch systems in wind turbines, particularly in off-shore wind turbine systems.

According to another advantageous embodiment, a status signal is emitted as a function of the calculated charging voltage UL and/or of the predicted energy demand EB and/or of the determined capacitance C and/or of the determined internal resistance Ri.

A status signal can be, for example, an electric signal containing information about the calculated charging voltage UL. This information can be the calculated charging voltage UL itself or else it can be information indicating that the calculated charging voltage UL falls within a certain value range. The signal can also be optical, that is to say, of an electromagnetic nature, or acoustic such as, for example, an acoustic warning signal. The emitting of several status signals of a different nature also fall within the scope of the invention.

In one particularly advantageous embodiment, a first status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is not greater than a first limit value. The first limit value can be, for instance, a value below which it can be assumed that the emergency energy storage device is operating normally, that is to say, that it can fulfill its intended function.

In one advantageous embodiment, a second status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than a first limit value and not greater than a second limit value. In particular, the second status signal can contain information indicating that, even though the emergency energy storage device is functioning normally, it will have to be serviced within a certain period of time in order to retain its functionality.

According to another advantageous embodiment, a third status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than a second limit value and not greater than a third limit value. In particular, the third status signal can contain information indicating that, even though the emergency energy storage device is still functioning normally, failure of the emergency energy storage device is imminent, that is to say, the emergency energy storage device has to be repaired and/or replaced.

In another advantageous embodiment, a fourth status signal is emitted when the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than a third limit value, whereby the third limit value is a maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max. The fourth status signal indicates that the emergency energy storage device is not capable of fulfilling its intended function since, even at the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max, the energy EC stored in the emergency energy storage device is not sufficient to meet the predicted energy demand EB, taking into account losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri.

According to a preferred embodiment, if the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than a maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max, the calculated charging voltage UL is reduced to the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max. Consequently, if the calculated charging voltage UL is greater than the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max, the emergency energy storage device is not charged with the originally calculated charging voltage UL, but rather only with the maximum permissible charging voltage UL, max. This is a protective function aimed at protecting the emergency energy storage device from excessively high voltages that might damage or even destroy the emergency energy storage device.

FIG. 1 shows an emergency energy storage device 1 and an energy consumer 2, whereby the emergency energy storage device 1 takes over the supply of power to the energy consumer 2 in case of an emergency situation. In order to predict the energy demand EB of the energy consumer 2, a means 3 for predicting the energy demand EB of the energy consumer 2 is provided. The energy demand EB of the energy consumer 2 predicted by the means 3 for predicting the energy demand EB of the energy consumer 2 is adapted by means of a safety correction function 4 and the adapted energy demand {tilde over (E)}B is then fed to a computing means 5. Moreover, the computing means 5 receives the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device, both of which had been determined previously. On the basis of the adapted energy demand {tilde over (E)}B, of the capacitance C of the emergency energy storage device and of the internal resistance Ri of the emergency energy storage device, the computing means 5 calculates a charging voltage UL, whereby the charging voltage UL is calculated in such a way that the energy EC stored in the emergency energy storage device at this charging voltage UL is just enough to meet the adapted energy demand {tilde over (E)}B, taking into account losses that occur, especially at the internal resistor Ri.

By means of an adaptation means 6, the charging voltage UL calculated by the computing means 5 is increased by a constant value and/or multiplied by a safety factor. The result of this adaptation is the adapted charging voltage ŨL. The adapted charging voltage ŨL is reported to a charging unit 7, in response to which the charging unit 7 either charges or discharges the emergency energy storage device until the adapted charging voltage ŨL has been reached.

The means 3 for predicting the energy demand EB of the energy consumer 2, the safety correction function 4, the computing means 5 and the adaptation means 6 are preferably configured in the form of software that runs in a control unit 8. The control unit 8 can be configured, for example, as a memory-programmable control unit of a pitch system of a wind turbine.

It should be noted that these routines may be practiced with other computer system configurations, including internet appliances, hand-held devices, wearable computers, multi-processor systems, programmable consumer electronics, network PCs, mainframe computers and the like. The system can be embodied in any form of computer-readable medium or a special purpose computer or data processor that is programmed, configured or constructed to perform the subject instructions. The term computer or processor as used herein refers to any of the above devices as well as any other data processor. Some examples of processors are microprocessors, microcontrollers, CPUs, PICs, PLCs, PCs or microcomputers. A computer-readable medium comprises a medium configured to store or transport computer readable code, or in which computer readable code may be embedded. Some examples of computer-readable medium are CD-ROM disks, ROM cards, floppy disks, flash ROMS, RAM, nonvolatile ROM, magnetic tapes, computer hard drives, conventional hard disks, and servers on a network. The computer systems described above are for purposes of example only. An embodiment of the invention may be implemented in any type of computer system or programming or processing environment. In addition, it is meant to encompass processing that is performed in a distributed computing environment, were tasks or modules are performed by more than one processing device or by remote processing devices that are run through a communications network, such as a local area network, a wide area network or the internet. Thus, the term program and processor are to be interpreted expansively.

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26.92/100 Score

Market Attractiveness

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53.0/100 Score

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72.41/100 Score

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60.0/100 Score

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Citation

Patents Cited in This Cited by
Title Current Assignee Application Date Publication Date
Electrical energy storage system and method for operating such a system CONTI TEMIC MICROELECTRONIC GMBH 14 February 2002 09 October 2002
Notbetriebseinrichtung zur Verstellung von Rotorblättern für eine Windkraftanlage SIEMENS AG 31 July 2003 17 March 2005
Pitch drive device capable of emergency operation for a wind or water power plant MOOG UNNA GMBH 23 March 2011 30 January 2013
Method For Managing Power Limits For A Battery FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC 09 March 2011 30 June 2011
Verfahren zum Betreiben einer elektrischen Anlage zur unterbrechungsfreien Stromversorgung eines Gleichstromverbrauchers in der Fernmeldetechnik, sowie eine insbesondere zur Durchführung des genannten Verfahrens dienende derartige elektrische Anlage MEISSNER MANFRED DIPL.-ING. 8500 NUERNBERG DE 13 November 1992 27 May 1993
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